Skip to main content

Full text of "The Manors of Suffolk : notes on their history and devolution"

See other formats


7  L 


y 


I/-/ 


The 


Manors  of  Suffolk 


Notes  on 


Their  History  and  Devolution 


The  Hundreds  of  Babergh  and  Blackbourn 

With  some  Illustrations  of  the  old  Manor  Houses 


BY 


W.  A.  COPINGER,  M.A.,  LL.D.,  F.S.A.,  F.R.S.A. 

Of  the  Middle  Temple,    Barrister-at-law.  Professor   and  Dean   of  the   Faculty  of  Law  in  the 

Victoria  University  of  Manchester.  Sometime  President  of  the  Bibliographical  Society.  Author  of 

"  County  of  Suffolk :  Its    History  as  Disclosed  by    Existing  Records,"  &c. 


LONDON 

T.    FISHER    UNWIN 
1905 


THIS     WORK 

IS 

DEDICATED 
TO 

ILorb   jfrancts   1berve& 

IN 

THANKFUL  RECOGNITION 

OF    THE    ENCOURAGEMENT    AND    ASSISTANCE 
WHICH  THE  AUTHOR  RECEIVED 

FROM 

HIS  LORDSHIP 

IN  THE  ISSUING  OF  THE 

RECORDS  OF  THE  COUNTY  OF  SUFFOLK. 


Hote. 

The  present  is  a  kind  of  trial  volume,  and  forms  the 
first  instalment  of  si<  like  volumes  already  written  on  the 
Manors  of  Suffolk.  Should  it  meet  with  acceptance,  the 
volumes  will  be  sent  to  press  so  soon  as  a  sufficient 


number  of  copies  have  been  subscribed  to  repay  the  cost  of 
printing.  No  doubt  more  might  have  been  said  respecting 
the  manors,  and  especially  the  manor  houses,  but  in  view  of  the 
fact  that  there  are  about  2,000  manors  in  Suffolk,  and  the 
•  of  restricting  the  work  to  seven  volumes,  little  more 


than  dry  facts  could  be  given  to  speak  for  themselves. 

For  most  of  the  statements  made  authority  is  quoted,  but 
where  the  author  has  found  no  authority  he  has  indicated 
the  fact,  and  drawn  the  best  inference  he  could.  And 
where  full  information  has  not  been  obtained,  he  has  almost 
invariably  given  the  information  he  had.  however  defective,  in 
the  hope  that  such  might  lead  to  the  supplying  by  others  of 
what  was  lacking.  For  the  sake  of  easy  reference,  citation  of 
fines  levied  prior  to  the  reign  of  Hen.  VII.,  a  calendar  of 
which  has  been  printed,  is  "Feet  of  Fines,"  while  of  those 
subsequently  of  which  no  printed  calendar  exists,  "  Fine  " 
only. 

The  Author  has  to  thank  the  Rev.  E.  Fairer,  Rector  of 
Huulcrclay,  for  his  kindness  in  perusing  the  proof  sheets,  and 
he  is  under  an  obligation  to  his  daughter  Katharine  for  the 
Index  Rerum,  and  to  his  daughter  Margaret  Sarsfield  for  the 
Indices  Nominum  and  Locorum. 

W.  A.  COPINGER. 

KERSAL  CELL, 

MANCHESTER. 


Jnttobuction. 

| HE  Hundred  division  is  now  practically  obsolete,  having 
been  superseded  by  Petty  Sessional  and  other  divisions,  but 
as  late  as  1869  there  was  a  High  Constable  for  each  Hundred 
of  the  County. 

The  division  of  the  County  into  Hundreds  has  been  vari- 
ously accounted  for.  It  probably  was  an  early  Saxon  device, 
recast  no  doubt  by  King  Alfred,  who  certainly  revised  the 
scheme  and  altered,  settled,  and  brought  the  divisions  into  greater  systema- 
tic order.1  The  three  divisions  of  Counties,  Hundreds,  and  Tithings  were 
dealt  with  by  the  King.  Each  had  its  own  Court.  The  tithing  was  com- 
posed of  ten  families  or  more  who  dwelt  together  and  were  bound  for  each 
other's  behaviour.  It  is  said  that  originally  each  tithing  ought  to  possess 
within  itself  a  church,  a  burial  ground,  divine  services,  and  the  sacraments. 
The  tithing  developed  into  Parishes,  and  of  these  the  Hundred  was  made 
up.  We  are  quite  aware  that  in  the  older  laws  of  the  Anglo-Saxons,  the 
word  tithing  is  not  used,  the  term  then  in  vogue  being  "  Gild  brethren," 
as,  for  instance,  in  the  Laws  27  and  28  of  Alfred. 

Edgar  seems  to  have  been  the  first  Saxon  King  to  estimate  aright  the 
value  of  the  Hundred  division,  and  to  give  it  a  name  and  place  in  the 
local  divisions  of  the  County.  It  was  by  his  ordinance  (959-975)  that  the 
Hundred  had  to  meet  every  four  weeks,  and  in  fact  by  him  the  functions 
of  the  Hundred  were  first  duly  prescribed.  This  king  also  provided  that 
every  man  should  be  under  "  borh  "  or  suretiship  both  within  the  enclosed 
places  and  without,  and  that  witnesses  should  be  appointed  to  every 
"  borh  "  and  to  every  Hundred. 

Ethelred's  laws  (978-1016)  followed  on  the  same  lines,  providing  of 
"  borhs  "  that  every  freeman  should  have  a  true  "  borh  "  or  surety,  and 
that  the  "  borh  "  might  present  him  to  every  justice,  if  he  should  be 
accused.  Knut's  laws  (1016-1035)  follow  on  the  same  lines,  every  freeman 
having  to  be  brought  into  a  Hundred  and  into  a  tithing.  He  had  to  be 
brought  into  a  "  borh,"  and  the  "  borh  "  had  to  hold  and  lead  him  to  every 
plea,  i.e.,  he  had  to  be  brought  in  so  as  to  be  under  pledge  with  a  surety 
who  should  be  answerable  for  his  appearance  in  any  suit.  The  regulation 
did  not  apply  to  those  who  by  rank,  family  connection,  or  commendation, 
were  exempted  from  the  provisions  of  this  and  similar  enactments. 

In  the  laws  of  Edward  the  Confessor  (1043-1066)  we  find  cap.  13  headed, 
'  The  Divisions  of  the  Shires  and  Hundreds,"  runs  thus  :  The  divisions  of 
the  shires  properly  form  part  of  the  King's  jurisdiction,  and  attached  to 
them  is  the  King's  highway.  The  divisions  of  the  Hundred  and  wapen- 
takes  belong  to  the  earls  and  the  viscounts  (the  sheriffs)  assisted  by  the 
County  Court. 

The  Hundred  was  an  important  division.  It  was  the  division  on 
which  was  primarily  based  the  assessment  for  geld  and  served  as  the  area 
for  rating  purposes,  besides  being  the  organisation  or  body  amenable  for 
damages  in  case  of  riot  or  destruction  of  property.  Mr.  Round  has  satis- 
factorily shown  that  the  Hundred  and  not  the  manor  nor  even  the  vill  was 
treated  as  the  fiscal  unit  for  the  collection  of  Danegeld. 

1  See  Statute  law  in  the  latter  part  of  this  king's  reign,  about  the  year  890. 


rf.  INTRODUCTION. 

The  butinm  of  the  Hundred  was  transacted  in  the  "  hundred  mote," 
in  which  in  later  times  the  townships  or  parishes  were  represented  by  the 
town  reeve  and  four  assessors.  The  Court  of  the  Hundred  exercised  both 
civfl  and  criminal  jun-<!i<  n..n,  and  litigant-,  were  bound  to  seek  justice 
in  this  Court  before  applying  to  a  higher  tribunal. 

As  the  king  was  entitled  to  a  fine  for  each  offence,  his  reeve  used  to 
attend  the  Court  twice  a  year  to  receive  these  fines.    It  was  on  these 
that  the  Court  exercised  the  duty  of  seeing  that  every  man  was 


enrolled  in  his  tithing,  a  practice  which  continued  long  after  the  Norman 
Conquest  as  the  sheriff's  turn,  or  leet  and  view  of  frankpledge.  It  was 
sometime  a  lower  Court  for  the  payment  of  small  debts  and  then  the 
bailiff  of  the  Hundred  presided. 

Hundreds  were  either  in  the  King's  hand  or  in  private  hands  by 
grant  from  the  Sovereign.  When  in  the  King's  hand  the  sheriff  usually 
let  them  at  farm  to  bailiffs.  The  bailiff  generally  presided  in  the  Court, 
and  after  paying  hi>  nut  under  the  tenancy  or  holding,  made  what  profit 
be  could  from  the  fees  and  amercements  or  other  -exactions  levied  on  the 
Miitors  and  men  of  the  Hundred. 

In  process  of  time,  the  greater  number  of  the  Hundreds,  certainly 
in  the  County  of  Suffolk,  had  been  granted  to  private  individuals,  and  in 
many  cases  the  lord  of  the  hundred  did  not  own  a  single  acre  in  it. 

MANORS. 

Some  have  supposed  the  word  "  manor  "  to  be  derived  from  the  old 
French  word  "  manoir,"  or  rather  perhaps  "  manior,"  or  chief  dwelling; 
but  others  from  the  French  "  mesuer,"  signifying  to  govern,  or  to  guide, 
because  the  lord  of  a  manor  has  the  guidance  and  direction  of  all  his  tenants 
within  the  limits  of  his  estate  ;  "  and  this,"  says  Lord  Coke,  "  I  hold  the 
most  probable  etymology,  and  most  agreeing  with  the  nature  of  a  manor ; 
for  a  manor  in  these  days  signifies  the  jurisdiction  and  royalty  incorporate 
rather  than  the  land  or  scite."1  True,  my  Lord,  but  is  this  not  deriving 
the  name  from  a  quality  not  inherent  in  the  manor  at  the  time  of  the 
original  user  of  the  name  ?  The  etymology,  no  doubt  accorded  with  the 

ire  of  the  thing  in  Lord  Coke's  day,  and  to  some  extent  in  our  own  time — 
but  this  hardly  seems  sufficient. 

Manors  have  been  usually  regarded  by  our  writers  on  English 
antiquities  as  of  Norman  introduction,  but  modern  investigation  tends  to 
disclose  a  much  earlier  origin.  They  are  no  doubt  as  ancient  as  the  Saxon 
constitution,  and  the  germ  from  which  they  sprung  has  been  traced  to 
Roman  times. 

The  elements  of  the  manor  are  discernible  during  a  somewhat  lengthy 
period  in  Anglo-Saxon  times ;  but  certainly  up  to  the  very  time  of  the  Norman 
Conquest  the  greater  part  of  the  estates  passing  under  the  name  of  manors 
bore  but  a  poor  resemblance  to  the  ordinary  manorial  estate  of  later  days. 

The  Roman  colonization  did  not  affect  the  institutions  of  this  country 

Mathemodc  in  which  they  were  affected  by  the  Anglo-Saxon  settlement. 

i!7ner  ^  not  mt?r'ere  .^h  existing  Celtic  institutions  further  than 

happened  to  be  inconsistent  with  the  Roman  occupation,  but  the 

•  Complete  Copyholder.  Ed.  1644. 


INTRODUCTION.  vii. 

latter  produced  changes  of  a  more  radical  character.  The  Teutonic  influence 
affected  every  existing  institution,  whether  of  Celtic  or  Roman  origin,  and 
operated  to  remodel  the  political  and  legal  aspects  of  society. 

The  principle  of  private  appropriation  and  property  in  land  no  doubt 
derived  its  origin  from  the  Romans,  but  that  is  all.  Later,  in  the  earlier 
period  of  the  Saxon  settlement,  the  lack  of  common  magisterial  jurisdiction 
led  to  the  government  of  the  manor  or  village  resting  to  a  certain  extent  on  its 
chief  owner,  and  though  the  jurisdiction  of  the  Thane  in  his  soc,  precinct, 
or  manor  has  been  asserted  to  have  been  inherent— an  original  jurisdiction 
arising  from  possession  of  land  and  men  (being  practically  the  same  juris- 
diction in  the  smaller  holdings  as  the  King  exercised  in  his  great  seignory, 
though  neither  of  them  absolute),  yet  this  seems  open  to  question.  It  is 
true  that  in  the  unsettled  state  of  the  country  and  the  difficulty  of  transit 
the  need  of  fixed  and  regular  tribunals  for  the  administration  of  justice  led  to 
the  Thane  determining  differences  between  his  men  in  their  civil  rights,  and 
also  as  a  matter  of  fact  we  find  him  with  the  advice  and  concurrence  of  his 
freemen  punishing  criminals  even  to  the  extent  of  life  and  death  in  the  Hall- 
Mote,  which  answered  in  those  days  to  what  the  Court  Baron  did  in  later 
times.  But  this  cannot  be  regarded  justly  as  an  inherent  jurisdiction.  It 
was  rather  an  assumed  jurisdiction  in  a  local  Court  for  lack  of  the  means 
of  obtaining  justice  from  the  proper  tribunals  or  from  the  King  himself. 
But  that  the  thane  did  exercise  the  extensive  rights  we  have  referred  to  is 
evidenced  by  the  fact  that  King  Alfred  took  from  the  Thane's  Court  the 
power  of  punishing  criminals.  In  process  of  time,  however,  later  Saxon 
sovereigns  began  to  indulge  some  of  their  great  men  with  grants  em- 
powering them  to  try  criminals  in  their  local  court,  in  which  every  freemen 
of  twelve  years  of  age  had  to  take  the  oath  of  allegiance  in  the  particular 
precinct,  finding  sureties  for  good  behaviour,  as  before  he  had  had  to  do  in 
the  Court  of  Friburgh.  That  bishops,  earls,  and  some  of  the  thanes  had 
obtained  charters  empowering  them  to  punish  criminals  in  their  own 
Courts  before  the  time  of  Edward  the  Confessor  is  clear  from  the  2ist  Law, 
entitled,  "  de  Baronibus  qui  suas  habent  curias  et  consuetudines."  These 
grants  rapidly  multiplied,  it  being  found  more  convenient  to  have  the 
view  of  tenants  within  the  manor.  That  the  tenants  regarded  it  as  advan- 
tageous to  themselves  is  rather  evidenced  by  their  assenting  to  make  an 
annual  payment  to  the  lord  in  consideration  of  the  charges  of  obtaining 
the  grant  of  leet  from  the  King,  an  annual  payment  which  at  least  in  some 
manors  was  called  the  Leet  Feu,  de  certo  Letoe. 

As  to  the  King's  tourn  belonged  fossa,  furca,  pillory,  tumbrel,  and 
cucking  stool,  so  to  the  lord's  leet  on  a  grant  of  leet  these  also  belonged,  and 
the  lord  was  bound  to  maintain  these  instruments  for  punishing  offenders, 
and  all  felonies  at  common  law  were  within  the  cognizance  of  the  leet  and 
there  punishable. 

The  Norman  Conquest,  however,  marked  the  period  of  the  rise  of 
manorial  influence,  and  fixed  the  manor  as  the  most  prominent  social 
institution  of  the  country  for  a  long  series  of  years.  It  then  received  a 
systematic  settlement  on  feudal  lines — developing,  however,  at  least  up 
to  the  reign  of  Edward  I. 

It  is  quite  true  that  we  find  manors  abundant  at  the  time  of  the  Norman 
invasion,  and  the  Domesday  Survey  is  most  particular  in  their  enumeration. 
There  is,  however,  no  evidence  to  show  that  these  so-called  manors  of 
Saxon  times  agreed  with  the  Norman  and  strictly  feudal  conception  of  a 


HI  INTRODUCTION. 

manor.  Many  of  these  manors  consisted  of  but  20  or  30  and  occasionally 
no  more  than  10  acres,  and  it  is  unreasonable  to  suppose  that  in  respect 
of  these  there  could  have  existed  manorial  rights  in  the  sense  of  later  days. 
There  can  be  littlr  dmibt  that  th<>  whole  aspect  of  the  Domesday  Survey 
shows  a  desire  on  the  part  of  the  compilers  to  assimilate  as  far  as  possible, 
in  nomenclature  at  least,  the  older  or  old  English  forms  of  holdings  with  the 
new  introduction  of  thr  invaders,  and  the  gradual  introduction  of  Norman 
methods  and  ideas  during  the  reign  of  the  last  Saxon  King  would  facilitate 
fefa 

The  term  "  manor  "  is  not  always  adhered  to  in  the  Survey  itself. 
It  gives  place  to  the  term  villa  for  the  whole  manor,  and  mansio  for  the 
manor  house  in  the  Exon  Survey,  and  in  all  these  cases  what  is  meant 
is  the  estate  of  a  ruler  or  lord  with  a  village  community  in  villenage  upon  it. 
No  one  can  peruse  that  code  of  laws  known  as  the  Reditudines  singularum 
penomtrum  dating  from  the  eleventh  century  without  being  satisfied  as 
to  the  practical  existence  of  the  manor  in  this  aspect  in  those  times. 
Manors  then  were  evidently  of  complex  origin.  Mr.  Seebohm,  who  in  his 
work,  "  The  English  Village  Community,  has  closely  examined  and 
analysed  the  various  factors  in  operation  in  the  production  of  the  manorial 
system  in  this  country,  says:  "The  most  reasonable  hypothesis,  in  the 
absence  of  direct  evidence,  appears  to  be  that  the  manorial  system  grew 
up  in  Britain,  as  it  grew  up  in  Gaul  and  Germany,  as  the  compound  product 
of  barbarian  and  Roman  institutions  mixing  together  during  the  periods 
first  of  Roman  provincial  rule  and  secondly  of  German  conquest."1 
Professor  Vinogradoff  is  not  prepared  to  allow  so  much  to  Roman  influence. 
His  view  is  that  "  the  economic  development  of  medieval  rural  life  is  to  be 
accounted  for  by  the  formation  of  old  English  society  of  a  village  community 
of  shareholders  which  cultivated  the  land  on  the  open  field  system,  and 
treated  all  other  requisites  of  rural  life  as  appendant  to  it.  The  evolution 
of  individualistic  husbandry,  and  of  political  protection  produced  the 
growth  of  lordships  which  culminated  after  the  Conquest  in  the  arrange- 
ment of  the  manor,  a  complex  institution  partaking  of  the  character  of 
an  estate  and  of  a  unit  of  local  government.  The  influence  of  the  Con- 
quest and  of  the  subsequent  formation  of  common  law  was  decisive  in 
submitting  society  to  a  system  of  personal  rights  and  relations ;  but  under- 
neath this  system  ancient  principles  of  communal  action  and  communal 
responsibility  were  still  fully  alive."' 

There  seems  to  have  been  an  assumption  in  the  wording  of  the  writ 
ordering  the  Domesday  Inquest  that  the  villa  and  the  manor  were  identical, 
and  no  doubt  in  by  far  the  greater  number  of  cases  the  manor  was 
coterminous  with  or  was  contained  within  the  limit  of  the  vill ;  but  the 
returns  demonstrated  that  there  were  a  vast  number  of  exceptions.  Still 
there  does  seem  in  most  cases,  where  there  were  several  manors  in  a  town- 
ship, to  have  been  one— even  where  the  manor  did  not  stand  in  the  relation- 
ship of  manor  and  sub-manor,  of  which  the  lord  was  practically  the  lord  of 
the  township.  In  the  return  made  of  lords  of  townships  in  1316,  out  of 
453  in  Suffolk  not  more  than  42  townships  had  more  than  one  lord,  and 
there  were  lords  of  other  manors  in  the  township — but  by  no  means  were 
all  the  lords  of  manors  included  in  the  list.  Fifteen  townships  only  had 
morr  than  two  lords  specified,  and  in  the  Hundreds  of  Bosmere  and  Claydon, 
Half  Hundreds  of  Mutford  and  Lothingland,  Samford,  Cosford,  Risbridge, 

'  and  Ed.  p.  422.  •  Growth  of  the  Manor,  p.  365. 


INTRODUCTION.  ix. 

Thedwestry,  Plomesgate,  Carlford,  Wilford,  Colneis,  Loes,  Thredling 
(strangely  the  whole  of  the  Liberty  of  St.  Etheldred)  there  was  but  one  lord 
for  each  villa. 

There  can  be  no  doubt  that  the  later  feudal  idea  of  the  manor  involved 
the  administration  of  justice.  The  baron  who  led  his  tenants  in  the  field 
in  time  of  war,  administered  justice  to  them  assembled  in  his  hall  in  time 
of  peace.  The  Court  he  held  for  this  purpose  was  called  the  "  hall  mote," 
from  the  place  in  which  it  was  held,  or  the  Court  Baron  from  the  territory 
to  which  it  belonged. 

Lords  of  manors  were  in  former  days  important  individuals,  especially 
if  in  addition  to  the  right  to  hold  a  Court  Baron,  a  right  belonging  to  every 
lord,  he  had  the  right  to  hold  a  Court  Leet.  Lord  Coke,  referring  to  the 
Court  Baron,  says,  "  These  Courts  were  termed  Court  Barons  because  in 
ancient  time  such  personages  were  called  Barons,  and  came  to  the  Parliament 
and  sate  in  the  Upper  House  ;  but  when  time  had  wrought  such  an  altera- 
tion that  manors  fell  into  the  hands  of  meane  men,  and  such  as  were  farre 
unworthy  of  so  high  a  calling ;  then  it  grew  to  a  custome  that  none  but 
such  as  the  King  would,  should  come  to  the  Parliament,  such  as  the  King 
for  their  extraordinary  wisedome  or  quality  thought  good  to  call  by  writ, 
which  writ  ran  hac  vice  tantum.  Yet  though  Lords  of  Manors  lost  their 
names  of  Barons,  and  were  deprived  of  that  dignitie  which  was  inherent 
to  their  names,  yet  their  courts  retaine  still  the  name  of  Court  Barons, 
because  they  were  originally  erected  for  such  personages  as  were  Barons ; 
neither  hath  time  been  so  injurious  as  to  eradicate  the  whole  memory  of 
their  ancient  Dignitie ;  in  their  name  there  is  stamps  left  of  their  nobilitie, 
for  they  are  still  intituled  by  the  name  of  Lords.'" 

Not  only  was  the  Court  Baron  absolutely  incident  to  the  manor,  but 
it  was  of  its  essence  and  inseparable  from  it,  just  as  suit  of  court,  or  the 
obligation  of  attendance  was  inseparably  incident  to  the  feud.  The  triers 
in  the  Court  Baron  were  freemen,  for  the  suitors  were  such,  and  a  freeman 
could  only  be  tried  by  his  peers  or  equals.  From  this  it  followed  that 
if  the  lord  had  no  tenants,  by  reason  of  escheat  or  the  like,  the  right  to  hold 
the  Court  ceased.  And  if  he  had  but  one  tenant  his  (the  lord's)  position 
was  equally  unfortunate,  for  that  one  tenant  having  no  peer  could  not  be 
tried,  and  consequently  his  appeal  had  to  be  made  to  his  lord's  superior 
lord.  For  this  reason  we  find  it  laid  down  that  if  there  were  not  two  free 
tenants  or  frank  suitors,  as  they  are  sometimes  called,  at  the  least,  the 
Court  Baron  could  not  be  held,  and  consequently  the  manor  became  ex- 
tinct so  far  as  this  particular  jurisdiction  was  concerned,  the  lord  being 
thenceforth  merely  entitled  to  hold  a  Customary  Court  for  his  copyhold 
tenants.  It  has  been  thought  that  there  should  be  more  than  two  free 
tenants  holding  of  the  manor  to  enable  the  lord  to  hold  a  Court  Baron,  but  this 
is  not  correct.  The  reason  assigned  for  the  view  is  this — that  assuming 
there  were  only  two,  if  one  of  these  two  were  the  plaintiff  and  the  other 
the  defendant,  the  lord  would  be  under  some  difficulty  to  try  them  by  their 
peers,  and  it  must  be  admitted  that  there  is  one  case  on  record  of  a  cause 
being  removed  out  of  a  Court  Baron  by  reason  of  there  not  being  four 
suitors  there.  But  it  should  be  borne  in  mind  that  the  Court  Baron  is  not 
held  exclusively  for  the  trial  of  disputes  between  one  free  tenant  and  another, 
and  there  is  no  authority  for  asserting  that  a  Court  Baron  cannot  be  held 

1  "  Compleate  Copyholder,"  Ed.  1644,  pp.  63,  64. 


,  INTRODUCTION. 

so  lone  as  there  are  two  free  tenants.  Of  course,  the  legal  requisites  of  a 
manor  in  the  twentieth  century  cannot  be  taken  as  necessary  to  a  manor 
as  it  existed  at  the  time  of  the  Norman  Conauest  or  even  as  late  as  the 
fourteenth  century  It  would  be  absurd,  lor  instance,  to  insist  that 
every  manor  in  these  early  days  comprised  land  held  by  freehold  tenants 
and  land  held  1  omary  or  villein  tenants.  This  Professor  Maitland 

dearly  points  out  in  his  exhaustive  Introduction  to  "  Select  Pleas  in  Manorial 
and  other  Seignorial  Courts ' 

A  Customary  Court  is  also  incident  to  a  manor.  This  is  held  by  the 
lord  for  his  villeins,  or  those  who  hold  at  his  will  by  copy ;  for  the  suitors 
in  the  Court  Baron  could  not  notice  the  claims  of  the  villeins  or  copyholders, 
who  were  of  a  different  order  of  men.  In  this  Court  of  the  copyholders  or 
Customary  Court  all  matters  relating  to  the  tenements  held  by  copy  were 
tsacted ;  but  copyholders  not  being  originally  free  in  their  persons,  and 
holding  by  free  or  frank  tenure  were  not  entitled  to  be  tried  by  their 
».  The  lord  himself  or  his  steward  sitting  for  him  was  the  judge  of 
this  Court.  To  this  Court  the  copyholders  owed  suit  as  the  free  tenants 
did  to  the  Court  Baron,  and  like  the  latter  were  denominated  the  homage  ; 
not  indeed  that  the  copyholders  ever  did  homage  expressly  as  the  free 
tenants  did  on  acceding  to  the  tenancy ;  for  homage  could  only  be  done 
by  a  freeman.  The  copyholders  being  termed  the  homage  in  the  Customary 
Court  is  merely  by  way  of  analogy  to  the  homage  in  a  Court  Baron.  From 
a  copyholder  fealty  in  lieu  of  homage  was  due. 

A  manor  cannot  at  the  present  day  be  created  of  which  a  copyhold  can 
be  held,  except,  of  course,  by  the  transcendant  power  of  an  Act  of  Parliament 
of  which  one  or  two  instances  can  be  found  on  the  Rolls.*  By  the  statute 
Quia  emptores  terrantm  passed  18  Edw.  I.  (1290)  the  tenants  of  common  lords 
were  prohibited  from  granting  any  part  of  their  lands  in  fee  to  be  held  of 
themselves ;  but  whether  they  alienated  the  whole  or  part  (for  that  Act 
enabled  them  to  alienate  the  whole)  the  feoffee  was  to  hold  immediately  of  the 
lord  above.  We  may  mention  as  we  are  not  writing  for  the  legal  profession 
that  "  lord  above  "  does  not  mean  "  the  Lord  in  heaven,"  but  the  superior 
lord  of  the  feoffor  or  grantor.  Perhaps  the  explanation  is  unnecessary— 
if  so  the  writer  hopes  to  be  pardoned,  as  for  the  moment  he  had  overlooked 
the  Educational  Act  of  1870,  and  the  marvellous  information  of  the  present 
day. 

The  result  of  the  Statute  of  Edward  I.  above  referred  to  was  to  stay 
the  increase  of  manors,  and  even  the  King  himself  it  is  said,  is  incapable  of 
creating  a  manor  at  the  present  time.1 

DIVISION  OF  MANORS. 

Many  of  the  manors  of  which  we  have  treated  in  the  ensuing  work 
have  become  divided,  and  it  seems  therefore  advisable  to  say  a  word  or 
two  as  to  this.  It  is  clear  that  prior  to  the  Statute  Quia  emptores  terrarum, 
that  is  the  year  1290,  as  a  manor  might  have  been  created  so  it  might  have 
been  divided  and  sub-divided  and  the  number  of  manors  thus  increased. 
But  since  the  passing  of  this  Act  a  manor  could  not  be  divided  into  separate 

'  SeMeo  Society,  1889,  PP  «*«-.  *'• 

Heo  VIII  r   13;  »nd  37  Hen.  VIII.  c.  a. 
ite  Copyholder,"  Ed.  1644.  p.  57. 


INTRODUCTION.  xi. 

manors  by  the  tenant  of  a  common  lord,  as  such  division  would  be  a 
multiplication  in  effect.' 

A  distinction,  however,  must  be  drawn  between  a  division  arising  from 
act  of  the  party  and  by  operation  of  law.  The  division  by  operation  of 
law  would  be  when  the  manor  descended  to  several  coparceners  as  to 
daughters  being  coheirs,  and  they  made  partition.  Here  each  of  the  co- 
parceners would  have  a  manor  in  case  part  of  the  demesnes  and  services 
were  allotted  to  one  and  part  to  the  other.  So  a  tenant  in  dower  of  a  third 
part  of  a  manor  has  a  manor  and  may  hold  a  Court  and  grant  copies.1 

REPUTED  MANORS. 

A  manor  may  be  suspended  for  a  time  and  revive ;  as,  for  instance,  if 
it  descended  to  two  coparceners  and  on  a  partition  the  services  were  allotted 
to  one  and  the  demesne  lands  to  the  other,  and  the  one  died,  leaving  the 
services  or  demesne  lands,  as  the  case  might  be,  to  the  other,  the  manor 
would  revive,  as  it  was  merely  suspended  during  the  severance  of  the 
demesne  lands  from  the  services  and  not  destroyed.3 

Should,  however,  the  demesne  lands  and  the  services  become  absolutely 
separated,  so  as  to  be  incapable  of  uniting  again,  the  manor  no  longer 
continues  a  manor  in  reality,  though  it  may  continue  to  be  a  reputed  manor. 
It  would,  in  other  words,  cease  to  be  a  legal  manor,  for  the  support  of  which 
both  demesne  lands,  and  services  are  necessary,  though  it  might  still  be 
regarded  as  what  is  termed  a  seigniory  in  gross. 

If  the  lord  grant  all  the  demesne  lands  or  all  the  services  to  a  stranger, 
or  if  all  the  services  become  extinct,  the  manor  will  be  destroyed.  But 
though  all  the  free  tenancies  escheat,  or  become  forfeited,  or  are  purchased 
by  the  lord,  the  manor  is  properly  at  an  end ;  yet  in  contemplation  of  law 
it  may  continue  for  certain  purposes,  as  to  preserve  the  right  of  wrecks 
and  estrays  and  so  forth.  Thus  in  one  case  the  lord  of  a  manor  declared 
that  he  had  immemorially  enjoyed  the  privilege  of  appointing  a  sexton 
of  the  parish  wherein  the  manor  was  situate.  It  was  objected  and  proved 
that  the  manor  had  ceased  in  legal  existence  for  some  time  prior  to  the 
vacancy  in  question,  but  it  was  held  that  to  enable  the  lord  to  exercise  the 
right  he  claimed  it  was  not  necessary  to  prove  a  continuing  manor  for  all 
purposes.4 

Of  course,  if  there  be  but  one  free  tenant,  the  seigniory  as  to  him  remains 
with  respect  to  his  services,  &c.,  though  there  can  be  no  Court  Baron  held. 

Those  who  wish  for  further  details  of  the  manor  and  of  the  various 
Courts  may  consult  Scriven's  "Treatise  on  the  Law  of  Copyholds,  &c."  ;5 
Elton's  "Treatise  on  the  Law  of  Copyholds,  &c."  ;6  and  for  the  older 

1  We  are  aware  of  one  or  two  old  cases  to  the  contrary,  and  one  curious  on  the  subject 
may  consult  Brooke's  Abr.  Fines,  fol.  17  ;  Harris  t;.  Nicholls,  Cro.  Eliz.  19 ;  Morris  v. 
Paget,  Cro.  Eliz.  39,  Leon  26;  Smith  v.  Bonsai,  Golds.  117  fol.  15 ;  Bright  v.  Forth, 
Cro.  Eliz.  442  ;  Buccleugh's  case  6  Mod.  151 ;  Finch's  case  6  Rep.  64. 

J  Bragg's  case,  Godb.  135. 

3  2  Rolles,  Abr.  122  Manor  (F)  fol.  3,  and  (H) ;  Thetford's  case,  I  Leon  204. 

4  Soane  v.  Ireland,  10  East,  259.      A  power  to  appoint  a  gamekeeper  however,  is  not  a 

prescriptive  right  incident  to  merely  a  reputed  manor,     (i  Ch.  G.  L.  25). 

5  7th  Ed.  by  Brown. 

6  2nd  Ed.,  1893-8. 


INTRODUCTION. 

and  quainter  literature  of  the  subject,  "  Le  Courte  Leet  et  Court  Baron 
collect,  per  John  Kitihm.de  Graieslnne,  an  apprentice  in  Ley  (Lond.1598); 
Treatise  collected  out  of  the  Statutes.  &c.,  together  with  an  easier  and 
plan  method  for  the  keeping  of  a  Court  Leet,  Court  Baron,  and  Hundred 
Court,  Ac.,  by  John  Wilkinson,  of  Barnard's  Inne  Gent."  (Lond.  1620); 
••Pad*  Consult um.  Lv  Judge  Jenkins  (Lond.  1657);  Andrew  Hornes 
r  of  Justice,"  sec.  17  ;  "  On  Views  of  Frankpledge  "  (Lond.  1768) ; 
Kitson,  "On  Courts  Leet"  (Lond.  1794);  Nelson's  "Lex  Manenorum 
(Lond.  1657) ;  "  The  Compleate  Copyholder,  wherein  is  contained  a 
learned  Discourse  of  the  Antiquity  and  Nature  of  Manors  and  Copyholds, 
by  Sir  Edward  Cooke  "  (Lond.  1644, 1668) ;  "  Lord  Coke's  Second  Institute  " 
(Lond.  1804) ;  "  Comyn's  Digest  of  the  Laws  of  England"  (Lond.  1822) ; 
Title  "  Leet,"  &c. 

For  the  benefit  of  the  general  reader  we  may  give  the  following  explana- 
tion of  some  of  the  terms  used  in  the  quotations  from  the  Domesday  Survey, 
dividing  the  notes  into  two  parts— (i)  as  to  Persons  ;  (2)  as  to  Land. 

(i)  As  to  Persons.— Thane  was  at  least  originally  like  the  term  earl, 
not  so  much  a  title  of  dignity  as  of  service.  Those  who  served  the  King 
in  places  of  eminence,  either  in  Court  or  Commonwealth  were  called  Thani 
majores  and  Thani  Regis  ;  and  those  who  served  under  them  in  like  manner 
as  under  other  great  officers  of  the  kingdom  and  under  bishops,  abbots, 
and  the  greater  prelates  of  the  church  were  called  Thani  minores  or  the 
leaser  thanes.  Later  there  seem  to  have  been  three  classes  of  thanes— 
the  King's  thanes,  the  middle  thanes,  and  the  lesser  thanes,  who  really 
were  the  great  landowner's  of  the  realm  in  Saxon  times.  But  from  the 
xoth  century  to  the  Conquest,  as  the  authors  of  the  "  English  Law  to  Edw. 
I  "  point  out,  thaneship  is  not  an  office  unless  described  by  some  specific 
addition  showing  what  the  office  is.  It  was  a  social  condition  above  that 
ol  the  churl,  carrying  with  it  both  privileges  and  customary  duties.  '  We 
may  perhaps,"  say  the  writers  last  referred  to,  "  roughly  compare  the  thanes 
of  the  later  Anglo-Saxon  monarchy  to  the  county  gentlemen  of  modern 
times  who  are  in  the  commission  of  the  peace  and  serve  on  the  grand 
jury.  But  we  must  remember  that  the  thane  had  a  definite  legal  rank.'" 

This  seems  to  be  correct  so  far  as  the  lesser  thane  is  concerned,  but 
to  the  King's  thanes,  the  barons  of  Norman  days,  and  to  the  middle  thanes, 
the  county  knights  of  later  times  would  seem  more  nearly  to  correspond. 
Speaking  generally,  however,  the  thane  answered  to  the  lord  of  the  manor 
of  Norman  days. 

Libert  homines  or  freemen  was  a  term  of  considerable  latitude,  signifying 
sometimes  the  freemen  or  freeholders  of  a  manor,  at  other  times  any 


holding  by  military  tenure.  Many  of  these  were  tenants  in  chief 
of  the  King.  '  The  ordinary  freemen  before  the  Conquest,"  says  Kelham, 
"  and  at  tin-  time  of  compiling  Domesday  were  under  protection  of  great 
men  ;  but  what  their  quality  was,  further  than  that  their  persons  and  blood 
were  free,  that  is,  that  they  were  not  nativi  or  bondmen,  it  will  give  a 
knowing  man  trouble  to  discover  to  us."'  These  freemen,  under  protection, 
are  called  in  the  Survey  Libert  homines  commendati.  They  appear  to  have 
placed  themselves  by  voluntary  homage  under  this  protection,  their  lord 

'  Pollock  and  Maitland.  i.  p.  10. 

'  Domesday  Book  Illustrated,  p.  254. 


INTRODUCTION.  xiii. 

or  patron  undertaking  to  secure  their  estates  and  persons  ;  and  for  this 
protection  and  security  they  paid  him  an  annual  stipend  by  way  of  acknow- 
ledgment, or  performed  some  service  annually.  No  doubt  the  origin  of 
this  "  Commendatio  "  is  to  be  found  in  the  Roman  civil  law. 

The  Commendati  dimidii  were  persons  depending  on  two  several  lords 
and  paying  half  their  protection  fee  to  one  and  half  to  another  lord.  Sub 
Commendati  were  such  as,  like  under-tenants,  were  under  protection  of  those 
who  were  themselves  depending  for  protection  on  some  superior  lord. 
Sub- Commendati  dimidii  were  those  who  were  under  the  Commendati 
dimidii,  and  had  two  patrons  or  protectors  the  same  as  they  had. 

The  socmen  or  sochemanni  were  those  inferior  land  owners  who  had 
lands  in  the  Soc  or  franchise  of  a  great  baron  ;  privileged  villeins  who, 
though  their  tenures  were  absolutely  copyhold,  yet  had  an  interest  equal 
to  a  freehold.  Their  services  were  fixed  and  determined,  and  they  could 
not  be  compelled  to  relinquish  their  holdings  at  their  lord's  will,  nor  against 
their  own.  There  were,  however,  different  conditions  of  socmen,  some 
enjoying  the  usufruct  within  the  soc  freely,  others  performing  certain 
inferior  services  of  husbandry. 

Villeins  or  villani  were  of  various  classes.  Under  Saxon  rule  they 
were  in  a  condition  of  downright  servitude,  belonging  with  their  children 
and  goods  to  the  lord  of  the  soil  like  the  cattle  or  stock  on  the  land.  They 
derived  their  names  either  from  the  word  vilis,  or  else  as  Lord  Coke  says,  a 
villa,  because  they  lived  chiefly  in  villages  and  were  employed  in  rustic 
works  of  the  most  sordid  kind.  These  villeins  belonged  principally  to 
lords  of  manors,  and  were  either  villeins  regardant,  that  is,  annexed  to  the 
manor  or  land,  or  else  they  were  in  gross  or  at  large,  that  is,  annexed  to  the 
person  of  the  lord  and  transferable  by  deed  from  one  owner  to  another. 
Speaking  generally,  they  answered  to  the  Saxon  gebur,  whose  normal  holding 
in  early  Saxon  days  was  the  yard-land  or  a  bundle  of  normally  30  scattered 
acres  in  the  open  fields  held  in  villenage.' 

Bordars  or  bordarii.  Lord  Coke  calls  them  "  boors  holding  a  little 
house  with  some  land  of  husbandry,  bigger  than  a  cottage."  Some  have 
considered  them  as  cottagers  taking  their  name  from  living  at  the  borders 
of  a  village  or  manor.  Bishop  Kennett  says  "  they  were  those  who  had  a 
bord  or  cottage  with  a  small  parcel  of  land  allowed  them  on  condition  they 
supplied  the  lord  with  poultry  and  eggs  and  other  small  provisions  for  his 
board  and  entertainment."  They  were  distinct  from  the  servi  and  villani 
and  of  a  less  servile  condition,  performing  such  domestic  works  as  grinding, 
threshing,  drawing  water,  cutting  wood,  &c.  Speaking  generally  they 
answered  to  the  Saxon  cotsette. 

The  servi  and  villani  are  distinguished  in  Domesday,  though  the  dis- 
tinction is  difficult  to  determine  beyond  the  fact  that  the  former  were  a 
degree  lower  than  the  latter.  The  servi  or  bondmen  were  servants  at  the 
arbitrary  pleasure  of  the  lord  appointed  to  servile  works  and  received  their 
wages  and  maintenance  at  his  discretion. 

(2)  As  to  the  Land. — The  carucata  or  ploughland  was  as  much  arable 
land  as  could  be  managed  with  one  plough,  and  the  beasts  belonging  thereto 
in  a  year,  having  meadow,  pasture  and  houses  for  the  householders  and 

'  Seebohm,  "  The  English  Village  Community  "  2nd  Ed.,  p.  164. 


Vu  INTRODUCTION. 

>  K*Jn«yiiff  to  it .  The  quantity  was  necessarily  uncertain,  as  it  differed 
according  to  the  nature  of  the  soil  and  the  custom  of  husbandry  in  each 
county.  Bishop  K«nm-tt.  riting  from  a  Deed  in  the  Monasticon,  informs 
us  that  a  canicate  in  tin-  n-ign  of  Richard  the  First  was  computed  at  60 
acres.  "  Yet,"  he  adds,  "  another  charter,  9  Rich.  I.  allots  a  hundred 
•ens  to  a  canicate.  And  Fleta  in  the  time  of  Edward  the  First  says,  if 
tend  lay  in  three  common  fields,  then  nine  score  acres  to  a  carucate,  60 
(or  winter  tillage,  60  for  spring  tillage,  and  60  for  fallow.  But  if  the 
land  lay  in  two  fields  then  eight  score  acres  to  a  carucate,  one  half  for 
tillage  and  the  other  for  fallow 

The  caruca  was  a  ploughteam  of  eight  oxen.  This  was  the  normal 
ploughteam,  but  the  number  varied  according  to  the  nature  of  the  soil, 
so  consequently  did  the  number  of  virgates  in  the  hide  or  carucata.1 

Sir  Henry  Ellis  in  his  well-known  Dissertations  on  Domesday,  points 
out  a  matter  which  has  occasioned  some  difficulty.  He  says,  "  In  abbre- 

mg  the  Domesday  returns  the  Norman  scribes  appear  occasionally, 

i  in  the  same  county,  to  have  used  the  contraction  car  or  car'  both  for 
cantta  and  carucata,  although  the  one  signifies  the  plough  and  team,  and 
the  other,  as  Dr.  Nash  expresses  it,  the  team's  tillage.  The  omission  to 
observe  this  has  led  many  of  the  translators  of  Domesday  into  error." 

The  Quarentena  was  the  fortylong  or  furlong,  from  the  French 
QtutrcnU,  forty,  a  measure  of  forty  perches  or  poles.  In  this  computation 
the  perch,  according  to  the  Monasticon  Anglicanum  (iii.  16)  consisted  of 
twenty  fet-t  "  Quaelibet  Virga  unde  Quarentenae  mensurabuntur,  erit 
viginti  pedum." 

Sac  was  the  power  or  privilege  of  hearing  and  determining  causes  and 
disputes,  levying  forfeitures  and  fines,  executing  laws,  and  administering 
justice  within  a  certain  precinct.  Soc  was  the  precinct  or  territory  in  which 
sac  and  other  privileges  were  exercised. 

PECULIAR  SERVICES. 

Not  many  manors  or  lands  in  Suffolk  were  held  under  peculiar  services. 
One  or  two  instances  of  grand  and  petty  serjeanties  are  mentioned  by 
Blunt  in  his  Fragmenta  Antiquitatis.  Nedging  and  Kettlebaston  were 
held  by  William  de  la  Pole  Marquess  of  Suffolk  under  a  grant  from  Hen.  VI. 
by  the  service  of  carrying  a  golden  sceptre  with  a  dove  on  the  head  of  it 
upon  the  Coronation  day  of  the  King,  his  heirs,  and  successors ;  as  also  a 
sceptre  of  ivory,  with  a  golden  dove  on  the  head  of  it,  upon  the  day  of 
Coronation  of  the  Queens  of  England. 

Rowland  le  Sarcere  held  one  hundred  and  ten  acres  of  land  in 
Hemingston  by  serjeanty;  for  which  on  Christmas  day  every  year  before 
the  King  he  had  to  perform  an  indecent  service3  which  was  subsequently 

'  Flcia  bb.  ii.  cap.  72  «.  4.  See  "  The  Ploughland  and  the  Plough  "  by  Canon  Taylor ; 
Dometday  Studies,  i.  143-186 ;  Round's  Feudal  Studies,  87. 

•  Mr.  Seebohm  after  examination  of  the  connection  between  the  oxen  and  the  holdings 
came  to  the  conclusion  that  the  hide  or  carucate  was  a  holding  corresponding  with 
Ibe  poanMion  of  a  full  ploughteam  of  8  oxen  ;  and  that  the  half  hide  corresponded 
with  the  fioaieaiion  of  one  of  the  2  rakes  of  4  abreast,  while  the  virgate  corresponded 
with  the  finneaiion  of  a  pair  of  oxen  and  the  half  virgate  or  bovate  with  the 
pOHtwiou  of  a  tingle  ox  ;  all  having  their  fixed  relations  to  the  full  manorial  plough- 
team  of  8  oxen.  ("  The  English  Village  Community,"  2nd  Ed.,  p.  65.) 


'  Sand  et  temel,  unum  sVltum  unum  Sufflum,  et  unum  Bombulum  (Pla.  Coron.  14  Edw.  I. 
Rot  6  Done  Sufi.). 


INTRODUCTION.  xv. 

commuted  at  xxvis.  viiid.  a  year  payable  at  the  King's  Exchequer.  One 
Baldwin  formerly  held  the  lands  by  the  same  services. 

John,  son  of  Bartholomew  de  Aveyleres  or  D'Avillers,  held  a  certain 
serjeanty  in  the  town  of  Shelfhanger  in  the  County  of  Norfolk,  and  Brome 
and  Erwarton  in  the  County  of  Suffolk,  by  the  service  of  being  Marshal  of 
the  Foot  Soldiers  of  the  Counties  of  Norfolk  and  Suffolk  in  the  King's 
army  in  Wales,  when  the  King  should  happen  to  go  thither  with  his  army 
at  the  costs  of  the  counties  aforesaid.1 

Walter  Pychard  of  Wratting  held  one  hundred  acres  of  land  of  the 
King  in  chief  by  the  Serjeanty  of  finding  for  him  one  Footman  with 
a  Bow  and  four  Arrows,  as  often  as  the  King  went  into  Wales  with  his 
army,  for  forty  days,  at  his  own  cost.2 

Robert  Bardolf  held  a  certain  tenement  in  Haughley  in  chief  of  the 
King  by  the  Serjeanty  of  being  and  doing  the  office  of  Bailiff  of  the  Honour 
of  Haughley3 ;  and  Geoffrey  Frumbaud  held  sixty  acres  of  land  in  Wingfield 
by  the  service  of  paying  to  the  King  two  white  doves  yearly.4 


'  Pla.  Coron.  14  Edw.  I.  Rot.  3  Norf.  Rot.  6  in  dorso  Suff. 
'  Pla.  Coron.  14  Edw.  I.  Rot.  46. 
-  Pla.  Coron.  14  Edw.  I.  Rot.  9  Suff. 
4  Pla.  Coron.  4  Edw.  I.  Rot.  6  in  dorso. 


Xfst  of  Subscribers. 


R«v.  L.  W.  ll 
HxkwM,  B« 

Ufe 

o«.  Col.  N. 
Barren.  E. 
B*44*lt    M»»    M.  A. 
BrtHH.  TV  Mo*  Noble  the  Marqnit  of. 
•rtool.  Lady. 

.   Walter  T. 

H.  H.  Smith. 
\V     N    L. 
Public  Library. 
dark*.  Sir  ETMM.  F.S.A. 
CobboM.  Frhs  T 
CobboU.  H.  Si.  C. 
Canter.  J.  S. 
Cony. 'Col.  the  HOB.  H. 
Crop,  F.  A..  F.S.A. 
C«JJM.  C    Milnrr-Gibton.   F.S.A. 
Diedti.  Rrv    Canon  Cecil. 
Dnkm.  E.  H.  W.,  F.S.A. 
E*fk  S.A. 

Eld.  Rev    F.J  .  F  S  A. 
Edit.   Mr,    Edward. 
Kibendf*.  A    F. 
Eyr*  *  Spouinroode.    . 
Farm,  Rev.  E..  F.S.A. 
Folkard.  Henry  T..  F.S  A 
Fmioa.  Tbomat  W.  (two  copiei). 
Fullenoo,  Joka. 
C*n*.  W.  B. 
Gvrdo*.  Sir  W.  Brampton. 
H.nU»d.  ErM«t,  K 
Harvard  Uwrernty  Library. 
Hatlewood,  Rev.  Dr.  F.  G. 
Haww,   R     11 

Henrty,    Lord    Francit    (two    copies). 
Kerrey.  Cape,  R  N 
Herrey,  Rev.  Sydeaham  H.  A. 
Hill.  Arthur  G.,   F.S.A. 
Hill.  Rev.   E. 

Hovell.  The  Very  Re*.  De  Berdt,  D.D.  (Dean 
of  Waiapt). 

o».  TW  Royal. 

Thr  Ri(ht  Hon.  the  Vitcount. 

M    K-.   LL.D. 

Pntak. 

Rev.  G.  W..  FAA.  (Dean  of  Durham). 


Lament,  Miss. 

Langham,  George  H. 

Layton,  Rev.  W.  E.,  F.S.A. 

Leadam,   H.   E. 

Lowther,  Hon.   William. 

l.ucas,  I.  Seymour,  F.S.A. 

Marshall,  Frederick. 

Meade,  Capt.  J.  P. 

Mcthold,  F.  J.,  F.S.A. 

Methold,  T.  T.  (two  copies). 

Newbury  Library. 

Norton,  H.  Turton. 

Ogilvie,  Mrs.  Margaret. 

Olorenshaw,  Rev.  J.  R. 

Paget,  Aimer ic. 

Partridge,  Charles,  jun.,  M.A.,  F.S.A. 

Poix,  Edmond  du. 

Preston,  Richard. 

Preston,  Theodore  J. 

Pretty,  W. 

Pretyman,  Capt.  E.  G.,  M.P. 

Raven,  Rev.  Canon,  D.D.,  F.S.A. 

Read  &  Barrett. 

Reform  Club. 

Rivett-Carnac,  Col.  J.  H.,  F.S.A., A.D.K. 

Roby,  Arthur  G. 

Russell,  Rev.   H. 

Rylands,  John,  Library. 

Sinclair,  Walter  M. 

Singh,  H.  H.  Prince  Frederick  Duleep. 

Stanford,  Thomas. 
Stcchert,  G.  E. 

Stevenson,  F.  S.,  M.P. 

Suckling,  Mrs.  Florence  H. 

Suffolk  Institute. 

Sutton,  Charles  W. 

"  Times,"  The,  Book  Club  (three  copies). 

Unwin,  T.  Fisher  (52  copies). 

Wakerley,  Arthur. 

Walpole,   John   E. 

Warner,  T.  Courtenay  T.,  M.P. 

Webster,  Isaac. 

Whayman.  Horace  W. 

Wightman,  A. 

Wild,  Rev.  E.  J. 

Wilson,  Arthur  Maitland. 

Wood,  J. 

Woolby,  The  Misses. 

Wyncoll,  Col.  C.  L. 


BABERCH    HUNDRED. 


8AXTON. 
1576. 


SPEED. 
1610. 


BOWEN, 
1777. 


THE 


MANORS  OF  SUFFOLK. 


BABERGH    HUNDRED. 

(UFFOLK  at  a  period  prior  to  the  Norman  Conquest  was 
divided  into  three  parts— the  Liberty  of  St.  Etheldreda, 
the  Liberty  of  St.  Edmund,  and  the  Geldable.  The 
Hundreds  of  Babergh  and  Blackbourn  were  both  in  the 
Liberty  of  St.  Edmund. 

Queen  Emma  of  Normandy,  the  mother  of  Edward  the 
Confessor,  had  as  a  marriage  portion,  either  from  Ethelred  in 
1002,  or  from  her  second  husband  Knut  in  1017,  jurisdiction  in  eight 
Hundreds  and  a  half  adjoining  the  Monastery  of  St.  Edmund ;  ^Elfric  son 
of  Earl  Withgar  and  afterwards  Ordgar  having  custody  of  the  franchise. 

After  the  Coronation  of  the  Confessor  in  1043  he  took  into  his  own 
hands  the  possessions  of  his  mother,  to  whom  he  does  not  appear  to  have 
been  very  favourably  inclined,  and  on  the  petition  of  the  Monks  of  St. 
Edmund  bestowed  upon  them  the  eight  hundreds  and  a  half,  and  the 
gift  was  confirmed  to  the  Monks  by  William  the  Conqueror.1 

The  fee  continued  in  the  Abbot  of  St.  Edmund's  until  the  dissolution 
of  the  Monasteries,  when  it  passed  to  the  Crown,  where  it  has  since  con- 
tinued, the  government  being  in  the  Sheriff  and  his  officers. 

The  Hundred  of  Babergh  (Babburgh,  Babenberga,  Babenga,  Babrig, 
Baburgh,  Balberg)  lies  to  the  south-west  of  the  County.  The  river  Stour 
separates  its  western  and  southern  boundaries  from  Essex,  and  it  has  several 
rivulets  which  fall  into  the  Stour.  On  the  west  it  is  bounded  by  the  same 
stream  and  the  Hundred  of  Risbridge  ;  on  the  north  by  the  Hundreds  of 
Thingoe  and  Thedwestry ;  and  on  the  east  by  those  of  Cosford  and;  Samford. 
Nayland  on  the  Stour,  Lavenham,  and  Melford  are  its  principal  towns.  The 
Borough  of  Sudbury  is  also  within  its  borders,  though  the  main  part  of 
the  borough  is  in  Essex.  The  Churches  of  Lavenham,  Melford  and  Stoke 
are  larger  and  richer  than  most  others  in  the  County,  and  are  evidence  of 
the  comparative  wealth  of  this  part  of  the  County  in  former  days. 

Babergh  Hundred  contains  the  following  33  Parishes  and  118  Manors  : — 


Parishes. 

Manors. 

Parishes. 

Manors. 

(  Acton. 

Assington. 

Acton     

Clerbeck. 
Rokewodes. 

Assington  .  . 

Levenya,  Stratton, 
Shimplingford. 

Leys. 

Aveley  or  Alvingley. 

\  Talemach. 

Boxford. 

Boxford  .  .  . 

Pevton  Hall. 

Alpheton  .  . 

Alpheton. 

Coddenham  Hall. 

1  Regr.   Nigrum  de  Vestrario  Abb.  S.  Edmundi    MS.  Bibl.  Publ.    Cantab.    Mm.  4, 
19  fol.  93  v. 

A 


THE    MANORS   OF   SUFFOLK. 


Box  ford  — 


Brent  Elrigh 


Bures. 


Cavendish . 


Chilton  . . . 


Cockfield   . 


Cornard 
Great . . . 


Cornard 
Little.. 


Manor*. 

^_^_^^_— i— - 

Boweshowse  al.  Born- 
house. 

Boxstead  Hall. 
Trokettso/.Trucketts 

Mores. 

Brent  Eleigh. 
Abbot's  Hall. 
Fen  Hall. 
Bures. 

Overhall  al.  Roper's. 
Netherhall  or  Silves- 
ters. 

Smallbridge. 
Cornerth    Hall    al. 

Cornhall    al.   Nor- 

thall. 
Tany's. 
Overhall. 
De  Grey's. 
Netherhall. 
Newhall. 
Houghton  Hall. 
Bulley  Hall. 
Impey  or  Impsey  o 

Quipsey  Hall. 
Kensings'or  Kessings 

Hall. 
Peyton's. 

Peche's  or  Pechy's. 
More  Hall. 
Collingham  Hall. 
Stansfield  Hall. 
Chilton  als.  Walding- 

field  Hall,Carbonels 

with  Chilton. 
Cockfield. 
Earl's  Hall. 
Butlers  al.  Jacobbies. 
Pepers    al.    Colches- 

toe's. 
Cornard     Magna     or 

Abbas  Hall. 
Grey's. 

Little  Cornard. 
Cawston  or  Caxton's. 
Peacock's  Hall. 
Series. 
Catcheleigh,  Appul- 

gary's,  Folybrok, 

Caneworth. 


Edwardston 


Glemsford . . 


Groton  . . 

Hartest 
Lavenham . . 
Lawshall 


Melford 
Long 


Milden   . . , 

Monk  Illeigh 
Nayland    , 


Newton 


Polstead    . 


Preston 


Manors. 


Edwardston. 
Lynnes  al.  Algood's. 
Tewes   or    Tues    al. 
Tendring. 

Glemsford. 
Methold's  and  Wim- 

bold's. 

Callis  al.  Tylnes. 
Glemsford       al . 

Peverells. 

Groton. 
Castelins. 

Hartest. 

Lavenham. 

Lawshall. 

Long  Melford. 
Monks      Melford     or 

Melford    Monacho- 

rum. 
Luton's. 
Woolhouse. 
Woodfoule,    and  also 

Blakes. 
Cranevyles  al.  Craina- 

viles. 

Kentwell  Hall. 
Melford  Rectory. 

Milden  al.  Wells  Hall. 
Bures  or  Bowers. 

Monk  Illeigh. 
Nayland. 

Newton  Hall. 
Sayham,      Siam      or 

Saxham  Hall. 
Botelers    al.    Butlers 

or  Buxtons. 

Polstead. 
Sprotts. 
Casteles. 

Newstead    or    New- 
stead  Hall. 

Preston       Hall       or 

Church  Hall. 
Swifts. 
Maisters. 
Mortimer's. 
(  Priory. 


BABERGH   HUNDRED. 


Parishes. 


Manors. 


Parishes. 


Manors. 


Shimpling . 

Somerton  . 
Stanstead  . 


Stoke  by 
Nayland 


Shimpling. 

Chadacre  or  Chadacre 
Hall,  Gifford  and 
Boxstead's. 

Rowheads  al.  Rous- 
hedges. 

Somerton. 

Hores. 

Stanstead  or  Overhall. 

Netherhall. 

Woodhouse. 

Tendring  Hall  al. 
Stoke  by  Nayland. 

Giffard's  Hall. 

Levenhey  al.  Nether- 
hall. 

Scotland  Hall. 

Withermarsh. 

Capel. 

Chamberlain's. 

Causer's,   Peachan's 
or  Shardelowe's. 

Stoke  Rectory. 


Sudbury    . . 


Waldingfield 
Great 


Waldingfield 
Little 


Wiston 


|  Wood  Hall. 
(  Place's. 

Carbonels  or  Butler's. 

Badley     al.     Peyton 
Hall. 

Brandeston  Hall. 

Moreves  al.  Moreyes 
al.   Saires,  with 
Storkenest. 

Sandesford's  al.  Stan- 
ford. 

Dowres  or  Dowayres. 

Woodhall     al.     Wal- 
dingfield Parva. 
Netherhall. 
Holbrook  Hall. 
Luns  Hall. 

Wiston    or    Wissing- 

ton. 
Wiston  Grange. 


From  the  Hundred  Rolls  we  learn  that  the  Countess  Cloverine  with- 
held certain  suit  for  two  years,  which  suit  James  de  Makerel  used  to  make 
to  this  Hundred1  ;  and  that  land  of  John  de  Buc  of  Sudbury  owed  suit 
which  was  withheld  for  6  years.2  In  the  Inquisition  p.m.  of  Thomas 
Cavendish  in  1477,  land  in  this  Hundred  is  referred  to.3 

Amongst  the  MSS.  of  the  Earl  of  Ancaster  is  a  certificate  (1514-23) 
of  Sir  William  Waldeyn,  Sir  William  Clopton,  George  Mannok,  Robert 
Crane  and  Robert  Ford  the  Elder,  commissioners,  concerning  the 
musters  and  for  valuing  men's  substance  in  the  Hundred  of 
Babergh.  Among  the  proprietors  named  are  the  Queen,  the 
College  of  St.  Gregory  in  Sudbury,  Sir  Edward  Nevyll,  the  Duke  of 
Norfolk,  Sir  William  Waldegrave,  Lady  Peyton,  the  Guilds  of  St.  Peter, 
St.  John,  the  Trinity  and  St.  Christopher  in  Boxford,  the  Provost  of 
Cambridge,  the  Abbess  of  Dartford,  Sir  Richard  Fitzlawes,  Lady 
Salisbury  the  Abbess  of  Mailing,  the  Earl  of  Oxford  and  many  others. 

Amongst  the  Bodleian  Charters  is  an  acknowledgment  of  delivery 
by  Robert  Crane  to  Thomas  Abbot  of  Bury  the  Collector  of  moneys  in 
Babergh  Hundred4 ;  and  amongst  the  Additional  Charters  in  the  British 
Museum  are  several  Deeds  relating  to  the  same  Hundred,  1517  to  1792.* 

It  is  stated  in  the  Letter  Book  of  the  Deputy-Lieutenants  and  Justices 
of  the  Peace  of  Suffolk  1608-1640*  that  in  a  Rate  of  £1,500  for  the  whole 
County,  the  franchise  of  Bury  was  £500  ;  of  this  £100  was  payable  out  of 


1  H.R.  ii.  143. 

'  Ib. 

3  I.P.M.,  17  Edw.  IV.  4. 


'  Bodl.  Suff.  Ch.  135. 

'  Add.  Ch.  10542,  10554. 

'  13  Rep.  Hist.  Com.  pt.  iv.  434. 


4  THE    MANORS   OF   SUFFOLK. 

Babergh  Hundred,  the  same  being  levied  upon  every  town  within  the  said 
Hundred  in  the  proportions  given. 

In  the  Great  Domesday  of  Ipswich,  compiled  in  1520,  the  taxes  paid 
by  every  town  in  Suffolk  to  the  King  are  specified.  Originally  the  amount 
paid  to  thr  King  was  uncertain,  being  levied  by  fresh  assessments  at  each 
grant  made  by  the  Commons ;  but  in  1334  new  taxations  were  made,  by 

ie  of  the  King's  Commission  which  fixed  the  tax  payable  in  each  case. 
This  is  given  in  Liber  Six  t  us  of  Richard  Percyhale's  Great  Domesday 
Book  and  the  portion  relating  to  the  Hundred  of  Babergh  will  be  found 
in  the  Proceedings  of  the  Suffolk  Institute  in  1885.  This  Hundred  contains 
71,813  acres  of  land. 


ACTON.  5 

ACTON. 

N  the  time  of  King  Edward  the  Confessor,  Seward  of  Maldon 
the  Thane  held  12  carucates  of  land  in  Acton  as  a  manor 
with  soc  and  sac.  There  were  23  villeins,  38  bordars,  17 
slaves,  8  ploughteams  in  demesne,  20  belonging  to  the  men, 
50  acres  of  meadow,  wood  for  40  hogs,  2  mills,  8  horses  at  the 
Hall,  34  beasts,  200  hogs,  300  sheep,  9  hives  of  bees  and  a 
church  living  to  which  were  attached  30  acres  of  free  land — 
all  valued  at  20  pounds.  By  the  time  of  the  Norman  Survey  the  value 
had  increased  to  30  pounds,  and  there  had  been  various  other  changes. 
The  8  ploughteams  in  demesne  had  been  reduced  to  6,  and  those  belonging 
to  the  men  had  come  down  to  14,  one  mill  had  disappeared,  but  the  horses 
at  the  Hall  had  been  increased  to  n.  All  the  other  animals,  except  the 
sheep,  had  been  reduced  in  number,  the  34  beasts  were  then  31,  the  hogs 
160,  the  9  hives  of  bees  were  then  7,  but  the  sheep  from  300  had  increased 
to  423.  The  manor  was  then  held  by  Ranulph  Peverell,  and  was  excep- 
tionally large,  extending  into  Melford,  Sudbury  Great  and  Little  Walding- 
field,  Milding  and  Edwardston.  In  Acton,  besides  what  was  held  as  a 
manor  at  the  time  of  the  Norman  Survey,  were  4  freemen  whom  Ranulf 
received  as  a  holding  of  50  acres.  Acton  was  a  league  long  and  a  league 
broad  and  paid  13^.  in  a  gelt.1  In  course  of  time  this  huge  manor  became 
divided  into  five — Acton  Hall,  Rokewodes,  Clerbeck,  Leys  and  Tale- 
mach,  the  last  four  being  named  after  families  who  held  the  same 
respectively  in  early  times. 

ACTON   MANOR. 

Gipps  says  that  the  Tollemaches  held  the  Manor  of  Acton  25  Edw.  I., 
but  their  holding  was,  as  we  shall  see,  one  of  the  Manors  in  Acton.  The 
Inquis.  quod  damnum  4  Edw.  II.  (59)  mentions  a  Bentley  or  "  Benetteley 
Manor  of  "  Acton  Manor,  of  which  at  this  time  Hugh  Talmache  was  seised, 
and  as  early  as  the  56  and  57  Henry  -III.  [1271-2]  Hugh  son  of  William 
Tallemache  had  a  third  of  what  is  said  to  be  the  Manor  of  Acton  claimed 
from  him  by  Peter  de  Ryngesale  and  Margaret  his  wife.2  Strangely  enough 
the  Tolemaches  did  at  this  time  hold  the  Manor  of  Bentley  near  Ipswich. 
This  Hugh  Tollemache  had  a  considerable  amount  of  land  undoubtedly  in 
Acton  in  the  time  of  Hen.  III. — in  fact,  half  a  fee  held  of  the  Honor  of 
Hatfield  Peverel3,  and  the  family  held  their  land  as  a  distinct  manor  known 
as  Talemach  to  which  we  will  shortly  refer.  The  several  manors  are 
indiscriminately  referred  to  in  the  various  documents  as  Acton  Manor. 

The  main  manor  belonged  in  the  time  of  Rich.  I.  to  the  Hodebovilles, 
and  in  that  King's  reign  was  held  by  Ralph  de  Hodeboville.  He  died  in 
1190,  and  Davy  says  (referring  to  another  manor  in  Acton)  he  was 
succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir  John  de  Hodeboville  who  died  in  1299,  but 
this  is  not  possible,  as  the  son  could  not  well  have  died  a  hundred  and  nine 
years  after  his  father.  Sir  John  de  Hodeboville  had  the  lordship  in  1196." 
Davy  makes  the  Hodebovile  holding  of  Balisden  Manor  only,  and  starts 
the  Manor  of  Acton  practically  with  Robert  de  Bures  in  1313.  He  labours 
under  a  delusion  on  this  point,  apparently  not  being  aware  of  the  Fine 

1  Dom.  ii.  417.  3  Red  Book  of  the  Exch.  cxxxv.  rider  c. ; 

*  Abbr.  of  Pleas,  56  and  57  Hen.  III.  8.  T.   de    Nevill,  291 ;  H.R.  ii.    142  ; 

Chart.   Rolls,    15   John   2,  3,   13 ; 

Testa  de  Nevill,  285. 
4  Abbr.  of  Pleas,  7  Rich.  I.  and  9  John  2. 


6  THE    MANORS   OF   SUFFOLK. 

levied  in  the  5th  year  of  Edw  1 1  and  th<-  entry  on  the  Close  Rolls  6  Edw.  III.1 
which  show  that  Robert  dr  Hurt's  and  Hillaria  his  wife  in  1311  acquired 
their  interest  from  Rog«  r  «!••  Hodeboville.  The  Red  Book  of  the  Exchequer 
does  not  mention  the  manor,  but  states  that  Sir  John  de  Hodeboville  held 
one  fee  in  Acton  of  the  Honor  of  Peverell  in  1210-12.*  An  extent  of  the 
manor  as  held  by  John  de  Hodebovile,  a  son  or  grandson  of  the  former 
John  will  be  found  in  the  Inquis.  post  mortem  under  his  name  in  1301.' 
i  de  Hodeboville  and  Matilda  were  the  parents  of  John,  who  married 
Hillary,  and  they  held  2  parts  of  the  manor  of  the  gift  of  Peter  de  Debenham 
and  Roger  de  Hodebovyle.4  It  was  John  son  of  John  de  Hodebovill  who 
had  enfeoffed  Peter  de  Debenham  and  Roger  de  Hodebovill  of  the  manor.5 
The  other  part  of  the  manor  at  this  time  seems  to  have  belonged  to  Walter 
de  Hodeboville  in  right  of  his  wife  Elizabeth  de  Clerbeck.'  The  manor 
was  vested  in  Roger  de  Hodeboville  and  was  acquired  from  him  by  Robert 
de  Bores  and  Hilary  his  wife  in  1311',  and  between  that  time  and  1331 
we  meet  with  the  following  documents  in  connection  with  the  manor  : 
Licence  to  Robert  Bures  to  alienate,  no  doubt  by  way  of  settlement' ; 
Inquisition  and  Extent, Alicia  de  Hodeboville9;  Fine,  Robert  de  Bures 
and  Hillaria  his  wife  v.  James  de  Bures  and  John  de  Bures10 ;  Fine,  Robert 
de  Bures  and  Hillaria  his  wife  v.  Edmund  le  Boteller  1329."  Inquis.  1331 
Robert  de  Bures  and  Hillaria  his  wife."  On  the  north  side  of  the  Chancel 
of  Acton  Church  between  two  pillars  and  under  a  Gothic  arch  is  a  very  ancient 
altar  monument  formerly  adorned  with  a  cross  fleury,  but  now  robbed  of  all  its 
brasses  except  one  escutcheon  which  belongs  to  the  name  of  Buers.  And 
on  a  flat  stone  in  the  north  aisle  is  or  was  a  portrait  of  a  knight  (in  brass) 

6  feet  high,  completely  armed,  cross  legged,  at  his  feet  a  lion  ;  on  his  shield 
the  arms  of  Bures.    The  inscription  was  engraved  round  the  verge  of  the 
stone,  at  the  upper  end  of  which  at  the  right-hand  corner  '  Robert  de  Bures  ' 
is  still  legible.    Ancient  portraits  as  large  and  complete  as  this  are  very 
uncommon.    This  Robert  de  Bures  was  keeper  of  forfeited  lands  in  Suffolk.13 
The  manor  then  passed  to  Sir  Andrew  de  Bures  and  Alicia  his  wife  as  shown 
by  an  Inquis.  p.m.  in  1360. '4    Sir  Andrew  had  died  the  12  April,  1360. 
Gipps  says  Sir  Andrew  de  Bures  left  two  sons,  Sir  Robert  and  another. 
Sir    Robert    Bures   died    about    1393  (Blomefield    says    he    died    the 

7  Oct.,  1361),  and  left  Alice  his  sole  daughter  and  heir  married  to  Sir 
Guido  de  Bryan,  but    they  both  died  without   issue,  3  Hen.  V.     After 
them   the  second  son  of   Sir  Andrew  was   seated  at   Acton,   and    the 
family  flourished  again  for  many  descents  ;  but  at  length  Henry  de  Buers 
died  in  the  reign  of  Queen  Elizabeth.     Page  agrees  that  this  branch  of  the 
family  terminated  in  the  male  line  upon  the  death  of  Henry  Buers  which,  he 


•  Pt.  il  16. 

•  132  B.  I52d..  cxxxv.  rider  c.  Testa  de 

Nevill,  271. 
'  29  Edw.  I.  28,  2  Edw.  II.  57. 

•  Calendar  of  Heirs  extracted   from  the 

Inquisition    I    and    2    Edw.     II. 
D.K.R.  32.  App.  i.  p.  254. 
'  Originialia  33  Edw.  I.,  Rj.  14,  I.P.M., 
Kdw.  I.  217,  Feet  of  Fines,  34 
Edw.  I.  22. 

•  Extent.    Elizabeth  Clerbeck  and  Walter 

Hodeboville  her  husband,  I. P.M., 
35  Edw.  I.  21,  Walter  in  right  of 
Diaheth  his  wife  I. P.M.  3  Edw.  II. 
31,  Hillary  wife  of  John  de  Hode- 


boville I.P.M.  3  Edw.  II.  12,  Close 
Rolls,  3  Edw.  II.  13. 
'  Feet  of  Fines  5  Edw.  II.  36,  Close  Rolls, 

6  Edw.  II.  pt.  ii.  16. 
I.Q.D.,  6  Edw.  II.  53. 
I.P.M.,  8  Edw.  II.  19. 
"  Feet  of  Fines,  n  Edw.  II.  17. 

Feet  of  Fines,  3  and  4  Edw.  II.  37. 
I.P.M.,  5  Edw.  III.  55. 
1   Close  Rolls,  17  Edw.  II.  36,  20,  15,  18 
Edw.    II.    20.    For    Pedigree    see 
Add.  MSS.  inBrit.Mus.  19121,  and 
for  brasses  of  de  Bures  see  Publica- 
tions of  Suffolk  Institute  vol.  i.  26. 
"  I.P.M.,  34  Edw.  III.  60. 


ACTON.  7 

says,  was  in  1528  "  who  left  issue  by  Anne  his  wife,  daughter  of  Sir  Wm. 
Waldegrave  of  Smallbridge  in  Bures,  three  daughters,  Joan,  Bridget  and 
Anne.  These  co-heirs  married  Sir  William,  Thomas  and  Edmund  Butts 
sons  of  Sir  William  Butts,  Knt.,  Physician  to  Hen.  VIII.  Joan  and  Bridget 
the  wives  of  Sir  William  and  Thomas  Butts  died  without  issue,  and  Anne 
the  only  daughter  and  heiress  of  Edmund  Butts  and  Anne  his  wife  married 
Nicholas  eldest  son  and  heir  of  Sir  Nicholas  Bacon  Lord  Keeper  who  inherited 
the  manor  in  her  right,  and  it  continued  in  their  descendants  for  many 
generations.  In  1764  Sir  Richard  Bacon  Bart,  of  Colchester  held  the 
property.  It  now  belongs  to  Earl  Howe,  who  is  lord  of  the  manor  by 
purchase  from  the  Bacon  family."  This  statement,  however,  does  not 
seem  to  agree  with  the  facts.  In  the  first  place  Henry  Buers  had  four 
daughters,  not  three,1  and  the  fourth  daughter  Mary  married  Thomas 
Barrow  and  had  a  large  family,  5  sons  and  4  daughters,  viz.,  Thomas,  who 
died  without  issue,  William,  Henry,  Edward,  John,  Anne,  Bridget,  Elizabeth, 
and  Mary.  In  verification  of  our  statement  we  may  mention  that  the 
grant  of  wardship  of  the  four  daughters  and  co-heirs  of  "  Henry  son  of 
Robert  Bures  of  Acton  "  to  William  Buttes  is  still  in  existence,  and  is 
dated  the  gth  August,  I52Q.2  The  whole  statement  of  Page,  if  intended  to 
show  how  the  manor  descended,  is  an  entire  delusion,  and  but  demonstrates 
how  the  history  of  Suffolk  has  been  almost  invariably  treated.  Of  course, 
no  complete  history  has  yet  appeared,  and  with  the  exception  of  Suckling's 
four  Hundreds  and  the  Hundred  of  Thingoe  by  Gage,  Cullum's  Hawstead, 
and  Gage's  Hengrave,  nothing  worthy  of  the  name  of  history  has  appeared 
in  connection  with  th,e  County. 

Now  Sir  Guy  Bryan,  who  married  the  Buers  heiress,  did  not  die 
without  issue  as  stated  by  Gipps,  nor  did  the  manor  descend  as  inferred 
both  by  him  and  Page.  Sir  Guy  Bryan  and  Alice  his  wife  who  died  the 
nth  January,  J-4343 ,  left  a  daughter  Elizabeth  married  to  Robert  Lovell. 
Elizabeth  Lovell  died  about  1438,  and  the  manor  is  included  in  her  Inquisi- 
tion p.m.4  She  left  a  daughter  Matilda,  married  to  John  i^th  Earl  of 
Arundel,  who  died  the  i2th  June  1435,  and  they  had  a  son  Humphrey  i4th 
Earl  of  Arundel,  who  survived  his  father  3  years,  but  died  at  the  early 
age  of  9  on  the  24th  April,  1438,  and  the  manor  is  mentioned  in  his 
Inquisition  p.m.5  On  Elizabeth  Lovell's  death  about  1438  the  manor 
passed  to  her  grandson  Humphrey  Earl  of  Arundel,  and  on  his  death  the 
same  year  to  his  sister  Amicia,  who  was  married  to  James  Butler  Earl  of 
Ormond  and  Wiltshire,  and  died  in  1457  without  issue.6  On  the  Patent 
Rolls  appears  a  grant  of  the  manor  by  Edw.  IV.  to  Thomas  Cole  and  the 
heirs  male  of  his  body,  it  being  then  described  as  "  occupied  by  Thomas 
Roos  Knt.,  and  James,  late  Earl  of  Wilts  respectively  as  their  right  of 
inheritance."7  But  in  the  seventh  year  of  the  same  monarch  there  is  a 
grant  of  the  manor  by  him  to  Henry  Earl  of  Essex  and  his  wife  Isabel  and 
the  heirs  of  their  bodies.8  Henry  Bourchier,  Earl  of  Essex,  was  in  1447 
created  Viscount  Bourchier,9  and  in  1455  constituted  Lord  Treasurer  of 
England  ;  but  notwithstanding  the  favours  received  from  the  King  he 

'  I.P.M.,  of  Henry  Bures  20  Hen.  VIII.  87.  'Pat.   Rolls,    i   Edw.    IV.   pt.   iv.   14,   4 

'  13  Rep.  Hist.  Com.  pt.  iv.  406.  Edw.  IV.  pt.  ii.  28. 

'  I.P.M.,  13  Hen.  VI.  34.  8  Pat.  Rolls,  7  Edw.  IV.  pt.  ii.  16. 

4  I.P.M.,  16  Hen.  VI.  46.  »  For  full  account  of  his  lordship,  see  under 

5  I.P.M.,  16  Hen.  VI.  50.  Hopton      Manor     in     Blackbourn 
*  I.P.M.,  35  Hen.  VI.  16.     See  account  of                    Hundred. 

him    under   Bures    Manor   in  this 
Hundred. 


8  THE   MANORS  r OF   SUFFOLK. 

fonook  his  Royal  master  and  espousing  the  interests  of  the  Earls  of  March 
and  Warwick  was  invested  with  the  Treasurership  of  England  by  the 
former,  and  on  his  accession  to  the  Throne  as  Edw.  IV.  was  created  Earl 
of  Essex  His  estates  were  greatly  swelled  by  the  confiscations  which 
befel  the  attainted  Earl  of  Wiltshire  and  the  Lord  Roos.  He  married 
Isabel  sister  of  Edw.  IV.,  and  by  her  had  issue  William  who  married  Anne 
daughter  of  Kuhanl  Widville  Karl  Rivers  and  sister  of  Elizabeth 
Owen  of  Edw.  IV.,  and  dird  in  his  father's  lifetime,  leaving  Henry 
&  CTCCT38QT  as  2nd  Earl  of  Essex.  Henry  Bourchier  first  Earl 
of  Essex  died  the  4th  April,  1483',  when  the  manor  passed  to  his  widow 
Isabel,  who  died  the  2nd  October  following.1  The  manor  did  ultimately 
come  back,  as  Page  states,  to  Robert  Bures  son  and  heir  of  William,  and 
he  died  seised  the  loth  July,  1524',  leaving  a  son  Henry  Bures  who  married 
Anne  daughter  of  Sir  William  Waldegrave  of  Smallbridge  in  Bures,  and 
died  the  oth  July,  1528,  leaving  four  daughters.  Dr.  William  Buttes  or 
Butt  us  serviens  ct  medicus  "  of  Hen.  VIII.  and  an  early 

member  of  the  College  of  Physicians,  obtained  from  the  Sovereign  the 
wardship  of  the  four  daughters  and  co-heirs  of  Henry  Bures,  and  seems  to 
have  well  feathered  his  nest  by  the  acquisition.  Buttes  is  frequently 

red  to  in  the  State  Papers,  which  show  how  great  a  favourite  he  was 
with  tlx  King.  The  Bures  estates  consisted  of  the  Manors  of  Acton,  Rey- 
don.  and  Whersted,  and  other  lands  in  the  County  of  Suffolk  and  in  Essex. 

ve  bonds  still  extant  given  by  Buttes  to  the  Treasurer  of  the  King's 
Chamber  shew  that  this  wardship  was  far  from  being  a  free  gift.4  On  the 
loth  November,  1529,  Dr.  Buttes  had  a  grant  of  an  annuity  of  forty  marks 
out  of  his  wards'  estates  during  the  wardship  ;  and  subsequently  his  three 
sons  married  three  out  of  the  four  co-heiresses.  The  fourth  daughter 
was  married  to  Thomas  Barrowe,  and  William  Barrowe  his  son  and  heir 
seems  to  have  had  the  manor  in  1591,  or  a  share  in  it,  which  in  1599  had 
passed  to  Sir  Nicholas  Bacon,  Knt.,  son  of  the  Lord  Keeper,  he  having 
married  at  Redgrave,  2  May,  1562,  Anne  only  daughter  and  heir  of  Edmund 
Butts,  and  Anne  his  wife5  third  daughter  of  Henry  Bures.  This  marriage  was 
a  scheme  of  his  father,  the  Lord  Keeper,  for  the  bridegroom  was  but  fourteen 
and  the  bride  but  12  at  the  time  of  their  marriage,  in  1562.  It  was  foreseen 
that  Anne  at  that  time  would  become  the  heiress  of  her  two  uncles,  and 
their  wives  as  well  as  of  her  mother,  for  they  were  all  parties  to  the 
marriage  settlement,6  and  to  the  seven  royal  licences  of  alienation  which 
were  necessary  to  give  legal  effect  to  the  assurances.  The  settlement  is 
dated  the  3  Oct.  3  Eliz.  [1561],  and  is  an  elaborate  document  dealing  with 
the  estates  of  Thomas  Buttes  as  well  as  those  of  his  wife.  Two  counter- 
parts exist  each  consisting  of  two  large  skins  of  vellum,  and  they  are  signed 
and  sealed  by  the  parties.  They  are  splendidly  engrossed  on  red  lines 
after  the  faslu'on  of  letters  patent  of  that  period.  Three  fines  were  limited 
pursuant  to  the  settlement  of  the  4th  part  in  the  manor  during  Hilary 
term  4  Eliz.  by  Sir  Nicholas  Bacon,  and  against  Sir  William  Buttes,  Anne 
Buttes,  widow,  and  Thomas  Buttes  respectively. 

1  I.P.M.,  i  Rich.  III.  31.  husband  60  years,    but     did   not 

'  I.P.M.,  2  Rich   III.  35.  re-marry.      She    had  a    moiety  of 

»  I.P.M.,16  Hon.  VIII.  35  where  the  manor  the  Manor  of    VVherstead,  William 

*  said  to  be  held  of  the  King  as  of  Barrowe,  second  son  of  Mary,  hav- 

Hat  field  Honor  valued  at  £20  p.  an.  ing  the  other  moiety. 
'  13  Rep.  Hist.  Com.  pt.  iv.  406.                            Articles  and  Agreements  3  Sept.   1561 

'  She  liwd  till  the  22  Dec.,  1609,  in  her  13  Rep.  Hist.  Com.  pt.  iv.  413. 
year.      She    survived     her 


ACTON.  9 

Sir  Nicholas  Bacon  was  knighted  in  1578,  and  was  the  first  baronet 
created  in  1611.  Besides  the  succession  of  inheritances  which  accrued  to 
him  from  his  marriage,  he  enjoyed  the  large  possessions  left  him  by  his 
father  in  1579.  Sir  Nicholas  Bacon  died  the  I3th  Nov.  1624,'  and  was 
succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir  Sir  Edmund  Bacon,  who  died  the  loth  April, 
1649,  and  was  succeeded  by  his  brother  Sir  Robert  Bacon  who  died  the 
16  Dec.  1655.  Sir  Robert  Bacon  was  succeeded  by  his  brother  Sir  Butts 
Bacon.  He  married  Dorothy  dau.  of  Sir  Henry  Warner  of  Parham  Kt., 
and  widow  of  William  2nd  son  of  Sir  Robert  Jermyn  Knt.,  and  died  in  1661, 
when  the  manor  passed  to  his  son  and  heir  Sir  Henry  Bacon  Bt.,  who  removed 
to  Herringfleet,  where  his  father  had  built  a  seat.  He  married  Barbara 
dau.  of  Wm.  Gooch  of  Mettingham.  He  was  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir 
Sir  Henry  Bacon  Bt.,  who  married  Sarah  dau.  of  Sir  John  Castleton  of 
Sturston,  Bart.,  and  died  in  1685-6,  when  the  manor  passed  to  his  son  and 
heir  Sir  Edmund  Bacon  4th  Bart.,  who  married  first  Philippa  dau.  of  Sir 
Edmund  Bacon  of  Redgrave,  and  secondly  Mary  dau.  of  John  Castell  of  Raven- 
ingham,  and  dying  in  1721  the  manor  passed  to  his  eldest  son  by  his  first 
marriage  Sir  Edmund  Bacon  5th  Bart.,  who  married  Susan  dau.  of  Sir  Isaac 
Rebow  of  Colchester,  Essex,  and  dying  the  2  Oct.  1738  the  manor  passed  to 
his  son  and  heir  Sir  Edmund  Bacon  6th  Bart.  He  died  unmarried  in  1750, 
when  the  manor  passed  to  his  uncle  Sir  Henry  Bacon  7th  Bart.,  who 
dying  in  1753  unmarried  it  went  to  his  brother  Sir  Richard  Bacon  8th  Bt. 
who  married  first  Bridget  Mahew,  and  second  Lucy  Gardiner,  and  dying  in 
1773  without  male  issue  surviving  the  manor  with  the  title  passed  to  his 
nephew  Sir  Edmund  Bacon  gth  Bt.,  the  eldest  son  of  Castell  Bacon  and  of 
Elizabeth  dau.  of  Richard  Dashwood  of  Cockley  Cley  in  Norf .,  his  wife,  the 
youngest  son  by  his  second  marriage  of  Sir  Edmund  Bacon  4th  Bart. 
Sir  Edmund  Bacon  gth  Bart,  married  Anne  daur.  of  Sir  Wm.  Beauchamp 
Proctor  Bart,  and  K.B.  The  manor  now  belongs  to  Earl  Howe/an  ancestor 
having  purchased  from  the  Bacon  family.  Court  Rolls  of  Acton  Manor 
for  18-19  Rich.  II.  and  Hen.  IV.  are  in  the  Public  Record  Office.3 

CLERBECK   MANOR. 

Another  manor  in  Acton  called  Clerbeck  was  long  held  by  a  family 
of  this  name.  We  learn  from  the  Red  Book  of  the  Exchequer  that  in  1210 
Sir  Henry  de  Clerebec  held  half  a  fee  and  Hamo  de  Clerebec  another  half 
fee  in  Oreton  of  the  Honor  of  Peverel4 ;  and  further,  somewhat  later,  that 
Hamo  son  and  heir  of  Henry  de  Clerebec  was  under  age,  and  ought  to  be 
in  the  custody  of  the  King,  who  had  the  Honor  of  Peverel.5  Also  from 
the  Hundred  Rolls  that  Robert  de  Clerbek  gave  3  acres  in  Acton  to  the 
religious  house  of  Hatfield  in  frankalmoin.6  Robert  de  Clerbeck  died  in 
1272,  and  was  succeeded  by  John  de  Clerbeck,  who  died  1285,  and  having 
had  an  only  son  Walter  who  died  in  his  father's  lifetime  was  succeeded  by 
his  3  sisters  Joan,  Isabella,  and  Alicia,  his  co-heirs,  who  in  1290  paid  their 
relief.  Henry  de  Clerbeck  is  the  next  Lord  we  meet  with,  and  an  extent 
of  this  manor  will  be  found  in  his  Inquisition  p.m.  in  I29&.7  Elizabeth  de 
Clerbeck,  probably  the  widow  of  Henry,  was  the  next  holder  of  the  manor, 
and  died  in  1303,  when  it  passed  to  her  son  Robert  de  Clerbeck,  who  died 
in  1329.  The  Originalia  Rolls  show  that  Joan  de  Clerbeck  in  1332  held 

1  I.P.M.,  7  Nov.  I  Car.  I.  *  I52d.  cxxxv.  rider  c. 

*  See   Rokewodes    Manor,  Acton,  in  this         5  Testa  de  Nevill,  300. 

Hundred.  6  H.R.  ii.  144. 

3  Portfolio  203,  i.  i  I.P.M.,  24  Edw.  I.  45. 


xo  THE    MANORS    OF   SUFFOLK. 

lands  by  the  sen-ice  of  a  yd  part  of  a  knight's  fee,  and  the  King  took  homage 

of  Walt  -de  her  son  and  heir  of  all  lands  she  held  of  the  Honor 

of  Peverrll.'  e  years  later  this  Walter  de  Clerbek  had  licence  toenfeoff 

Robert  de  Rokwod  and  John  de  Fordham,  chaplain  of  a  messuage  80  acres 

of  land  4  of  meadow  2  of  pasture  10  of  wood  and  30$.  of  rent  in  Acton, 

h  was  probably  this  Clerbeck  Manor,  and  for  them  to  regrant   to  him, 

Alice  his  wife,  and  his  heirs.'     Walter  seems  to  have  died  the  next  year, 

leaving  John  his  son  and  heir.1     John  Clerbeck  died  in  1385,  and  the 

manor  then  seems  to  have  consisted  of  one  messuage  100  acres  of  land  5  of 

meadow  one  of  pasture  10  of  wood  and  305.  rent  in  Acton  and  Preston.4 

He  was  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir  John,  and  he  by  his  widow  Hawsia 

for  life.    She  died  in  1426,  and  was  succeeded  by  John  Clerbeck  son  and 

.  who  died  in  1427,  and  was  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir  Walter,  who 

died  in  1437.    The  manor  then  consisted  of  i  messuage  containing  4  acres 

called   Clerebeks  84    acres    of    land    10    of  wood  6   of  meadow   4    of 

pasture  and   145.    rent   in   Acton,  Kettlebaston,  Sudbury,   Melford   and 

Preston.'     Walter  Clerbeck  was  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir  Thomas 

who  died  in  1482,*    and  the  manor  passed  to  his  son  and  heir  Andrew 

who  died  in  1500,  and  was  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir  Thomas.     Thomas 

Clerbeck  was  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir  Thomas  who  died  in  1527 

without  issue,  and  was  succeeded  by  his  Aunt  Joan  wife  of  Wm.  Partrich, 

at  whose  death  in  1530  the  manor  passed  to  her  nephews  William   Lucy, 

Henry  Mack-William,  Edmund  Walgrave,  Roger  Martin,  Richard  Merton, 

Edward  Danyell,  Thomas  Ligate,  Thomas  Smerte,  clerk  and  John  Cordall. 

The  manor  was  sold  to  Thomas  Daniel  third  son  of  Edmund  Daniel  by 

Grace  daughter  and  heir  of  Sir  Richard  Baynard  Knt.  of  Messing  in  Essex 

which  Edmund  was  son  of  Sir  Thomas  Daniell  Knt.  created  Lord  of  Rathivire 

in    Ireland  by   King    Edward   IV.    and    Margaret    his    wife     daughter 

of  Sir  Robert  and  sister  of  Thomas  Howard  Duke  of  Norfolk.    Thomas 

Daniell  the  purchaser  married  ist  Anne  daughter  of  Sir  Edmund  Lucy,  and 

2ndly  Frances  daughter  of  John  Butler  of  Coventry,  widow  of  Edward 

Felton  of  Pentlow  in  Essex.    His  will  is  dated  the  31  July  8  Eliz.  and  on  his 

death  in  1566  the  manor  passed  to  his  son  and  heir  Edmund  Daniell.     He 

married  Margaret  daughter  and  co-heir  of  Edmund  West  of  Cornard,  and 

died  the  5  Oct.  1569.     His  will  is  dated  the  29  Aug.  n  Eliz.     His  eldest 

son  and  successor  John  Daniell  married  Margaret  d.  and  co-h.  of  Edmund 

Tyrrel,  but  died  in  1596  without  issue  when  the  manor  passed  to  his  brother 

Francis  Daniell;   after  which  it  descended  with  Rokwodes  Manor  next 

dealt  with. 

ROKEWODES. 

Another  manor  in  Acton  called  Rokewodes  was  held  by  the  Rokewood 
family,  also  as  of  the  Honor  of  Hatfield  Peverell  and  probably  originally 
formed  part  of  Clerbeck.  In  1302  Roger  de  Stoke  and  Joan  his  wife,  Alan 
de  Rokewode  and  Elizabeth  his  wife,  and  Godfrey  de  Leyes  and  Alice 
his  wife' gave  the  King  for  relief  50  shillings  in  respect  of  half  a  fee  in  this 
This  Alan  de  Rokewode  left  issue  Sir  Robert  de  Rokewode,  who 
married  Margaret  daughter  of  Michael  de  Bures.  There  is  a  licence  on  the 
Patent  Rolls  for  this  Robert  to  enfeoff  John  de  Bures  and  Robert  Clerebek 

'  Original.*,  6  Edw.  III.  16.  >  I.P.M.,  15  Hen.  VI.  23. 

Pat.  Rolls,  ii  Edw.  III.  pt.  i.  38.  «  I.P.M..  21  Edw.  IV.  13. 

n  I2  E<!w'  IH  "'  I5  Edw>  IIL  **•         '  (W11'011  J°an'  Elizabeth,  and  Alice  were 
'•  4.  App.  ii.  p.  136.  granddaughters  and  heirs  of  Henry 

I.P.M..  9  Rich.  II.  17.  de  Clerbeck.) 


ACTON.  ii 

of  a  messuage  140  acres  of  land,  7  of  meadow  6  of  pasture  28  of  wood  405. 
of  rent  and  a  third  part  of  a  messuage  and  of  a  mill  in  Acton  held  in  chief 
as  of  the  Honor  of  Peverell  and  for  the  feoffees  to  regrant  the  same  to  him  and 
Margaret  his  wife.1  He  died  in  1333,*  and  the  manor  passed  to  his  son 
Sir  Robert  de  Rokewode  who  had  a  son  Sir  John  de  Rokewode  of  Stoke- 
by-Nayland.  On  Sir  John  de  Rokewood's  death  two  parts  of  the  manor 
passed  to  his  widow  Joan  who  died  in  I39i,3  and  was  succeeded  by  her  son 
John  de  Rokewood.  He  died  also  in  1391,  and  was  succeeded  by  his 
brother  and  heir,  William  Rokewood  who  died  in  I422.4  Davy  says  he 
was  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir  William,  who  was  succeeded  by  his  son 
and  heir  Thomas,  and  he  in  1422  by  his  son  and  heir  John ;  but  this  seems 
to  be  erroneous,  for  the  Inquisition  on  William  de  Rokewood  in  1422 
states  that  he  died  the  26  April,  leaving  John  Rokewood  his  son  and  heir 
aged  21  years.  By  an  Inquisition  recited  on  the  Patent  Rolls  in  1424  it 
was  found  that  William  Rokewod  had  conveyed  the  manor  to  Thomas 
Swynborne  and  others  in  fee.5  The  next  lord  was  Sir  Richard  Waldegrave, 
but  how  he  became  entitled  does  not  appear.  He  died  in  I434,6  and  was 
succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir  Sir  William  Waldegrave,  and  he  by  his  eldest 
son  and  heir  Sir  Richard  Waldegrave  who  died  without  issue  in  1439. 
The  manor  then  passed  to  Thomas  Daniel,  who  had  purchased  the  Manor  of 
Clerbeck.  Both  the  manors  being  vested  in  the  family  of  Daniels  they 
built  the  mansion  called  Acton  Place,  which  was  erected  on  the  site  of  the 
old  mansion  of  the  Clerbecks.  The  manor  devolved  with  the  Manor  of 
Clerbeck  to  Francis  Daniel,  who  married  Margaret  daughter  of  Roger 
Martyn  of  Long  Melford  and  left  a  son  John  Daniel,  who  inherited  the 
property  and  married  1st  Katharine  and  2ndly  Elizabeth  daughter  of  Sir 
Edward  Waldegrave  Knt.  of  Stansgate.  A  licence  for  this  John  Daniel  to 
alienate  (no  doubt  by  way  of  settlement)  the  manors  of  Rokwodes  and 
Clerbeck  in  1628  will  be  found  amongst  the  Sloane  MSS.  in  the  British 
Museum.7  John  Daniel  died  in  1638,  and  was  succeeded  by  his  son  and 
heir  Charles  Daniel  who  married  Mary  daughter  of  Edward  Standish  of 
Standish,  and  was  buried  at  Acton  the  12  April  1658.  He  or  his  son  and 
heir  John  Daniell  who  had  no  issue  sold  the  manors  to  Robert  Jennens 
Aide-de-camp  to  the  great  Duke  of  Marlborough  and  grandson  of  Humphrey 
Jennens  of  Erdington  Hall  co.  Warwick,  who  had  amassed  an  enormous 
fortune  as  an  ironmaster  in  Birmingham.  Robert  Jennens  married  Anne 
daughter  and  heir  of  Carew  Guidott  a  lineal  descendant  of  Sir  Anthony 
Guidott  Knt.  a  noble  Florentine  employed  on  several  embassies  by  Edw.  VI. 
He  died  in  1725-6,  and  was  buried  in  Acton  Ch.  with  the  following 
inscription : — 

To   the    Memory   of 

Robert  Jennens  of  Acton  Place  in  the  County  of  Suffolk  Esqr.  fourth 
son  of  Humphrey  Jennens  Esqr.  of  Worwickshire  who  died  the  sth  of 
February  i?2f  in  the  54th  year  of  his  age  leaving  only  one  son  William 
Jennens  by  Anne  his  wife  only  daughter  and  heiress  of  Carew  Guidott  of 
Hampshire  Esqr.  He  purchased  the  Estate  and  began  the  House.  This 
monument  was  erected  by  his  wife  who  also  built  this  Chapel.  She  died 
the  24th  December  1761  aged  85  and  is  deposited  in  the  family  vault  under 
the  Chancel  adjoining  to  this  Chapel  with  the  remains  of  her  said  husband. 

1  Pat.   Rolls,    10     Edw.    II.   pt.    ii.    26.  '  I.P.M.,  15  Rich.  II.  pt.  i.  56. 

Originalia,  10  Edw.  II.  15,  I.Q.D.,  '  I.P.M.,  10  Hen.  V.  7. 

9  Edw.  II.  74.  5  Pat.  Rolls,  2  Hen.  VI.  pt.  i.  32. 

1  I.P.M.,  27  Edw.  III.  31,    160  acres  of  6  I.P.M.,  13  Hen.  VI.  27. 

Honor  of  Peverell.  '  Slo.  xxxii.  59,  Add.  106. 


xt  THE    MANORS    OF    SUFFOLK. 

Robert  Jennens  was  succeeded  by  his  only  son  William  Jennens  for  whom 
William  III.  stood  sponsor,  and  who  was  in  his  youth  page  to  George  1. 
\\  ilham  Jcnnm-  In  <•<!  and  died  a  bachelor— being  reckoned  to  be  the  richest 
commoner  in  England.  He  was  the  last  annuitant  of  the  Exchequer  tontine  of 
£100  share  for  which  he  received  £3,000  a  year  for  a  lengthy  period.  In  his 
safe  were  found  at  his  death  £19,000,  and  at  his  bankers  he  kept  £50,000. 
s  funded  property  amounted  to  £796,554,  and  he  had  an  estate  bringing 
in  £8,000  a  year.  A  will  was  found  in  his  coat  pocket,  but  unsigned,  owing, 
as  his  servant  said,  t<>  hi-  having  forgotten  his  spectacles  at  home  when 
he  went  to  his  solicitor  for  the  purpose  of  executing  it.  He  died  at  Acton 
the  19  June  1798  at  the  ace  of  97. 

\Vm.  Jennens's  own  aunt  was  mother  to  William 

Hanmer  of  the  Fenns,  who  married  his  first  cousin  Miss  Jennens  of  Gopsal 
bv  whom  he  had  a  daughter  Hester  who  married  Assheton  Curzon  afterwards 
Viscount  Curzon  by  whom  she  had  a  son  the  Hon.  Penn  Assheton  Curzon,  who 
married  Sophia  Charlotte,  Baroness  Howe,  and  died  the  i  Sept.  1797,  leaving 
George  Augustus  W illiam  Curzon,  heir-at-law  to  all  the  real  estate  of  William 
Jennens.  He  died  the  6  Jan.  1805,  when  his  brother  Richard  William  Penn 
Curzon  inherited  these  manors.  He  married  ist  Harriett  Georgiana  Brude- 
nell,  2nd  daughter  of  Robert  6th  Earl  of  Cardigan,  and  had  issue  George 
Augustus  Frederick  Louis  and  Richard  William  Penn  and  other 
children.  The  eldest  son  succeeded  as  2nd  Earl  Howe  on  the  death  of 
hi-  fatlu-r  the  12  May  1870,  and  married  Harriet  Mary  daughter  of  Henry  C. 
Sturt,  and  had  a  daughter  Harriet  Alice.  The  2nd  Earl  Howe  died  in 
1876,  and  was  succeeded  by  his  brother  Richard  William  Penn  Curzon- 
HOWI-,  3rd  Earl  Howe,  who  married  in  1858  Isabella  Katherine  eldest 
daughter  of  Major-General  the  Hon.  George  Anson.  He  died  in  1903  and 
was  succeeded  by  his  eldest  son  Richard  George  Penn  Curzon-Howe  4th 
Earl  Howe  and  the  present  holder  of  these  manors.  The  magnificent  house 
originally  designed  for  Acton  Place  was  never  completed. 

Anns  of  Daniel :  Arg.  a  pale  fusiles  sa.— of  Jennens  :  Arg.  a  chevron 
sable  between  3  plummets  of  the  second  rimmed  Or — Howe,  Quarterly,  ist 
and  4th  Or,  a  fesse  between  three  wolves'  heads,  erased,  sa.  for  Howe ;  2nd 
and  3rd  Arg.,  on  a  bend,  sa.,  three  popinjays,  or,  beaked  and  legged,  gu., 
for  Curson. 

LEYS   MANOR. 

In  the  time  of  Edward  I.  we  meet  with  a  small  manor  in  Acton 
called  Leys  (or  Leyes  called  after  a  family  here  in  the  time  of  Edw. 
II.),  which  by  the  time  of  Henry  VI.  became  joined  with  the  Manor 
of  Rokewodes.  In  1296  this  manor  belonged  to  Alice  daughter  and  co-heir 
of  Robert  de  Clerbeck,  who  married  Geoffrey  de  Leyes.  He  was  lord  in 
his  wife's  right,  and  on  his  death,  for  by  some  accounts  he  seems  to  have 
died  in  her  lifetime,  the  manor  passed  to  his  widow.  She  died  in  1312' 
and  was  succeeded  by  her  son  and  heir  Robert  de  Leyes.  On  Robert  de 
Leyes's  death  Anne  his  widow  succeeded  and  she  was  followed  by  her 
only  daughter  Beatrix,*  married  to  Stephen  Bacon.  The  manor  seems  in 
the  time  of  Hen.  VI.  to  have  belonged  to  Richard  Waldegrave,  and  was 
;bsequently  acquired  by  the  Rokewoods,  for  William  Rokewood  died 
seised  of  it  in  1422,  when  it  passed  to  his  son  and  heir  John.3  He  was 
followed  by  Sir  Richard  Waldegrave  Knt.,  who  died  the  2  May  1434,* 

I  r  M..  5  Edw.  II.  59.  i. p.M.  10  Hen.  V.  7.  • 

•  I.P.M.,  13  Hen.  VI.  a. .  «  I.P.M.  13  Hen.  VI.  27. 


ACTON.  13 

and  was  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir  Sir  William  Waldegrave  and  he 
by  his  eldest  son  Sir  Richard  who  died  in  1439  without  issue.  The 
devolution  is  subsequently  identical  with  the  Manor  of  Rokewodes. 

TALEMACH   MANOR. 

The  Manor  of  Talemach  early  lost  its  identity,  for  we  learn  nothing  of 
it  after  1329,  though  as  a  "  place  called  Talmages  in  Acton  Manor  "  we 
meet  with  it  in  the  Inquis.  p.m.  of  Henry  Bures  in  20  Hen.  VIII.  There 
were  five  lords  practically  in  succession  of  the  name  of  Hugh  Talemach.  The 
first  was  lord  in  1213,  the  2nd  in  1220,  the  3rd  died  in  1297,'  the  4th  Hugh 
was  succeeded  by  his  widow  Illaria  who  died  in  1301,  and  the  5th  Hugh  was 
seised  with  his  wife  Katherine  and  died  in  1311, *  being  succeeded  by  his  son 
and  heir  John.  The  successor  of  this  John  Talemach  was  another  Hugh  Tale- 
mach, but  it  does  not  appear  that  lie  was  seised  of  more  than  a  fourth  of 
the  manor.  An  action  was  brought  by  Peter  de  Ryngesale  and  Margaret 
his  wife  against  Hugh  son  of  William  Talemathie  claiming  a  third  part  of  this 
Manor  in  1272 .3 

A  "  Talmaghe  Manor  "  is  included  in  the  Inquis.  p.m.  of  Sir  Robert 
Broughton,  who  died  the  17  Aug.  21  Hen.  VII.  [1505]  leaving  John  his 
son  and  heir4  and  a  "Talmages  Manor"  in  that  of  Robert  Drury  who  died 
the  2  March  26  Hen.  VIII.  [1534]  leaving  Sir  Wm.  Drury  his  son  and 
heir.5 


i 


v  ) 


ACTOK    PLACE. 


1  Extent.     I.P.M.  25  Edw.  I.  16. 

3  Benetteley  Manor,  I.Q.D.,  4  Edw.  II.  59. 

3  Abbr.  of  Pleas  56  and  57  Hen.  III.  8. 


«  I.P.M.  22  Hen.  VII.  I. 
s  I.P.M.  27  Hen.  VIII.  24. 


THE    MANORS    OF    SUFFOLK. 

ALPHETON   MANOR 

LONGED  in  the  time  of  King  John  to  Walter  de  Bernham 
who  had  a  grant  of  free  warren  here.1  There  was  an  action 
as  to  the  title  to  the  ndvowson  between  this  Walter  de 
Bernham  and  the  Abbot  of  Albemarle  in  which  the  latter 
pleaded  a  grant  of  Count  Stephen  de  Albemarle  and  con- 
firmation of  Count  William  his  son  and  vouched  to 
warrant  Count  Baldwin  who  married  the  heiress  of  the 
said  Count.'  He  was  dead  before  1231,  for  we  find  from  the  Close 
Rolls  that  an  order  was  given  to  the  Sheriff  not  to  allow  Robert  de  Sancto 
Albano  to  distrain  on  this  manor,  he  having  in  his  custody  the  son  and  heir 
of  Walter  de  Bernham,  for  the  debt  of  a  certain  Jew.3  The  infant  was 
another  Walter,  as  we  learn  from  a  fine  in  which  Walter  de  Thurkelby  was 
plaintiff  and  Walter  de  Bernham  deforceant  respecting  the  manor  and 
advowson.4  This  Walter  was  still  holding  the  manor  in  1266,'  and  the 
following  entries  relating  to  the  manor  are  from  the  Feet  of  Fines  24  Edw. 
I.  23  [1296]  William  de  Mortuo  Mari  clerk  v.  John  de  Bernham  and  Mary 
his  wife  30  Edw.  I.  8  [1302]  Robert  de  St.  Quintino  v.  William  de  Mortuo 
Mari.  5  Edw.  II.  2  [1311]  John  de  Whelnitham  and  Alice  his  wife  v.  Geoffrey 
de  Ketlesberston  and  Nicholas  de  Whelnitham.  Davy  states  the  descent 
of  the  lordship  to  be  as  follows  : — 

9  Edw.  II.  [1316]  John  de  Whelnetham  living  1321.  William 
Inge  and  Isolda  his  wife  died  in  1321. 

15  Edw.  II.  [1322]  Joan  daughter  of  William  Inge  and  Margery 

his  wife  late  wife  of  Sir  Eudo  la  Zouch  Knt.  heir.  Sir  John 

de  Whelnetham  son  and  heir  of  John  died  in  1365.  Margaret 

daughter  and  heir  of  John  de  Whelnetham  died  in  1384. 
She  married  Sir  John  de  Brokesborn. 

John  de  Welnetham  had  free  warren  here  in  1318.'  It  would  appear 
that  on  the  death  of  John  Whelnetham  the  manor  passed  to  his  son  Sir 
John,  and  on  his  death  passed  to  Margaret  his  daughter  and  heir  who  was 
married  to  Sir  John  de  Brokesbourn  Knt.  who  died  in  1383  and  was 
succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir  Edmund  de  Brokesbourn.  His 
only  daughter  and  heir  Eleanor  married  Sir  William  Raynforth 
and  carried  the  manor  into  that  family.7  Sir  William  Raynforth 
died  in  1434,  and  the  manor  passed  to  Sir  Lawrence  Raynforth  Knt. 
his  son  and  heir,  who  was  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir  Sir 
John  Raynforth  and  he  by  his  son  and  heir  Sir  John  Raynforth  who 
died  without  issue.  The  next  lord  was  Edward  Latimer  of  Freston,  who 
died  the  20  May  1541,"  and  was  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir  Christopher 
Latimer,  against  whom  in  1563  a  fine  of  the  manor  was  levied  by  Edmund 
Bookynge.9  On  the  death  of  Christopher  Latimer  the  manor  seems  to  have 
passed  to  his  daughter  and  heir  Anne.  Sir  Roger  Martin  Kt.  of  Long 
Melford  son  of  Richard  Martin  by  Eleanor  his  ist  wife  dau.  of  Francis 
Mannock  of  Giffard's  Hall  in  Stoke  by  Nayland  was  the  next  lord.  He  died 
in  1556  and  was  buried  at  Long  Melford  on  the  5th  Oct.  that  year  according 

1  See  Fine  i  John  14,  6  John  20  ~and        '  The  manor  is  mentioned  in  an  Inquis. 

Abbr.  of  Pleas  6  John.  p.m   of  Margeria  wife  of  Sir  John 

Abbr.  of  Pleas  de  Banco,  t.  John  in  dorso.  de  Sutton  in  1738.    I.P.M.  8  Rich. 

OOM  Rolls,  15  Hen.  III.  m.  9.  II.  33. 

Feet  of  Fines.  35  Hen.  III.  88.  "  I.P.M.  33  Hen.  VIII. 

H.K.  ii.  143,  153.  .  Fine  Easter  5  Eliz. 
Chart.  Rolls,  12  Edw.  II.  88, 


ALPHETON.  15 

to  the  Registers,  though  he  is  usually  stated  to  have  died  in  1657.  From 
this  time  to  the  time  of  Sir  Roger  Martin  created  a  baronet  the  19  Car.  II. 
the  manor  devolved  in  the  same  course  as  the  Manor  of  Stanstead  or  Over- 
hall  in  Stanstead  in  this  Hundred.  Sir  Roger  Martin  sold  the  manor 
to  Houblon  of  London  whose  daughter  married  John  Littell  or  Little. 
Mrs.  Little  was  lady  of  the  manor  in  1764,  and  was  succeeded  by  her  son 
and  heir  George  Saubridge  Littel  whose  daughter  and  heir  Elizabeth 
married  Sir  Robert  Clarke  of  Freckenham  Bart.  The  manor  was  devised 
after  their  death  and  the  death  of  their  son  to  Nathaniel  Barnardiston  of  the 
Ryes  Sudbury  only  son  of  John  Barnardiston  by  Anne  his  wife  dau.  of 
Edward  Leeds  of  Croxton  Park  co.  Cambridge  Serjeant-at-law. 
Sir  Robert  Clarke  died  in  1770,  and  his  lady  in  1797,  surviving  her  son 
Sir  John  Clarke  Bart,  who  had  died  in  1782.  Nathaniel  Barnar- 
diston married  in  1783  Elizabeth  Joanna  only  child  of  John  Styles  of 
Kingston,  Surrey,  and  dying  the  23  Dec.  1837  the  manor  passed  to  his 
son  Nathaniel  Clarke  Barnardiston  who  married  the  i  March  1826  Sophia 
dau.  of  George  Robert  Eyres  of  Cavenham  House  co.  Norfolk  by  Louisa 
his  wife  dau.  of  Sir  Harry  Parker,  Bart.,  of  Melford,  and  on  his  death  in  1883 
passed  to  Col.  Nathaniel  Barnardiston  his  s.  and  h.  the  present  lord,  who 
in  Feb.  1858  married  Lady  Florence  Legge  dau.  of  Wm.  4th  Earl  of  Dart- 
mouth. Nathaniel  Walter  Barnardiston  his  eldest  son  and  heir-apparent 
in  1892  married  Sarah  Hall  3rd  dau.  of  D.  R.  Floyd-Jones  of  Fort  Neck 
House,  Long  Island,  formerly  Lieut. -Governor  of  New  York. 

Arms  of  Martin  :    Argent,  a  Chevron  between   three   mascles    sable, 
within  a  bordure  engrailed  gu. 


Z6  THE    MANORS   OF   SUFFOLK. 

ASSINGTON. 

the  time  of  the  Confessor  8  carucates  of  land  were  held 
here  as  a  manor  by  Seward  of  Maiden  the  Thane,  and  he 
had  soc  and  sac.  There  were  then  21  bordars,  14  slaves, 
7  ploughteams  in  demesne,  13  ploughteams  belonging  to 
the  men,  wood  for  30  hogs,  15  acres  of  meadow,  i  mill, 
6  horses  at  the  Hall,  24  beasts,  100  hogs,  210  sheep,  and  14 
hives  of  bees— and  there  was  a  church  living  with  30  acres  of 
free  land.  By  the  time  of  the  Norman  Survey  the  bordars  had  increased  to 
55,  but  the  slaves  had  diminished  by  two,  the  ploughteams  in  demesne  had 
come  down  one,  and  those  belonging  to  the  men  also  by  one.  There 
were  5  horses  at  the  Hall  in  lieu  of  6,  one  beast  less,  40  hogs  and  120  sheep 
less,  while  the  hives  of  bees  had  come  down  from  14  to  6.  There  were, 
however,  12  goats  additional.  The  manor  was  then  held  by  Ranulf 

Peverell.'' 

There  were  also  in  Assington  five  freemen  under  the  same  Seward  by 
commendation  and  soc,  but  they  could  sell  their  lands  provided  they 
remained  within  the  soc ;  and  among  them  they  had  30  acres  of  land, 
i  acre  of  meadow  and  I  ploughteam.  There  was  another  freeman  here, 
free  so  far  as  his  land  was  concerned,  but  not  belonging  to  the  manor,  of 
which  Ranulf  s  predecessor  in  title  had  commendation  and  soc.  He  held 
30  acres,  and  had  one  ploughteam  which  was  in  Saxon  times  valued  at 
10  pounds,  later  at  12,  but  by  Domesday  times  at  20  pounds.  The  Great 
Record,  however,  notes  that  it  could  not  render  within  100  shillings  of 
that  amount.  Of  the  20  pounds,  20  shillings  were  set  on  the  free  men. 
The  place  was  a  league  long  and  8  quarentines  broad  and  paid  yd.  in  a 
gelt.' 

ASSINGTON  MANOR. 

The  manor  belonged,  as  we  have  seen,  at  the  time  of  the  Domesday 
Survey  to  Ranulf  Peverell.  He  had  married  Maud,  a  Saxon,  daughter 
of  Ingelric  and  mother  of  William  Peverell  by  William  the  Conqueror. 
Dugdale  says  Ranulf  Peverell  was  the  reputed  progenitor  of  the  several 
families  of  the  name  of  Peverell.  Ranulf  was  succeeded  by  his  son 
Matthew  Peverell,  who  married  Oliva  and  was  succeeded  by  his  son  and 
heir  William  Peverell  who  held  the  manor  in  the  time  of  Hen.  I.  when  it 
passed  with  the  Honor  of  Peverell  into  the  King's  hands.5  He  gave  the 
manor  to  William  Lungespeye,  who  gave  the  same  to  Robert  de  Buiffuns  ; 
but  by  the  time  of  King  John  it  had  returned  to  that  monarch,  who  gave 
the  manor  to  Andrew  de  Bello  Campo,  whose  son  John  de  Bello  Campo 
held  the  same  in  the  time  of  Hen.  III.  There  is  an  order  on  the  Close 
Rolls  in  1225  to  take  into  the  hands  of  the  King  the  lands  which  John  de 
Bello  Campo  had  in  Assington  and  to  give  seisin  to  Roger  de  Clare.4  It 
appears,  however,  that  in  1275  the  manor  was  held  by  Arnold  de 
Boys  or  de  Bosco,5  who  on  his  death  in  1277*  was  succeeded  by  William 
de  Bosco.  In  1296  William  de  Bosco  enfeoffed  Millicent  de  Monto 
Alto  of  a  moiety  of  the  manor  in  order  that  she  might  grant  the 
same  to  the  said  William  de  Bosco  for  life,  and  then  to  William  la 
Zusche  and  Matilda  his  wife  and  the  heirs  of  their  bodies  with  remainder 

Dom.  ii.  417.  5  n.R.  ii.  142,150.  He  had  free  warren  here. 

Dom.  ii.  417.  lb.  143. 

'  Madox,  Bar.  Angl.  p.  62.  •  I. P.M.  5  Edw.  I.  o. 
•  OOM  Rolls,  9  Hen.  III.  pt.  i.  12,  8. 


I 

55 

t/3 


ASSINGTON.  17 

to  the  right  heirs  of  Matilda.1  The  other  half  of  the  manor  was 
held  by  Roger  Corbet  of  Hadleigh,  who  had  married  Joan  daughter  of 
Arnold  and  sister  of  William  de  Bosco.2  He  had  acquired  this  moiety  of 
William  de  Bosco  without  licence  of  the  King,  for  which  act  he  subsequently 
received  a  pardon.3  Roger  Corbet  seems  ultimately  to  have  acquired 
the  whole,  and  on  his  death  was  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir  John  Corbet, 
on  whose  death  it  passed  in  dower  to  his  widow  Agnes,  who  dying  in  I3534 
it  passed  to  Sir  Robert  Corbet  Knt.  their  son  and  heir,  and  on  the  Origi- 
nalia  Rolls  will  be  found  an  order  to  accept  security  from  Robert  Corbet 
son  and  heir  of  John  Corbet  deceased  for  relief  in  respect  of  this  manor 
held  of  the  King  in  chief  as  of  the  Honor  of  Hatfield  Peverell.5  Sir  Robert 
Corbet  married  Beatrix  daur.  of  Sir  Richard  de  la  River  and  sister  and 
co-heir  of  Sir  Thomas  de  la  River.  He  died  in  1405,*  and  was  succeeded  by 
his  son  and  heir  Sir  Robert  Corbet  Knt.  then  aged  40.  He  bore  Two 
barrulets  and  on  a  canton  a  lion  passant.  He  died  in  1417'  when  a  portion 
of  the  manor  passed  to  his  widow  Joan,8  and  ultimately  the  whole  on  the 
death  of  Joan  in  1420,  to  his  daughter  and  heir  Sibilla  the  wife  of  John 
Grevell  who  dying  in  1426'  the  manor  passed  to  her  uncle  Guy  Corbet  the 
brother  of  the  last-named  Sir  Robert  Corbet.  A  fine  was  in  1433 
levied  of  the  manor  by  John  Creswell  clerk  and  Thomas  Isaak  against  Guy 
Corbet  and  Joan  his  wife  who  was  daughter  of  Sir  Edmund  Thorp  the 
elder  of  Ashwell  Thorp.10  Guy  Corbet  made  his  Will  in  1433  and  died 
the  same  year,  leaving  his  widow  Joan  and  a  son  afterwards  Sir  Robert 
Corbet.  The  widow  Joan  who  held  in  dower  died  in  1439"  when  Sir  Robert 
Corbet  succeeded.  He  married  Elizabeth  dau.  of  —  Dorward  of  Rocking 
in  Essex,  and  died  in  1478,"  being  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir  Robert 
Corbet.  He  married  Maud  daughter  of  Sir  John  Fortescue,  and  married 
also  (during  the  said  Maud  his  first  wife's  lifetime,  forsaking  her)  Lettice 
daughter  of  John  Shirewood  of  Coventry  and  left  issue  by  her  Robert  and 
Alice,  his  first  wife  Maud  surviving  him,  from  whom  he  never  was  divorced. 
Upon  the  death  of  Robert  Corbet,  his  brother  Roger  Corbet  2nd  son  of  Sir 
Robert  Corbet  made  an  entry  upon  the  lands  as  next  and  legal  heir  on 
the  ground  of  the  illegitimacy  of  his  brother's  children,  Lettice  the  2nd 
wife  having  married  -  -  Talboys  a  servant  to  Thomas  Rotherham,  Arch- 
bishop of  York  and  Chancellor  of  England,  Roger  sued  him  in  the  Spiritual 
Court  of  Canterbury,  and  Talboys  procuring  a  prohibition,  Roger  appealed 
to  Rome,  and  a  writ  was  directed  by  Rotherham  to  Roger  of  Ne  exeat  regnum; 
upon  which  Roger  was  laid  up  in  the  counter  two  years,  but  being  enlarged 
in  the  last  year  of  King  Edw.  IV.  died  shortly  afterwards.  It  appears 
that  Maud  retired  into  the  nunnery  of  Helleaston  in  Bedfordshire  and 
there  died.  The  son  Robert  Corbet  does  seem  ultimately  to  have  held 
the  manor,'3  and  to  have  been  succeeded  by  Richard  Corbet  who  died  the 
25  June,  1524'*  leaving  a  widow  Jane  who  held  the  manor  for  life  in  dower, 
and  a  son  and  heir  Richard  Corbet  who  succeeded.  The  Davy  MSS.  state 
that  this  Richard  Corbet  sold  to  William  Hunberstone  as  a  trustee  probably 
for  Robert  Gurdon  ;  while  Page  and  Muskett  both  state  that  Sir  Myles 

1  Pat.  Rolls  24  Edw.  1. 17.  "  I.P.M.  7  Hen.  V.  41,  8  Hen.  V.  44. 

*  I.Q.D.  6  Edw.  II.  9.  »  I.P.M.  4  Hen.  VI.  33. 

3  Originalia  6   Edw.    II.    16,  Pat.    Rolls         ">  Feet  of  Fines  ii  Hen.  VI.  32. 

6  Edw.  II.  pt.  ii.  10.  "  I.P.M.  17  Hen.  VI.  24. 

«    I.P.M.  30  Edw.  III.  15.  "  I.P.M.  18  Edw.  IV.  19. 

'   0.  30  Edw.  III.  4.  «  Inquis.  p.m.  I  and  2  Hen.  VIII.,  D.K.R 

6   I.P.M.  6  Hen.  IV.  6.  10,  App.  ii.  p.  lai. 

I.P.M.  5  Hen.  V.  34.  •<  I.P.M.  16  Hen.  VIII.  31,  33. 

c 


18  THE    MANORS  OF  SUFFOLK. 

Corbet  sold  to  Robert  Gurdon  son  of  John  Gurdon  of  Oldham,  Essex. 
There  are  fines  in  1555  and  1556,  the  first  by  William  Humberstone 
against  Richard  Corbett  and  others  and  the  second  by  John 
Gurdon  and  others  against  Sir  Richard  Corbett.1  There  is  a 
Chancery  action  in  the  time  of  Elizabeth  between  Robert  Gurdon 
and  Sir  Richard  Corbet  and  another  as  to  this  manor  and  the  Manors 
of  Shimplingford  and  Series.'  In  1559  John  and  Robert  Gurdon  were 
called  upon  to  shew  title  to  the  manor.'  Robert  Gurdon  was  High  Sheriff 
of  Suffolk.  He  married  Rose  Sexton  6th  daughter  of  Robert  Sexton 
of  Lavenham  and  co-heir  of  her  brother  Thomas  Sexton  and  widow  of 
William  Appleton  of  Little  Waldingfield,  and  died  the  5  April  1578  in 
his  6yd  year.4  He  left  two  sons  John  and  Robert  and  one  dau.  Elizabeth 
and  was  succeeded  by  his  son  John  Gurdon  who  was  High  Sheriff  of  Suffolk 
in  1584  and  married  Amicia  sole  daughter  and  heir  of  William  Brampton 
of  Letton  co.  Norfolk  and  died  the  20  Sept.  1623.'  John  Gurdon  was 
succeeded  by  his  son  Brampton  Gurdon,  High  Sheriff  of  Suffolk  in  1628 
who  married  ist  Elizabeth  daughter  of  Edw.  Barret  of  Belhouse  in  the 
parish  of  Alvelev  co.  Essex  and  co-heir  of  her  mother  who  was  a  daughter 
and  co-heir  of  Sir  Thomas  Litton  Knt.  and  andly  Meriell  dau.  of  Martin 
Sedley  of  Morley  co.  Norf.6  Brampton  Gurdon's  Will  is  dated  1647.* 
He  had  by  his  wife  Elizabeth  6  sons,  John,  Robert,  Brampton,  William, 
Edward,  William,  and  3  daurs.  Elizabeth,  Amy  and  Judith. 
Robert  married  Joyce  dau.  of  James  Harvey  of  Essex  and  Amy  married 
Sir  Henry  Mildmay  of  Grace's  in  Essex,  Knt.  By  his  2nd  wife  Meriell  he 
had  four  sons  :  Brampton,  Thomas,  Edward,  Martin,  and  3  daurs.  Abigail, 
Meriell  and  Amye.  Brampton  married  Mary  dau.  of  Henry  Foisted 
Citizen  and  Mercer  of  London.  Abigail  married  Roger  Hill  of  Pounsford 
co.  Somerset,  and  Muriel  married  Richard  Saltonstall  son  of  Sir  Richard 
Saltonstall  of  Yorkshire,  Knt. 

Brampton  Gurdon  was  succeeded  by  his  son  John  Gurdon  who 
married  Ann  daughter  of  Sir  Calthorp  Parker  of  Erwarton,  Knt.  He 
was  M.P.  for  Suffolk  in  the  Long  Parliament.8  There  is  a  request 
among  the  State  papers  for  a  licence  for  the  Hall  by  this  John  Gurdon 
in  i&72.9  He  made  his  will  the  25  June  1677  and  died  in  1679 
at  the  age  of  84,  having  had  7  sons  and  5  daughters,10  and  was  succeeded 
by  his  son  Robert  Gurdon  who  married  Elizabeth  daur.  of  Lord  Lysle ; 
but  dying  the  24  May  1683  aged  68  years  and  4  months,  without  issue, 
was  succeeded  by  his  brother  the  Rev.  Nathaniel  Gurdon  D.D.,  Rector  of 
Chelmsford,  who  married  Elizabeth  daughter  of  the  Rev.  Emanuel  Arundel 
of  Stoke  Beven  co.  Northampton,  and  dying  the  n  February  1696  in  the 
64  year  of  his  age,"  was  buried  in  Assington  Church  where  there  is  a 
mural  tablet  at  the  east  end  of  the  Chancel.  He  had  two  sons  and  four 
daughters  and  was  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir  John  Gurdon  M.P.  for 

•  Fine  Easter  2  Mary  i,  Mich.  3  Mary  i.  »  P.C.C.  68  Pembroke  the   19  Oct.  1647. 

•  C.P.  »er.  ii.  B.  Ixx.  14.  Proved  16  May  1650. 
'  i  Eliz.  Memoranda  Hil.  Rec.  Rot.  79.  •  D.N.B.  xxiii.  353. 

•  Will.  3  Apl.  1578,  P.C.C.  10  Bakon,  •  S.P.  1672  p.  410. 

I.P.M.  21  Eli*  .Will.     See  Muskett         ">  Will  P.C.C.   129    King.    Proved  the  4 

Manorial  Families  i.  278.  Oct.  1679. 

'  Will   P.C.C.   99  Swann  6    Dec.    1621.         "  Will  P.C.C.  72  Lort.    Proved  20  March 

Proved  10  Oct.  1623.  1698. 

'  Blomefield,  Norf.  2nd  Ed. vol.  ii.  479-482, 

x.  232.  See  Gent.  Mag.  Supplt.  Diet. 

1814, 


ASSINGTON.  19 

Sudbury  who  married  Letitia  daughter  and  co-heir  of  Sir  William  Cooke 
of  Broom  Hall,  Norfolk,  Bart.,  and  died  the  2  Dec.  1758  in  his  86  year.1 
His  wife  had  died  the  7  Feb.  1710  in  her  37th  year.  John  Gurdon  had 
issue  ten  children  Jane,  Nathaniel,  John,  Elizabeth,  William,  Letitia,  Philip, 
Brampton,  Parker  and  Letitia  respecting  whom  a  mural  monument  on  the 
north  side  of  the  Ch.  of  Assington  briefly  records  "  Their  Bodies  are  buried 
in  Peace,  but  their  name  liveth  for  evermore." 

John  Gurdon  was  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir  Nathaniel  Gurdon 
who  married  Elizabeth  daughter  of  John  Sayer  of  Stowmarket.  He 
died  in  1767  and  was  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir  John  Gurdon 
who  died  unmarried  in  1777,*  when  the  manor  passed  to  the  Rev. 
Philip  Gurdon  his  first  cousin,  the  son  of  the  Rev.  Philip  Gurdon 
4th  son  of  John  Gurdon  who  died  in  1758.  Philip  Gurdon  married 
Sarah  Richardson  and  died  in  1817,  when  the  manor  passed  to 
his  son  and  heir  John  Gurdon  who  died  in  1869.  He  married 
ist  Bridget  Aurea  daughter  of  William  Lambarde  of  Beechmont,  Sevenoaks, 
and  2ndly  Anne  daughter  of  Colonel  Chas.  Powell  Leslie  of  Glaslough  co. 
Monogham  M.P.  and  was  succeeded  by  his  grandson  the  eldest  son  of 
his  eldest  son  John  Barrett  Gurdon  (who  d.  in  1863)  by  Sophia  Catherine 
dau.  of  Charles  Douglas  Halford  of  West  Lodge,  East  Bergholt.  Philip 
Gurdon  married  Edith  3rd  dau.  of  the  Rev.  Charles  Holland,  Rector  of  Pet- 
worth.  By  arrangement  made  in  1897  between  the  said  Philip  Gurdon 
and  his  seventh  cousin  Sir  William  Brampton  Gurdon  K.C.M.G.,  C.B.,  M.P., 
J.P.  of  Assington  Hall  younger  son  of  Brampton  Gurdon  M.P.  of  Letton 
Norf.  by  the  Hon.  Henrietta  Susannah  dau.  of  Nicholas  late  Lord  Colborne, 
the  manor  and  the  Assington  estates  of  the  Gurdons  were  acquired  by  the 
said  Sir  William  Brampton  Gurdon  who  is  the  present  lord.  In  1888  he 
married  Lady  Eveline  Camilla  2nd  dau.  of  the  5th  Earl  of  Portsmouth. 

Court  Rolls  of  the  Manor  31  Hen.  VI.  will  be  found  in  the  Record 
Office.1 

LEVENYA  STRATTONS  MANOR. 

Another  manor  of  Assington  known  as  Levenya  Strattons  was  held 
by  Godfrey  de  Bellomonte4  who  died  without  issue  in  1293  and  was 
succeeded  by  his  brother  Sir  John  de  Bellomonte  and  he  by  his  son  Richard 
de  Bellomonte.  In  1343  William  de  Criketot  was  lord  and  a  fine  was 
levied  in  1413  by  William  Loveney  and  Margaret  his  wife  against  Thomas 
Shopage,  Thomas  Maydeston  of  Isleworth,  John  Parleman  clerk,  Thomas 
Warner  of  Trimley  and  John  Bacheler  of  Heston.5  The  manor  subse- 
quently passed  to  the  Waldegraves.6  Sir  Richard  Waldegrave  Knt.  died 
seised  the  2  May  1434,  and  was  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir  Sir  William, 
and  he,  by  his  son  and  heir  Sir  Richard  Waldegrave  who  dying  without 
issue  in  1439  the  manor  passed  to  his  brother  Sir  Thomas  who  died 
in  1500  and  was  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir  Sir  William  Waldegrave 
who  dying  the  30  January  1527  the  manor  passed  to  his  son  and  heir  George 
Waldegrave  who  died  the  following  year.  Hugh  Waldegrave  seems  to 
have  died  seised  the  25  March  1543,  and  to  have  been  succeeded  by  his 
son  and  heir  Edward  Waldegrave.7  In  1546  this  manor  belonged  to 

1    Will  P.C.C.    55    Arran    21  Feb.  1752.  *   Feet  of  Fines  i  Hen.  VI. 

Proved  1759.  6  As  to  the  full  descendants  of  the  Walde- 

'    Will  15  Sept.  1777,  465  Collier  P.C.C.  graves     and     their     marriages,     see 

3  Portfolio  203,  2.  Smallbridge  Manor,  Bures,     in    this 

4  See     further    Groton    Manor    in     this  Hundred. 

Hundred.  '    I.P.M.,  35  Hen.  VIII.  174. 


ao  THE  MANORS  OF  SUFFOLK. 

Robert  Gurdon  by  virtue  of  a  fine  levied  this  year  by  him  against  Edward 
Weldon.1  Two  years  later  the  manor  passed  from  the  said  Robert  Gurdon 
to  Richard  Corbett.1  In  1552  a  fine  of  the  manor  was  levied  by  Robert 
Spencer  against  Sir  Richard  Corbett,'  and  in  1555  by  John  Gurdon  against 
Robert  Gurdon  and  others,4  after  which  the  manor  devolved  as  shewn 
in  the  descent  of  Assington  Manor. 

SHIMPLINGFORD. 

A  third  manor  in  Assington  was  known  as  the  Manor  of  Shimplingford, 
no  doubt  so  called  after  its  holder  in  the  time  of  Edw.  III.  though  of  course 
as  a  separate  manor  it  no  doubt  existed  from  the  time  of  Edw.  I.  at  least. 
Ralph  Shimplingford  died  seised  in  1376  when  the  manor  passed  to  his 
daughter  Margery  who  died  in  1416  when  it  passed  to  Margery's  heir  John 
son  of  John  Holland.  Later  this  manor  passed  to  the  Wiseman  family 
and  in  1518  a  fine  was  levied  of  it  by  Richard  Bp.  of  Norwich  against  Sir 
John  Wiseman  and  others.3  It  subsequently  became  vested  in  the  Corbets, 
and  Sir  Richard  Corbet  died  seised  of  it  the  25  June  1524  when  it  passed 
to  Richard  Corbet  his  son  and  heir  and  from  him  to  Robert  Gurdon  who 
died  in  1579,  after  which  the  devolution  is  the  same  as  that  already  shewn 
of  the  main  manor  of  Assington. 

AVELEY  OR  ALVINGLEY  MANOR. 

This  manor  in  Assington  was  held  in  Edward  the  Confessor's  day  by 
Brungar  a  freeman  under  Robert  by  commendation.  It  consisted  of  a 
carucate  of  land  with  soc.  There  was  one  villein  and  there  were  10  bor- 
dars,  2  ploughteams  in  demesne  and  half  a  ploughteam  belonging  to  the 
men,  wood  for  6  hogs  and  4  acres  of  meadow,  i  mill,  i  horse  at  the  Hall, 
and  at  the  time  of  the  Norman  Survey  14  beasts,  49  hogs  and  87  sheep. 
The  value  had  increased  from  20  shillings  to  30.  The  Domesday  tenant 
in  chief  was  Suane  of  Essex  the  son  of  Robert  son  of  Wimare.  This  Robert 
had  commendation  only.  The  Abbot  of  Bury  had  soc  and  sac  in  King 
Edward's  time  and  the  Domesday  survey  mentions  a  case  of  horses  being 
stolen  and  found  in  the  house  of  this  Brungar  and  that  the  Abbot  who  had 
the  soc  and  sac  and  Robert  the  father  of  Suane  who  had  commendation 
over  Brungar  came  to  the  plea  respecting  the  theft.  The  Record  quaintly 
adds  as  the  result  of  the  trial,  "  They  went  away  on  terms  of  friendship 
without  a  verdict  so  far  as  the  Hundred  could  see." 6  Grants  of  the  manor 
will  be  found,  one  without  date,  amongst  the  Additional  Charters,  and  one 
dated  1298,  amongst  the  Harleian  Charters  in  the  British  Museum.7 

Sir  Godfrey  de  Bellomonte  seems  to  have  been  lord  in  the  time  of 
Edw.  I.  and  died  in  1293.  The  manor  is  mentioned  and  an  extent  given 
in  the  Inquis.  p.m.  of  Cecilia  de  Ferariis  sometime  wife  of  Godfrey  de 
Bellomonte.*  Sir  John  de  Bellomonte  succeeded  his  brother  Sir  Godfrey 
as  lord  and  the  Davy  MSS.  make  a  Robert  Clopton  the  next  lord,  but  in 
what  right  is  not  stated.  The  next  lord  Davy  mentions  is  Thomas  la 
Zouch  who  died  in  1405  and  as  a  matter  of  fact  no  record  is  found  of  any 
intermediate  lord9  except  that  the  manor  is  the  subject  of  a  fine  in  1306 
between  William  Inge  and  William  Gernon  and  Isabella  his  wife.10  Thomas 

Fine  Easter  38  Hen.  VIII.  •  Dom.  ii.  4016. 

Fine  Easter  2  Edw.  VI.  »  Add.  Ch.  27334,  Harl.  45  I.  32,  33. 

Fine  Easter  6  Edw.  VI.  •  I. P.M.  21  Edw.  I.  49. 

Fine  Easter  2  Maryi.  •  I.P.M.  6  Hen.  IV.  17. 

Fine  Easter  10  Hen.  VIII.  "  Feet  of  Fines  34  Edw.  I.  2. 


ASSINGTON.  21 

la  Zouch  was  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir  William,  and  in  1462  we  meet 
with  a  fine  of  the  manor  levied  by  Robert  Gardenere  and  Margaret  Dunham 
against  John  Chaworth  and  Margaret  his  wife.1  Elizabeth  wife  of  Sir 
William  Chaworth  Knt.  was  lady  of  the  manor  in  the  time  of  Hen.  VII. 
and  died  in  1503*  when  she  was  succeeded  by  her  son  and  heir  Sir  John 
Dunham  who  died  the  9  May  I524,3  and  was  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir 
Sir  John  Dunham  Knt.  The  manor  was  then  valued  at  7  marks  p. a.  and  was 
held  of  the  Abbot  of  Bury.  In  1550  we  meet  with  a  fine  levied  of  the  manor 
by  Sir  Richard  Corbett  against  Thomas  Grantham  and  others 4 ;  in  1555  one 
levied  by  John  Wynterflood  against  Sir  Richard  Corbett5  and  others,  and  in 
1570  a  third  levied  by  John  Wynterflod  against  Sir  Edmund  Brudenell.6  In 
the  time  of  Elizabeth  we  meet  with  a  Chancery  suit  relating  to  this  manor 
between  the  said  Sir  Edmund  Brudenell  and  John  Winterfloyde.7  This 
John  Winterfloyde  or  Winterflood  in  1593  devised  to  the  poor  of  the  parish 
four  bushels  of  meslin  payable  out  of  the  Manor  of  Aveley  Hall  to  be 
distributed  in  bread  at  Christmas. 


Feet  of  Fines  2  Edw.  IV.  3.  *  Fine  Mich.  2  Mary  i< 

I.P.M.  18  Hen.  VII,  53.   "  '  Fine  Mich,  is  Eliz. 

I.P.M.  17  Hen.  VIII.  159.  ?  C.P.  ser.  ii.  B.  xxix.  I, 
Fine  Mich.  4  Edw.  VI. 


THE  MANORS  OF  SUFFOLK. 


BOXFORD  MANOR. 

OT  much  is  known  respecting  this  manor.  Godfrey  de 
Bellomonte  had  free  warren  here  in  1275,'  but  it  is  uncer- 
tain if  he  had  a  manor.  The  Abbot  of  St.  Edmunds 
presented  to  the  living  in  1316  and  not  unlikely  had  the 
manorial  rights.  The  manor  is  mentioned  in  the 
Inquisition  post  mortem  of  Sir  Richard  Corbet  who  died 
the  25  June  1524,  and  it  then  passed  to  Richard  Corbet  his 
son  and  heir.*  We  find,  however,  that  shortly  afterwards,  namely,  in 
1553,  it  was  granted  by  the  Crown  to  William  Lord  Howard.  In  1764 
it  was  in  the  King. 

PEYTON  HALL. 

Peyton  Hall  belonged  at  the  time  of  the  Norman  Survey  to  William  Malet 
and  passed  to  his  younger  brother  Walter  lord  of  Sibton.  He  was  succeeded 
by  Reginald  Fitz  Walter  his  2nd  son,  who  was  living  in  1135  and  appears 


I  m  -•••'•• 


to  have  assumed  the  name  of  Peyton.  He  held  both  Peyton  Hall  in  Box- 
ford  and  Peyton  Hall  in  Ramsholt  of  Hugh  de  Bigod  and  was  server 
to  Hugh  Bigod  and  Roger  Bigod  Earl  of  Suffolk.  William  de  Peyton  his 
eldest  son  held  lands  in  Boxford,  and  King  Stephen  granted  to  John  de 
Peyton  brother  of  this  William  all  his  lands  in  Peyton  to  hold  as  his  ancestors 
before  held  the  same. 

John  de  Peyton  had  4  sons  John  the  elder,  Robert,  Peter  and  John 
the  younger.  Robert  was  Lord  Justice  of  Ireland  in  the  time  of  Hen.  III. 
and  being  Lord  of  Ufford  assumed  his  surname  from  that  place.  His  son 
Robert  de  Ufford  was  created  Earl  of  Suffolk  in  1336,  and  installed  a  Knight 
of  the  Garter.  One  of  the  brothers  of  the  Earl  was  the  unfortunate  John 
Ufford  of  whom  Weever  tells  us  he  was  brought  up  at  Cambridge  and 
made  doctor  of  law,  "  promoted  first  to  the  deanery  of  Lincoln,  then  to  the 
Chancellorship  of  England  and  lastly  to  the  Archbishopric  of  Canterbury 
which  he  never  enjoyed,  being  cut  off  by  the  plague  (which  consumed  nine 
parts  of  the  men  in  England)  before  he  received  either  his  pall  or  consecra- 


•  Chart.  Rolls  8  Edw.  1. 5, 10  Edw.  1. 33. 


I.P.M.  16  Hen.  VIII.  31. 


BOXFORD.  23 

tion  June  7,  1348  and  lieth  obscurely  buried  in  that  Cathedral  Church."1 
The  3rd  son  Peter  de  Peyton  succeeded  to  the  lordship  of  Peyton  Hall  in 
the  time  of  King  John  and  married  Helena  by  whom  he  had  issue  Robert 
de  Peyton  father  of  Sir  John  de  Peyton  Knt.  whose  male  issue  seems  to  have 
failed  in  the  time  of  Edw.  III.  The  4th  son  John  the  younger  sold  to  John 
his  eldest  brother  all  the  lands  which  he  had  in  Boxford  of  the  fee  of  the 
Abbey  of  St.  Edmund  and  Stoke  Nayland  which  their  father  John  or 
their  uncle  William  formerly  possessed.  Sir  John  the  eldest  son  succeeded 
and  was  lord  of  Peyton  Hall  and  also  possessed  lands  in  Stoke  Nayland. 
He  married  Matilda  de  Bueriis  (Buers)  sister  and  heir  of  Symond  de  Notelle 
and  had  three  sons  and  one  daughter  Agnes  mentioned  in  the  Will  of  her 
brother.  The  sons  were  Sir  John  de  Peyton  Knt.,  William  and  James. 
Sir  John  succeeded  to  the  lordship.  He  flourished  in  the  time  of 
Hen.  III.  and  married  after  having  two  wives  successively  of  the  name  of 
Agnes,  dementia  lady  of  Weyland  to  whom  and  to  himself  a  grant  of  land 
was  made  in  1242.  He  had  a  grant  of  free  warren  here  in  1298  2  and  three 
years  later  served  in  Parliament  as  one  of  the  Knights  of  the  Shire  for  Suffolk. 
This  John  de  Peyton  is  probably  the  man  who  with  Agnes  his  wife  levied 
a  fine  of  Peyton  Manor  in  1317  against  Henry  de  Wellington  and  Henry 
de  Norwich  parson  of  Colneye.3  He  was  buried  at  Stoke  Nayland  in  1318. 
His  Will  is  dated  in  Sept.  of  this  year,  and  it  was  proved  the  26  Jan.  1318. 
On  his  death  he  was  succeeded  by  his  eldest  son  Sir  Robert  Peyton.  A 
release  &c.  of  the  manor  in  1335  and  1346  will  be  found  amongst  the  Harl. 
Charters.4  Sir  Robert  de  Peyton  made  his  will  in  1348  and  died  in  1351 ,  when  he 
was  buried  near  his  father.  He  had  two  wives,  first  Christiana  de  Apleton  widow 
of  William  de  Apleton  who  died  in  1325  leaving  several  children  who  all  died 
without  issue  and  was  buried  at  Stoke  Nayland  with  great  pomp.  Her 
funeral  expenses  are  thus  set  down — 50  quarters  of  wheat  \l.  ios.,  one 
hogshead  of  wine  53/.  45.  4^.,  muttons  55.  8  barrow-hogs  245.  10  calves,  &c. 
His  second  wife  was  Joan  de  Marney  of  the  Marneys  of  Layer  Marney  in 
Essex  by  whom  he  had  issue  Sir  John  de  Peyton  and  William,  which  latter  lies 
buried  at  Wicken  in  Cambridge.  Sir  Robert  was  succeeded  by  his  son  and 
heir  Sir  John  de  Peyton  who  married  Margaret  daughter  and  co-heir  of 
Sir  John  Gernon  Knt.  of  Lees  in  Essex,  descended  from  the  Barons  of 
Tregoze  and  Colvile,  in  whose  right  he  had  the  Manor  of  Wicken  and  in 
1393  jointly  with  her  held  part  of  the  Manor  of  Esthorpe  by  the  service 
of  one  knight's  fee ;  but  it  does  not  appear  that  he  acquired  any  property 
in  Boxford  by  virtue  of  this  marriage,  as  stated  by  Gipps,  quoting  from 
Camden,  and  by  Kirby,  probably  copying  from  one  or  the  other.  Sir  John 
de  Peyton  died  in  1394  and  was  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir  John  de 
Peyton  who  married  Joan  daughter  and  heir  of  Sir  Hamon  de  Sutton  of 
Wixoe  Knt.  by  which  marriage  this  place  came  to  the  Peytons.  He 
had  issue  by  his  wife  (afterwards  married  to  Sir  Roger  Drury  Knt.), 
Margery  wife  of  Thomas  Daubeny  of  Sharrington  co.  Norfolk  and  three 
sons  John,  Thomas  and  Robert.  John  Peyton  the  eldest  was  a  minor 
at  the  death  of  his  father  and  15  years  old  in  1407,  when  an  agreement 
was  made  between  Margaret  his  grandmother  and  Joan  his  mother  with 
John  Burgoyne  of  Drayton  in  Cambridgeshire,  for  his  marriage  with  Grace 
daughter  of  John  Burgoyne  ;  which  marriage  subsequently  was  solemnized. 
The  issue  of  the  marriage  were  2  sons  John  and  Thomas  and  a  daughter 
Anne  who  married  Jeffry  Lochton.  Their  father  died  the  6  Oct. 

1   Weever  Funeral  Monuments  p.  222.  3  Feet  of  Fines  n  Edw.  II.  18. 

'   Chart.  Rolls  26  Edw.  I.  5.  «   Harl.  54  H.  21,  22. 


24  THE   MANORS  OF   SUFFOLK. 

1416'  and  was  succeeded  by  his  son  John  Peyton  aged  3$  years  who  died  in 
his  minority  the  29  Oct.  1432  whereupon  Thomas  Peyton  his  brother,  then 
aged  17,  succeeded.  He  was  High  Sheriff  of  the  counties  of  Cambridge 
and  Huntingdon  in  1443  and  1453.  In  1484  by  Deed  dated  the 
ao  May  Thomas  Peyton  who  held  the  manor,  then  said  to  be  worth 
I4/.,  and  held  of  the  Abbot  of  Bury  by  Will  directed  feoffees  to 
settle  the  manor.  He  died  the  30  July  the  same  year  and  was 
buried  at  Isleham  in  Cambridgeshire,  where  there  is  an  effigy  of  him  in 
brass.  He  married  ist  Margaret  daughter  and  co-heir  of  Sir  John  Bernard 
of  Isleham  Knt.  by  whom  Isleham  came  to  the  Peyton  family,  and  had 
issue  by  her,  Thomas,  Margaret  and  Grace.  His  second  wife  was  Margaret 
daughter  and  co-heir  of  Sir  Hugh  Francis  of  Giffords  in  Wickhambrook 
and  widow  of  Thomas  Garneys  of  Kenton,  and  by  her  he  had  2  sons 
Christopher  Peyton  High  Sheriff  of  the  Counties  of  Cambridge  and  Hunting- 
don 12  Hen.  VI I.1  and  Francis.  Thomas  the  eldest  son  died  before  his 
father  and  by  his  wife  Joan  Calthorp  had  issue,  Thomas  Peyton  who 
succeeded  but  died  without  issue  the  ist  August  1490,'  Robert,  John  and 
Edward  with  six  daughters.  Sir  Robert  Peyton  the  brother  of  the  last 
Thomas  Peyton  succeeded.  He  was  sheriff  of  the  County  of  Huntingdon 
in  1498  and  died  the  27  March  1518,*  being  buried  in  Isleham  Church, 
where  there  is  an  altar  tomb  of  freestone  with  a  slab  of  speckled  marble 
from  the  middle  of  which  has  been  torn  a  plain  cross.  Under  an  arch  in 
the  wall  at  the  feet  are  the  matrices  of  a  man  and  woman,  three  boys  and 
three  girls  with  a  label  from  the  mouth  of  the  first  of  each  to  a  crucifix  and 
under  them  this  on  a  brass  plate  :— 

Of  yo'  charite  p'y  for  the  souls  of  S'  Ro'bt 

Peyton,  knyght,  which  de'pted  to 
God  the  xviii  day  of  m'che,  y*  yere  of  o'  lord  M" 
Dxviij.  and  for  the  soule  of  Dame  elizabeth 
Peyton  his  wyfe,  whiche  dep'tid  to  god  y  yer  of  o' 
lord  M°D    .     .    . 

The  date  has  never  been  filled  up,  the  plate  remaining  smooth.  Over 
this  a  fine  perk  ;  and  under  the  East  window  a  rich  fascia  of  vine  leaves 
and  grapes,  and  oak  foliage  above  over  the  space  formerly  occupied  by 
the  altar.  He  left  issue  by  his  wife  Elizabeth  daughter  of  Sir  Robert  Clere  of 
Ormsby  co.  Norfolk,  three  sons,  Sir  Robert  Peyton  to  whom  the  manor 
ultimately  passed,  John  who  married  Dorothy  daughter  of  Sir  Robert  Tyndall 
of  Hockwould  co.  Norfolk  Knt.  from  whom  descend  the  Peytons  of 
Doddington  and  Edward  who  died  without  issue  and  also  2  daughters, 

•  I.P.M.,  4  Hen.  V.  42.  «  I.P.M.,  10  Hen.  VIII.  i,  in  which  the 

1  Inquis.  6  Hen.  VII.  740, 7  Hen.  VII.  62.  manor    is    stated    to    be    held  of 

the    Abbot    of    Bury    and    to  be 
worth  £24  per  annum. 

•  There  is  an  inscription  to  this  Christopher  on  the  wooden  cornice  of  the  roof  of  the 
Church  of  Isleham  as  follows : — 

Pray  for  the  good  prosperity  of 

Crystofer  Peyton  and  Elizabeth  hys 

wyf,  and  for  the  sowle  of  Thomas 

Peyton  Squyer  and  Margarett  hys  wyf 

fader  and  moder  of  the  seyd  crystofer 

peyton,  and  for  the  sowles  of  all  the 

awncestre  of  the  sayd  crystofer  peyton  qwich 

did  make  thys  rofe  in  the  yere  of  owr 

lord  MCCCCLXXXXV.  beynge  the  i 

Yere  of  kyng  henry  the  VII. 


BOXFORD.  25 

Margaret  and  Elizabeth .  Elizabeth  the  widow  of  Sir  Robert  Peyton  succeeded 
and  had  the  manor  in  jointure  until  her  death,  also  in  1518,  when  it  passed  to 
her  son  Sir  Robert  Peyton  who  was  High  Sheriff  of  the  two  counties  already 
named  in  1525  and  1535.  He  married  Frances  daughter  and  heir  of  Francis 
Haseldyne  of  Little  Chesterford  co.  Essex  and  of  Steeple-Marden  in  Cam- 
bridgeshire, in  whose  right  he  became  possessed  of  these  places.  She 
founded  the  Hospital  at  Isleham  and  was  buried  in  the  Church  of  that  place 
in  1580.  They  had  6  sons,  Robert,  William,  Richard,  Christopher, 
Edward  and  John  and  2  daughters  Katharine  and  Elizabeth.  Richard  the 
3rd  son  lived  at  Chesterford  and  married  Mary  daur.  of  Lawrence  Hyde  of 
Hyde  Hall  Herts.,  and  died  in  1574  aged  40.  There  is  a  large  slab  in  Isle- 
ham  Church  bearing  the  brass  figure  of  a  man  in  a  coat  and  furred  gown 
and  hose  ;  his  right  hand  on  his  breast,  his  left  hanging  down  holding  a 
book,  his  lady  wears  a  coif  and  hood,  standing  cape,  pinkt  sleeves,  and 
short  ruffles,  her  apron  has  strings  and  is  laced.  Over  her,  quarterly — 

I  Peyton.  2  Three  piles  wavy.  Gernon.  3  A  chevron,  in  chief  three 
estoiles.  4  A  bear  rampant  muzzled.  Bernard.  5  A  cross  fleury. 
6  Three  battle  axes  erect.  7  A  lion  rampant  and  a  label  of  three. 
8  A  lion  rampant.  In  the  centre  of  all  a  mullet.  These  quarter- 
ings  also  impale,  a  saltire  engrailed  and  chief  Erm.  Hyde, 
which  last  coat  is  single  in  a  lozenge.  Below  is  the  first  coat  of 
eight  quarters  single,  and  impaling  Hyde  ;  and  between  them 
this  inscription  : — 

Here  under  lyeth  a  woorthy  squyer  that  Rycharde  Payton  kyght 

An  honest  Gentleman,  and  thyrde  sonne  to  Robert  Payton  knyght, 

In  Greys  Inne  student  of  the  lawe,  wheare  he  a  Reader  was. 

He  feared  God,  and  loved  his  woorde,  in  truth  his  lyfe  did  passe 

In  practysing  of  justice  lore  was  all  his  whole  delyght. 

He  never  wronged  ani  one  to  whom  he  myght  do  ryght. 

Whome  he  esteemed  an  honest  freend,  whom  he  might  stand  in  stede, 

He  never  left  to  do  hym  good  with  woorde,  with  purse,  and  deede. 

For  tenne  yeares  space  he  married  was  unto  a  faythfull  wyfe, 

By  parent  named  Marye  Hyde,  they  lived  devoyde  of  stryfe. 

The  earth  hym  bare  twyse  twentie  yeares,  and  virtuously  he  lyved 

A  godly  lyfe  he  dyd  embrace,  and  vertuosly  he  dyed. 

Below  in  a  lozenge, 


and  on  a  plate, 

The  thirteenth  daye  of  Apryll  yeares  seventy  and  foure 
A  thousand  fyve  hundred  being  put  to  yt  more. 

Sir  Robert  Peyton  died  the  I  August  1550,  and  was  buried  in  Isleham 
Church  where  there  is  a  plate  bearing  this  inscription  : — 

Pray  for  the  soule  of  Syr  Robert  Peyton  knyght  the 
sonne  of  Syr  Robert  Peyton,  knight,  whych  married 
Fraunceys  the  daughter  and  heyre  of  Fraunceys  Has- 
sylden,  Esquire,  decessyd,  which  syr  Robert  decessyd 
the  first  day  of  August  A"  d'ni  M°DL.  whose  soule  god  p'dn. 


26  THE    MANORS   OF   SUFFOLK. 

He  was  succeeded  by  his  eldest  son  Sir  Robert  Peyton  knight  of  the  shire 
for  Cambridge  in  1557  and  High  Sheriff  of  the  Counties  of  Cambridge  and 
Huntingdon  in  1553  and  1567.  He  was  knighted  by  James  I.  at  Royston 
Nov.  1608.'  A  fine  of  the  manor  was  levied  against  him  and  his  wife 
by  Richard  Peyton  in  1562* ;  and  another  fine  was  in  1582  levied  against 
him  and  others  by  Sir  John  Cotton  and  others.'  He  married  Lady  Elizabeth 
Rich  daughter  of  Richard,  Baron  Rich  of  Lees,  Lord  High  Chancellor  of 
England,  by  whom  he  had  issue  3  sons  Robert  who  died  unmarried 
in  his  father's  lifetime,  Sir  John  Peyton  and  Richard  Peyton 
who  died  without  issue,  and  3  daughters  Mary,  Frances  and  Winifred. 
On  his  death  he  was  succeeded  by  his  eldest  son  Sir  John  Peyton 
who  was  lord  of  Peyton  Hall,  Wicken  and  Wixho  and  Sheriff  of  the 
Counties  of  Cambridge  and  Huntingdon  in  1593,  Knight  of  the  Shire  of  the 
last  named  county  and  was  created  a  Baronet  in  1611.  By  his  wife  Alice 
daughter  of  Sir  Edward  Osborn,  Lord  Mayor  of  London  in  1583 
and  progenitor  of  the  Duke  of  Leeds,  he  had  6  sons  and  6  daughters, 
one  of  which  Alice  was  married  to  Sir  John  son  and  heir  of  Sir  John  Peyton 
of  Doddington  Knt.  He  was  succeeded  by  his  eldest  son  Sir  Edward  Peyton 
who  was  educated  first  at  Bury  St.  Edmunds  School  and  afterwards  at 
Cambridge.  He  was  knighted  the  4  Feb.  1610  and  served  in  Parliament  for 
the  County  of  Cambridge,  and  was  Custos  Rotulorum  thereof,  of  which  office 
he  was  deprived  by  the  Duke  of  Buckingham,  and  subsequently  taking  part 
with  the  Presbyterians  in  the  time  of  the  great  rebellion  he  impoverished 
himself  and  his  family  and  sold  Isleham  and  other  estates.  He  had  a 
numerous  family  by  his  three  wives  and  dying  in  1557,  was  succeeded  by 
his  eldest  son  by  his  first  wife  Matilda  daughter  of  Robert  Livesay  of 
Tooting  in  Surrey, — Sir  John  Peyton  Bart.  Sir  John  Peyton  married  first 
a  daughter  of  Sir  Edward  Bellingham  by  whom  he  left  no  issue  and  2ndly 
a  daughter  of  -  -  Hobart  by  whom  he  had  3  sons,  Edward  who  died  young, 
Sir  John  Peyton  his  successor  and  Thomas  a  Captain  in  the  Guards  who 
died  a  bachelor.  He  also  had  one  daughter.  He  died  in  1666  and  was 
buried  in  St.  Giles's  in  the  Fields,  London,  being  succeeded  by  his  only 
surviving  son  Sir  John  Peyton  Bart.  This  Sir  John  was  a  soldier  and 
occupied  several  military  offices,  serving  also  at  sea  in  the  Dutch  war.  He 
was  attainted  by  Act  of  Parliament  in  the  time  of  James  II.,  but  restored  by 
William  III.  He  was  made  governor  of  Ross  Castle  in  Kerry.  This  family  is 
remarkable  for  the  number  of  wives  each  had  the  privilege  of  marrying,  but  in 
this  instance,  though  Sir  John  had  three  wives  successively  he  died  the  23 
March  1721  without  issue.  Page  makes  out  that  the  manor  passed  after 
a  long  line  of  ancestry  to  Sir  Algernon  Peyton  Bart.,  second  son  of  Algernon 
Peyton,  D.D.,  rector  of  Doddington  in  Cambridgeshire  so  created  in  1666-7 
who  succeeded  to  the  estates  and  representation  of  his  family  on  the  decease 
without  issue  in  1660  (he  probably  means  1666)  of  his  elder  brother  Sir  John 
Peyton  Bart,  of  Doddington.  He  adds  that  Sir  Algernon  Peyton  appears 
to  have  resided  at  Peyton  Hall  and  his  only  son  and  heir  Sir  Sewster  Peyton 
succeeded  to  his  title  and  estates.  He  married  Anne  second  daughter  of 
George  Dashwood  of  London.  Algerina  his  sister  married  George  Dash- 
wood  a  Colonel  in  the  Army,  brother  to  the  wife  of  Sir  Sewster  Peyton, 
and  had  a  son  George  Dashwood  who  married  his  cousin  Margaret  daughter 
of  Sir  Sewster  Peyton  whose  son  Henry  Dashwood  upon  the  decease  of 
his  uncle  Sir  Thomas  Peyton  Bart,  in  1771  (he  probably  means  1772) 

•  ?  d.  1590.  >  Fine,  Easter  24  Eliz. 

•  Fine  Mich.  4  Eliz. 


BOXFORD. 


27 


without  issue,  inherited  the  property  and  assumed  in  consequence  the 
surname  and  arms  of  Peyton.  Finally,  Page  says  the  Peyton  Hall  Estate 
probably  passed  to  George  Dashwood  upon  his  marriage  with  Algerina 
daughter  of  Sir  Algernon  Peyton  Bart,  and  their  son  George  Dashwood 
is  the  person  whom  Mr.  Kirby  says  held  this  property  in  1764  and  had  a 
residence  in  or  near  Sudbury  called  Wood  Hall.  Much  of  this  account 
of  Page  is  guesswork.  He  knew  that  George  Dashwood  took  in  some 
way  and  this  is  his  mode  of  accounting  for  the  fact ;  but  Davy  has  nothing 
about  the  connection  of  the  Peytons  of  Doddington  with  this  manor, 
further  than  that  the  Dash  woods  represented  them.  He  makes  Sir  John 
Peyton  who  died  without  issue  in  1721  to  have  been  lord  and  then  merely 
says  it  passed  to  George  Dashwood.  It  is,  however,  possible  that  when 
Sir  Edward  practically  ruined  the  family  and  sold  Isleham  in  the  time  of 
Charles  I.  he  may  have  disposed  of  this  manor  to  the  Doddington  branch 
of  the  family,  his  sister  Alice  having  married  the  representative  of  this  branch, 
Sir  John  Peyton.  George  Dashwood  the  son  of  George  Dashwood  by 
Algerina  his  wife  2nd  daughter  of  Sir  Algernon  Peyton  Bart,  of  Doddington, 
was  unquestionably  lord  of  this  manor  and  died  in  March  1762.  He 
married  Margaret  2nd  daughter  of  Sir  Sewster  Peyton  and  had  2  sons 
Henry  and  James  and  2  daughters  Margaret  and  Penelope.  He  was 
succeeded  by  his  eldest  son  Henry  who  in  compliance  with  the  will  of  his 
uncle  Sir  Thomas  Peyton  Bart.,  obtained  an  Act  of  Parliament  enabling 
him  to  take  the  name  of  Peyton  and  was  created  a  Baronet  in  1776. 
In  1771  he  married  Frances  elder  daughter  of  Sir  John  Rous  of 
Herham  Hall  Bart,  and  sister  of  John  ist  Earl  of  Stradbroke.  He  was 
member  of  Parliament  for  the  County  of  Cambridge  in  1782  and  was 
re-elected  in  1784.  He  left  2  sons  Sir  Henry  and  Algernon  and  4  daughters 
Frances,  Louisa,  Charlotte  and  Harriet.  Sir  Henry  Peyton  died  in  1789 
and  was  succeeded  by  his  eldest  son  Sir  Henry  Peyton  who  married  Hariet 
widow  of  James  Bradshaw  and  daughter  of  Thomas  Fitzhugh  by  whom 
he  had  issue  Henry  Peyton  2nd  Bart,  who  was  M.P.  for  the  County  of 
Cambridge  in  1802.  He  died  in  1854  and  was  succeeded  by  his  only  son 
Sir  Henry  Peyton1  who  married  Georgiana  Codrington  of  Dodinton  co. 
Gloucester  and  had  issue,  Henry  who  died  a  minor  in  his  father's  lifetime 
and  Sir  Algernon  William.  Sir  Henry  Peyton  died  the  18  Feb.  1866  and 
was  succeeded  by  his  only  surviving  son  Sir  Algernon  William  Peyton 
4th  Baronet.  He  married  Sarah  youngest  daughter  of  Daniel  Hoik  Webb 
of  Wykham  Park  and  on  his  death  was  succeeded  by  his  son  Sir  Thomas 
Peyton  5th  Baronet.  He  married  Lucy  daughter  of  William  Watts  and 
died  in  1888,  when  the  manor  passed  to  his  son  Sir  Algernon  Francis 
Peyton  6th  Baronet.  The  manor  is  now  vested  in  Sir  Joshua  Thellusson 
Rowley  Bart,  of  Tendring  Hall. 

Extract  from  Court  Rolls  of  the  Manor  (one  of  that  in  Ramsholt) 


Peyton  Hall,  with  the  farm  and  318  acres, 
was  offered  for  sale  by  public  auction  in 
London  at  the  Auction  Mart  opposite 
the  Bank  of  England  the  i8th  July, 
1859.  In  the  Particulars  Peyton  Hall  is 
described  as  raised  on  a  natural  knoll, 
sheltered  and  ornamented  with  timber 
and  shrubberies  and  it  is  further  stated 
that  its  gardens,  grounds  and  approach 
give  it  a  character  never  found  in  mere 
farm  houses  or  modern  erections.  The 


house  is  stated  to  have  been  then  built 
many  generations  ago  and  to  have  much 
of  the  style  of  the  Elizabethan  period, 
the  front  presenting  somewhat  of  a 
uniform  elevation,  the  centre  being  a 
little  set  back  with  a  verandah,  and  the 
roofs  of  the  wings  having  pointed  gables. 
The  Manor  of  Peyton  Hall  which 
belonged  to  the  Vendors  at  the  time 
was  not  offered  for  sale. 


28  THE    MANORS   OF   SUFFOLK. 

13  Rich.  II.  will  be  found  amongst  the  Bodleian  Suff.  Charities  [1368]; 
and  two  deeds  of  Sir  Robert  Crane  found  amongst  deeds  relating  to  this 
manor  are  in  the  Harlcian  Collection.' 

Arms  of  Peyton  :    Sa.,  a  cross,  engrailled,  or. 

CODDENHAM   HALL   MANOR. 

This  place  appears  as  Kodenham  in  Domesday  but  not  then  seemingly 
held  as  a  manor.  Walter  de  Saint  Valery's  predecessor  in  title  had  held 
by  commendation  only  2  freemen,  but  at  the  time  of  the  Domesday  Survey 
Roger  de  Rheims  held  them,  though  by  what  title  the  Hundred  did  not 
know,  nor  could  anyone  say  on  Roger's  behalf  how  he  had  acquired  title, 
and  consequently  the  holding  is  classed  as  an  encroachment  upon  the 
King.  The  freemen  had  only  20  acres  of  land  valued  at  10  shillings  in 
former  days,  but  at  that  time  said  to  be  worth  nothing.1  In  the  time  of 
Hen.  I.  Thomas  de  Codeham  held  lands  here,  and  in  1188  they  passed  to 
his  son  and  heir  Robert  de  Codeham  who  had  also  a  moiety  of  the  advowson. 
He  was  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir  Thomas  de  Codeham.  The  manor 
appears  in  1316  to  nave  been  vested  in  Thomas  Fitz  Eustace  and  Amicia 
his  wife,  for  by  a  fine  levied  this  year  we  learn  that  they  had  settled  this 
manor  and  the  Manor  of  Halstead  upon  Robert  the  son  of  the  said  Thomas.3 
However,  later,  in  1339  Amicia,  described  as  late  wife  of  Sir  Thomas  Fitz- 
Eustace,  released  to  Sir  Thomas  de  Grey  her  father  and  Alicia  her  mother 
her  life  interest  in  the  manor.  The  deed  is  amongst  the  Harleian  Charters 
in  the  British  Museum,  and  is  dated  at  Cavendish  "  die  Jovis  in  Virg. 
S.  Laur.  Mart.  13  Edw.  III.  [1339].*  In  1361  Sir  Thomas  de  Mont- 
chensy  by  a  deed  dated  35  Edw.  III.  [1361]  released  to  John  de  Multone 
parson  of  Stanstead  co.  Kent,  John  de  Bradefeld  parson  of  Hausted  co. 
Kent,  John  deTonevolle  clerks  and  others  this  manor  which  he  claimed  by 
descent  in  fee  simple  from  William  de  Montchensy  Knt.  his  grandfather,5 
and  3  years  later  Sir  William  de  Clopton  and  others  alienated  to  Sir  Thomas 
de  Fitton  and  others  all  right  in  the  manor.  In  1403  [the  29  Sept.  5  Hen. 
IV.]  John  de  Boys,  Clement  Spycer  and  John  Esthorpe  conveyed  to  John 
Allyn  and  Alice  his  wife.6  The  daughter  of  John  Aleyn  married  Robert 
Clopton  and  the  manor  passed  to  him.  He  by  Deed  the  18  Oct.  17  Hen.  VI. 
[1438]  conveyed  the  manor  to  Geoffrey  Clopton,  John  Clopton  his  son 
and  heir,  William  Bullok  and  Thos.  Odyham/  We  next  find  John  Clopton 
son  and  heir  of  Geoffrey,  Wm.  Bullok  and  Thos.  Odyham  as  lords,  but 
they  were  probably  trustees.  It  is  possible  that  the  fine  levied  in  1465 
of  "  Codnamhall  Manor  "  by  John  Porter,  Thomas  Pynk,  John  Lovell 
clerk,  John  Lamborne  and  Wm.  Phelip  pet.  against  Henry  Chicheley  and 
Alice  his  wife  and  Wm.  Grygge  and  Hugh  Vaugham  deforciants8  may  have 
reference  to  this  manor.  However  this  may  be  it  is  clear  that  in  1504  the 
manor  had  become  vested  in  Wm.  Forth  of  Hadleigh  for  he  died  seised  of 
it  on  the  6th  of  August  this  year.9  He  was  succeeded  by  his  son  and 
heir  Robert  Forth  who  died  the  27  July  1540, lo  and  was  succeeded  by  his 
son  and  heir  William  Forth.  The  next  lord  was  William  Risbie  of  Lavenham 
who  died  seised  the  23  Sept.  1552,"  and  was  succeeded  by  Robert  Risbie  his 


•  Harl.  639. 

•  Dom.  ii.  449,  4496. 

»  Feet  of  Fine*  10  Edw.  II.  19. 

•  Harl.  Ch.  50  A.  35- 

•  Cott.  MSS.  xxvii.  131. 

•  Harl.  47  A.  29. 


'  Harl.  48  D.  18. 

•  Feet  of  Fines  5  Edw.  IV.  10. 

•  I.P.M.,  20  Hen.  VII.  2. 


it 


I.P.M.,  32  Hen.  VIII.  4. 
I.P.M.,  6  Edw.  VI.  65. 


BOXFORD. 


29 


son  and  heir.  In  1563  a  fine  of  the  manor  was  levied  by  Edward  Clere 
against  George  Risbie,1  and  in  1571  by  Robert  Peyton  against  William 
Humberstone.a  The  manor  passed  to  the  Bronds  or  Brands  of  Edwardston 
and  Wm.  Jos.  Brand  was  lord  in  1655.  It  afterwards  passed  to  the  Bennetts 
and  Thomas  Bennet  was  lord  in  1764.  He  was  succeeded  by  his  two 
daughters  and  co-heirs  Elizabeth  and  Anne  ;  the  former  died  in  1768  and  the 
latter  in  1786,  both  unmarried,  and  in  1847  the  manor  belonged  to  William 
Green  who  resided  there.  In  1855  William  Green's  executors  held,  but 
before  1885  the  manor  had  passed  to  and  was  held  by  George  Leech,  a 
farmer  here  and  at  Little  Waldringfield ;  and  it  has  since  passed  to, 
and  is  now  vested  in  Charles  J.  Grimwade  of  Hadleigh. 

Coddenham  Hall  is  now  converted  into  a  farm  house. 

BOWESHOWSE   al.    BORNHOUSE   MANOR. 

There  were  4  other  small  manors  in  Boxford  of  which  very  little  is 
known.  Boweshouse  al.  Bornhouse  seems  to  have  been  held  in  1316  by 
the  Abbot  of  St.  Edmunds,  but  in  1349  it  was  leased  by  Michael  de  Bures 
to  the  Friars  of  Clare.  In  1553  William  Lord  Howard  had  licence  to  alien 
it  to  Robert  Richers  who  had  a  licence  to  alien  to  Sir  John  Huddlestone. 
From  Sir  John  Huddlestone  the  manor  passed  to  his  son  and  heir  William 
Huddlestone,  who  died  in  1563  and  was  succeeded  by  his  brother  and  heir 
Edmund  Huddlestone3  who  had  licence  to  alien  a  third  part  of  the  manor. 
In  1568  Alice  Lovell  sister  of  Edmund  Huddlestone  and  wife  of  Sir  Thomas 
Lovell  was  lady,  and  in  1570  Sir  Thomas  Lovell  and  others  levied  a  fine  of 
the  manor  against  Thomas  Duke  of  Norfolk.4  The  following  year  a  fine 
was  levied  against  the  said  Thomas  Lovell  and  others  by  Thomas  Gale.' 
This  manor  subsequently  passed  to  the  Waldegraves  of  Smallbridge  in 
Bures  and  Sir  William  Waldegrave  held  the  manor  in  1585.  Two  years 
later  he  and  his  son  and  heir  apparent  William  Waldegrave  sold  the  manor 
for  £900  to  John  Bronde  of  Boxford  clothier  and  his  son  Benjamin  Bronde. 
The  Conveyance  is  dated  the  28  April  30  Eliz.  and  was  made  to  John  Bronde 
and  Benjamin  as  joint  tenants  in  fee  simple.  A  fine  was  in  1591  levied 
of  the  manor  by  the  said  John  Brond  against  William  Waldegrave.6 
By  Indenture  dated  the  22  Jan.  1608  John  Brond  and  Benjamin  then 
described  as  of  Edwardston  conveyed  the  manor  to  Matthew  Smyth  and 
Henry  Sokes  as  trustees  to  the  use  of  John  Brond  for  life  with  remainder 
in  fee  to  James  Brond  another  son  of  the  above  John  Brond.  This  Settle- 
ment does  not  appear  to  have  had  any  operation,  for  we  find  that  by  a  deed 
dated  the  20th  March  1627  Benjamin  Brond,  no  doubt  as  the  survivor 
under  the  joint  tenancy  created  by  the  Conveyance  from  the  Waldegraves 
30  Eliz.,  sold  the  manor  for  £1150  to  Joan  Cutler  of  Polstead  widow.  This 
Joan  Cutler  was  a  connection  of  the  Bronds  and  by  an  Indenture  dated  the 
21  May  16  Charles  I.  [1640]  she  made  a  Settlement  on  her  grandchildren 
the  Bronds,  settling  the  manor  to  the  use  of  herself  for  life  with  remainder 
to  the  use  of  her  grandson  William  Brond  in  tail  with  remainder  to  the 
use  of  John  Brond  in  tail  with  remainder  to  the  use  of  Anne  Brond 
and  Elizabeth  Beresse  in  fee  simple.  Mrs.  Cutler  by  an  Indenture  dated 
the  27  May  1648  conveyed  her  life  interest  in  the  manor  under  the  Settle- 
ment to  her  grandson  William  Brond.  For  many  years  prior  to  this  date 

1    Fine  Easter  5  Eliz.  *   Fine  Hil.  12  Eliz.  ;  Easter  13  Elia. 

*   Fine  Hil.  13  Eliz.  '    Fine  Mich.  13  Eliz. 

»   Fine  5  July  10  Elia.  46.  •   Fine  Hil.  33  Eliz. 


30  THE   MANORS  OF   SUFFOLK. 

and  at  this  time  the  lands  of  the  manor  which  extended  into  Polstead  were 
in  the  occupation  of  Martin  Cobbould.  In  the  middle  of  the  i8th  century, 
Jacob  Brond  or  Brand  was  lord.  He  died  in  1755  and  was  succeeded  by 
his  son  and  heir  William  Beall  Brand  who  died  in  1799  and  was  succeeded 
by  his  widow  Ann  M.  H.  Brand  who  died  in  1814  being  succeeded  by 
Thomas  William  Cooke  grand-nephew  of  Wm.  B.  Brand  who  died  in  1825 
and  was  succeeded  by  his  widow  who  was  later  married  to  Charles  Tyrell. 

CALTHORPE  HALL  MANOR. 

The  second  of  these  small  manors  was  known  as  Calthorpe  Hall  and 
was  held  by  Thomas  Peyton  who  died  seised  in  1491  and  was  succeeded 
by  his  brother  and  heir  Robert  Peyton  who  died  the  27  March  1518  when 
it  passed  to  his  son  and  heir  Robert  Peyton.1 

BADLEY'S  OR  BADLEY  HALL  MANOR. 

The  third  of  these  manors  was  Badley's  and  it  is  mentioned  in  an 
Inquis.  in  1492*  as  held  of  Peyton  Hall  Manor  and  to  be  worth  4^.  It  is 
included  in  the  Inquis.  p.m.  of  Sir  Robert  Peyton  who  died  the  27  March 
1518  and  passed  to  his  son  and  heir  Robert  then  aged  20  years  and  up- 
wards' and  is  also  the  subject  of  a  fine  levied  in  1556  by  John  Ely  junior 
and  others  against  the  last-mentioned  Robert  Peyton  and  others.4 

GEORGES  MANOR. 

The  first  mention  we  find  of  this  manor  is  in  the  Inquis.  p.m.  of  John 
Straunge  in  1468,'  when  the  manor  is  stated  to  be  held  as  of  the  Duchy 
of  Lancaster.  We  next  find  it  mentioned  in  an  Inquis.  in  1491*  as  a  manor 
and  a  tenement  called  '  Callys '  with  30  acres  of  land  and  8  of  meadow 
worth  405.  held  of  the  Abbot  of  Bury  and  as  having  been  settled  by  Thomas 
Peyton  by  Deed  i  Rich.  III.  and  by  his  Will.  The  inquisition  finds  that 
Thomas  Peyton  died  seised  the  i  Aug.  5  Hen.  VII.  and  that  Robert  Peyton 
aged  22,  his  brother,  was  his  heir.  In  the  same  inquisition  the  Manor  of 
Sayham  Hall  worth  5/.  is  mentioned  as  held  of  this  Manor  of  Georges  in 
Boxford  and  under  a  like  title. 


I.P.M.,  10  Hen.  VIII.  i.  *   Fine  Mich.  4  Mary. 

Hen.  VII.  740.  *  I.P.M.,  7  Edw.  IV.  34. 

•   |J>.M.,  10  Hen.  VIII.  i.  •   6  Hen.  VII.  740. 


BOXSTEAD. 


BOXSTEAD. 


MANOR  here  is  merely  by  inference  mentioned  in  Domesday. 
It  was  in  fact  all  the  land  in  Boxstead  which  was  included 
in  the  possession  of  Roger  de  Poictou  and  had  been  in  four 
different  holdings. 

In  the  Confessor's  time  Boxtead  had  been  held  by  Ulric 
King  Edward's  thane  as  2  carucates  of  land.  There  were 
2  villeins,  u  bordars,  4  slaves,  3  ploughteams  in  demesne  and 
half  a  one  belonging  to  the  men,  15  acres  of  meadow,  wood  for  5  hogs,  3  horses, 
5  beasts,  24  hogs  and  30  sheep.  By  the  time  of  the  Great  Survey  one 
villein  and  one  slave  had  gone,  there  was  one  ploughteam  less  in  demesne, 
the  beasts  were  reduced  by  i  and  the  hogs  by  9,  but  the  sheep  had 
increased  to  71.  As  to  the  horses  it  seems  that  these  had  disappeared. 
The  great  record  says  "  When  Ralph  left  there  were  two  " — one  had  there- 
fore then  gone — "  and  now  none." 

There  were  also  in  Boxtead  5  freemen  under  Wisgar  by  commendation 
and  soc,  with  2  carucates  of  land  and  they  could  sell,  but  the  King  gave 
them  to  Norman,  son  of  Tancred.  There  was  also  a  freeman  under  com- 
mendation to  the  said  Ulric  with  45  acres,  of  which  30  were  in  the  soc  of 
St.  Etheldreda  and  15  in  the  soc  of  Norman  the  predecessor  in  title  of 
Ralph  de  Limesey  in  Cavendish  ;  and  under  them  were  3  bordars.  Among 
them  they  formerly  had  4  ploughteams,  but  at  the  time  of  the  Survey 
2  only.  In  the  same  manor  was  half  a  carucate  of  land  under  the  Abbot 
of  St.  Edmund  which  the  tenants  could  not  sell  without  licence  of  the 
Abbot — but  the  King  gave  it  to  Norman  son  of  Tancred.  On  this  land 
was  I  slave  and  formerly  there  had  been  i  ploughteam.  The  value  of 
the  manor  in  Saxon  times  was  8  pounds  later  7  and  at  the  time  of  the 
Survey  100  shillings,  and  the  freemen  were  set  to  farm  at  52  shillings. 
The  value  of  the  manor  and  the  freemen  taken  together  was  put  at  6  pounds. 
It  was  a  league  long  and  five  quarantenes  broad  and  paid  in  a  gelt  yd.1 


BOXSTEAD  HALL. 

BOXSTEAD  HALL  MANOR. 

This  manor  was  forfeited  in  the  time  of  Hen.  I.  by  Roger  Poictou  and 
was    held    by    William    Hervey    in    the    time    of    Rich.   I.       He   was 

•  Dom.  ii.  3496,  350. 


33  THE    MANORS    OF   SUFFOLK. 

succeeded  by  his  son  Theobald  Walter  le  Botiller  who  married  Matilda 
Vavasour  and  died  in  1206,  being  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir  Theobald 
Walter  who  married  Joan  daughter  of  John  de  Marisco  and  died  in  1248, 
when  the  manor  passed  to  his  nephew  William  Fitz  Hervey  who  was  Sheriff 
of  Norfolk  and  Suffolk  from  32  Hen.  II.  to  2nd  Rich.  I.  In  the  6th  Rich.  I. 
Theobald  Walter  was  plaintiff  in  a  fine  against  William  Hervie  of  the 
3rd  part  of  a  knight's  fee  here  conveyed  to  Theobald  who  re-conveyed 
to  William  and  his  heirs  and  the  said  William  released  his  right  in  all  the 
lands  which  were  Hervey  Walter's,  grandfather  of  Theobald.  This  is  no 
doubt  the  half  a  fee  held  of  the  Honor  of  Lancaster  said  to  be  held  by 
Sir  William  Hervey,  1210-12  in  the  Red  Book  of  the  Exchequer' 
and  by  "  William  son  of  Hervici "  in  the  Testa  de  Nevill  (291). 
William  Fitz  Hervey  was  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir  William  Hervey 
who  held  the  manor  at  his  death  in  1255.*  He  was  succeeded  by  his  son 
William  Hervey  who  held  the  manor  of  Edmund  the  King's  brother  by 
render  of  half  a  knight's  fee,  with  the  advowson  of  the  Church.  He 
died  in  1297,'  and  was  succeeded  by  his  daughter  and  heir  Amy  who 
married  Robert  Leyes  or  de  Lyes.  Page,  no  doubt  copying  from  the 
author  of  the  Magna  Britannia,  informs  us  that  the  lordship  was  vested  in 
the  Abbot  of  Bury  9  Edw.  I.  [1281]  but  this  is  a  delusion.  Robert  de 
Leyes  and  Amy  had  an  only  daughter  Beatrix  who  married  William  de 
la  Lee  who  died  in  1281  leaving  an  only  daughter  Beatrix  married  to  Thomas 
de  Badwell.  According,  however,  to  Sir  Symonds  d'Ewes,  Thomas  de 
Badwell's  wife  was  the  daughter  of  Robert  de  Lyes  and  Amy  Hervey. 
This  Thomas  Badwell  left  a  son  W.  Badwell,  who  died  without  issue  and  a 
daughter  Anne,  who  married  Thomas  Poley  in  the  time  of  Rich.  II.  and 
were  ancestors  of  the  Poleys  who  subsequently  had  this  Boxstead  Hall 
Manor.  Beatrix  the  wife  of  Thomas  Badwell,  died  about  1326*  and  the 
manor  passed  to  William  de  la  Gosefeld3  and  Isabel  his  wife,  but  in  1330 
Beatrix  widow  of  William  de  Ferrers  appears  as  lady  and  she  conveyed 
in  1331  to  Sir  Robert  de  Bures  and  Michael  his  son.6  According  to  Davy 
the  next  lord  was  Sir  Wm.  Giffard  Knt.  in  1339,  and  we  find  that  in  1333 
a  fine  was  levied  of  the  manor  by  Sir  William  Giffard  and  Isabel  his  wife7 
against  William  Hervey.8  Sir  William  Giffard  seems  to  have  had  a 
daughter  Cecilia,  for  we  find  from  a  Charter  in  the  Bodleian  dated  1362 
a  person  answering  her  description  coming  into  court  in  Boxstead  on 
Wednesday  next  after  the  octave  of  the  Holy  Trinity  and  enrolling  a 
charter  by  which  she  quits  claim  to  Stephen  Bacun  and  Beatrice  his  wife 
all  her  right  in  the  manor  with  the  advowson  of  the  Church.9 

Davy  makes  Lord  Scroope  of  Masham  lord  in  1456,  but  this  seems 
to  be  a  mistake.  He  was  probably  misled  by  finding  Boxstead  in  the 
Inquisition  p.m.  of  this  date  of  Sir  John  Le  Scrope.  The  land  was  in 
Boxstead,  but  it  was  50  acres  of  pasture  called  "  Palmeres  "  held  as  of 
Honor  of  Boulogne.10  Of  this  same  land  Sir  Thomas  Scrope  de  Masham 
died  seised  in  1475."  Davy  makes  Anne  Badwell  daughter  and  heir  of  Thomas 
Badwell  married  to  Thomas  Poley  lady  of  the  manor  and  from  them  deduces 

132  B.  I4&J,  I52d.  «  Harl.  49  I.  44. 

.P.M.,  40  Hen.  III.  '  See   Gyffords    and    Hallymote    Manor, 
I.P.M..  25  Edw.  II.  51.  Wattisfield  in  Blackbourn  Hundred. 

I.P.M..  i  Edw.  III.  88.  •  Feet  of  Fines,  7  Edw.  III.  17. 

See  Feet  of  Fines,  rz  Edw.  II.  42,  19  '  36  Edw.  III.,  Bodl.  Suff.  Ch.  361. 

Edw.  II.   9.      Originalia,  19  Edw.  '°  I.P.M.,  34  Hen.  VI.  14. 

II.  ii.     I.Q.D.,  17  Edw.  II.  104.  "  I.P.M.,  15  Edw.  IV.  41. 


BOXSTEAD.  33 

the  Poley  holding  of  the  manor.  On  the  other  hand  Page  informs  us  that 
the  manor  was  held  by  Robert  Harleston  who  was  attainted  for  his  adherence 
to  the  house  of  Lancaster  in  the  early  part  of  the  reign  of  Edw.  IV.  This 
Monarch  granted  the  manor  to  his  brother  Richard  Plantagenet,  Duke  of 
Gloucester,  afterwards  Rich.  III.  It  is  quite  true  that  the  Manor  of 
Boxstead  is  mentioned  in  the  Inquisition  p.m.  of  Robert  Harleston  in 
1475'  but  so  is  it  also  in  that  of  Joan  wife  of  Sir  William  Parre  the  same 
year.2  The  one  matter  which  is  clear  is  that  the  manor  was  vested  in 
Thomas  Poley,  who  died  in  1461,  he  being  the  son  of  the  Thomas 
Poley  whom  Davy  refers  to  as  having  acquired  the  manor  by 
marriage  with  Anne  daughter  and  heir  of  Thomas  Badwell  of  Boxstead 
and  sister  and  heir  of  John  Badwell  of  Boxstead.  In  1445  we  find  a  fine 
levied  of  the  manor  between  Robert  Purfy  clerk,  against  John  Baily  and 
Thomas  Poley,3  which  is  almost  conclusive  of  the  correctness  of  Davy's 
statement.  This  Thomas  Poley  who  died  in  1461  married  Alice  daughter 
and  co-heir  of  Geffrey  Rookehill  or  Rockhill  of  Wormingford  co.  Essex 
and  was  succeeded  by  his  son  John  Poley  man-at-arms  in  the  retinue  of 
Lord  Hastings  in  1480  who  died  in  1487  leaving  by  Agnes  his  wife  daughter 
of  Sir  Richard  Whetley  or  Whethill  Knt.  of  Calais,  a  son  Richard  Poley 
who  married  Anne  daughter  of  Sir  Wm.  Clopton  Knt.  of  Liston  Hall  co. 
Essex  and  of  Kentwell  Hall  Melford  and  died  the  igth  February  1543 
to  whose  memory  there  is  a  strip  of  brass  on  the  North  side  of  the  Altar  in 
Boxstead  Church.  He  left  with  other  issue  a  son  John  Poly  who  married 
Margery  daughter  of  John  Blyant  of  Ringshall  and  heir  to  Richard  her  brother 
and  succeeded  to  the  Lordship.  He  died  in  1580  and  there  is  an  inscrip- 
tion to  his  memory  on  the  South  side  of  the  Altar  in  Boxstead  Church.  The 
manor  passed  to  his  son  [John  Poley  (afterwards  knighted)  aged  30  at 
his  father's  death.  He  died  apparently  without  issue  and  the  manor 
passed  to  his  brother]  William  Poley  who  married  Alice  daughter  and 
heir  of  Edmund  Shaa  of  Horndon-on-the-Hill,  Essex,  and  grand  daughter 
of  Sir  John  Shaa  Lord  Mayor  of  London  in  1500.  He  died  the 
17  Dec.  1587  and  in  Boxstead  Ch.  is  an  altar  monument  on  which  lie  large 
as  life  two  portraits  of  him  and  his  wife.  They  are  of  oak  painted  black 
and  are  perfectly  sound  and  entire.  They  are  most  peculiar  and  unlike 
any  other  in  Suffolk.  On  her  pillow  is  this, 


and  on  her  Prayer  Book  an  escutcheon  with  the  arms  of  Poley  impaling 
those  of  Shaa,  or  Shaw.  William  Poley  left  with  several  daughters, 
2  sons  Sir  John  Poley  Knt.  his  eldest,  who  died  without  issue  in 
Flanders,  and  Sir  William  Poley  Knt.  who  ultimately  succeeded.  He 
married  Anne  2nd  daughter  of  Sir  Robert  Jermyn  Knt.  of  Rushbrooke 
and  was  buried  in  Boxstead  Ch.  August  6,  1629,  his  widow 
surviving  until  1658.  He  had  with  3  daughters,  Robert,  killed  at  the 
Isle  of  Rhe'  without  issue  and  Sir  William  who  succeeded  him.  Sir  William 
Poleymarried  first  Elizabeth  daughter  andco-heirof  Sir  Henry Arden  Knt.  of 
Warwickshire  maid  of  honour  to  Henrietta  Queen  of  England  and  secondly 

'    I.P.M.,  15  Edw.  IV.  49.  3    Feet  of  Fines,  23  Hen.  VI.  12. 

•   I.P.M.,  15  Edw.  IV.  34. 


34  THE   MANORS  OF    SUFFOLK. 

Elizabeth  5th  daughter  of  Paul  D'Ewes  of  Stowlangtoft.    He  was  buried  at 
Boxstead  18  May  1664,  and  was  succeeded  by  his  son  Sir  John  Poley  Knt. 

Sir  Richard  Gipps  says  of  him,  he  was  a  Gentleman  of  sound  under- 
standing, a  sincere  heart,  and  a  plain,  primitive  and  open  behaviour, 
a  loyal  subject  and  a  true  lover  of  his  country.  He  was  chosen  Burgess 
of  Sudbury  without  his  knowledge  and  sat  in  the  Convention  against 
his  inclination,  where,  in  that  memorable  Debate  Jan.  28,  1688,  whether 
the  Throne  was  vacant,  he  made  the  following  Speech :  '  Mr.  Speaker,  I 
am  sent  hither  to  do  the  Church  and  Caesar  Right,  to  vindicate  the  Doctrines 
of  one,  and  preserve  the  Majesty  of  the  other ;  both  which  are  in  Danger 
from  Gentlemen's  Arguments  in  the  Debate  of  this  Day.  Mr.  Speaker, 
here  is  an  Affair  of  the  greatest  Weight  before  us,  both  as  we  are  Christians 
and  Englishmen  ;  no  less  than  the  deposing  a  King  whom  we  have  sworn 
Allegiance  to.  Will  our  Religion  or  our  Laws  justify  such  a  Proceeding  ? 
I  know  they  will  not.  Gentlemen  indeed  have  laid  a  mighty  Stress  upon 
the  Original  Contract ;  and  urg'd  the  Vacancy  of  the  Throne  from  his 
Majesty  s  Breach  of  that.  But,  I  hope,  we  shall  not  proceed  rashly  in  a 
matter  of  such  Consequence  to  us  and  our  Posterity.  And  therefore  I 
move  that  this  Debate  be  adjourn'd  till  the  Original  Contract  be  produc'd, 
and  laid  upon  the  Table  for  the  Members  to  peruse,  that  we  may  see 
whether  his  Majesty  has  broke  it,  or  no."  After  this  he  retired  into  private 
life  and  lived  and  died  respected  by  all  his  countrymen  and  neighbours 
at  his  seat  at  Boxstead  Hall  the  I3th  September  1705.  He  had  married 
ist  Elizabeth  dau.  of  George  Walton  of  Little  Bursted  in  Essex  who  died 
the  25  Jan.  1677,  2ndly  Bridget  Sams  the  youngest  daughter  of  Richard 
Sams  of  Little  Totham  nr.  Maldon  in  Essex  buried  the  23  Dec.  1689,  and 
3rdly  Dorothy  3rd  dau.  of  Sir  Henry  Felton  of  Playford  Bart,  but  left  no 
issue.1  Sir  John  Poley  was  succeeded  by  his  brother  Thomas  Poley. 
He  married  Frances  daughter  of  Sir  Richard  Head  Bart,  of  Rochester  and 
had  issue  two  sons  and  two  daughters,  Richard  who  married  Elizabeth 
Walford  and  died  in  1701  without  issue,  William  who  also  died  without 
issue,  Bridget,  and  Elizabeth  Poley  who  married  Robert  Weller2  of  Ton- 
bridge,  and  carried  the  Boxstead  Manor  which  has  been  for  so  many 
generations  in  the  ancient  family  of  Poley  to  the  Wellers.  In  the  Dormitory 
on  the  north  side  of  the  Chancel  of  Boxstead  Ch.  is  a  fair  mural  marble 
pointing  to  a  lesson  to  be  derived  from  the  lives  of  the  Poleys  :— 

I  stand  not  here  to  compliment  the  dead, 
Or  make  the  living  blush,  the  Family 
Which  lies  interr'd  within  this  narrow  vault, 
Could  boast  themselves  to  be  no  more  than  men. 
Though  all  for  private  Virtue's  loss  should  grieve, 
And  acts  of  goodness  merit  our  applause  ; 
Though  Custom's  self  commands  the  contrary  ; 
I'm  not  permitted  to  say  more  than  this  : 
Whatever  blemishes  their  Lives  disclose, 
They  beg  in  Charity  may  be  conceal'd  : 
And  if  some  Virtues  shine  through  Envy's  vail ; 
Those  imitate,  and  spare  thy  generous  Praise. 

1   According  to  a    MS.    pedigree    in    the        •  This  Robert  Weller  was  a  son  of  Thomas 

writer's    possession,    which     came  Weller  by  Elizabeth  his  wife,  which 

from  the  late  Dr  Howard,  Sir  John  Thomas  was  son  of  Thomas  Weller 

Poley   is   assigned    three  children,  and     Elizabeth      Barton,     which 

William  Poley,  buried  the  25  Apl.,  Thomas  was  son  of  Richard   and 

1698,  Elizabeth  Poley,  died  the  n  Agnes  Thomas    his    wife,    which 

Oct.,    1726,   and    John     Poley  of  Richard   was    son    of    Alexander 

Boxsted  Hall,   born  the  24  June,  Weller   who    died    in    1596    and 

1676,  and  died  the  13  SepL,  1757.  Elizabeth  Deuce  his  wife. 


BOXSTEAD. 


35 


Elizabeth  Weller  died  in  1761  having  had  by  Robert  her  husband  who  had 
died  in  1751,  an  only  son  George  Weller  who  assumed  the  name  of  Poley. 
He  married  Frances  daughter  of  Thomas  Hussey  of  Burwash  co.  Sussex 
and  by  her  who  died  in  1796  left  at  his  decease  the  2gth  December  1778 
aged  69  a  son  George  who  died  unmarried  the  10  April  1780  and  the  Rev. 
John  Weller  Poley,  Rector  of  Hartest  and  Boxford  his  successor.  He 
married  Jane  daughter  of  John  Blanch  Whaley  of  Colchester  and  by  her 
who  died  the  20  Dec.  1832  left  at  his  decease  the  10  May  1799  an  only  son 
George  Weller  Poley  who  married  Helen  Sophia  daughter  of  James  Fisher 
of  Browston  Hall,  and  by  her  who  died  the  20  Oct.  1860  left  a  son  John  George 
Weller  Poley  who  was  successor  to  his  father  on  his  death  the  5  Nov.  1849. 
He  was  High  Sheriff  for  the  County  in  1857  and  married  the  28  Oct.  1847 
Diana  youngest  daughter  of  Thomas  Halifax  of  Chadacre  Hall  Shimpling 
and  dying  the  5  Sept.  1869,  was  succeeded  by  his  eldest  son  John  George 
H.  Weller-Poley  of  Boxsted  Hall,  the  present  lord  of  the  manor,  who  was 
High  Sheriff  of  the  County  in  1883. 

Extracts  from  the  deeds  of  William  Poley  in  1643  will  be  found  in 
the  Bodleian,1  and  a  Court  Roll  of  the  manor  is  mentioned  in  the 
loth  Report  of  the  Historical  MSS.  Commissioners.4  Boxsted  Hall  is 
an  ancient  mansion  surrounded  by  a  moat  and  situated  in  a  park  of  about 
90  acres  in  extent.  A  few  years  ago  the  Hall  was  repaired  and  its  carvings 
restored.  It  is  the  seat  of  its  owner  the  present  lord.  An  account  of 
Boxted  Hall  will  be  found  in  the  Publications  of  the  Suff .  Institute,3  and  of 
the  Poley  Family  in  Burke's  Landed  Gentry,4  Notes  and  Queries  3rd  Ser.  ii. 
417,  546,  8th  Ser.  xii.  508.  Amongst  the  Early  Chancery  Proceedings 
may  be  seen  a  suit  respecting  a  forged  bond  concerning  lands  enfeoffed  by 
Elizabeth  Lady  Clopton  in  this  manor.3 

There  are  two  other  small  manors  in  Boxstead — one  known  as  Troketts 
or  Truckets  Manor — the  other  as  More's  manor. 

TROKETTS  al.  TRUCKETS  MANOR. 

This  was  the  lordship  of  William  Felton,  who  died  the  23  Dec.  9  Hen. 
VII.6  In  the  Inquis.  p.m.  of  this  William  Felton  the  manor  is  referred 
to  as  a  manor  called  '  Trokettes '  with  tenement  called  '  Bekkes '  in 
Boxsted  worth  12s.  held  of  the  Abbot  of  Bury.  On  William  Felton's 
death  the  manor  passed  to  his  heir  Edmund  Felton  of  Pentlow.  He 
died  the  I3th  May  1519,'  and  was  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir 
Edmund  Felton  who  died  the  10  Dec.  1542  and  was  succeeded  by  his 
son  and  heir  George  Felton8  who  was  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir 
Edmund  Felton.9  In  1553  a  fine  was  levied  of  the  manor  by  Edmund 
Felton  and  others  against  George  Felton  and  others10  and  in  1570  by  George 
Tyrrell  and  others  against  Margaret  Felton  widow  and  others."  The  manor 
passed  to  John  Felton  and  fines  were  levied  against  him  in  1572  by  William 
Aylof  and  others12  and  in  1574  by  Richard  Elyott.13  Amongst  the  Exchequer 
depositions  are  the  particulars  of  a  suit  by  Thomas  Cronshaye  clerk  against 
Thomas  French  and  others  in  1587  as  to  parcel  of  land  at  Boxstead  with 

1  4180.  "  I.P.M.,  35  Hen.  VIII.  223. 

'  Pt.  ii.  63.  '  See    Glemsford    al.    Peverells     Manor, 

3  Vol.  I.  iii.  358-373.  Glemsford,  in  this  Hundred. 

4  i.  1280.  "  Fine,  Mich.  I  Mary. 

5  E.C.P.,  i  Hen.  V.— 4  Hen.  VI.  6,  156.  "  Fine,  Easter  12  Eliz. 

6  Inq.  10  Hen.  VII.  1014.  "  Fine,  Trin.  14  EUz. 

'  I.P.M.,  ii  Hen.  VIII.  27.  "  Fine,  Mich.  16  and  17  Eliz. 


36  THE    MANORS    OF   SUFFOLK. 

wood,  and  the  meets  and  bounds  of  this  manor  are  involved.      George 
Felton  is  referred  to  as  late  owner  of  the  Manor  of  Trucketts  in  Boxstead. 

In  the  time  of  Charles  I.  this  manor  belonged  to  Frederick  Scott  and 
later  to  Sir  Robert  Dicer  Bart.  In  1827  it  was  owned  by  Asgood  Pec. 

MORES  MANOR. 

The  other  manor,  Mores,  was  the  lordship  of  William  Cressener  in 
the  isth  century.  He  died  in  1454  and  was  succeeded  by  his  third  son 
Ralph  Cressener  and  he  by  Robert  Cressener  and  he  by  Alexander  Cressener 
the  prother  of  Ralph.  Alexander  Cressener  died  in  1497  and  was  succeeded 
by  his  son  and  heir  John  Cressener,  who  in  1542  sold  the  manor  to  Richard 
Poley.1  In  1588  a  fine  was  levied  of  the  manor  and  that  of  Somerton  Hall 
by  Edmund  Saunders  and  others  against  Philip  Coningsby  and  others.* 
In  1798  the  manor  was  vested  in  Lady  Blundell.  In  1827  it  was  vested 
in  the  Marchioness  of  Devonshire. 


Fine,  Mich.  34  Hen.  VIII.  .  Fine,  Easter  30  Eliz. 


BRENT  ELEIGH. 


BRENT  ELEIGH. 


37 


HIS  place  was  held  in  Edward  the  Confessor's  time  by 
Ulward  a  freeman  under  Archbp.  Stigand  and  consisted  of 
3  carucates  of  land,  5  bordars,  2  slaves,  2  ploughteams  in 
demesne,  3  acres  of  meadow,  i  mill,  2  horses  at  the  Hall, 
6  beasts,  20  hogs  and  100  sheep,  then  valued  at  40 
shillings,  but  by  the  time  of  the  Norman  Survey  at  80 
shillings.  It  was  half  a  league  long  and  4  quarantenes  broad 
and  paid  in  a  gelt  3%d. 

The  Domesday  tenant  was  Tehell  de  Herion  or  Helyon.1  There 
were  one  or  two  other  small  holdings  in  Illegh  or  Eleigh  entered  in  the  Survey 
—one  that  of  Richard  son  of  Earl  Gislebert  who  had  7  men  here  under 
Wisgar  by  commendation  and  soc  and  sac  holding  60  acres  of  land,  i 
ploughteam  and  i  mill  valued  at  10  shillings2  and  the  Bishop  of  Bayeux 
who  had  3  freemen  under  soc  and  commendation  of  Earl  Algar  (but  then 
Tehell  de  Herion  held  them  of  the  Bishop)  with  30  acres,  formerly  i  plough- 
team,  then  but  half  a  team,  and  half  an  acre  of  meadow,  valued  at  5 
shillings.3  There  was  also  another  holding  probably  in  Brent  Eleigh 
under  the  head  Lelegay  in  the  Domesday  Survey,  and  this  was  the  holding 
of  the  Abbot  of  St.  Edmund  who  had  5  freemen  in  the  tenancy  of  Arnulf 
with  3  carucates  and  a  half,  5  bordars,  3  acres  of  meadow,  wood  for  2  hogs 
and  i  slave.  They  ploughed  with  4  teams  and  could  give  or  sell  their 
land,  but  the  soc  and  sac  and  commendation  and  the  custom  remained 
with  the  Abbot.  The  value  in  Saxon  times  was  placed  at  3  pounds,  but 
by  the  period  of  the  Great  Survey  this  had  risen  to  4  pounds.  The  extent 
was  4  quarantenes  in  length  and  6  in  breadth  and  it  paid  in  a  gelt  3j^.4 

BRENT  ELEIGH  MANOR. 

The  lordship  was  very  early  vested  in  the  family  of  Illeigh  or  Ely 
from  whom  it  passed  in  the  time  of  Hen.  III.  to  that  of  Shelton  by  the 
marriage  of  Ralph  de  Shelton  with  Catherine  daughter  and  heir  of  Henry 
de  Illegh.  The  estate  of  Catherine  was  extensive,  for  Ralph  her  husband 
gave  18  marks  to  Hen.  III.  and  did  homage  to  that  King  for  three  whole 
fees  held  of  the  Honor  of  Will,  de  Helyun. 

In  1244  Ralph  Shelton  was  dead  and  Henry  his  son  and  successor 
held  the  3  fees,  said  to  be  in  chief  of  the  King.5  Nicholas  de  Shelton  was 
lord  in  1257,  and  in  that  year  gave  lands  there  to  the  Abbot  and  Convent 
of  St.  Osyth  in  Essex  ;  in  1270  Henry  de  Shelton,  who  seems  to  have  been 
the  son  of  Nicholas,  held  divers  lands  of  his  father  with  the  manors  of  Arsa 
(or  Illeye)  Combusta  Brent  (or  Burnt)  Ellye  and  died  in  1271.  Robert 
his  son  and  heir  had  livery  at  his  father's  decease  and  in  1286  had  liberty 
of  free  warren  therein.6  He  settled  land  here  to  maintain  lights  in  this 
parish  church,  and  in  1305  he  and  Isabel  his  wife  held  the  manor  for  life, 
John  de  Shelton  being  their  son  and  heir  and  of  full  age,  with  remainder 
to  Thomas  and  Henry  their  other  sons.  Sir  Robert  died  this  year, 
being  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir  John  de  Shelton.  John  de  Shelter 
died  seised  in  1332 8  leaving  Ralph  de  Shelton  his  son  and  successor 

Dom.  ii.  4276.  6  Hund.  Rolls,  ii.  142,  150,  153. 

Dom.  ii.  3926.  '  Inquis.  p.m.   Robert  de   Schelton  and 

Dom.  ii.  3736.  Isabela  his  wife,  33  Edw.  I.  43. 

Dom.  ii.  3596.  '  I.P.M.,  7  Edw.  III.  2. 

T.  de  Nevil,  291. 


38  THE    MANORS    OF    SUFFOLK. 

then  aged  17.  Blomfield  says,  "  In  1330  it  was  found  that  Sir  Ralph 
de  Shelton  sen.  son  and  heir  of  John  held  the  estate  jointly  with  his  wife 
Joan  and  that  he  died  Oct.  16  in  the  same  year  [of  course,  he  did  nothing 
of  the  kind]  leaving  only  three  daughters  Joan  aged  12,  Margaret  5  years 
and  Isabel  naif  a  year  old."  It  is  difficult  to  see  how  this  could  be — for 
John  de  Shelton  died  seised  in  1332  leaving  a  son  Ralph  de  Shelton  after- 
wards Sir  Ralph.  It  seems  that  Margaret  the  wife  of  John  de  Shelton 
deceased  having  long  before  his  death  separated  herself  from  him  of  her 
own  accord  and  "  lived  with  her  gallant  "  lost  her  dower  in  this  manor 
for  so  doing,  so  that  Sir  Ralph  had  it  wholly  from  his  father's  death. 

On  the  Close  Rolls  in  1333  is  an  order  to  Wm.  Bishop  of  Norwich  to 
pay  to  the  Abbot  of  St.  Mary's  York  the  £40  by  which  the  Bishop  made  a 
fine  with  the  King  for  the  custody  of  all  lands  which  belonged  to  John  de 
Shelton  tenant  in  chief  in  Brent  Eleigh,  during  the  minority,  of  Ralph  son 
of  the  said  John.1  The  grant  to  the  Bishop  of  Norwich  of  the  custody 
of  the  lands  is  on  the  Originalia  Rolls  of  1333.'  The  complaint  of  T.  de 
Walpole  as  to  this  wardship  in  1334  will  be  found  on  the  Rolls  of  Parlia- 
ment.1 

There  is  a  fine  as  to  the  third  part  of  the  manor  in  1346  which  is  some- 
what strange.  Thus  "  Thomas  Kenyng  and  Margaret  his  wife  v.  Ralph 
de  Shelton  and  Johanna  his  wife  of  a  3rd  part  of  Manor  of  Brendholleye."  4 
Possibly  this  Margaret  may  have  been  the  wife  of  John  de  Shelton  married 
to  one  Thomas  Kenyng  after  her  husband's  death  and  this  fine  might 
have  been  in  respect  of  the  dower  not  lost.  However  by  1346  Sir  Ralph 
de  Shelton  was  lord  of  the  whole.  He  was  in  the  King's  Company  at 
Cressy  and  there  received  the  order  of  knighthood,  the  King  then  pardoning 
him  the  contempt  and  penalty  which  he  had  incurred  in  not  taking  that 
order  upon  him  before,  when  his  Majesty  directed  in  his  proclamation  that 
all  these  who  had  40  pounds  a  year  in  land  should  take  the  order  upon 
them.5  He  married  Joan  daughter  of  Sir  John  de  Playz  of  Wetyng,  Knt. 
Sir  Robert  was  a  warlike  personage  and  at  the  battle  of  Poictiers  took 
John  Rocourt  prisoner  for  whom  he  obtained  a  safe  conduct  in  1356.  Sir 
Ralph  de  Shelton  by  his  Will  dated  in  1373  and  proved  in  1375  under  the 
name  of  Sir  Ralf  Shelton  senior  Knt.  ordered  his  body  to  be  buried  in  the 
chancel  of  St.  Mary's  Church  at  Shelton  in  Norfolk  and  there  according  to 
Blomefield  he  was  interred  having  died  on  the  17  Nov.  1373  "  and  his 
gravestone  lieth  in  the  midst  of  it,  with  his  effigies  in  complete  armour 
and  a  Saracen's  head  cooped  for  his  crest."6  He  left  Sir  Ralph  Shelton 
jun.,  knt.,  his  son  and  heir,  who  was  then  married  to  Alice  daughter  of 
Sir  Thos.  Uvedale  of  Tacolneston  Knt.  In  1385  he  attended  John  Duke 
of  Lancaster  in  his  great  expedition  into  Spain  and  was  at  the  famous 
battle  of  Nazaret.  He  succeeded  to  the  manor  on  the  death  of  Joan 
widow  of  Sir  Ralph  the  Elder  the  4  January  1405,  when  it  was  found  that 
she  having  died  without  any  heirs  by  Sir  Ralph  the  Elder,  the  manor 
reverted  to  Sir  Ralph  son  of  Sir  Ralph  who  was  then  58  years  of  age.7 
We  do  not  attempt  to  explain  this.  Blomefield  most  distinctly  makes 
Sir  Ralph  Shelton  jun.  Knt.  son  of  Sir  Ralph  Shelton  sen.  Knt.  and 
loan  widow  of  Sir  Ralph  Shelton  sen.  to  die  "  having  no  heirs 
by  Sir  Ralph  "  when  he  makes  the  manor  "  revert  to  Sir  Ralph  son  of 

•  Close  Rolls,  7  Edw.  III.  pt.  i.  16.  *  Rymer  v.  561. 

•  O.,  7  Edw.  III.  5.  •  I.P.M.,  50  Edw.  III.  56. 
'  Vol.  ii.  75.  »  I.P.M.,  7  Hen.  IV.  8. 

•  Feet  of  Fines,  ao  Edw.  III.  23. 


BRENT    ELEIGH.  39 

Sir  Ralf."1  Perhaps  Blomefield's  excuse  is  to  be  found  in  a  note  on  page 
266  where  he  says,  speaking  of  the  Sheltons,  "This  family  was  so  numerous 
from  their  original,  that  an  exact  account  of  them  in  a  regular  pedigree 
cannot  be  fixed."  We  may  however  be  thankful  at  having  arrived  at  a 
period  where  the  descent  of  the  manor  seems  less  involved  in  mystery. 
This  last  Sir  Ralph  Shelton  according  to  both  Blomefield  and  Davy  died 
the  25th  April  1424  "  as  the  inscription  on  his  tomb  in  Great  Snoryng 
church  saith."  Neither  give  the  inscription,  so  we  venture  to  think  his 
death  was  in  1414  and  not  1424."  His  successor  was  Wm.  Shelton  the 
brother  of  Sir  Ralph  jun.  He  married  Katherine  daughter  of  Simon 
Barett  and  died  in  I42I.3  John  Shelton  son  and  heir  of  Wm.  was  the  next 
lord,  he  having  livery  of  his  lands  in  1427.  He  died  in  1430"  leaving  his 
widow  Margaret  surviving.  She  remarried  Robert  Alyngton  and  died 
about  1479,'  when  John's  son  and  heir  Sir  Ralph  Shelton,  succeeded. 
Ralph  Shelton  was  High  Sheriff  of  Norf.  and  Suff.  in  1487  and  married 
Margaret  daughter  of  Robert  Clere  of  Ormesby  and  of  Elizabeth  his  wife 
daughter  of  Sir  Thos.  Uvedale  by  whom  he  had  John  his  son  and  heir, 
Ralph,  Richard,  Elizabeth  and  Alice  married  to  John  Heveningham. 
Sir  Ralph  Shelton  was  living  in  1492  but  died  before  1500,  for  then  Margaret 
Shelton  of  Shelton  "  late  the  wife  of  Sir  Rafe  Shelton  Knt."  desired  by  her 
will  to  be  buried  in  Shelton  chancel  by  her  husband  "in  a  tumbe  which  is 
ordeyned  to  that  intent."  Their  son  and  heir  Sir  John  Shelton  was  High 
Sheriff  of  Norfolk  in  1504  and  was  made  Knight  of  the  Bath  at  the  corona- 
tion of  Hen.  VIII.  Sir  John  Shelton  married  Anne  daughter  of  Sir  William 
Boleyn  of  Blickling  in  Norfolk  Knt.  and  died  21  Dec.  1539  in  the  62nd 
year  of  his  age,  being  buried  in  Shelton  chancel  with  this  inscription,  "  Hie 
sum  sepultus  Johannes  de  Shelton  miles."  The  inscription  about  the  tomb 
on  brass  is  : — 

Johannes  Shelton  miles  quondam  istius  pagi  Dominus 

Si  Fortunam,  si  Vitam,  si  Felicitatem,  scire  cupis, 

Hec  Carmina  tibi  dicent. 

Lege,  Vive  et  Vale. 

Morborum  vicia,  et  Vite  Mala  maxima  fugit, 
Nunc  careo  pacis,  pace  fruor  placida. 
Vixit  Annos  62  A".  1539. 
Bene  merenti  Uxor  posuit. 

On  the  south  side  of  the  tomb  are  these  arms :  A  quartered  coat, 
I  Shelton,  2  Illegh,  3  Burgullion,  4  Cockfield,  Shelton,  and  Boleyn 
impaled.  On  the  north  side,  Shelton  and  Boleyn  impaled,  Boleyn  and 
Butler  Earl  of  Ormond  quartered6  and  Shelton  and  Boleyn  impaled  again. 
Sir  John's  own  effigies  in  a  praying  posture  with  his  arms  on  his  surcoat  and 
that  of  his  wife  with  Boleyn' s  arms  are  in  the  east  window  of  the  chancel. 
Sir  John,  son  and  heir  of  Sir  John  Shelton  Knt.  called  the  younger,  was 
High  Sheriff  of  Norfolk  in  1522  and  again  in  1525  and  had  livery  of  this 
manor  and  Milden.  In  1551  a  fine  was  levied  of  the  manor  by  Robert 
Gufdon  against  the  said  Sir  John  Shelton,  no  doubt  on  some  settlement 
of  the  estate.7  He  married  Margaret  daughter  of  Sir  Henry  Parker  Knt. 

'  Norf.  v.  265.  having  been  the  sister  and  co-heir  of 

*  I.P.M.,  2  Hen.  V.  2.  Thomas  Boleyn  Earl  of  Wilts  and 

3  I.P.M.,  9  Hen.  V.  50.  Ormond  son  of  Sir  William  Boleyn 

«  I.P.M.,  9  Hen.  VI.  43.  Knt.    of    Blickling    by    Margaret 

5  I.P.M.,  19  Edw.  IV.  7.  daughter  and   co-heir  of  Thomas 

6  These    arms  were  quartered  in  conse-                     Botiler  or  Butler  Duke  of  Ormond. 

quence  of  Anna,  Sir   John's  wife        '  Fine,  Easter  5  Edw.  VI. 


40  THE    MANORS    OF   SUFFOLK. 

son  and  heir  of  Henry  Lord  Morley  and  was  one  of  those  who  joined  Queen 
Mary  at  Kt  nninghall  in  order  to  advance  her  to  the  throne.  He  is 
un.lrr  an  altar  monument  in  the  chancel  of  the  Church  of  Shelton 


with  this  iiiM  ription  :  — 

Sir  John  Shelton  marryed  Margaret  the  doughter  of  the  Lord 

Morly  and  had  issue  Ralphe,  Anne  Alys  and  Marie  and  died 

the  ......  day  of  November  Anno  Dm.  1558.' 

Ralphe  married  [Mary]  the  daughter  of  Sir  William  Woodhouse 

Anne  married  the  son  and  heir  of  Sir  John  Godsalve 

Alys  married  the  sonn  and  Heir  of  Sir  Thos.  Josselyn 

Mary*  now  Ladye  Scudamore. 

Arms  of  Shelton    and    quarterings:    Shelton  impaling  Morley,  Shelton 
and  Woodhouse,  &c. 

Sir  Ralph  Shelton  the  eldest  son  succeeded  and  married,  as  stated  in 
the  above  inscription,  ist  Mary  daughter  of  Sir  Wm.  Woodhouse  of  Wax- 
ham  Knt.  and  2ndly  Anne  daughter  of  Thos.  Barrow  of  Barningham  who 
afterwards  married  Sir  Charles  Cornwallis.  Sir  Ralph  Shelton  is  buried 
on  the  north  side  of  the  Altar  with  the  following  inscription  :  "  Ralphe 
Shelton  maryed  Mary  the  Doughter  of  Sir  William  Woodhouse  the  i3th 
Daye  of  Septembre,  Anno  Dom.  1551  by  whom  he  had  issue  Tho.  John 
Raphe  Edward  Margaret  and  Audrey  and  dyed  the  15  June  1568." 
On  the  side  of  the  tomb  the  dates  of  the  children's  births.  Arms  :  Shelton, 
Illeye,  Burgullion,  and  Cockfield,  quartered,  impaling  Woodhouse  of 
Waxham.  Thomas  Shelton,  Sir  Ralph's  eldest  son  is  said  to  have  succeeded. 
He  married  Elizabeth  daughter  of  Edward  Flowerdew  Baron  of  the 
Exchequer  and  was  gentleman  porter  of  the  Tower.  He  died  in  1595 
and  was  succeeded  by  his  brother  Sir  Ralph  who  married  Dorothy  daughter 
of  Sir  Robert  Jermyn  of  Rushbrooke  Knt.  and  was  killed  at  the  Isle  of 
Rh6  in  France.  Dying  without  issue  he  was  succeeded  by  his  half  brother 
Henry  only  surviving  son  of  Sir  Ralph  Shelton  by  Anne  Barrow  his  second 
wife.  Henry  married  Elizabeth  daughter  of  Thomas  Jermyn  of  Depden 
and  dying  the  18  Oct.  1634  at  Barningham  was  buried  there.  He  was 
succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir  Maurice  Shelton  of  Shelton  in  Norfolk,  and 
Barningham  in  Suffolk,  which  latter  he  had  as  heir  to  Maurice  Barrow  son  of 
William  Barrow  of  Westhorp  brother  of  Anne  Barrow  aforesaid  his  grand- 
mother. From  the  time  of  Maurice  Shelton  to  the  death  of  Henry  Shelton 
the  24  May  1690  the  manor  passed  in  the  same  course  as  the  Manor  of 
Barningham  in  Blackbourn  Hundred. 

The  Davy  MSS.  suggest  a  doubt  as  to  this  descent  saying  or  in  the 
time  of  Philip  and  Mary  the  manor  passed  to  Richard  Thorpe,  who  sold  it  to 
Sir  Ambrose  Jermyn  who  sold  it  to  Samuel  Colman  who  was  succeeded  by 
his  son  and  heir,  when  the  manor  probably  became  united  with  Abbot's 
Hall  another  manor  in  the  parish  of  Brent  Eleigh  and  descended  accordingly. 
We  do  find  in  1558  a  fine  levied  of  this  manor  and  that  of  Welleshall  al. 
Milden  by  Robert  Thorpe  against  Ralph  Shelton*  and  the  manor 
no  doubt  did  then  pass  to  Thorpe,  for  on  the  Memoranda  Rolls  in  1560  is 
an  order  for  removal  of  process  from  the  site,  &c.,  of  the  Manor  of  Brent 
Eleigh  and  discharge  of  a  Robert  Thorpe.' 

In  1844  the  manor  belonged  to  Thomas  Brown  M.D.  ;  in  1855  to 
Mrs.  S.  A.  Brown;  later  it  vested  in  Walter  Thomas  Brown,  D.L.,  J.P., 

1  A  Fine  of  the  manor  was  levied  this  year        •  Fine,  Mich.  5  Mary  r. 

between  Robert  Thorpe  and  Ralph         :  Memoranda  2  Eliz.  Mich.  Rec.  Rot.  138 
Shelton  and  others.    (Fine,  Mich.  5 
Mary  i). 


BRENT   ELEIGH.  41 

of  Brent  Eleigh,  who  died  in  1905,  and  it  is  now  vested  in  the  executors 
of  his  will. 

Particulars  of  the  services  and  customs  of  the  manor  will  be  found  in 
the  British  Museum  Collection  of  MSS.1  The  Court  Rolls  1464  to  1501 
are  in  the  Brit.  Mus.*  Admittances  of  tenants  to  lands  called  Melkys 
al.  Veyses,  1497-1608  will  be  found  amongst  the  Harleian  Charters.3 
Conveyances,  &c.,  of  the  site  of  the  manor  in  1551,  1601,  and  1607  will 
also  be  found  amongst  these  same  Charters  in  the  Brit.  Mus.4  A  fine  was 
levied  of  a  manor  of  Brent  Eleigh  in  1589  by  William  Webbe  against 
William  Massye  and  others.5 

Arms  of  Shelton  :  Azure,  a  cross  or.  and  for  Crest  Saracen's  head 
couped  the  shoulders  ppr. 

ABBOTS  HALL  MANOR. 

This  manor  was  constituted  in  the  gift  in  1257  °f  Nicholas  de  Shelton 
to  the  Abbey  of  St.  Osyth,  Essex,  and  at  the  Dissolution  it  was  granted 
by  the  Crown  to  Robert  Goodwin  in  1542. 6  The  following  year  we  find 
the  manor  vested  in  John  Spring,  and  in  1574  in  William  Spring7  who 
this  year  sold  it  to  John  Ho  veil  al.  Smith8  who  with  Helen  his  wife  had 
licence  to  alien  in  1593  and  conveyed  in  1594'  to  Edward  Colman  who  died 
in  1599  and  was  succeeded  by  William  Colman  his  son  and  heir.  The  manor  in 
the  last-mentioned  fine  effecting  the  passing  of  the  property  is  called  "Manor 
of  Illegh  Combusta  alias  Brent  Illeyghe  alias  Abbott's  Hall."10  William 
Colman  died  in  1606  and  the  manor  passed  to  his  son  John  Colman  who  sold  it 
to  Paul  D'Ewes"  from  whom  it  passed  to  his  son  Sir  Symonds  D'Ewes12  who 
sold  it  by  Conveyance  the  i  Oct.  1649  t°  Robert  Canham  of  Milden  Hall 
clothier,  for  £1,400. '3  The  statement  of  Davy  seems  somewhat  confused. 
The  facts  seem  to  be  that  Paul  D'Ewes  was  originally  a  mortgagee  of  the 
Estate  and  subsequently  became  the  purchaser.  Amongst  the  Harleian 
Charters'4  is  a  recognizance  by  which  for  £240  John  Colman  and  Maria  his 
wife  acknowledge  the  manor  to  belong  to  Paul  D'Ewes.  It  is  dated  in  1625. 
There  is  also  amongst  the  Harl.  MSS.  in  the  Brit.  Mus.  a  copy  of  the 
recognizance  of  John  Colman  in  £1,000  made  in  chancery  for  performance 
of  his  covenants  with  Paul  D'Ewes  who  had  bought  the  manor  of  "  Brunt 
Illeigh  alias  Abbots  Manor  "  of  him.  The  date  is  the  22  May  i62615  and 
the  document  is  clearly  one  given  on  a  sale  by  John  Colman  to  Paul 
D'Ewes  and  not  as  Davy  seems  to  put  it  on  a  sale  by  Paul  D'Ewes  or 
rather  his  son  Sir  Symonds  to  John  Colman.  However,  the  manor  does  seem 
to  have  returned  to  the  Colemans  or  Colmansand  John  Coleman  appears  to 
have  been  succeeded  by  his  cousin  Edward  Colman  who  died  the  27  January 
1651  aged  58  and  was  succeeded  by  his  youngest  son  Edward  who  died 
in  1698  aged  62  and  was  succeeded  by  Edward  Coleman  who  gave  this  manor 
to  Edward Goate in  1739.  On  the  north  side  of  the  Chancel  of  the  Ch.  of  Brent 

1  Add.  MSS.  6156,  6160,  Harl.  1006.  I0  Fine,  Easter  36  Eliz. 

•  Harl.  Rolls  I.  22.  "  Harl.  51  H.    33    is  a  licence  of  King 

3  Harl.  55  H.  30-37.  James  I.  authorizing  the  alienation 

4  Harl.  57  H.  8,  55  G.  40,  112  E.  41.  by  Isaac  Wincoll    and    Mary    his 

5  Fine,  Mich.  31,  32  Eliz.  wife     to    Paul    D'Ewes   of    their 

•  Particulars  for  the  grant  34  Hen.  VIII.  parcel  of  this  manor. 

will     be     found    in    the    Record  "  See     Stowlangtoft    Manor     in     Black- 
Office  D.K.R.  9,  App.  ii.  p.  213.  bourn  Hundred. 

'  See    Netherhall    Manor,    Little   Wald-  "Harl.  85  H.  41. 

ingfield  in  this  Hundred.  '4  Harl.  49  E.  15. 

•  Fine,  Mich.  16  and  17  Eliz.  *  Harl.  98,  67. 
»  Fine,  36  Eliz.  East.  Term. 


42  THE    MANORS    OF   SUFFOLK. 

Eleigh  is  a  handsome  marble  monument.  Beneath  this  is  a  portrait  large  as 
life  with  the  following  inscription:  "Near  this  marble  lieth  the  Body 

ir.  Kdward  Colman  ;  the  last  of  an  ancient  and  worthy  Family,  of 
which  he  was  an  Ornament  and  Support :  whose  great  Virtues  need  no 
Recital  in  this  Place  especially  where  he  has  left  so  many  monuments  of 
Piety  to  God,  and  good  will  towards  men.  He  died  the  27  of  February  A.D. 
1739  jEtat.  72." 

In  the  Life  of  Dr.  Balbie,  the  celebrated  and  eminent  Physician  who 
died  in  London  in  June  1776  aged  72,  it  is  said  that  his  relations  the  Cole- 
mans  of  Brent  Eleigh  notwithstanding  the  great  political  antipathy  they  had 
to  his  marriage  with  the  daughter  of  Barnham  Goode  the  under-master 
of  Kton  School,  behaved  to  the  wife  with  the  utmost  civility,  and  left  Balbie 
thirty  thousand  pounds. 

Edward  Goate  married  Mary  dau.  of  Thomas  Barnardiston  of  Wy ver- 
sion Hall  by  Mary  dau .  of  Sir  George  Downing  Bart .  of  Cambridgeshire  and  died 
the  21  Dec.  1747  aged  53.  He  is  interred  with  his  wife  in  Brent  Illeigh  Ch. 
where  there  is  a  monument  to  their  memory.  It  seems  the  wife  died  the  i7th 
Feb.  1804,  having  attained  the  great  age  of  95  and  as  the  inscription  says 
"  might  have  been  accounted  a  rare  instance  of  happy  longevity  but  that 
in  the  last  year  of  her  life  she  had  the  misfortune  to  survive  her  tenderly 
affectionate  youngest  daughter  and  her  only  and  best  of  sons  which  brought 
her  with  sorrow  to  the  grave."  The  marble  was  inscribed  as  a  tribute  of 
filial  respect  for  her  parents  by  Mary  Ranby  her  only  remaining  child. 

Edward  Goate  was  succeeded  in  the  lordship  by  his  son  and  heir  Edward 
Goate  who  served  ten  years  in  the  first  Regiment  of  Foot  Guards  and  was 
afterwards  Colonel  of  the  East  Suffolk  Regiment  of  Militia.  He  died  May 
25th,  1803,  at  the  age  of  63  years,  and  on  a  marble  to  his  memory  in  Brent 
Eleigh  Church  it  is  stated  that  he  "  enjoined  his  family  not  to  raise  any 
monument  to  his  memory  but  to  have  written  on  his  stone  that  in  the  vault 
beneath  lie  his  remains."  The  statement  however  is  made  as  to  his  serving 
in  the  Army  and  Militia  and  then  follow  the  words  :  "  The  space  above 
allowed  not  room  to  enumerate  his  merits 

but  they  are  deeply  engraved 
on  the  hearts  of  his  family, 
his  friends,  his  dependants, 
and  his  neighbours." 

On  Edward  Goate's  death  the  manor  passed  under  his  will  to  his 
daughter  Sarah  Dionesse  who  married  Thomas  Brown  M.D.  of  Lostock 
Place.  He  died  the  9  Sept.  1852  aged  77,  and  his  widow  the  nth  Aug. 
1866  aged  79,  when  it  passed  as  the  main  manor. 

Admissions  of  tenants  of  this  manor  in  1534  and  1556  will  be  found 
amongst  the  Harleian  Charters  in  the  British  Museum.1 

FEN  HALL  MANOR. 

The  first  lord  of  this  manor  we  meet  with  is  Peter  de  Denarston  who 
had  free  warren  here  in  1312.* 

In  1327  we  find  from  the  Patent  Rolls  that  a  commission  was  issued 
on  complaint  of  this  Peter  de  Denarston  that  Edmund  de  Sancto  Mauro, 
Sir  William  Cockerel  and  others  broke  his  houses  at  Brent  Eleigh  and 
Milden,  felled  his  trees  and  carried  them  away.3  The  manor  belonged 

•  Harl.  58  E.  2,  58  E.  3.  >  Pat.  Rolls,  i  Edw.  III.  pt.  i.  28*. 

•  Chart.  Rolls,  5  Edw.  II.  2. 


BRENT    ELEIGH. 


43 


to  Robert  Thorpe  in  1560.'  From  him  it  seems  to  have  passed  to  William 
Humberston  under  a  fine  levied  in  1566'  and  then  on  to  William  Spring, 
who  in  1574  sold  it  to  John  Hovell  al.  Smith3  who  in  1585  leased  it  to 
Isaac  Wyncol.4  The  licence  for  its  sale  is  dated  the  2  Sept.  1593,  and  it 
was  then  held  of  the  Crown  in  chief.5 

It  is  said  that  the  manor  and  advowson  of  the  Vicarage  were  granted 
in  1542  to  Robert  Goodwin  as  parcel  of  the  possessions  of  St.  Osyth's  Abbey  in 
Essex,  but  this  must  refer  to  the  estate  which  Nicholas  Shelton  gave  to  the 
Abbey  in  1257.  Amongst  the  Conventual  leases  in  the  Augmentation  Office 
is  a  lease  dated  the  loth  Nov.  29  Hen.  VIII.  [1537]  from  John  Colchester, 
Abbot  of  the  Monastery  of  St.  Osyth's  to  Thomas  Myryell  of  Assington 
Gent,  of  "  All  that  the  Manor  of  Brendeillegh  with  the  appurtenances  in 
the  County  of  Suffolk,  the  parsonage  of  the  said  Toun  and  all  manner  of 
Tyths  to  the  same  and  all  other  their  lands  tenements  rents  farms  and 
hereditaments  with  their  appurtenances  in  Brendeillegh  and  other  towns 
thereunto  adjoining  with  the  perquisites  of  Courts  thereto  belonging  and 
all  other  their  appurtenances  except  reliefs,  wards,  marriages,  escheats 
and  the  presentation  of  the  vicarage  there  "  for  the  term  of  68  years  from 
Michaelmas  then  last  past  under  the  yearly  rent  of  £7  with  power  to  the 
said  Thomas  Myryell  to  retain  thereout  205.  by  the  year  for  the  payment 
of  the  rents  resolute  going  out  of  the  premises  the  said  Thomas  and  his 
executors  paying  all  out-rents  yearly  going  out  of  the  said  manor  and 
other  the  premises  to  all  manner  of  persons,  and  the  costs  and  charges  of 
the  Channon  Bailiff,  the  Steward,  and  other  the  Lord's  officers  and  servants 
as  often  as  they  shall  repair  unto  the  said  farm  by  the  Abbot's  assignment 
to  keep  courts  there  and  also  discharging  the  Abbot  and  Convent  against 
the  Vicar  of  Brendeillegh  and  his  successors  of  one  yearly  pension  of  8 
marks  going  out  of  the  said  Monastery  to  the  said  Vicar. 

According  to  an  entry  in  theHarl.  MSS.  John  Colman  sold  the  manor  to 
Paul  D'Ewes  in  1626.'  Dr.  Colman,  fellow  of  Trinity  College  Cambridge  about 
1700,  built  a  fine  parochial  library  at  the  end  of  the  chancel  of  the  Church 
and  well  furnished  it  with  books — subsequently  Edward  Colman  built  some 
almshouses  for  6  poor  people  and  in  1736  liberally  endowed  them.  The 
last  of  the  family,  Edward  Colman,  gave  the  estate  to  his  kinsman  Edward 
Goate  whose  son  Edward  in  1747  inherited  the  same. 


1  2   Eliz.    Memoranda    Mich.    Rec.    Rot.         4  Harl.  56  C.  39. 

138.  *  Pat.  Rolls  35  Eliz.  pt.  i.  i. 

1  Fine,  Trin.  8  Eliz.  6  Harl.  MSS.  98. 

»  Fine  Mich.   16  and   17  Eliz.,  Originalia 

16  Eliz. 


44  THE   MANORS   OF   SUFFOLK. 

BURES. 

the  time  of  the  Domesday  Survey  there  were  certainly  two 
manors  here  though  one  only  is  named  as  such.  The  first 
was  held  in  Edward  the  Confessor's  day  by  Witgar  who 
had  18  freemen  by  commendation  and  soc  and  sac.  These 
freemen  could  sefi  their  land  without  licence,  but  there 
were  4  socmen  who  could  not  sell.  The  18  freemen  had 
i  carucate  of  land  and  a  half,  and  3  socmen  who  had  a 
like  quantity,  had  under  them  i  villein  7  bprdars  3  ploughteams  and 
4  acres  of  land,  wood  for  6  hogs  and  one  mill  valued  at  20  shillings. 

Bures  was  a  league  long  and  half  a  league  broad  and  paid  24^.  in  a 
gdt — others  held  land  here,  and  there  was  a  church  benefice  with  18 
acres  of  land.  The  Domesday  tenant  in  chief  of  this  manor  was  Richard 
son  of  Earl  Gislebert.' 

The  other  manor  was  held  in  Saxon  times  by  Uluric  son  of  Brictric 
who  had  2  carucates  of  land  and  there  were  7  slaves,  2  ploughteams  in 
demesne,  wood  for  40  hogs,  4  acres  of  meadow,  2  beasts,  60  sheep,  and  40 
hogs  valued  at  60  shillings,  which  at  the  Norman  Survey  had  come  down 
to  40  shillings.  The  slaves  had  come  down  to  4  and  the  hogs  to  20  ; 
but  there  were  in  addition  2  bordars,  i  mill,  2  horses,  140  sheep  in  lieu  of 
60  and  35  goats.  Another  carucate  was  held  in  Edward  the  Confessor's 
time  by  Tosti  a  freeman  with  i  villein,  i  slave,  i  ploughteam,  wood  for 
10  hogs,  2  acres  of  meadow,  40  hogs,  20  sheep  which  particulars  by  the 
time  of  the  Norman  Survey  had  somewhat  varied.  The  villein  had  gone, 
but  there  were  two  bordars  ;  20  of  the  hogs  had  disappeared,  but  there  were 
15  goats.  The  value  was  20  shillings.  Besides  there  were  2  freemen 
under  Harold  who  had  60  acres  which  they  could  sell  and  i  ploughteam 
valued  at  5  shillings  and  the  freemen  were  delivered  up  to  make  up  the 
manor.  John  son  of  Waleran  was  the  Domesday  tenant  in  chief.2 

Two  other  holdings  only  are  mentioned  in  Domesday  Survey.  One  was 
that  of  the  Abbot  of  Bury  holding  3  socmen  with  8  acres  of  land  and  one 
acre  of  meadow  valued  at  i6d.  These  socmen  could  give  or  sell  their  land, 
but  by  soc  and  all  customs  they  would  continue  under  the  Abbot.'  The 
other  holding — that  of  Roger  de  Rheims — was  more  extensive.  He  held 
a  carucate  of  land  which  had  belonged  to  Earl  Algar.  There  was  one  villein, 
and  one  slave  one  ploughteam  in  demesne  and  another  belonging  to  the 
men.  There  were  also  2  bordars,  2  acres  of  meadow  and  there  had  been  for- 
merly half  a  mill  (but  this  half  interest  had  gone  by  the  time  of  the  Norman 
Survey)  one  horse,  30  hogs  and  100  sheep,  the  whole  being  valued  at  20 
shillings.4  This  Roger  de  Rheims  or  Reymes  had  come  over  with  the 
Conqueror  and  had  received  for  his  services  the  Honor  of  Raimes  consisting  of 
10  knights'  fees  in  Essex.  From  him  descended  Richer  de  Reymes  who 
flourished  in  the  reign  of  King  Stephen.  Richer  was  the  father  of  Roger, 
the  father  of  Ralph,  the  father  of  William  who  left  two  daughters  only, 
Agnes  married  to  Adam  de  Rattlesden  and  Maud  who  died  without  issue. 

In  later  times  the  two  manors  of  Domesday  became  divided  into  six: 
Bures  St.  Mary  or  Bures  Magna  Manor,  Netherhall  or  Sylvesters  Hall, 
Overhall  or  Ropers',  Cornertn  Hall,  Smallbridge  Manor  and  Parry's 
Manor. 

1  Dom.  ii.  435*.  »  Dom.  ii.  360. 

•  Dom.  ii.  393.  «  Dom.  ii.  4216. 


BURES.  45 

BURES  MANOR. 

This  was  the  portion  of  Witgar  and  of  Richard  son  of  Earl  Gislebert  as 
the  Domesday  tenant.  This  Richard  was  the  progenitor  of  the  illustrious 
house  of  Clare,  of  the  Barons  of  Fitzwalter  and  the  Earls  of  Gloucester 
and  Hertford.  He  was  the  son  of  Gilbert,  surnamed  Crispin  Comte  d' 
Eu,  and  Brionne  grandson  of  Richard  I.  Duke  of  Normandy.  He  had 
at  the  time  of  the  Domesday  Survey  188  manors  and  burgages,  thirty  five 
being  in  Essex  and  ninety-five  in  Suffolk.  Planche  in  his  Account  of  the 
Conqueror  and  his  Companions  cites  an  amusing  incident  recorded  by  the 
Continuator  of  Guillaume  de  Jumieges  of  how  on  the  exchange  Richard 
fitz  Gilbert  effected  with  the  Archbp.  of  Canterbury  of  the  Castle  and  estate 
of  Brionne  for  Tunbridge  in  Kent  equal  value  was  ascertained.  A  league 
was  measured  with  a  rope  round  the  Castle  of  Brionne,  and  the  same  rope 
being  brought  over  to  England,  was  employed  in  meting  out  a  league  round 
Tunbridge,  so  that  exactly  the  same  number  of  miles  was  allotted  to  the 
latter  estate  as  the  former  had  been  found  to  contain.  In  1073  he  was 
joined  under  the  designation  of  Richardus  de  Benefacta  with  William 
de  Warren  in  the  office  of  Justiciary  of  England.  A  few  years  later  he 
was  in  arms  against  the  rebellious  lords,  Robert  de  Britolio,  Earl  of  Here- 
ford and  Ralph  Waher  or  Guader  Earl  of  Norfolk  and  Suffolk,  and  greatly 
distinguished  himself. 

Dugdale  and  others  have  confounded  him  with  his  grandson  and 
namesake,  and,  as  Mr.  Planche  has  pointed  out,  have  "reversed  the  order  of 
events,  but  ascribed  the  same  acts  to  both  father  and  son  and  recorded 
the  same  fate  to  Richard  and  his  grandson."  Richard  the  Domesday 
tenant  married  Rohesia  only  daughter  of  Walter  Giffard  the  ist  Earl  of 
Buckingham  and  had  by  her  six  sons  and  three  daughters — Gilbert  his 
successor,  Godfrey,  Roger  an  eminent  soldier  in  the  reign  of  Henry  I.  and 
died  without  issue,  Walter  who  made  some  conquests  in  Wales  and  died 
also  without  issue,  Richard  a  monk  of  Bee  in  Normandy  and  afterwards 
Abbot  of  Ely,  Robert,  steward  to  Hen.  I.  from  whom  the  Barons  Fitz  Walter 
descend.  His  three  daughters  were  Rohesia  married  to  Eudo  Dapifer, 
Adelaide  married  to  Walter  Tirel  and  father  of  Hugh  Tirel  the  Crusader,  and 
a  third  daughter  married  to  Ralph  de  Telgers.  On  Richard's  death  the 
manor  passed  with  his  lands  in  England  to  his  son  Gilbert  known  as  Lord 
of  Tonbridge.  He  joined  in  the  rebellion  of  Odo  Bishop  of  Bayeux  in 
1088  but  subsequently  received  a  pardon.  He  married  Adeliza  daughter 
of  the  Earl  of  Cleremont  and  had  4  sons  and  3  daughters — Richard  his 
successor,  Gilbert,  created  Earl  of  Pembroke  in  1138  and  father  of  Richard 
surnamed  Strongbow  so  celebrated  in  connection  with  Ireland,  Walter 
who  died  without  issue,  Baldwin,  Adelaide  married  to  William  de  Percy 
whose  daughter  Maud  married  William  Earl  of  Warwick  and  whose 
daughter  Agnes  was  the  ancestress  of  the  later  Percies,  Rohese  married 
to  Baduon  de  Monmouth  and  Margaret  married  to  William  de  Montfichet. 
Gilbert  Lord  of  Tonbridge  died  about  1091  and  the  manor  passed  with  most 
of  the  estates  to  Richard  who  was  taken  prisoner  by  Robert  de  Beleswe 
at  the  siege  of  Courci  in  1091  and  is  erroneously  stated  to  have  died  from  the 
effects  of  his  incarceration  which  was  the  result.  He  was  the  first  of  the 
family  who  bore  the  title  of  Earl  of  Hertford.  He  acquired  vast  possessions 
in  Wales  as  the  result  of  a  long  continued  warfare  which  he  waged  some- 
what on  his  own  account  there.  He  was  in  1136  killed  in  a  combat  with 
the  Welsh  chieftains  Joworth  and  his  brother  Morgan-ap-Owen  in  a  woody 
tract  called  "  the  ill-way  of  Coed  Grano,"  near  the  Abbey  of  Lanthony. 


46  THE   MANORS  OF  SUFFOLK. 

He  married  Alice  sister  of  Ranulph  2nd  Earl  of  Chester  and  was  succeeded 
by  his  eldest  son  Gilbert  who  following  his  father's  example  called  himself 
after  his  principal  Barony  "  de  Clare  '  as  2nd  Earl  of  Hertford.' 

In  the  time  of  Hen.  III.  the  manor  was  held  by  William  de  Aguilon.  He 
married  a  granddaughter  of  Henry  Fitz  Aylwin  first  Mayor  of  London.  In  the 
time  of  King  John  he  made  fine  with  the  King  for  the  custody  and  marriage  of 
Joan  the  granddaughter  and  heir  of  this  Henry  Fitz  Aylwin  then  the  widow 
of  Ralph  Le  Parmentier  who  after  the  death  of  her  husband  had  been  placed 
in  the  custody  of  William  de  Harcourt  Seneschal  of  William  Marshal  Earl 
of  Pembroke.'  This  lady  was  the  daughter  of  Peter  eldest  son  of  Henry 
Fitz  Aylwin.  On  the  Roll  of  Fines  of  the  isth  year  of  the  reign  of  John, 
1214  is  a  mandate  to  the  Barons  of  the  Exchequer  as  to  moneys  payable 
by  this  Wm.  Aguilon,  and  on  the  Close  Rolls  the  next  year  we  find  the 
following  letter  to  Peter  des  Roches  Bishop  of  Winchester  one  of  the  King's 
vicegerents  during  his  absence  across  the  channel :  "  Rex  domino  P.  Win- 
toniensi  Episcopo,  etc.  Mandamus  vobis  quod  secundum  recordum 
fidelium  nostrorum.  W.  comitis  Arundellie  et  W.  Briwerre  quod  ab  eis 
factum  fuit  de  convencione  facta  inter  nos  et  Willelmum  Aguillun  de  filia 
et  herede  Petri  filii  Henrici  filii  Eilwini  Majoris  Londom'arum  et  de  terris 
et  redditibus  que  fuerunt  ejusdem  Henrici,  Majoris  Londoniarum,  eidem 
Willelmo  sine  dilatione  plenariam  saisinam  habere  faciatis  de  predictis 
terris,  redditibus,  et  aliis  que  fuerunt  predicti  Henrici  filii  Eilwini  tarn 
infra  civitatem  Londoniarum  quam  extra.  T.  meipso  apud  Partenai  ij 
die  Septembris." 

William  Aquilon  was  one  of  those  who  swore  to  obey  the  mandate 
of  the  twenty-five  Barons  chosen  to  be  conservators  of  Magna  Charta  at 
Runnimede  in  1215  and  was  one  of  the  party  of  the  Barons  on  the  accession 
of  Henry  the  Third.  In  right  of  his  wife  he  also  held  land  in  Addington 
in  Surrey  by  the  Serjeanty  of  making  a  dainty  dish  called  "  Malpigernoun  " 
or  Dillegrout  in  the  King's  kitchen  on  the  coronation  day  and  serving  up 
the  same  to  the  King's  table.  In  the  Testa  de  Nevill  the  tenure  is  thus 
noted :  "  Willelmus  Aguillon  tenet  quandam  terram  in  villa  de  Adinton 
per  serjantiam  faciendi  hastias  in  coquina  domini  Regis  die  coronacionis 
sue  vel  aliquis  pro  co  debet  facere  ferculum  quoddam  quod  vocatur 
Girunt,  et  si  apponatur  sagina  tune  vocatur  Malpigernoun."  In  a  later 
inquisition  taken  after  the  decease  of  Hugh  Lord  Bardolf  the  details  of 
the  tenure  are  somewhat  more  exact  and  are  thus  expressed :  "per  servicium 
ad  inveniendum  unum  cocum  ad  coronamentum  domini  Regis  ad  facien- 
dum unum  ferculum  pro  domino  Rege,  quod  vocatur  Mees  de  Geroun, 
sumptibus  domini  Regis  in  una  olla  lutea."  The  manor  of  Adington  had 
been  granted  by  William  the  Conqueror  to  his  cook,  Tezelinus,  and  no  doubt 
this  was  the  original  of  the  tenure.  The  service,  according  to  Banks' 
Extinct  Peerage  has  been  regularly  claimed  by  the  lords  of  this  manor  and 
allowed  at  each  coronation  of  the  Sovereigns. 

William  Aguilon  died  before  the  3rd  Oct.  1244  as  we  learn  from  an 
entry  on  the  Fine  Rolls  of  the  28th  year  of  Hen.  III.,  leaving  his  son  Robert 
Aguilon  his  successor  and  heir.  Dugdale  is  in  error  when  he  states  that 
William  Aguilon  was  succeeded  by  a  son  of  a  like  Christian  name.  He 
cites  as  his  authority  Claus.  42  Hen.  III.  in  dorso,  m.  n,  but  the  entry 
is  really  Close  Rolls  44  Hen.  III.  m.  n  in  dorso,  where  the  name  is  Robert 
and  not  William.  Dugdale  also  confuses  between  this  Robert  and  another 

1  See  Sodbury  Manor  in  this  Hundred.  '  Pat.  Rolls,  14  John. 


BURES.  47 

Robert  Aguilon  also  son  of  William  living  about  the  same  time.  This  latter 
Robert  married  Agatha  one  of  the  daughters  and  co-heirs  of  Falk  de  Beaufou, 
Lord  of  Hokewold  and  East  Herling  co.  Norf.  and  of  Debenham  co.  Suffolk. 
He  died  in  1286  leaving  four  daurs.  Agatha,  Isabella,  Johanna  and 
Margeria  of  whom  Adam  de  Kokefield,  Lucas  de  Poynings,  Ralph  Fitz 
Bernard  and  Andrew  de  Sakevill  were  respectively  the  heirs  as  appears 
by  a  pleading  of  "  Quare  Impedit,"  for  the  advowson  of  the  Church  of 
Hokewold  in  Hillary  Term  7  Edw.  III.  1334. 

Our  Robert  Aguilon  about  the  year  1257  married  Joan  de  Mohun  one 
of  the  seven  daughters  of  William  de  Ferrers  Earl  of  Derby.  He  was  a 
devoted  loyalist  and  on  the  Patent  Rolls  of  the  49 th  year  of  Hen.  III. 
when  the  battle  of  Lewes  had  ended  in  the  capture  of  the  Sovereign  by  the 
rebel  Simon  de  Montfort  Earl  of  Leicester  are  inserted  under  the  heading 
"  De  securitate  recipienda  a  Roberto  Aguilun,  inimico  Simonis  de  Monte- 
forti,"  four  letters  with  the  King's  teste  at  Northampton  nth  Apl.  1265 
severally  addressed  to  Thomas  Fitz  Thomas  Mayor  of  London,  Robert 
Aguilon  and  Master  Thomas  de  Piweleden  from  which  we  learn  that  he 
had  deferred  taking  the  oath  which  had  been  required  by  the  rebels  of 
those  who  were  suspected  of  adherence  to  their  opponents.  Robert 
Aguilon  resided  in  the  City  of  London  in  the  mansion  which  had  descended 
from  his  ancestors  Henry  Fitz  Aylwin  on  the  north  side  of  the  church  and 
cemetery  of  St.  Swithin  in  Candlewick  Street  over  against  London  stone. 

Robert  Aguilon  married  for  a  second  wife  Margaret  Countess  of  Devon 
and  of  the  Isle  of  Wight  a  daughter  of  Thomas  Comte  de  Savoy  and  sister 
of  Beatrix  wife  of  Raymond-Berenger  Comte  de  Provence  mother  of 
Eleanor  wife  of  King  Henry  III.  She  had  been  previously  married  in 
1218  to  Herman  Comte  de  Ribourg  and  in  1257  to  Baldwin  Earl  of  Devon 
and  of  the  Isle  the  last  male  of  the  illustrious  family  of  de  Reviers  who 
in  July  1262  died  by  poison  eaten  at  the  table  of  Peter  de  Savoy  his  wife's 
brother.  Robert  Aguilon  was  Sheriff  for  the  Counties  of  Sussex  and  Surrey 
in  1267  and  a  member  of  the  King's  Privy  Council  for  the  50  years  of  his 
reign,  and  on  the  morrow  of  his  decease  17  Nov.  1272  John  de  Kirkeby 
delivered  the  King's  seal  under  his  (Kirkeby's)  own  seal  and  that  of  Peter  of 
Winchester,  Keeper  of  the  Wardrobe  to  Lord  Walter,  Archbishop  of  York, 
Robert  Aguilon  and  the  rest  of  the  King's  councillors  in  presence  of  the 
same  councillors.  He  had  licence  to  castellate  his  two  mansions  of 
Perching  co.  Sussex  and  Adington  co.  Surrey  in  the  48th  and  54th  years  of 
Hen.  III.  After  the  decease  of  John  Fitz  Alan  Earl  of  Arundel  18  March 
1272  Robert  Aguilon  was  made  custodian  of  the  castle  of  Arundel  and  of 
the  lands  of  the  Honor. 

On  the  Charter  Rolls  is  a  grant  I3th  June  1271  to  Robert  Aguilon  of 
free  warren,  and  a  weekly  market  on  Thursday  and  a  fair  on  the  vigil,  the 
day  and  the  morrow  of  St.  Michael,  at  his  manor  of  Bures.  The  grant  is 
as  follows1  :  "  Pro  Roberto  Aguillon.  Rex  Archiepiscopis,  Episcopis,  etc., 
salutem.  Sciatis  nos  concessisse  et  hac  carta  nostra  confirmasse  dilecto 
et  fideli  nostro  Roberto  Aguillon  quod  ipse  et  heredes  sui  imperpetuum 
habeant  liberam  warrennam  in  omnibus  dominicis  terris  suis  de  Bures  in 
comitatu  Suffolcie,  dum  tamen  terre  ille  non  sunt  infra  metas  foreste  nostre, 
ita  quod  nullus  intret  terras  illas  ad  fugandum  in  eis  vel  ad  aliquid  capien- 
dum  quod  ad  Warrennam  pertineat  sine  licencia  et  voluntate  ipsius  Roberti 
et  heredum  suorum  super  forisfacturam  nostram  x  librarum.  Concessimus 

1  Legibas,  De  Antiquis  liber.  Camden  Soc.  1846  p.  xliii. 


48  THE    MANORS    OF    SUFFOLK. 

etiam  oidem  Roberto  quod  ipse  et  heredes  sui  imperpetuum  habeant 
unum  mercatum  apud  predictum  manerium  suum  de  Bures  singulis 
septimanis  per  diem  Jovis  et  unam  feriam  ibidem  singulis  annis  per  tres 
dies  duraturam,  videlicet,  in  vigilia  et  in  die  et  in  crastino  sancti 
Michaelis,  nisi  mercatum  illud  et  feria  etc.  Quare  etc.  Hiis  testibus 
venerabile  patre  W  (altero)  Eboracensi  archiepiscopo  Anglie  primate, 
G  (odfrido)  Wvgorniensi  et  R  (ogero)  Lichfeldensi  et  Coventrensi  episcopis, 
Gilberto  de  Clare  comite  Gloucestrie  et  Hertfordie  ;  Jphanne  de  Warrenna 
comite  Surreie,  Humfrido  de  Bohun  comite  Herefordie  et  Essexie,  Rogero 
de  Mortuomari,  Rogero  de  Leyburn,  Willelmo  de  Wyntreshull,  Willelmo 
Belet,  Petro  de  Chaumpvent,  Rogero  de  Wauton,  Gilberto  filio  Hugonis  et 
aliis.  Datum  permanumnostram  apud  Westmonasteriumxiii.  die  Jurm(i27i).M 
It  is  believed  that  the  fair  is  still  kept  up  but  the  day  has  been  altered 
to  Holy  Thursday.  On  the  Hundred  Rolls  1275  we  find  an  entry  that 
the  jurors  say  that  Stephen  de  Langton  had  held  half  a  knight's  fee  in 
Bures,  and  Mabilia  his  wife  now  holds  the  aforesaid  half  fee  for  the  term 
of  her  life  of  Sir  Robert  Aguilon,  and  the  said  Robert  holds  the  same  of 
the  King  in  chief.  Robert  Aguilon  had  much  contention  in  1279  with 
John  de  Warren  Earl  of  Surrey  and  the  Bishop  of  Chichester  in  respect 
of  sporting  rights  in  the  County  of  Sussex  and  his  men  and  their  dogs  were 
captured  and  imprisoned  in  Lewes  Castle  until  set  free  by  the  King's  writ. 
Sir  Robert  Aguilon  died  the  15  January  1286  leaving  a  daughter  only  by  his 
first  wife  Isabella  then  the  wife  of  Sir  Hugh  Bardolf.  Her  age  at  the  time 
of  the  death  of  her  father  was  28  years,  having  been  born  on  the  25  March 
1258.  Sir  Robert  died  seised  of  lands  in  the  counties  of  Sussex,  Surrey, 
Kent,  Hertford,  Buckingham,  Norfolk  and  Suffolk.  The  Inquisition  takeli 
in  respect  of  the  dower  of  the  widow  as  to  the  Manor  of  Bures  is  as  follows  :' 
"  Inquisitio  facta  apud  Bures  vii°  die  Julii  anno  regni  Regis  Edwardi 
xx°  de  terns  et  tenementis  que  fuerunt  Margarete  quondam  uxoris  Roberti 
de  Aguilon  per  xii.  juratos,  &c.  Qui  dicunt  super  sacramentum  suum 
quod  dicta  Margareta  nichil  tenuit  de  domino  Rege  in  capite  die  quo  obiit 
in  comitatu  Suffolcie,  sed  tenuit  manerium  suum  de  Bures  Tany  de  Ysabella 
filia  Roberti  de  Aguylon,  ad  terminum  vite  sue  nomine  dotis  per  mortem 
Roberti  Aguillon  per  servicium  duorum  denariorum  annui  redditus.  Item 
dicunt  quod  dictum  manerium  debet  revertere  Ysabelle,  uxori  domini 
Hugonis  Bardolfi,  tanquam  filie  et  heredi  Roberti  Aguilon  patris  sui. 
Summa  totalis  extente  xl/i.  ixs.  viiid.  ob.  de  quibus  debent  resolvi  per 
annum  Abbati  de  Sancto  Edmundo  iis.  et  iid.  et  ob.  pro  warpany.  Et 
sic  remanet  de  claro  xi/t.  viis.  et  vid." 

Hugh  Bardolf  was  the  eldest  son  of  William  Bardolf  by  his  wife  Juliana 
only  dau.  and  heir  of  Hugh  de  Gournay  and  he  was  born  29  Sept.  1259.  Upon 
his  marriage  with  Isabella  his  father  settled  on  him  and  his  bride  the  Manor 
of  Plumpton  co.  Sussex  to  hold  to  the  said  Hugh  and  Isabella  conjointly 
for  life  with  remainder  to  the  heirs  of  the  said  Hugh ;  and  Sir  Robert  de 
Aguilon  settled  on  the  young  couple  his  capital  messuage  and  Manor  of 
Watton-at-Stone  where  Thomas  their  eldest  son  and  heir  was  born  on  the 
feast  of  St.  Francis  4th  October  1282.'  Of  this  Hugh  Bardolf  Baron  of 
Wormegay  co.  Norf.  we  have  this  description  in  the  Roll  of  Caerlaverock 
among  those  of  the  squadron  of  Henry  de  Lacy,  Earl  of  Lincoln. 

Hue  Bardoulf  de  grant  maniere, 

Riches  horns,  preus  e  courtois, 

En  asure  quint  fuelles  trois, 

Portoit  de  fin  or  esmere". 
1  Ib.  p.  Ixxxii.  •  I.P.M.,  33  Edw.  I. 


BURES.  49 

Which  may  be  rendered  :  "  Hugh  Bardolf,  a  man  of  mighty  deeds,  rich, 
gallant  and  courteous,  bore  upon  azure  three  cinquefoils  of  pure  gold 
beautifully  wrought." 

He  was  summoned  as  a  baron  to  Parliament  from  8  March  27  Edw.  I. 
1299  t°  29  Sept.  30  Edw.  I.  1302,  and  was  the  twenty-second  peer  who 
subscribed  the  letter  to  the  pope  at  Lincoln  12  Feb.  1300  29  Edw.  I.  by 
the  style  and  title  of  Dominus  de  Wirmegeye.  He  died  in  the  month  of 
September  1304  leaving  Thomas  Bardolf  his  son  and  heir  then  of  the  age 
of  22  years  and  upwards.1 

There  is  a  fine  of  the  manor  in  1308  as  follows  :  John  son  of  Thomas 
de  Bassyngburne  v.  Isabel  daughter  of  Robert  Aguylun  (Thos.  son  of 
Hugh  Bardolf  and  Thos.  de  Grey  appon.  clam).a 

In  1312  Isabella  Lady  Bardolf  released  to  Sir  Michael  de  Poynings 
knight  and  Margaret  his  wife  all  her  right  in  the  Manor  of  Bures  by  deed 
dated  at  Barcomb  in  Sussex  on  the  feast  of  the  Annunciation  of  the  Virgin 
Mary  25  March  1312.  The  seal  attached  to  it  was  of  red  wax,  the  impress 
a  cinquefoil,  each  leaf  of  it  charged  with  a  fleur-de-lis,  the  cinquefoils 
being  her  husband's  arms,  and  gules,  a  fleur-de-lis  argent,  her  paternal  arms. 

Sir  Michael  de  Poynings  was  called  to  the  King's  counsel  to  advise 
on  the  affairs  of  the  realm  and  was  actively  employed  in  the  French  and 
Scottish  Wars  both  in  the  time  of  Edw.  I.  and  Edw.  II.  He  died  before 
9  Edw.  II.  1316  as  at  this  date  we  find  Margaret  his  widow  returned  as 
lady  of  the  manor.  On  her  death  the  manor  passed  to  her  son  Thomas 
de  Poynings  who  was  summoned  to  Parliament  as  a  Baron  on  the  23rd 
April  1337.  In  1328  he  had  a  grant  of  free  warren  here.3  He  married 
Agnes  one  of  the  daughters  and  co-heirs  of  John  son  of  Bartholomew  de 
Cryol  and  was  slain  in  the  great  sea  fight  with  the  French  at  Sluse  in  1339 
being  succeeded  by  his  eldest  son  Michael  de  Poynings  2nd  Baron 
summoned  to  Parliament  from  the  25  Feb.  1342  to  24  Feb.  1368.  On 
account  of  the  valiant  conduct  of  his  father  the  King  received  the  son's 
homage,  though  under  age,  and  granted  him  livery  of  his  lands  arid  full 
benefit  of  his  marriage  taking  security  for  the  payment  of  the  relief.  He 
gave  a  thousand  marks  to  Queen  Philippa  in  1366  for  the  wardship  and 
marriage  of  William  son  and  heir  of  John  Lord  Bardolf  to  the  end  that  he 
might  take  Agnes  his  daughter  to  wife,  who  by  the  name  of  "Agnes  Bardolf  " 
is  mentioned  as  a  legatee  in  the  will  of  her  mother  Joane  Lady  Poynings 
dated  12  May  1369  and  by  that  of  "  Lady  Bardolf  my  sister  "  in  the  will 
of  Thomas  Lord  Poynings  28th  Oct.  1374.  He  was  present  at  Cressy 
and  married  Joane  widow  of  Sir  John  de  Molyns  Knt.  and  died  in  1369, 
when  he  was  succeeded  by  his  son  Thomas  de  Poynings  3rd  Baron.  He 
married  Blanch  de  Moubray  but  died  in  1375  without  issue  and  was 
succeeded  by  his  brother  Richard  Poynings  4th  Baron  who  was  then  17 
years  of  age. 

Davy  has  only  3  lords  of  this  manor  after  this — 1385  Rich,  de  Walde- 
grave,  1467  Wm.  Bourchier  son  and  heir  apparent  of  Henry  Earl  of  Essex, 
and  1848  Osgood  Hanbury.  The  two  former,  however,  do  not  appear 
to  be  correct  and  in  any  case  there  is  a  wide  gap,  which  unfortunately 
cannot  be  filled  with  certainty  except  in  the  particular  that  Sir  Richard 
Corbett  died  seised  of  the  manor  the  25  June  1524  and  it  then  passed  to 
Richard  Corbett  his  son  and  heir.4 

1  I.P.M.,  32  Edw.  I.  14.  3  Chart.  Rolls,  2  Edw.  III.  84. 

'  Feet  of  Fines,  2  Edw.  II.  2.  4  I.P.M.,  16  Hen.  VIII.  31. 


50  THE    MANORS  OF   SUFFOLK. 

OVERHALL  <i/.  ROPER'S  MANOR. 

In  the  time  of  Edw.  I.  the  manor  was  vested  in  Robert  de  Bures  who 
had  a  grant  of  free  warren  here  in  1313.'  He  married  Hillaria  and  died 
seised  of  the  manor  about  1331.*  He  was  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir 
Sir  Andrew  de  Bures  who  also  had  a  grant  of  free  warren  here  in  I335-3 
By  Alicia  his  wife,  daughter  and  heir  of  Sir  John  de  Roydon  he  left  two 
sons  Robert  and  Andrew.  He  died  the  22  April  1360*  and  was  succeeded 
by  his  son  Robert  de  Bures  who  however  died  the  following  year  on  the 
7th  of  October  leaving  his  only  daughter  Alice  married  to  Sir  Guy  de 
Bryan,  and  on  her  death  the  n  January  1434'  the  manor  devolved  in 
the  same  course  as  Netherhall  Manor  next  dealt  with.  The  manor  is 
included  by  name  in  the  Inquis.  p.m.  of  Sir  William  Waldegrave  who 
died  the  30  Jan.  1527,*  of  Sir  George  Waldegrave  who  died  8  July  1528,' 
and  of  Sir  Wm.  Waldegrave  who  died  the  7  Nov.  I554-8 

NETHERHALL  OR  SILVESTERS  MANOR. 

Davy  mentions  as  the  first  lords,  Peter  de  Silvester  and  Sir  Roger  de 
Silvester,  but  assigns  no  date.  Succeeding  them  he  has  Joan  (daughter 
of  Silvester  ?)  widow  of  Robert  de  Bures  whom  he  makes  in  1365  marry 
Sir  Richard  Waldegrave,  and  die  in  1410.  Sir  Richard  Waldegrave, 
however,  died  in  1400  according  to  Weever,  but  probably  in  1410  and  Joan 
in  1406,  when  they  were  succeeded  in  this  manor  according  to  Davy,  by 
their  son  Sir  Richard  Walgrave  Knt.  who  was  styled  Lord  of  Buers  and 
Silvesters.  He  was  a  valiant  soldier  and  with  Lord  Clinton,  Sir  John 
Howard  and  Lord  Falconbridge  was  appointed  in  1402  to  keep  the  seas, 
and  landing  20,000  men  in  Brittany  won  the  town  of  Conquet  and  the 
Isle  of  Rhe\  He  married  Jane  daughter  and  sole  heir  of  Sir  Thomas 
Montchensy  of  Edwardstone  Knt.  and  died  in  1434.  He  does  not  seem  to 
have  retained  this  manor  till  his  death,  for  we  find  Alice  daughter  and  heir 
of  Robert  de  Bures,  who  married  Sir  Guy  de  Bryan,  holding  at  her  death 
the  II  January  1434.'  Their  daughter  Elizabeth  followed  as  lady  of  this 
manor  and  married  Robert  Lovell.  Their  daughter  Matilda  married  John 
Fitz  Alan  I3th  Earl  of  Arundel  who  died  the  12  June  1435  leaving  a  son 
Humphrey  son  and  heir  Duke  of  Touraine  and  I4th  Earl  of  Arundel  but  6 
years  old  at  his  father's  death.  Humphrey  Fitz  Alan  i4th  Earl  of  Arundel 
succeeded  his  grandmother  Elizabeth  Lovell  on  her  death  abt.  1438,  but 
himself  died  on  the  24  April  this  same  year  when  the  manor  passed  to  his 
sister  and  heir  Amicia  married  to  James  Butler  Earl  of  Ormond  and  Wiltshire. 
The  manor  is  mentioned  in  the  inquisition  post  mortem  of  Elizabeth  Lovell.10 
Amicia  Countess  of  Ormond  and  Wiltshire  died  without  issue  in  1457."  Her 
husband,  who  was  a  staunch  adherent  of  the  House  of  Lancaster,  and  lord 
lieutenant  of  Ireland  in  1451-2  and  Lord  Treasurer  of  England  three  years 
later,  participated  in  the  triumph  over  the  Duke  of  York  at  Wakefield, 
but  being  in  the  Battle  of  Mortimer's  Cross  where  the  Lancastrians  were 
defeated  he  fled  and  being  taken  prisoner  was  beheaded  at  Newcastle  on 

1  Chart.  Rolls,  7  Edw.  II.  10.  "  I.P.M.,  19  Hen.  VIII.  44. 

•  I.P.M.,  5  Edw.  III.  55.  »  I.P.M.,  20  Hen.  VIII.  18. 

'  Chart.  Rolls,  9  Edw.  III.  37.  •  I.P.M.,  i  and  2  P.  and  M.  92. 

«  I.P.M.,  34  Edw.  III.  60.  »  I.P.M.,  13  Hen.  VI.  34. 

«  Nethirhall  Manor  and  Overhall   Manor  I. P.M.,  16  Hen.  VI.  50. 

as   of    Honor  of  Clare,  Alice  wife  "  I.P.M.,  35  Hen.  VI.  16. 

of  Sir  Guy  Bryan.     I. P.M.,  13  Hen. 

VI.  34- 


BURES.  51 

the  ist  May  1461.  He  was  attainted  by  Parliament  in  the  November 
following  his  execution.'  This  manor  with  Overhall  was  granted  forthwith 
by  Edw.  IV.  to  Sir  Thomas  Waldegrave,  but  there  is  a  grant  on  the  Patent 
Rolls  in  1467  by  the  Crown  to  Henry  Bourchier  created  Earl  of  Essex  the 
30  June  1461*  and  to  his  wife  Isabel  and  the  heirs  of  their  bodies  of  "  the 
manor  called  '  Silvestres  Halle '  in  Sayntmaryburys  with  the  mills  there 
and  all  the  lands,  rents,  reversions  and  services  in  Saynt  mary  burys," 
&c.,3  and  in  1479  we  nn^  yet  another  grant  by  Edward  IV.  of  this  manor 
with  that  of  Overhall  and  a  tenement  called  "  Ropers  "  in  Bures  and  a 
water  mill  to  Anne  daur.  of  Richard  Wodvill  Earl  Rivers  and  sister  of 
Elizabeth  Queen  of  Edw.  IV.  who  had  married  Sir  William  Bourchier  the 
son  of  the  above  Henry  Earl  of  Essex.4  The  Grant  will  be  found  amongst 
the  Cotton  MSS.  in  the  Brit.  Mus.  It  is  dated  at  Westminster  Feb.  14, 
I479-5  The  next  lord  was  Sir  Wm.  Waldegrave  who  died  the  soth  Jan. 
1527  when  the  manor  passed  to  his  s.  and  h.  George6  and  the  subsequent 
devolution  of  this  manor  is  the  same  as  Smallbridge  Manor. 

Court  Rolls  of  this  manor  3,  4,  8  to  14  Hen.  IV.  and  i  Hen.  V.  will  be 
found  in  the  Public  Record  Office.7 

SMALLBRIDGE. 

This  manor  was  probably  carved  out  of  the  main  manor  in  the  time 
of  Henry  III.  Sir  Robert  de  Aguillon  was  lord  and  having  two  daurs.  Isabel 
and  Margaret  the  main  manor  became  divided  between  them.  One  married 
Sir  Michael  de  Poynings  and  became  lord  of  Smallbridge  Manor. 


SHALLBRIDGI. 


A  fine  was  levied  of  the  manor  in  1310  between  Michael  de  Poyning  and 
Margaret  his  wife  against  Thomas  de  Poynings.8  In  the  latter  part  of 
the  I4th  century  the  manor  belonged  to  William  Brande  who  died  in  1375 
seised  of  it  without  issue.  Sir  Richard  Waldegrave  Knt.  was  the  next 
lord  with  whom  we  meet  ;  he  was  the  great  grandson  of  John  de  Walgrave 
Sheriff  of  London  in  1205,  being  the  son  of  Sir  Richard  de  Walgrave  by 

•    I.P.M.,  i  Edw.  IV.  29.  5  Cotton.  Titus,  C.  10,  i. 

'   See  under  Hopton  Manor  in  Blackbourn  '  I.P.M.,  19  Hen.  VIII.  44. 

Hundred.  7  Portfolio,  203,  10. 

3  Pat.  Rolls,  7  Kdw.  iv.  pt.  ii.i6.  !  Feet  of  Fines,  4  Edw.  II.  20. 

4  Pat.  Rolls,  19  Edw.  IV.  4. 


52  THE   MANORS  OF   SUFFOLK. 

Agnes  Daubenny  his  wife,  which  Sir  Richard  was  son  of  Walter  and  Elizabeth 
his  \vift-.  daughter  of  Sir  James  Nevil,  which  Walter  was  son  of  John  de 
Walgrave  and  his  wife,  daughter  of  Sir  Henry  Hastings,  which  John  was 
son  of  Gwaryne  de  Walgrave  and  his  wife  daur.  of  Riston.  Weever  in 
his  Funeral  Monuments  states  that  the  following  story  having  reference  to 
the  Waldegrave  family  was  collected  by  John  Raven,  Richmond  Herald, 
out  of  the  pedigree  of  the  Waldegraves : — 

"  On  a  time  a  gentleman  of  Northampton  being  at  the  sign  of  the 
Crown  in  Sudbury,  and  having  conference  with  Master  Edward  Wald- 
grave  of  Bilston  in  Com.  Sufi*.  Esq.,  did  make  with  him  a  very  credible 
report  of  one  Waldgrave  in  Northamptonshire,  affirming  that  he  heard 
it  reported  of  old  time  that  these  Waldgraves  were  of  very  ancient 
antiquity,  before  William  the  Conqueror's  reign,  and  that  his  name  should 
be  John ;  who  having  one  only  daughter,  and  meeting  with  one  Wald- 
grave which  came  out  of  Germany,  and  was  employed  in  the  Conqueror's 
services,  the  said  German  Waldgrave  related  with  Waldgrave  of  Northamp- 
tonshire concerning  the  marriage  of  his  said  daughter ;  and  told  him  that 
he  would  give  his  consent  that  he  might  have  his  daughter  in  marriage, 
that  then  he  would  procure  him  a  pardon  from  the  Conqueror,  for  the 
quiet  enjoying  of  his  lands  and  livings.  By  which  means  he  obtained 
the  Conqueror's  grant,  with  his  own  hand  and  seal  for  confirmation  of 
all  his  lands  unto  him  and  his  posterity.  The  which  pardon  and  grant 
remaineth  to  be  seen  at  this  day,  1612,  in  the  French  tongue  and  is  in  the 
possession  of  the  Lords  of  that  Manor." 

Sir  Richard  Waldegrave  lived  at  Smallbridge  and  represented  Suffolk 
in  Parliament  in  the  reigns  of  Edw.  III.  and  Rich.  II.  and  was  chosen 
Speaker  of  the  House  of  Commons  in  the  latter  reign.  In  1383  he  obtained 
a  licence  to  crenelate  his  manor  house.1  He  also  had  this  same  year  a 
grant  of  free  warren  in  Bures.*  He  married  Joan  daughter  and  heir  of 
Silvester  of  Bures  and  according  to  Weever's  copy  of  the  inscription  on 
his  tomb,  died  in  1400,  but  this  inscription  states  that  his  wife  Joan  died 
in  1406,  vet  in  Sir  Richard's  Will  dated  the  22  April  1401  he  directs  his 
body  to  be  buried  on  the  north  side  of  the  parish  church  of  St.  Mary  of 
Buers  near  Joan  his  wife.  Joan  died  the  loth  July  1397  and  Sir  Richard 
the  2nd  May  1401.  The  inscription  as  given  by  Weever  is  this  : — 

Hie  jacet  Richardus  Waldegrave  miles  qui  obijt  2  die  Maij. 
Anno  Dom.  1400  et  Joanna  uxor  ejus  que  obijt  10  Junij 
1406  Quorum  animabus  propitietur  Deus.    Amen. 
Qui  pro  alijs  orat,  pro  se  laborat. 

By  his  Will  Sir  Richard  gives  205.  to  the  high  Altar,  35.  4^.  to  the  Chapel 
of  the  Virgin  Mary,  and  35.  4^.  to  the  Chantry  and  I2d.  to  every  priest 
praying  for  his  soul  on  the  day  of  his  burial ;  to  his  son  Richard  he  gave  a 
missal  with  a  vestment  and  chalice ;  to  the  parish  church  of  Walgrave  a  cope, 
to  the  Chapel  of  St.  Stephen  in  the  parish  of  Buers,  a  missal,  then  in  London 
Chantry  of  Polstede  a  vestment  and  to  the  Friars  of  the  Convent  of 
Sudbury  cs.  to  pray  for  his  soul  and  the  soul  of  Joan  his  wife  and  the  souls 
of  his  benefactors,  and  he  appointed  Master  William  Candysh  Rector  of 

Ji.  of  Bulmere  and  Nicholas  Blundel  his  executors.  He  was 
succeeded  by  his  son  Sir  Richard  Waldegrave  who  is  styled  Lord  of  Bures 
and  Silvesters.  In  1420  he  granted  to  Sir  William  Bardwell,  Sir  John 
Hevenyngham  and  others  his  manors  of  Smallbridge  and  Bures,  and  also 

Pat.  Rolls,  7  Rich.  II.  pt.  ii.  6.  •   Chart.  Rolls,  7  and  8  Rich.  II.  15. 


BURES. 


53 


his  Manor  of  Gaynshall  in  Wickambrook  by  way  of  Settlement.  Sir 
Richard  married  Jane  daughter  and  heir  of  Sir  Thomas  Montchensey  of 
Edwardston,  Knt.,  and  died  the  2  May  1434,'  but  Jane  his  wife  survived 
till  1450.  They  were  both  buried  in  the  parish  church  of  Bures.  Their 
son  Sir  William  Waldegrave  married  Joan  daughter  of  William  Doreward 
or  Durward  of  Booking  and  was  succeeded  by  their  eldest  son  Sir  Richard 
who  died  without  issue  in  1439  when  the  manor  passed  to  his  brother  Sir 
Thomas  Waldegrave  who  married  Elizabeth,  eldest  daughter  and  co-heir 
of  Sir  John  Fray  knt.  Chief  Baron  of  the  Exchequer.  He  died  in  1500, 
and  was  buried  at  Bures,  being  succeeded  by  his  son  Sir  William  Walde- 
grave. He  was  nominated  in  1513  as  one  of  the  most  discreet  persons  for 
assessing  and  collecting  the  subsidy.  He  was  knighted  in  1501  at  the 
marriage  of  Prince  Arthur.  A  copy  of  a  charter  by  Sir  William  Walde- 
grave founding  a  Chantry  in  Bures  will  be  found  amongst  the  Additional 
MSS.  of  the  British  Museum.2  By  his  will  dated  the  26  Jan.  152!  16  Hen. 
VIII.J  he  appointed  his  body  to  be  buried  in  the  parish  church  of  St.  Mary 
of  Buer  in  the  tomb  he  had  caused  to  be  made  under  the  arch  between 
the  high  altar  and  the  chapel  of  Jesu,  and  that  he  be  buried  within  24 
hours  after  his  decease.  To  Dame  Margery  his  wife  he  gave  all  his  jewels, 
his  manors  and  lands  in  the  counties  of  Suffolk,  Essex  and  Northampton ; 
and  he  adds :  "Above  all  things  I  desire  my  Executors  to  pay  my  debts, 
and  if  I  have  wronged  any  man,  to  satisfy  him ;  my  wife  has  the  Manor  of 
Edwardstone.  I  constitute  Margery  my  wife,  and  my  sons  George  and 
William  my  Executors."  He  was  seised  of  the  Manors  of  Roydon  and 
Whersted,  both  of  which  he  purchased  of  Robert  Buers,  and  was  seised  also 
of  divers  manors  in  Northamptonshire.  The  Chapel  of  Jesu  mentioned 
in  the  will  is  now  used  as  the  Vestry.  He  married  Margery  daughter  of 
Sir  Henry  Wentworth  of  Coldham  Hall  Wethersfield,  Essex,  and  dying 
the  3oth  January  152$*  was  succeeded  by  his  son  Sir  George  Walde- 
grave who  married  Anne  daughter  of  Sir  Robert  Drury  of  Hawsted  Knt. 
who  married  subsequently  Sir  Thomas  Jermyn  of  Rushbrook.  George 
Waldegrave  by  his  will  dated  July  6,  1528,  and  proved  Aug.  25th  following 
directed  his  body  to  be  buried  near  the  tomb  of  his  father.  To  Ann  his 
wife  he  devised  his  Manors  of  Smallbridge,  Silvester's  al.  Netherhall,  Over- 
hall  and  Frieps  in  Buers  together  with  a  manor  in  Essex  during  the  minority 
of  William  his  son  and  heir,  but  if  it  so  happen  that  the  said  William 
died  within  age,  then  he  willed  that  she  should  hold  them  until  George 
his  second  son  came  to  the  age  of  21  years,  and  if  he  died  within  age  then 
that  she  should  hold  them  in  like  manner  until  his  (testator's)  third  son 
Edward  came  to  the  age  of  21,  and  if  he  died  within  age  then  that  she 
hold  them  until  Richard  his  fourth  son  came  to  the  age  of  21.  And  the 
testator  constituted  Ann  his  said  wife  his  sole  Executrix.5  At  Depden 
two  figures  of  Lady  Ann  are  found  upon  the  same  brass  ;  she  is  represented 
with  each  of  her  husbands. 

George  Waldegrave  died  the  8  July  1528,  seised  of  the  Manors  of  Small- 
bridge,  Silvesters  otherwise  Nether-hall,  Overhall  and  Freps  or  Schrepps  in 
Bures,6  and  was  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heii  Sir  Wm.  Waldegrave  who  took 
an  active  part  in  raising  the  standard  of  Mary.  He  was  knighted  about 
1543  and  was  Sheriff  of  Norfolk  and  Suffolk  in  1549.  He  married  Julian 

'  I.P.M.,  13  Hen.  VI.  27.  *  Testamenta  Vetusta,  by  Nicholas  Harris 

•  Add.  34651.  Nicolas  ii.  629. 

'  Proved  the  6  March  1527.  6  I.P.M.,  20  Hen.  VIII.  18. 

«  I.P.M.,  19  Hen.  VIII.  44. 


54  THE    MANORS    OF   SUFFOLK. 

sole  daughter  and  heir  of  Sir  John  Raynsford  Knt.  and  died  the  12  December 
1554'  and  was  buried  in  St.  Mary's  Church,  Calais,  the  following  inscription 
on  brass  being  set  up  in  Bures  Ch. :— 

Of  your  charity  pray  for  the  soul  of  Sir  William  Waldegrave,  Knight, 
of  Bures  St.  Mary  in  com.  Suff.,  who  died  xii.  December  1554  and  left 
behynd  one  son  and  four  daughters,  on  whose  souls  Jesu  have  mercy.  The 
•aid  Sir  William  Waldegrave  died  at  Callys  in  France,  where  his  body  is 
buried  in  St.  Marie's  Church  there. 

Sir  William  \Yaldegrave  was  succeeded  by  his  son  William  Waldegrave 
who  was  knighted  in  1576  and  married  ist  Elizabeth  sister  of  Sir  Thomas 
Mildmay,  whose  arms  are  still  to  be  seen  in  a  window  at  Smallbridge. 
Quarterly  of  ten :  i,  Per  pale  arg.  and  gu.,  Waldegrave ;  2,  Barry,  of  ten  arg. 
andaz.,  Montchensey ;  3,  Gu.  an  eagle  displayed  arg.,  Vauncey ;  4,  Or.  a  fesse 
vair,  Creake  or  Creke ;  5,  Arg.  2  bars  sa. ;  and  in  chief  3  pierced  mullets  of  the 
last,  Mawgan  or  Moigne ;  6,  Erm.  a  fesse  sa.  betw.  3  fig.  frays  or.,  Fraye ; 
7,  Gu.  a  chevron  engrailed  betw.  3  fleur-de-lis  arg. ;  8,  Gu.  6  eagles  displayed, 
3,  2,  and  i  or.  (Lymsey  ?) ;  9,  Arg.  on  a  fesse  sa.  3  bezants  ;  10,  Gu.  a  cross 
flory  arg.,  Mannock ;  Impaling  for  Mildmay,  Per  fesse  nebulfc  arg.  and 
sa,  3  greyhounds'  heads  crazed  counter-charged  collared  or.  The  usual 
arms  assigned  to  Mildmay  are  Arg.  3  lions  ramp.  az.  armed  and  langued  gu.2 

Sir  William  was  elected  to  represent  the  County  in  Parliament  in  1559, 
1563,  and  1597.  On  the  occasion  of  the  threatened  invasion  of  England 
by  the  Spanish  Armada,  the  County  of  Suffolk  rose  to  the  occasion  and 
sent  a  considerable  number  of  Knights  and  soldiers  to  augment  the  army 
speedily  called  together  at  Tilbury  Fort.  They  were,  we  are  told,  "  All 
choice  men,  well  disciplined,  and  singularly  furnished.  Amongst  them 
Sir  William  Walgrave,  Knight,  who  had  500  men  in  his  band."  Sir  William 
Waldegrave  entertained  Queen  Elizabeth  at  the  Hall  in  1561  and  1579 
and  died  the  17  August  1613  and  he  and  his  first  wife  were  both  buried 
at  Buers  with  the  following  inscription  : — 

Here  liethe  buriede  Sir  William  Waldegrave  Knight,  and  Dame 
Elizabeth  his  wife  who  lived  together  in  godlie  marriage  21  yeare  and  had 
issue  6  sonnes  and  4  daughters.  The  said  Elizabeth  departed  this  life  the 
10  daye  of  may  in  the  year  of  our  Lord  God  1581  and  the  said  Sir  William 
deceased  the  i  daye  of  August  in  the  year  of  our  Lord  God  1613. 

Sir  William  Waldegrave  had  a  second  wife  who  died  the  2ist  July  1600, 
Grisild  relict  of  Sir  Thomas  Rivett  and  youngest  daughter  of  Lord  William 
Paget  of  Beaudesert  in  the  County  of  Stafford  whose  only  daughter  by  her 
first  husband  Sir  Thomas  Rivett  was  married  to  Henry  Lord  Windsor, 
of  Bradnam  in  the  County  of  Buckingham.  She  was  buried  at  Stoke  by 
Nayland  where  her  monument  is  still  standing. 

This  Sir  William's  daughter  Mary  married  Thomas  Clopton  of  Kentwell, 
who  died  in  1597  and  whose  son,  Sir  Wm.  Clopton  Knt.  had  by  his  first 
wife  Anne  daughter  of  Sir  Thomas  Barnardiston  Knt.  a  daughter  and  heir, 
Anne  married  to  Sir  Symonds  D'Ewes  the  great  Suffolk  antiquary. 

Sir  William  Waldegrave  was  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir  Sir  William 
who  died  about  3  months  after  his  father,  namely  on  the  25th  November 
1613,  leaving  a  son  by  his  second  wife  Jemima  daughter  of  Sir  Nicholas 
Bacon,  Knt.,  William  who  married  Frances  (afterwards  married  to  Pere- 
grine Clerke)  and  had  by  her  a  son  Thomas  who  on  his  father's  death  in 
1648  succeeded  him.  He  married  Mary  who  was  afterwards  married  to 
Philip  Cotton  and  dying  the  19  April  1677  was  succeeded  by  his  son  and 

1  I.P.M.,  i  and  a  P.  and  M.  92.  •  Suff.  Inst.  iv.  362. 


BURES. 


55 


heir  Thomas  Waldegrave.  He  was  High  Sheriff  and  a  Deputy  Lieutenant 
of  the  county  and  had  two  sermons  dedicated  to  him  by  Nath.  Bisbie  D.D. 
of  Long  Melford  in  1684.  He  married  Isabella  and  died  in  1692. 

The  Smallbridge  estate  passed  from  the  Waldegraves  at  the  end  of 
the  iyth  Century,  for  John  Currant  or  Currance,  the  purchaser,  held  his 
first  Court  for  the  manor  in  March  1702. 

In  the  early  part  of  the  last  century  the  manors  of  Smallbridge,  Sil- 
vester, Netherhall  and  Overhall  with  the  Parsonage  passed  into  the 
possession  of  the  Hanburys  of  Holfield  Grange  co.  Essex  and  in  1847  was 
held  by  Osgood  Hanbury  who  the  19  Aug.  1789  married  Susannah  Willett 
dau.  of  John  Barclay  banker  in  London  and  on  his  death  the  n  Feb.  1852 
passed  to  his  son  Osgood  Hanbury  who  the  21  July  1816  married  Eleanor 
Willet  dau.  of  W.  Hall  and  on  his  death  passed  to  his  son  Osgood  Hanbury. 
The  manor  subsequently  vested  in  Mrs.  Reginald  Hill  of  Coggeshall,  Essex, 
but  is  now  vested  in  Mrs.  Frederick  Hervey  of  Ickworth. 

CORNERTH  HALL  al.  CORNHALL  al.  NORTHALL  MANOR. 

This  manor  seems  to  have  been  held  by  Richard  de  Cometh  or  Cornerd 
in  the  time  of  Edw.  I.,  and  he  claimed  free  warren  here  in  1275.  He  is  a 
witness  to  a  deed  as  "  Richard  Cornherthe  Knight  "  in  1318,  conveying 
land  in  Bures.1  Upon  a  tomb  on  the  north  side  of  the  Church  of  St.  Mary 
Bures  lies  the  cross-legged  figure  of  a  knight  admirably  carved  in  wood, 
in  good  preservation  and  supposed  to  represent  this  Sir  Richard  who  is  said 
to  have  sold  the  Hall  for  fourpence. 

According  to  a  deed  amongst  the  Harleian  Charters  dated  the  Feast  of  St. 
George  23  Apl.  6  Hen.  IV.  [1405]  Joyce  Vyne  daughter  of  John  Vyne  released 
to  Sir  Thomas  Culpeper  and  Joyce  his  wife  mother  of  the  said  Joyce  Vyne  and 
to  his  heirs  male  of  the  body  of  the  said  Joyce  Culpeper  this  manor,2  and  Sir 
Thomas  Culpeper  was  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir  Thomas.  Amongst  the 
Harleian  Charters  we  meet  with  a  release  of  this  manor  in  1428  from 
"Joyeuse"  dau.  of  John  Vyne  to  his  mother  Joyeuse  daugh.  of  Thomas 
Cornnerde  and  to  the  right  heirs  of  the  said  Thomas  Cornerde.3  A  Mr.  Harper 
was  the  next  lord,  and  his  son  and  heir  George  Harper  sold  the  manor  in 
1548  to  Sir  Thomas  Barnardiston.  Sir  Thomas  died  in  1557  and  we 
find  Thomas  Clopton  and  Anne  his  wife  late  widow  of  Sir  Thomas  Barnar- 
diston holding  the  manor  and  on  Anne's  death  it  passed  to  Sir  Thomas 
Barnardiston  son  and  heir  of  Sir  Thomas.  Amongst  the  Chancery  Pro- 
ceedings in  the  time  of  Q.  Eliz.  is  an  Action  respecting  this  manor  (called 
Cornethall  Manor),  Thomas  Barnardiston  v.  Richard  Golding.4 

The  next  lord  we  meet  with  is  Sir  Stephen  Soame  in  1609.  He  was 
the  second  son  of  Thomas  Soame  of  Botley  or  Betley  in  Norfolk  (by  Anne 
his  wife  daughter  and  heir  of  Francis  Knighton  of  Little  Bradley  and 
widow  of  Richard  Le  Hunt  of  Hunt's  Hall  in  Bradley)  and  grandson  of 
Thomas  Soame.  He  was  Sheriff  of  the  City  of  London  in  1589  and  Lord 
Mayor  in  1598.  He  purchased  the  Manor  of  Brickendon  in  the  County  of 
Hertford  and  this  manor  and  other  estates,  and  married  Anne  daughter 
of  William  Stone  of  Segenhoe  in  the  County  of  Bedford  (sister  of  Serjeant 
Stone)  by  whom  he  had  six  sons  and  five  daughters — Sir  William  Soame 
who  was  Sheriff  of  Suffolk  8  Car.  I. ;  Sir  Stephen  Soame  of  Hey  don  in  Essex 
who  was  High  Sheriff  of  the  County  19  Jac.  I. ;  Sir  Thomas  Soame  of 

1  Ancient  Deeds,  12  Edw.  II.  C.  2197.  '  Harl.  78  D.  12. 

*  Harl.  80  H.  27.  "  C.P.,  ser.  ii.  B.  xxvi.  3. 


56  THE  MANORS  OF  SUFFOLK. 

Throcking  in  Hertfordshire  Knt.  who  was  Sheriff  of  London  1635  and  in 
1640  Alderman  of  that  City  and  later  M.P.  for  the  City ;  Nicholas,  John, 
and  Matthew.  Sir  Stephen  Soame  died  May  23,  1619,  aged  75,  and  by 
the  inquisition  taken  after  his  death  he  was  found  to  have  died  seised  of  the 
rectory  and  church  of  Hundon  and  advowson  of  the  vicarage,  the  Manor 
and  advowson  of  Herringswell,  Manor  or  farm  of  Little  Thurlow,  Pudbroks, 
Temples  and  advowson  of  Little  Thurlow,  Manor  of  Wetheringset,  Manor 
of  Thorneylees,  alias  Thorney  Campsey,  Earl  Stonham  Manor  and  advowson, 
Freckenham  Manor  and  advowson,  and  other  places  in  Suffolk.  He  was 
buried  in  Little  Thurlow  Church  with  this  inscription  : — 

Consecrated 
to  the  Memory 

of  the  Right  Worshipfull  Sr.  Stephen 
Soame  Kt.  Lord  Mayer  of  the  Citie  of 
London  in  the  year  of  our  Lord  1593  (?  8),  and  Mayor 

of  the  Staple  there,  almost  20  yeares,  who  was  the 

Second  Son  of  Thomas  Soame  of  Botely,  alias  Betely 

in  the  County  of  Norfolcke,  Gentleman,  and  Anne  his  Wife, 

Daughter  and  Heir  of  Francis  Knighton,  of  Little  Badley 

in  the  County  of  Suffolcke,  Esquyer,  and  the  Widowe  of  Richard 

Lehunt  of  the  said  Towne,  and  County,  Gentleman.      The  said  Sir  Stephen 

in  his  life  time  re-edified  and  newly  glazed  the  great  North  Window  of 

the  Cathedrall  Church  of  St.  Paul,  in  London.    Newly  settled  and 

adorned  at 

his  own  charge,  the  roof  of  Grocers  Hall  in  that  city,  gave  to  the 
same  Company  i6A  to  be  bestowed  weekely  in  Bread  upon  the  poor  pri- 
soners of  the  Counter  in  the  Poultry  of  London  for  ever.      In  this  Towne  of 
Little  Thurlow,  erected  and  buylt  a  Free-School  with  2ol.  maintenance 

for  a  Master  and  io/.  for  the  Usher  there  yearly  for  ever,  where  he 
erected  and  endowed  an  Alms  house  besides  for  9  poor  People  with  main- 
tenance for  ever,  the  maintenance  of  both  places  to  be  paid  by  annuity 
forth  of  the  Mannour  of  Carleton  in  Cambridgeshire.      He  departed  this 
life  May  23  being  Trinity  Sunday  1619  at  the  age  of  three  score  and  fif- 
teene  yeares,  at  his  Mansion  house,  by  him  formerly  buylt  in  this 
Parish  of  Little  Therlowe. 

There  is  a  monument  also  in  the  same  church  erected  to  his  wife  Anne 
who  died  the  20  August  1622.  On  Sir  Stephen  Soame's  death  this  manor 
passed  to  his  second  son  Sir  Stephen  who  had  it  with  the  Manor  of  Berkes- 
don  of  the  gift  of  his  father.  He  married  Elizabeth  daughter  of  Sir  Thomas 
Playters  of  Sotterley  by  whom  he  had  three  sons  and  several  daughters, 
Sir  Peter  Soame  Bart.,  John  Soame  and  Stephen  Soame  who  both  died 
without  issue.  Of  the  daughters  Anne  the  eldest  married  Sir  Gabriel 
How  of  Wotton  under  Edge  in  Gloucestershire,  Knt.,  Jane  the  second 
was  wife  to  Sir  John  Hoskins,  Mary  married  Edward  Fettiplace  of  Kingston 
in  Berks,  and  Jane  married  Sir  Edward  Nicholl  of  Faxton  in  the  county  of 
Northampton  Knt.  Sir  Stephen  Soame  the  son  died  in  1639.' 

Release  and  Leases  of  Cornerd  or  Cornhall  Manor  will  be  found  for 
I534»  J536  and  1543  amongst  the  Harleian  Charters  in  the  British  Museum.2 

TANY'S  MANOR. 

The  last  of  the  many  manors  of  Bures  is  Tany's  which  was  vested  in 
the  time  of  Edw.  I.  in  Robert  Aguillon  and  on  his  death  passed  to  his 
daughter  Isabel  married  to  Hugh  Lord  Bardolf,  from  whom  it  passed  like 
the  main  manor  to  the  Poynings  and  was  granted  by  Sir  Michael  de  Poyn- 

1  See  Overhall   Manor,  Cavendish  in  this         *  Harl.  80  H.  27,  Harl.  76  H.  21,  24,  41. 
Hundred. 


BURES.  57 

ings  in  1362  to  Sir  William  Band.  He  died  in  1375  without  issue.  The 
manor  subsequently  became  vested  in  Sir  Richard  Waldegrave  who  died 
in  1435,  after  which  the  devolution  of  this  manor  is  identical  with  that 
of  Smallbridge  Manor  already  given. 


58  THE    MANORS   OF  SUFFOLK. 

CAVENDISH. 

the  time  of  Edward  the  Confessor  Cavendish  was  held  by 
one  Norman  with  soc  and  sac  under  the  King  as  a  manor 
with  two  carucates  of  land.  There  was  a  church  living  with 
3  acres  of  free  land;  also  belonging  to  the  manor  were  5 
villeins,  8  bordars,  7  slaves,  2  ploughteams  in  demesne, 
3  belonging  to  the  men,  i  mill,  10  acres  of  meadow,  3 
beasts,  40  sheep  and  30  hogs.  By  the  time  of  the  Domesday 
Survey,  there  were  two  more  ploughteams  in  demesne,  24  beasts  in  lieu  of  3, 
no  sheep  in  lieu  of  40,  50  hogs  in  place  of  30.  To  the  manor  belonged 
Rodenham,  a  hamlet  with  2  carucates  of  land.  There  were  there  5  villeins, 
4  bordars,  2  slaves,  2  ploughteams  in  demesne  and  i£  belonging  to  the  men, 
half  a  mill  and  a  church  living  with  20  acres  of  free  land.  The  value  was 
100  shillings,  but  by  the  time  of  the  Domesday  Survey  the  condition  was 
somewhat  different ;  the  villeins  were  reduced  by  two,  the  slaves  by  one 
and  the  ploughteams  in  demesne  had  come  down  to  one,  while  the  mill 
had  gone  altogether.  The  number  of  bordars  had  increased  to  13  and  the 
value  to  10  pounds.  Cavendish  was  half  a  league  long  and  4  quarentenes 
broad  and  paid  in  a  gelt  lod.  The  manor  was  held  by  Ralph  de  Limesi 
as  the  Domesday  tenant  in  chief.'  The  rest  of  the  lands  specified  in 
the  Domesday  Survey  (though  not  at  the  time  forming  manors  but  sub- 
sequently composing  the  many  manors  of  Cavendish)  were  as  follows  : 
(a)  The  lands  of  Richard  son  of  Earl  Gislebert  who  had  9  freemen  under 
Wisgar  by  commendation  and  soc  and  sac  holding  3  carucates  of  land,  5 
bordars,  I  slave,  3  ploughteams,  14  acres  of  meadow,  4  beasts,  i  horse, 
15  hogs  and  46  sheep  valued  at  3  pounds.  All  were  held  by  Roger  de  St. 
Germains  under  Richard." 

(6)  Four  several  encroachments  upon  the  King : — ist  Aluric  brother 
of  Edric  and  Wisgar' s  man  encroached  on  half  of  his  brother's  land,  namely 
60  acres.  At  the  time  of  the  Domesday  Survey  Roger  de  Saint  Germain 
held  this  as  of  Richard's  fee,  but  the  record  states  that  it  never  belonged 
to  that  fee  by  commendation  or  soc.  There  were  here  a  villein,  a  bordar, 
and  an  acre  of  meadow.  2nd  Alwold  had  a  freeman  under  Harold's  com- 
mendation and  in  the  Confessor's  time  soc  and  sac  and  even  after  the 
Conquest;  but  by  the  time  of  the  Norman  Survey  Richard  had  encroached. 
The  freemen  here  had  one  carucate  of  land,  i  ploughteam  and  a  half 
and  2  acres  of  meadow  valued  at  20  shillings.  3rd  Richard  of  Clare  had 
encroached  upon  a  freeman  formerly  under  the  Confessor  but  his  pre- 
decessor in  title  had  no  interest  whatever  in  him.  This  freeman  had  i 
carucate  of  land  and  formerly  4  villeins  but  then  but  2,  7  bordars,  formerly 
2  ploughteams  then  i  only,  and  i  belonging  to  the  men,  wood  for  10  hogs 
and  then  a  mill  all  valued  at  20  shillings.3  4th  Ralph  de  Limesi  held  a 
freeman  formerly  under  Harold  with  land  which  Edric  the  deacon  who  died 
with  him  in  the  battle  of  Hastings  held  and  it  was  delivered  to  Baynard 
as  a  land  holding.  This  Edgar  added  to  Cavendish  after  Baynard  lost  it. 
At  the  time  of  the  Domesday  Survey  Ralph  de  Limesi  held  it  in  the 
Hall  demesne.4 

OVERHALL  MANOR. 

This  was  the  land  held  prior  to  the  Conquest  by  Norman  and  at  the 
time  of  the  Domesday  Survey  by  Ralph  de  Limesi5  who  married  Christina, 

1  Dom.  ii.  428,  4286.  «  Dom.  ii.  449. 

•  Dom.  ii.  3976.  5  See    Sayham  Hall    Manor,  Newton    in 

'  Dom.  4476,  448.  this  Hundred. 


CAVENDISH. 


59 


one  of  the  sisters  of  Prince  Edgar  Atheling  grandson  of  King  Edmund 
Ironside  who  was  brother  of  Edward  the  Confessor.  He  died  in  1093 
and  was  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir  Ralph  who  married  Halewise  and 
was  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir  Alan  and  he  by  his  son  and  heir  Gerard. 
Gerard  de  Limesi  married  Amy  dau.  of  Trian  de  Hornelade  of  Bidun- 
Limesi,  and  had  issue  John  de  Limesi  who  married  Alice  dau.  of  Robert 
de  Harcourt  afterwards  wife  of  Walleran  E.  of  Warwick  and  died  in  1198 
leaving  a  son  Hugh  who  died  in  1223  without  issue.  Gerard  also  had  two 
daus.  Basilia  married  to  Sir  Hugh  de  Odingsells  who  died  in  1238  leaving 
3  sons  Hugh,  Gerard  and  Sir  William  de  Odingsells  of  Warwickshire.  Hugh 
the  eldest  son  succeeded'  and  died  without  issue.  Gerard  the  2nd  son 
succeeded  and  apparently  on  his  death  was  succeeded  by  his  brother 
the  3rd  son  Sir  William  de  Odingsells  who  married  Joan  and  had 
a  son  Sir  William  de  Odingsells  who  inherited  the  one  moiety  of  the  manor 
which  came  from  his  grandfather  Sir  Hugh  de  Odingsells.  His  arms  were  : 
Ar.  a  fesse  gu. ;  in  chief  two  mullets  of  the  last. 

Gerard  de  Limesi's  second  dau.  Alianore  married  David  de  Lindsay 
a  Scot  and  the  Barony  of  Limesi  of  which  the  lordship  of  this  parish  was  a 
part  became  divided  between  Sir  Hugh  de  Odyngseles  and  David  de 
Lindsey.  Daniel  had  by  Alianore  several  children  and  David  their  eldest 
son  was  lord  of  a  moiety  of  the  manor  in  the  reign  of  Hen.  III.  In  1219 
the  King  had  the  lands  of  David  de  Lindsey  in  his  custody  and  on  the 
Patent  Rolls  are  letters  concerning  the  presentation  to  a  moiety  of  Caven- 
dish Church  in  consequence  of  a  moiety  of  the  manor  being  in  the  King's 
hands ;'  while  in  1223  a  precept  was  directed  to  the  Sheriff  of  the  County 
to  deliver  to  this  David  then  in  custody  of  the  King  of  Scotland,  seisin  of 
all  David's  lands  in  his  bailiwick  which  were  detained  because  he  had  not  done 
service  to  the  King  in  his  Welsh  expedition.  This  David  and  his  brothers 
all  dying  without  issue  his  moiety  in  the  lordship  passed  to  Sir  Henry  de 
Pinkenny  Knt,  in  consequence  of  his  marriage  with  Alice  sister  and  heir 
of  David  de  Lindsey,  and  their  son  Sir  Henry  Pinkenny  granted  the  same 
by  deed  to  Sir  William  de  Odyngselles'lord  of  the  other  moiety,  the  grand- 
son of  the  above  Sir  Hugh  de  Odyngselles  who  then  became  possessed  of 
the  entire  manor.  Sir  William  de  Odyngeseles  married  Ela  daughter  of 
William  Longspee  Earl  of  Salisbury  by  whom  he  had  issue  Edmund  who 
died  without  issue  and  4  daughters  his  co-heirs  amongst  whom  this  lord- 
ship again  became  divided.  Ida  one  dau.  married  John  de  Clinton, 
Margaret  another  married  Sir  John  de  Grey,  Alice  another  married  ist 
Maurice  Caunton  and  2ndly  Ralph  de  Parham,  Ela  the  4th  dau.  married 
ist  Sir  Peter  de  Birningham  knt.  and  2ndly  Sir  Eustace  le  Poer  Knt.  This 
is  the  descent  of  the  manor  practically  as  given  by  Page  who  has  clearly  taken 
his  account  from  what  Blomefield  says  of  the  descent  of  the  Manor  of  Oxburgh 
in  Norfolk.  Page  has  a  little  paragraph,  however,  on  his  own  account, 
and  it  is  this—  "  the  advowson  and  other  lands  in  this  parish  passed  in 
1370  to  Sir  John  Cavendish  who  had  previously  in  1359  obtained  the  manor 
of  Overhall  in  Cavendish  by  his  marriage  with  Alice  dau.  and  heiress  of 
John  de  Odyngseles."  He  seems  to  forget  that  he  has  never  mentioned 
any  John  de  Odyngseles  in  his  previous  account  nor,  indeed,  is  there  such 
a  person  in  the  pedigree  given  by  Blomefield.  Davy  has  a  most  confused 
list  of  lords,  some  with  ridiculous  dates,  others  without  any  at  all,  and  he 
is  apparently  in  hopeless  confusion  over  the  later  descents  of  the  Odyngseles 

1  H.R.  ii.  142,  150.  •  Pat.  Rolls,  3  Hen.  III.  5. 


60  THE   MANORS   OF  SUFFOLK. 

family.    The  manor  seems  to  have  passed  from  Hugh  de  Odyngseles  who 

in  1239  to  his  son  William  living  in  1263,  and  from  him  to  his  son 
Willi.iin  living  in  1286,  and  gone  to  his  son  Edmund  who  died  without 
ie. 

Hugh  de  Odyngseles  was  the  next  lord  and  died  in  1305,'  when  he  was 
succeeded  by  John  Odingseles  who  in  1315  had  licence  to  enfeoff  Thomas 
de  Wassingle  of  the  manor  held  in  chief  and  the  latter  was  empowered  to 
regrant  to  him  and  Emma  his  wife,  and  his  heirs.*  John  Odingseles  had  a  dau. 
Alice  who  married  Sir  John  Cavendish.  John  Odingseles  died  in  i353,J 
\vlu-n  apparently  Sir  John  Cavendish  became  lord  of  the  manor  in  right 
of  his  wife.  Davy  says  that  Alice  who  married  Sir  John  Cavendish  was 
dau.  and  co-heir  of  Sir  William Odyngseles  and  sister  and  co-heir  of  Edmund, 
but  as  he  apparently  makes  this  Sir  Wm.  to  be  the  same  Sir  William  who 
was  living  47  Hen.  III.  one  can  hardly  adopt  the  suggestion. 

There  is  a  licence  on  the  Originalia  Rolls  in  1358,'  to  John 
Wyngefeld  and  others  to  acquire  "Overhall  Manor  in  Cavendish,"  and  this  was 
carried  out  by  a  fine  in  the  same  year  levied  between  John  de  Wynggefeld, 
Gilbert  de  Debenham  and  John  de  Cavendish  and  Alice  his  wife  against 
John  son  of  John  de  Odingseles.5  It  is  quite  possible  that  this  was  in 
contemplation  of  some  settlement  of  the  manor  effected  by  John 
Cavendish  and  his  wife  by  conveyance  to  trustees. 

Sir  John  Cavendish  was  a  native  of  the  parish  and  descended  from  a 
junior  branch  of  the  Gernon  family  who  settling  here  assumed  the  name 
of  the  place.  From  the  Close  Rolls  of  the  time  of  Hen.  III.  we  learn  that  a 
Robert  son  of  Simon  de  Cavendish  was  then  engaged  in  a  law  suit  respect- 
ing 6  acres  of  land  in  this  place.6 

Sir  John  Cavendish  was  Chief  Justice  of  the  Court  of  King's  Bench, 
and  in  1370  a  fine  was  levied  of  the  advowson  and  sundry  lands  in  Caven- 
dish against  Sir  John  de  Clinton  Knt.  Sir  John  Cavendish  and  Alice  his  wife. 
In  1380  Sir  John  Cavendish  was  elected  Chancellor  of  the  University  of  Cam- 
bridge and  the  next  year  he  was  commissioned  to  suppress  the  insurrection 
against  the  King.  The  great  mover  in  the  rebellion  was  Wat  Tyler  who 
marched  at  the  head  of  his  followers  to  London,  where  they  broke  into  the 
Tower  and  murdered  Simon  of  Sudbury,  the  Archbishop  of  Canterbury. 
Whilst  the  insurrection  was  raging  in  London  many  parts  of  the  provinces 
were  similarly  disturbed.  The  populace  in  Suffolk  were  being  led  by  one 
John  Raw,  a  priest.  The  Chief  Justice  had  been  commissioned  to  suppress 
the  insurrection  in  the  City  of  York,  but  happening  at  this  time  to  be  in 
Suffolk  he  had  the  misfortune  to  fall  into  the  hands  of  the  rabble  then 
exasperated  by  the  intelligence  of  the  death  of  their  chief  at  the  hands  of 
Sir  John's  younger  son  John.  He  was  dragged  to  Bury  and  there  his 
head  being  struck  off  it  was  set  upon  the  pillory  of  the  market  cross  in 
the  month  of  June  1381."  His  will  is  dated  at  Bury  St.  Edmunds  on 
Monday  after  the  Feast  of  Palm  the  previous  year.  By  it  he  directed  his 
body  to  be  buried  in  the  Church  of  Cavendish,  near  the  body  of  Alice  his 
late  wife.  He  devised  to  Andrew  Cavendish  his  son  and  heir  his  manors 
and  lands  in  Cavendish,  Pentlowe,  Fakenham  Aspes  and  Saxham.  He 
left  legacies  to  Rose  the  wife  of  his  said  son  Andrew,  to  Margaret  daughter 

1  Extent,  I.P.M.,  33  Edw.  I.  74.  «  O.,  32  Edw.  III.  24. 

•  Pat.    Rolls,   9   Edw.    II.    pt.    ii.   21 ;  »  Feet  of  Fines,  31  and  32  Edw.  III.  8. 

I.Q.D.,  9  Edw.  II.  90,  ii  Edw.  II.  •  Close  Rolls,  n  Hen.  III.  3.     In  dorso. 

74-  '  I.P.M.,  5  Rich.  II.  ii,  14. 
»  I.P.M..  27  Edw.  III.  60. 


CAVENDISH.  61 

to  Andrew  his  said  son,  and  appointed  Robert  de  Swynbourne  and  John 
Rookswood  sen.  his  executors.  The  will  was  proved  the  26  August  1381. 
The  son  John  referred  to  was  one  of  the  esquires  to  the  body  of  Rich.  II. 
and  the  incident  of  his  dispatch  of  Wat  Tyler  in  Smithfield  after  he  had 
been  stabbed  by  Sir  William  Wai  worth  is  well  known.  For  his  zeal  in 
this  matter  John  Cavendish  was  knighted  on  the  spot  by  the  King  and 
had  settled  upon  him  in  perpetuity  a  pension  of  £40.  The  Chief  Justice 
was  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir  Sir  Andrew  Cavendish.  He  represented 
the  County  of  Suffolk  in  Parliament  in  1371  and  received  for  41  days 
attendance  the  sum  of  £8.  43.  In  1386  he  was  High  Sheriff  of  Suffolk  and 
Norfolk,  and  died  in  1395,'  when  the  manor  passed  to  his  widow  Rose  in 
dower,  and  William  Cavendish  son  and  heir  of  Sir  Andrew  conveyed  the 
reversion  by  fine  to  his  uncle  William  Cavendish  and  son  and  heir  of  John 
Cavendish  the  2nd  son  of  the  Chief  Justice.  The  two  fines  are  thus 
entered  :  "  William  Cavendyssh  of  London  v.  William  Cavendyssh  son  and 
heir  of  Sir  Andrew  Cavendyssh  of  Cavendish  Manor  called  Overhalle  with 
appurtenances  which  Robert  Chichesley,  William  Olyver,  John  Shawe, 
and  Thomas  Haryngton  held  for  the  life  of  Rose  wife  of  Andrew  Cavendyssh," 
and  "  Robert  Cavendyssh  v.  William  Cavendyssh  son  and  heir  of  Sir  Andrew 
Cavendyssh  of  Cavendish  Manor  called  Overhalle  with  appurtenances  which 
Rosa  wife  of  Andrew  Cavendyssh  held  as  her  dowry."8 

William  Cavendish  died  in  1433  and  was  succeeded  by  his  brother 
Robert  Cavendish  Serjeant  at  law.  He  died  in  1438,  without  issue,3  and 
was  succeeded  by  his  nephew  Thomas  Cavendish  son  of  William  the  brother 
of  Robert.  A  fine  was  levied  of  the  manor  in  1439  by  William  Norwold 
clerk,  John  Olney,  Thomas  Chalton,  Thomas  Batayle,  William  Flete, 
Mathew  Fowecher,  William  Barthelmewe  clerk  and  William  Berneway  v. 
William  Nell  and  Alice  his  wife.4 

Thomas  Cavendish  mortgaged  the  manor  to  John  Smyth  the  elder 
and  John  Smyth  the  younger,  as  we  learn  from  the  early  Chancery  Proceed- 
ings in  which  are  recorded  an  action  by  Thomas  Cavendish  and  Catherine 
his  wife  against  the  Smyths.5 

Thomas  Cavendish  died  in  1477,*  leaving  an  infant  heir  Thomas  and 
the  King  took  into  his  custody  this  manor.  There  is  a  grant  by  the  King 
in  1483  on  the  Patent  Rolls  to  Nicholas  Lathell  and  Richard  Williams  of 
the  custody  rending  to  the  King  10  marks  yearly.7  Thomas  Cavendish 
the  infant  became  Clerk  of  the  Pipe  in  the  Exchequer  and  married  Alice 
daughter  and  co-heir  of  John  Smith  of  Podbrook  Hall  in  Cavendish.  He  died 
in  1524  and  the  manor  passed  to  his  eldest  son  and  heir  George  Cavendish.  In 
1543  a  fine  was  levied  by  John  Coxe  and  others  against  this  George  Caven- 
dish most  likely  on  the  occasion  of  some  settlement  of  the  manor.8  The 
fine  included  Netherhall  Manor  as  well  as  Overhall.  This  is  the  well-known 
Gentleman  Usher  of  Cardinal  Wolsey  and  his  faithful  friend  and  historian. 
He  died  about  1561  when  the  manor  passed  to  his  son  and  heir  William 
Cavendish  who  died  the  following  year.  The  manor  was  in  1565  released 
to  William  Cavendish  of  London,  mercer.  It  must  have  been  during  his 

'  I.P.M.,  18  Rich.  II.,  ii  Hen.  IV.  5.  6  I.P.M.,  17  Edw.  IV.  4;  2oEdw.  IV.  i. 

'  Feet  of  Fines,  13  Hen.  IV.  30,  31.  'Pat.    Rolls,  i    Rich.    III.    pt.   v.  i,  8; 

3  I.P.M..  17  Hen.  VI.  16.  Harl.  433. 

«  Feet  of  Fines,  18  Hen.  VI.  16.  8  Fine,  Trin.  35  Hen.  VIII. 

*  E.C.P.,  5  Edw.    IV. ,  49  Hen.  VI.  31, 

255,    33,    49:    Ib.    38  Hen.  VI.- 

5  Edw.  IV.  27,  142. 


62  THE    MANORS   OF   SUFFOLK. 

holding  of  the  lordship  that  a  claim  was  made  by  Rafe  Cavendyshe  against 
Thomas  Griggs  and  others  as  to  lands  in  Cavendish  held  of  the  Manor  of 
"  Overhall  Cavendyshe  "  of  which  manor  William  Cavendyshe  plaintiff's 
father  is  said  to  have  been  lord  "  and  devised  to  plaintiff  by  Thomas 
Fowler." 

This  is  amongst  the  Early  Chancery  Proceedings.1  In  1569  the  manor 
was  sold  by  William  Cavendish  to  Robert  Downes  of  London  *  who  in  1573 
sold  it  to  John  Felton  of  Overchrysal  co.  Essex.1 

In  the  following  year  John  Felton  sold  the  manor  to  George  Howe  of 
Sudbury,  clothier,4  and  in  1601  the  manor  passed  to  Bridget  Cracherode 
daughter  of  Mathew  Cracherode  of  Cavendish.  Matthew  Cracherode  son 
and  heir  succeeded  in  1615  and  in  1622  the  manor  became  the  property  by 
purchase  of  Sir  Stephen  Soame  of  Heyden  co.  Essex.5  He  died  in  1639 
and  was  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir  Sir  Peter  Soame.  Sir  Peter 
succeeded  to  the  Baronetcy  of  his  relative  Sir  William  Soame  of  Little 
Thurlow  on  his  death  without  issue,  and  at  the  coronation  of  King  James  II. 
put  in  a  claim  ad  manutergium  tenendum  allocutur  (sic),  sed  constitutio 
deputati  refertur  beneplacito  Regis.  Quoad  residuum  clamei  non  allocutur, 
et  post  Rex  constituit  Anthonium  comitum  Kent,  ad  exequendum  officium 
in  jure  Petri.  This  claim  appears  in  a  petition  to  Francis  lord  Guild- 
ford  and  others,  commissioners  for  receiving  claims,  to  hold  the  basin  and 
ewer  for  a  moiety  of  the  manor  of  Heydon  and  the  towel  for  the  other 
moiety,  and  that  he  might  be  admitted  in  person,  or  by  a  proper  deputy 
to  perform  the  office,  and  to  have  all  the  profits  belonging  to  that  service. 
He  married  Susanna  youngest  daughter  of  Ralph  Freeman  of  Aspeden 
Hall  in  Hertfordshire  by  whom  he  had  two  sons  Sir  Peter  Soame  his 
successor  in  the  Baronetage,  and  Freeman  Soame  ;  and  two  daughters 
Susan  married  to  Sir  Cane  James  of  Creshall  in  Essex  Bart,  and  Elizabeth. 
The  arms  of  the  Soame  family  are  :  Gules,  a  chevron,  between  three  mallets, 
or.  Sir  Peter  Soame  the  father  did  not  transmit  this  manor  to  his  son, 
for  in  1679  he  sold  it  to  Isaac  Fuller  of  Cavendish  grocer  who  in  1701  sold 
the  same  to  William  Basset  of  Long  Melford  clothier.  In  1730  it  was 
purchased  by  Samuel  Thomas  of  Lavenham  and  was  sold  by  his  heir  in 
1791  to  Thomas  Ruggles  a  bencher  of  Lincoln's  Inn,  who  dying  in  1813 
left  by  his  wife  Jane  Anne  daughter  of  John  Freeland  of  Cobham  co.  Surrey 
a  son  John  Ruggles  of  Spains  Hall,  Essex,  who  was  High  Sheriff  of  Suffolk 
in  1829.  In  1827  he  took  the  name  of  Brise  and  married  Catherine  daughter 
of  John  Haynes  Harrison  of  Copford  Hall  Colchester  by  whom  he  had 
issue  with  two  daughters  a  son  Samuel  Brise  Ruggles  Brise  who  on  the 
death  of  his  father  in  Sept.  1852  succeeded  to  the  lordship.  He  married 
Marianne  Weyland  4th  daughter  of  Sir  Edward  Bowyer  Smyth  Bart. 
John  Yelloly  M.D.  physician  to  George  IV.  and  son  of  John  a  merchant 
of  Alnwick  by  Jane  daughter  of  George  Dawson  of  Little  Mill  purchased 
Cavendish  Hall  about  i^o-i,  but  apparently  did  not  at  the  time  acquire 
the  manor,  as  this  is  stated  to  have  been  vested  in  1844  in  J.  R.  Brise  and 
as  late  as  1855  m  Colonel  S.  B.  Ruggles  Brise.  It  is  true  the  statement 
vaguely  is  that  they  were  lords  of  the  "  Manor  of  Cavendish,"  and  in  1855 
in  the  same  work  containing  the  statement  as  to  Col.  Brise  being  lord  of 
Cavendish  we  find  it  stated  that  the  manors  of  Overhall  and  Netherhall 

1  C.P.  i.  210.  «  Fine,  Easter  16  Eliz. 

•  Fine,  Mich.  7  Eliz.  5  See    Smallbridge     Manor,     Bures,     in 

'  Fine,  Mich.  15  Eliz.  this  Hundred. 


CAVENDISH.  63 

were  owned  by  Samuel  Tyssen  Yelloly  who  was  the  second  son  of  Dr.  John 
Yelloly  (who  had  died  at  Cavendish  Hall  the  31  Jan.  1842)  by  Sarah  his 
wife  daughter  of  Samuel  Tyssen  of  Narborough  Hall,  Norfolk.  Samuel 
Tyssen  Yelloly  married  Mary  Ellis  daughter  of  the  Rev.  Edward  Bull  6th  son 
of  John  Bull  of  Pentlow,  Essex  by  Margaret  Toundron  his  wife  and  died 
at  Cavendish  Hall  in  1860  when  the  manor  or  some  interest  therein 
passed  to  his  son  and  heir  John  S.  De  Beauvoir  Yelloly  R.N.  for  he  and  Miss 
E.  S.  R.  Yelloly  are  stated  to  have  owned  the  Manors  of  Overhall  and 
Netherhall  in  1885  and  the  same  are  now  stated  to  be  in  John  Yelloly. 

DE  GREY'S  MANOR. 

On  the  marriage  of  Sir  John  de  Grey  of  Rotherfield  with  Margaret 
one  of  the  daughters  and  co-heirs  of  Sir  William  Odingsels  as  mentioned 
under  the  account  of  the  Manor  of  Overhall,  or  rather  upon  Sir  William's 
death  a  portion  of  the  land  which  belonged  to  him  seems  to  have  passed 
to  Sir  John  De  Grey  in  right  of  his  wife  and  to  have  been  thenceforth  held 
as  a  separate  manor,  or  possibly  the  holding  of  Sir  John  was  only  increased, 
for  it  must  be  remembered  that  his  father  William  de  Grey  had  already 
a  considerable  estate  in  Cavendish  in  respect  of  which  he  had  a  grant  of 
free  warren  in  1285.'  The  Greys  are  usually  supposed  to  be  descendants 
of  Arnulph  lord  of  Gray  in  Normandy  who  vr&s  living  about  970,  but  some 
have  derived  them  from  the  Picard  family  of  Croy.  They  no  doubt  had 
an  ancestor  Auschetil  de  Grai  who  came  over  with  the  Conqueror. 

Sir  John  de  Grey  was  the  son  and  heir  of  William  de  Grey  the  3rd  son 
of  Henry  de  Grey  a  great  favourite  with  Richard  I.  and  also  of  his  successors 
John  and  Hen.  III.  Sir  Thomas  de  Grey  the  son  and  heir  of  Sir  John  and 
Margaret  married  Alice  daughter  and  sole  heiress  of  Sir  Richard  de  Corn- 
herd  Knt.2  It  is  said  that  on  this  match  Sir  Thomas  finding  so  many  bearing 
his  own  paternal  arms  assumed  those  of  Cornherd  which  he  and  his  descen- 
dants continued  to  bear  as  their  arms,  viz. :  Az.  a  fesse  between  two  chevrons 
or.,  which  arms  it  is  further  said  the  Cornherds  had  in  imitation  of  the 
Bainard's  their  superior  lords,  the  field  and  chevrons  only  differing  in 
colour. 

In  1302  Thomas  de  Grey  had  a  grant  of  free  warren  in  respect  of  his 
Cavendish  estate,3  and  in  1321  he  and  Alice  his  wife  held  divers  lands  in 
Great  Cornard  of  Richard  Cornerd  the  wife's  father  and  also  this  manor 
called  "  Cavendish  Manor  "  worth  £10.  13.  4.  at  one  fee,  and  also  of  William 
de  Butevyler  one  messuage,  one  carucate  and  60  acres  of  land,  one  acre 
of  meadow  and  IDS.  rent  in  Little  Cornard,  Bures,  Newton,  Walding- 
field,  Illegh,  Preston,  Thorpe  and  Lillesey  worth  £3  per  annum,  at  the  4th 
part  of  a  fee,  and  they  also  held  more  of  the  inheritance  of  the  said  Alice — a 
messuage  and  one  carucate  of  land  in  Barnardeston  of  Arnold  de  Mounteney 
by  the  service  of  one  halfpenny  tithe  scutage  when  laid  which  house  and 
carucate  was  worth  £6.  13.  4.  per  annum.  Thomas  de  Grey  died  in  I32i4 
leaving  Alice  his  wife  surviving,  and  in  1322  she  settled  lands  on  her  sons 
Roger  and  John.  Sir  Thomas  de  Grey  Knt.  their  eldest  son  and  heir 
succeeded  and  married  ist  Isabel  eldest  daughter  and  co-heir  of  Fulk 
Baynard  of  Merton  and  settled  at  Merton  in  the  ancient  seat  of  the  Bay- 
nards.  He  married  2ndly  Alice  who  survived  him.  Sir  Roger  de  Grey 

1  Chart.  Rolls,  13  Edw.  I.  120.  3  Chart.  Rolls,  30  Edw.  I.  33. 

•  See  Cawston  or  Caxton's  Manor,  Little         '  I.P.M.,  15  Edw.  II.  22. 
Cornard  in  this  Hundred. 


64  THE   MANORS   OF   SUFFOLK. 

the  son  of  Sir  Thomas  succeeded  and  by  will  proved  in  1371  he  declared 
that  he  had  enfeoffcd  Sir  William  Bawde  Priest  and  others  of  his  Manors  of 
Cav«'ndi-li.  I.ittlc  l  oriKTth  and  Preston.  The  will  is  dated  at  Dover,  and 
i^  in  In  mil  IK-  dinrts  his  father  Sir  Thomas  de  Grey's  debts  to  be 
paid  and  that  Alice  his  wife  should  have  an  annuity  of  20  marks  per  annum 
and  Sir  Thomas  Grey  his  brother  another  of  the  same  sum.  On  Sir  Roger 
de  Grey's  death  which  occurred  in  1371'  he  was  succeeded  by  his  son  and 
lu -ir  Thomas  who  died  a  minor  in  1383'  having  had  two  sisters  Margaret 
married  to  Sir  Thomas  Shardelowe  but  had  died  the  year  before  her  brother 
without  issue,  and  Joan  married  to  Thomas  Pynckbeke  who  had  a  son 
Richard  who  died  without  issue.  On  the  15  May  21  Rich.  II.  [1398]  a  writ 
was  issued  to  enquire  of  whom  the  manor  of  Greys  in  Cavendish  was  held 
the  reversion  of  which  Thomas  late  Duke  of  Gloucester  acquired  in  fee 
simple  of  Master  Thomas  Grey  clerk  and  which  reversion  by  reason  of  the 
said  Duke's  forfeiture  pertained  to  the  King.3  The  manor  then  passed  to 
Agnes  Lady  Bardolph  wife  of  Sir  Thomas  Mortimer  eldest  daughter  of  Sir 
Michael  Poynings  and  was  sold  by  her  to  Robert  Lord  Poynings  and  others 
in  1402.  It  was  granted  by  the  Crown  to  Sir  John  Pelham  in  1404,  but 
appears  in  the  reign  of  Hen.  VI.  to  be  again  in  the  Crown  and,  indeed,  in 
that  reign  to  have  been  regarded  as  part  of  the  possessions  of  the  Duchy 
of  Lancaster,  for  Ministers'  accounts  of  the  manor  "  land  of  the  Duchy  of 
Lancaster,"  30  to  31  Hen.  VI.  [1452-3]  will  be  found  in  the  Public  Record 
Office.4 

In  1461  there  is  a  grant  on  the  Patent  Rolls  to  Thomas  Montgomery 
King's  Knt.  by  mainprise  of  John  Clopton  and  Thomas  Grene  of  the  custody 
of  the  King's  Manor  of  Greyes  in  Cavendish  with  courts  leet,  etc.,  for  12 
years  rending  to  the  King  £23.  6.  8.  yearly  and  supporting  all  charges,5 
and  also  from  the  same  Rolls  for  the  same  year,  we  learn  that  a  Com- 
mission was  issued  to  enquire  into  a  complaint  made  by  Henry  Earl  of 
Essex  and  others  that  whereas  they  were  lately  seised  of  the  Manor  of 
Greys  in  their  demesne  as  of  fee  in  time  of  peace  in  the  reign  of  Hen.  VI. 
and  received  esplees  thereby,  they  were  unjustly  disseised  by  Richard 
late  Duke  of  York.6 

We  do  find  land  in  Cavendish  mentioned  in  the  Inquisition  post 
mortem  of  Richard  Duke  of  York,  father  of  the  King  in  1463 .'  It  included 
Chelfordes  in  Cavendish  and  Paddokes  mill,  a  water  mill  there  and  other 
land  but  not  this  manor  apparently,  though  Davy  makes  this  Richard  Duke 
of  York  lord  of  the  manor  in  1463,  doubtfully  however  making  the  statement. 
Certainly  the  following  year  we  find  the  manor  vested  in,  and  Grey's  Hall 
occupied  by,  Thomas  son  of  Thomas  Colt  of  Carlisle  from  whom  the  manor 
acquired  the  name  of  Colt's  Hall  under  which  designation  it  is  still  known. 
A  fine  was  levied  of  the  manor  in  1464  by  Sir  John  Markham,  Henry  Sote- 
hill  and  John  Otre  against  Thomas  Colt  and  Joan  his  wife.8  Thomas  Colt 
the  purchaser  was  a  great  favourite  of  Edward  IV.  He  was  Chancellor 
of  the  Exchequer  and  one  of  the  Privy  Council  and  married  Joan  daughter 
and  heir  of  John  Trusbutt  of  Holm  in  Norf.9  He  died  the  loth  Aug.  1474, 

•  I.P.M.,  45  Edw.  III.  27.  J  Pat.  Rolls,  i  Edw.  IV.  pt.  iii.  19. 

•  I.P.M.,  46  Edw.  III.  2nd  nos.  17 ;  7  Rich.         '  Pat.  Rolls,  i  Edw.  IV.  pt.  iv.  cjd. 

I1-4I-  '  I.P.M.,  3  Edw.  IV.  14. 

•  Extent.     Thomas   Duke  of  Gloucester         '  Feet  of  Fines,  4  Edw.  IV.  6. 

for  Master  Thomas  Grey.    I.P.M.,         »  See  Pedigree  of  Trussbutts,  Blomefield's, 
22  Rich.  II.  79.  Norf.  8vo.  Ed.  vii.  405. 

•  Bundle  430,  No.  6905,  6907. 


CAVENDISH.  65 

and  was  buried  at  Roydon  in  Essex,  when  the  manor  passed  to  his  widow 
Joan.  She  remarried  Sir  William  Parr  and  died  on  Monday  before  the 
feast  of  St.  Lawrence  Anno  13  Edw.  IV.1  when  the  manor  passed  to  her 
son  and  heir  John  Colt  of  New  Hall  Essex  and  Colt's  Hall  in  Cavendish. 
He  was  the  ward  of  Sir  William  Parr  in  the  ist  Hen.  VII.  and  married 
ist  Jane  dau.  of  Sir  John  Ellington  of  Middlesex  and  andly  Mary  dau.  of  Sir 
John  Alne.  He  died  the  22nd  Oct.  1521  when  the  manor  passed  to  his 
son  George  Colt  of  Long  Melford  who  took  to  wife  Elizabeth  dau.  of  Henry 
Mac  William  of  Stambourn  in  Essex  and  dying  the  n  March  1578  was 
succeeded  by  his  son  Henry  who  married  ist  Elizabeth  dau.  of  John 
Coninsby  of  North  Mimms  in  Hertfordshire  and  2ndly  Margaret  dau. 
of  John  Heath  of  Netherhall  in  Essex.  By  his  first  wife  he  was 
father  of  Sir  George  Colt 2  who  married  Mary  daughter  of  William  Poley 
of  Boxstead  and  dying  the  6th  Jan.  1616  was  succeeded  by  his  eldest 
son  and  heir  Sir  Henry  Colt.  Sir  Henry  married  Bridget  dau.  of 
Sir  William  Kingsmill  of  Sidmanton  co.  Hants  and  died  abroad  the 
27  March  1635  seised  of  the  manor  of  "  Greys  alias  Colts  Hall  in  Caven- 
dish "  and  Poslingford  and  was  succeeded  by  his  eldest  son  George  Colt. 
He  married  Elizabeth  eldest  daughter  and  co-heir  of  John  Button  of  Sher- 
borne  in  Gloucestershire.  George  Colt  devoted  his  fortune  to  the  service 
of  Chas.  I.  and  Chas.  II.  and  Page  says  sold  his  property  in  Cavendish  and 
several  other  good  estates.  He  was  drowned  at  sea  from  off  a  Dutch 
vessel  January  20,  1658,  and,  according  to  Davy,  the  manor  passed  to  his 
son  and  heir  John  Dutton  Colt  M.P.  for  Leominster  who  married  ist  Mary 
d.  and  h.  of  John  Booth  of  Letton  co.  Hereford  and  2ndly  Margaret  relict 
of  John  Arnold  of  Monmouth.  John  Dutton  Colt  sold  the  manor.  The 
Colt  arms  were  :  Argent,  a  fesse  between  three  colts  in  full  speed,  sable. 

The  manor  seems  to  have  passed  to  the  Jennens  of  Acton  Place  and 
upon  the  death  of  William  Jennens  in  1798  descended  to  his  heir  at  law 
and  is  now  vested  in  Richard  George  Penn  Curzon-Howe,  4th  Earl  Howe. 
For  the  devolution,  see  Rokewood  Manor,  Acton  in  this  Hundred. 

NETHERHALL  MANOR. 

In  1275  Margaret  wife  of  Roger  de  Tryanton  or  Trehaupton  held  lands 
here  in  chief  of  the  King  at  half  a  Knight's  fee.3  There  is  an  action  by 
Nicholas  Rann  against  an  Adam  (or  Ada)  de  Trehaupton  as  to  a  messuage 
in  Cavendish  in  1281.* 

It  seems,  however,  that  this  particular  manor  or  at  least  2  messuages 
a  carucate  of  land  ro  acres  of  meadow,  14  acres  of  pasture  and  32  acres  of 
wood  were  held  by  Henry  de  Pynkeneye  in  chief  of  Hen.  III.  and  he  sold 
the  same  without  licence  to  William  de  Culworth  and  Margery  his  wife 
from  whom  the  same  passed  to  Adam  de  Trehaupton  the  son  and  heir  of 
Margery  and  then  on  to  John  de  Trehaupton  son  and  heir  of  Adam.  In 
1343  the  trespass  committed  by  entering  without  licence  was  pardoned 
and  John  permitted  to  retain.5 

1  Inquisition    p.m.    is  of    Joan    wife    of         3  H.R.  ii.  142,  150. 

Sir   William   Parre,    15    Edw.  IV.         "  Pat.  Rolls,  9  Edw.  I.  2$d. 

34.  5  Pat.  Rolls,  17  Edw.  III.  pt.  ii,  5. 

*  A  Fine  of  the  manor  was  levied  in  1601 

by  John  Helham  and  others  against 

this  Sir    George   Colt    and    others 

(Fine,  Easter,  43  Elk.). 


66  THE   MANORS   OF   SUFFOLK. 

John  de  Trehaupton  granted  the  manor,  then  stated  to  consist  of  51 
acres  of  land,  ij  acres  of  pasture  and  2\  acres  of  wood  to  William  de 
Genevyll  and  died  in  1350.' 

William  de  Genevyll  died  before  1364  leaving  two  daughters  and 
co-heirs  Beatrice  wife  of  John  Wegge  of  Clare  and  Elizabeth  wife  of  William 
Andrew  of  Sproughton,  for  in  that  year  there  is  an  order  on  the  Originalia 
Rolls  to  take  fealty  of  Beatrice  and  Wm.  Andrew  as  to  the  land  above 
held  of  the  King  in  chief  of  the  grant  of  John  de  Trehaupton.'  Davy 
makes  the  singular  mistake  of  treating  Beatrice  and  Elizabeth  the  daughters 
of  Genevyll  as  daughters  of  John  de  Trehaupton. 

Thomas  Andrew  son  and  heir  of  Elizabeth  wife  of  William  Andrew 
died  seised  (apparently  then  of  130  acres  of  land)  in  I437-3  It  seems  he 
had  but  a  moiety  of  the  manor,  in  fact  a  few  years  later  in  1443,'  a  moiety 
of  the  manor  is  included  in  the  Inquisition  p.m.  of  Richard  Wegge 
(probably  the  son  of  the  above  John  Wegge)  and  Isabel  his  wife. 

In  1438  Margaret  Andrew  had  licence  to  enfeoff  John  Jenney  of  a  4th 
part  of  the  manor.  On  Richard  Wegge's  death  in  1443  a  moiety  of  the  manor 
passed  to  Margaret  his  daughter  and  heir  who  had  married  Richard 
Clavering  and  the  following  year  Richard  Clavering  had  a  moiety  by  grant 
from  the  Crown.  He  was  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir  John  Clavering. 
In  1452  we  meet  with  a  fine  levied  of  a  moiety  of  the  manor  by  John  Smyth, 
John  Clopton,  John  Denston,  William  Chapman  and  Roger  Moryell  against 
Richard  Clavering  of  London  and  John  Clavering  son  and  heir  of  Richard 
Clavering.5  In  1543  this  manor  was  included  in  the  fine  already  referred 
to  in  the  account  of  Overhall  Manor  levied  by  John  Coxe  and  others  against 
George  Cavendish.6 

The  next  lord  was  Sir  John  Went  worth  of  Codham,  but  by 
what  title  does  not  appear.  In  1571  the  manor  was  vested  in  Anne 
daughter  and  co-heir  of  Sir  John  Wentworth  and  wife  of  Henry 
Howard  Lord  Maltravers  and  afterwards  of  Sir  William  Dean  who 
died  in  1580.  In  1588  George  Baxter  and  others  had  licence  to  alien  a 
moiety  of  this  manor  to  Matthew  Cracherode  and  Mary  his  wife  daughter 
of  John  Smith  of  Cavendish,  and  Matthew  Cracherode  held  in  1609.  Amongst 
the  Exchequer  Deposition  in  1595  we  see  there  was  an  action  as  to  the 
Manor  of  Netherhall  and  lands  called  '  The  Rushe  Pasture '  in  Burrefelde 
and  Padbrook  St.  and  as  to  lands  given  to  maintain  a  chantry  priest  or 
priests  in  Cavendish  Church.  The  action  was  between  William  Typpes 
and  others  and  George  Colt  and  others.7 

Matthew  Cracherode  died  in  1615  and  his  son  apparently  sold 
the  manor  to  Sir  Stephen  Soame  who  dying  in  1639  was  succeeded 
by  his  son  and  heir  Sir  Peter  Soame.  In  1706  the  manor  belonged 
to  Sir  Thomas  Robinson  and  he  sold  it  to  John  Moore  who  dying  in  1753 
it  passed  to  his  son  Henry  Moore  who  died  unmarried  in  1769  when  it 
passed  to  his  brother  Richard  Moore  who  died  in  1782  and  was  succeeded 
by  Richard  Moore  his  son  and  heir  who  sold  the  manor  and  died  in  1826. 

In  1855  the  manor  belonged  to  Samuel  Tyssen  Yelloby  who  died  in 
1860  and  has  since  passed  in  the  same  course  as  the  manor  of  Overhall, 
being  now  vested  in  John  Yelloby. 

'  I.P.M.,  24  Edw.  III.  62.  '  Feet  of  Fines,  30  Hen.  VI.  34. 

•  O.,  38  Edw.  III.  5.  «  Fine,  Trin.  35  Hen.  VIII. 

'  I.P.M.,  15  Hen.  VI.  38.  '  Exch.  dep.  Bury  St.  Edmunds,  38  Eliz. 

«  I.P.M.,  21  Hen.  VI.  24. 


CAVENDISH.  67 

NEWHALL  MANOR. 

In  1463  Richard  Duke  of  York  seems  to  have  held  a  third  part  of  this 
manor,1  and  in  1475  Thomas  Colt  lord  of  the  Manor  of  Greys  died  seised 
of  it.  The  subsequent  devolution  is  identical  with  that  of  Grey's  al. 
Colt's  Hall  Manor. 

HOUGHTON  HALL  MANOR. 

In  1548  Sir  John  Wentworth  of  Codham  was  lord,  and  the  manor  passed 
to  his  daughter  and  heir  Anne,  and  from  her,  as  mentioned  in  the  next  manor 
dealt  with,  down  to  William  Villiers  Lord  Grandison  who  died  in  1643. 
Anthony  Deane  was  lord  in  1669,  and  by  1706  the  manor  was  vested  in 
Sir  Thomas  Robinson.2  He  in  that  year  sold  it  to  John  Moore  of  Kent- 
well  Hall.  Amongst  the  Exchequer  Deposition  is  one  in  a  suit  in  1710 
between  Henry  James,  D.D.,  and  Henry  Grey  respecting  the  rectory  and 
parish  church  of  Cavendish,  and  the  farm  or  estates  called  Overhall,  Impey- 
hall  and  Houghton  Hall,  and  as  to  Tithes.3  John  Moore  died  in  1714 
when  the  manor  passed  to  his  nephew  John  Moore  who  died  in 
1753,  and  was  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir  Richard  Moore  who 
died  in  1782,  and  was  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir  Richard  Moore 
who  sold  the  manor  and  died  in  1826.  In  1847  the  manor  was  vested  in 
Charles  Heigham  and  in  1885  belonged  with  the  manors  of  Bulley  Hall 
and  Impey  to  George  H.  Goodchild. 

BULLEY  HALL  MANOR. 

This  manor  was  vested  in  Gilbert  de  Clare  Earl  of  Gloucester  and  Hert- 
ford who  died  in  1314."  It  is  mentioned  in  the  Inquis.  p.m.  of  John  Botiller 
in  I40Q.5  From  the  Botelers  the  manor  passed  to  the  Cavendishs  and 
there  are  two  fines  probably  connected  with  the  transfer,  one  in  1435  and 
the  other  in  1438.  Robert  Cavendysh  and  John  Cauvendysh  and  others 
v.  John  Botelere6  and  Robert  Cavendish  and  Elizabeth  his  wife  v.  John 
Botelere  of  the  manor  and  other  hereditaments  which  Robert  Cavendish, 
William  Clopton  and  others  held  for  life  of  the  said  Robert.7  Later  the  manor 
belonged  to  Henry  Wentworth  of  Codham  who  died  in  1482  8  when  it  passed 
to  his  son  and  heir  Roger  at  whose  death  it  passed  to  his  son  and  heir  Sir 
John  Wentworth  who  died  leaving  a  daughter  Anne  married  rst  to  Sir 
Hugh  Rich,  son  and  heir  of  Richard  Lord  Rich,  2ndly  to  Henry  Howard  Lord 
Maltravers  son  and  heir  of  Henry  Fitz  Alan  Earl  of  Arundel  and  3rdly  to 
Sir  William  Dean  of  Deans  Hall  in  Great  Maplestead  in  Essex.  This 
heiress  of  Sir  John  Wentworth  had  a  great  inheritance — the  Manors  of 
Wiston,  of  Overhall  and  Netherhall  in  Poslingford,  and  Cavendish, 
Impeys,  and  Bulley  Hall.  In  19  Eliz.  by  Indenture  September  24,  she 
demised  this  manor  and  others  to  Trustees  for  200  years  next  after  her 
death.  She  died  and  was  buried  at  Gosfield  in  Essex  January  roth  1580, 
when  the  manor  passed  to  Sir  Edward  Villiers  who  married  Barbara  eldest 

'  I.P.M.,  3  Edw.  IV.  14.  »  I.P.M.,  19  Hen.  IV.  4. 

•  See  Cockfield  Hall    Manor    and  Monks  6  peet  oj  Fines>  ^  Hen.  VI.  20. 
Melford  Manor.    Melford,    in    this  ,-  Tr       T,T 

Hundred.  '  Feet  of  Fmes>  l6  Hen"  VL  2t 

3  At  Newmarket  1710.    Exch.  dep.  '  I.P.M.,  22  Edw.  IV.  u. 

4  I.P.M.,  8  Edw.  II.  68,  see  Inquis.  p.m. 

on    Richard    de     Clare     Earl    of 
Gloucester.  I.P.M.,  47  Hen.  III.  34. 


68  THE   MANORS   OF   SUFFOLK. 

daughter  of  Sir  John  St.  John  of  Lidiard  Tregoze  co.  Wilts.  He  was 
president  of  Munster  in  Ireland  on  the  decease  of  the  Earl  of  Thomond.  He 
died  the  7th  Sept.  1626  lamented  more  deeply,  it  is  said,  "  than  any  governor 
who  had  previously  ruled  the  province  "  and  was  interred  in  the  Earl  of  Cork's 
Chapel  in  Youghal.  By  an  inquisition  post  mortem  January  14,  7  Charles  I. 
taken  at  Ipswich  it  was  found  that  Sir  Edward  Villiers  Knt.  had  died  seised  of 
t  he  Manors  of  Overhall  and  Netherhall  in  Poslingford  and  the  Manors  of  Impeys 
and  Bulley  Hall,  &c.,  and  that  by  Barbara  his  wife  daughter  of  Sir  John 
St.  John  he  had  left  a  son  and  heir  William  Villiers  aged  20  in  1625.  The 
will  of  Sir  Edward  Villiers  bears  date  the  3rd  August  1625.  The  son 
William  Villiers  became  Lord  Grandison  in  1630  on  the  death  of  his 
uncle.  Actively  espousing  the  Royal  cause  he  received  a  wound  at  the 
seige  of  Bristol  the  26  July  1643  of  which  he  died  in  the  following  month 
at  Oxford,  leaving  by  Mary  daughter  of  Paul  Viscount  Bayning  an  only 
daughter  Barbara  wife  of  Roger  Palmer  Earl  of  Castlemame  in  Ireland 
and  afterwards  Duchess  of  Cleveland  and  mistress  of  Charles  II. 

The  manor  does  not  seem  to  have  come  down  to  Barbara  but  to  have 
passed  to  Sir  Thomas  Robinson  who  died  seised  in  1683  and  was  succeeded 
by  his  son  and  heir  Sir  Lumley  Robinson  of  Kentwell  Hall  who  died  the 
following  year  and  was  succeeded  by  Sir  Thomas,  who  sold  the  manor  to 
John  Moore  who  died  in  1753  after  which  the  devolution  is  identical  with 
that  of  Netherhall. 

IMPEY  OR  IMPSEY  HALL  OR  QUIPSEY  HALL. 

This  manor  also  belonged  to  Sir  John  Cavendish  the  Lord  Chief  Justice 
who  was  murdered  in  1381  and  passed  to  his  son  Sir  Andrew  Cavendish 
who  died  in  1395  when  it  passed  to  his  son  and  heir  William.  It  is 
specifically  mentioned  as  "  Impeye  "  in  the  Inquis.  p.m.  of  Sir  Andrew 
Cavendish1  and  a  fine  was  levied  of  the  manor  in  1433  by  William  Clopton, 
Robert  Cavendysh,  John  Harleston,  Clement  Deneston  clerk,  Thomas 
Milde,  Thomas  Hegham,  Richard  Alrede  and  John  Smyth  clerk  against 
Joan  Cavendyssh  who  was  wife  of  John  Wylden.1  Later  it  passed  to  Sir 
John  Wentworth  and  from  him  descended  as  mentioned  in  the  account 
of  the  last  manor  to  Wm.  Villiers  son  of  Sir  Edward  Villiers  who  died  in 
1626  after  which  the  devolution  is  identical  with  the  Manor  of  Houghton 
Hall. 

KENSINGS  OR  KESSINGS  HALL  MANOR. 

This  belonged  to  Sir  John  Cavendish  the  Lord  Chief  Justice  who  was 
murdered  in  1381  and  passed  to  his  son  Sir  Andrew  who  died  in  1394  and 
subsequently  to  his  son  and  heir  William  Cavendish.  The  manor  is 
specifically  mentioned  as  "  Kemsynge  "  in  the  Inquis.  p.m.  of  Sir  Andrew 
Cavendish.'  The  next  lord  we  meet  with  is  Richard  de  Cornhearth  (Corn- 
hith)  in  1398,*  and  the  next  another  Richard  de  Cornerth  (Croniworthe) 
in  1425.' 

In  1548  this  manor  was  vested  in  John  Smyth.  Amongst  the  State 
Papers  of  Henry  VIII.  is  a  grant  to  John  Smyth  of  livery  of  lands  in  Caven- 
dish as  son  and  heir  of  John  Smyth.6  It  passed  to  John  Colt  who  died 
seised  in  1599  when  it  went  to  his  son  and  heir  Thomas  Colt.  In  1609  the 
manor  was  vested  in  John  Seath  or  Death. 

•  I.P.M.,  18  Rich.  II.  ii ;  H  Hen.  IV.  5.  «  I.P.M.,  22  Rich.  II.  34. 

•  Feet  of  Fines,  n  Hen.  VI.  33.  '  I.P.M.,  3  Hen.  VI.  32. 

>  I.P.M.,  18  Rich.  II.  ii ;  H  Hen.  IV.  5.  •  State  Papers,  1542,  443  (51). 


CAVENDISH.  69 

PEYTON'S  MANOR. 

This  manor  in  1298  was  held  by  John  de  Peyton  who  also  had  a  grant 
of  free  warren.1  It  subsequently  devolved  on  Thomas  Colt  who  died  seised 
in  1475,  and  henceforth  it  devolved  together  with  Grey's  or  Colt's  Hall 
Manor. 

PECHE'S  OR  PECHY'S  MANOR. 

This  was  held  by  John  Peche  son  of  John  Peche  who  conveyed  lands 
here  to  Sir  John  de  Peyton.  It  subsequently  passed  to  Richard  Duke 
of  York  who  died  seised  of  it  in  1463,*  and  later  vested  in  Thomas  Colt  who 
died  in  1475,  and  then  devolved  in  a  like  manner  as  Grey's  or  Colt's  Hall 
Manor. 

MORE  HALL  MANOR. 

Edward  Copley  died  seised  in  1609  and  was  succeeded  by  his  son  and 
heir  Edward  Copley  who  had  livery  of  his  estates  in  1622.  We  learn  nothing 
further  respecting  this  manor. 

COLLINGHAM  HALL  MANOR. 

This  was  the  inheritance  of  Sir  John  Cavendish  the  Lord  Chief  Justice 
so  brutally  murdered  in  1381.  He  was  succeeded  by  his  son  Sir  Andrew 
Cavendish  and  he  by  his  son  William  Cavendish  in  1394.  It  is  specifically 
mentioned  in  the  Inquisition  post  morten  of  Sir  Andrew  Cavendish.3 

It  was  in  1484  granted  as  part  of  the  endowment  of  a  chantry  in  St. 
Bartholomew  the  Less  in  London  known  as  the  Fry  Chantry4  and  on  the 
suppression  of  the  religious  houses  came  to  the  Crown. 

Edward  Copley  upon  founding  a  school  endowed  it  with  this  manor, 
it  is  said,  and  in  1609  it  passed  to  the  Governors  of  the  Free  School  at  Bury. 

STANSFIELD  HALL  MANOR. 

This  manor  we  find  mentioned  in  a  Fine  in  1637  levied  by  Matthew 
Abbott  and  it  appears  to  have  previously  belonged  to  his  father  Richard 
Abbott.5 

A  "Cavendish  Manor  "  was  the  subject  of  a  Fine  levied  in  1395  by  Sir 
Richard  Waldegrave,  Sir  Robert  Carbonell,  Thomas  Foryby  clerk  and  Wm. 
Skrene  against  Sir  William  Papworth  and  Alice  his  wife.6 

A  paper  on  Grey's  Hall  in  Cavendish  will  be  found  in  the  Proceedings 
of  the  Suffolk  Institute  vol.  vi.  23  and  on  the  Old  House  of  Overhall  in 
Cavendish  (read  on  a  visit  of  the  Institute  in  1893)  in  vol.  viii.  p.  261.  Also 
notices  of  the  Cavendish  Family  while  possessed  of  the  manor  by  Thomas 
Ruggles  in  Archaeologia  vol.  xi.  p.  50.  Notes  of  the  Family  also  will  be 
found  in  vol.  i.  of  the  Suffolk  Institute  p.  225  and  Memoirs  of  the  family 
by  Dr.  Kennett  1703,  8vo. 


'  Chart.  Rolls,  26  Edw.  I.  5.  *  Harl.  55  H.  25. 

•  I.P.M.,  3  Edw.  IV.  14.  5  14  Nov.  13  Car.  I.  pt.  iii.  34. 

>  I.P.M.,  18  Rich.  II.  n ;  n  Hen.  IV.  5.  6  Feet  of  Fines,  19  Rich.  II.  28. 


70  THE  MANORS  OF  SUFFOLK. 


CHILTON. 

N  Saxon  times  Godwin,  Alfer's  son,  held  with  soc  2  carucates 
of  land  as  a  manor.  There  was  a  church  living  with  5  acres 
of  free  land  and  i  villein,  3  bordars,  4  slaves,  2  plough- 
teams  in  demesne  and  among  the  men,  5  acres  of  meadow, 
3  hogs  and  80  sheep.  This  manor  was  at  the  time  of  the 
Domesday  Survey  held  by  Walter  son  of  Aubrey  of  Robert 
Malet  with  very  slight  difference  of  detail ;  3  of  the  slaves 
had  disappeared  and  there  were  but  half  the  number  of  sheep. 

Three  freemen  held  in  the  time  of  the  Confessor,  under  Godwin,  by 
commendation  and  soc,  40  acres  of  land  and  i  acre  of  meadow  with  one 
ploughteam  amongst  the  lot ;  and  these  freemen  were  valued  at  12  shillings, 
but  their  value  by  the  time  of  the  Norman  Survey  had  come  down  to  7 
shillings.  At  the  same  time  the  manor  itself  which  was  formerly  valued 
at  20  shillings  had  gone  up  to  40  shillings. 

It  was  4  quarentenes  long  and  3  broad  and  paid  in  a  gelt  $d.  whoever 
held  the  same.' 

The  Domesday  tenant  in  chief  was  the  son  of  William  Malet  one  of 
the  Conqueror's  companions  to  whom  the  body  of  Harold  was  committed 
for  burial  after  the  battle  of  Hastings.  William  was  appointed  governor 
of  York  Castle  built  by  William  the  ist  in  1068.  Robert  Malet  was  the 
son  of  this  William  by  Heselia  his  wife  and  was  also  present  at  the  battle 
of  Hastings  and  he  is  depicted  in  the  Bayeux  Tapestry  seated  on  one  side 
of  Duke  William  who  has  his  brother  Odo  the  bishop  on  the  other.  He 
was  the  founder  of  the  Benedictine  priory  at  Eye,  and  Blomefield  says 
"this  Robert  was  Great  Chamberlain  of  England  under  King  Henry  I.  ; 
but  in  the  second  year  of  that  King  was  banished  and  deprived  of  his 
possessions  for  adhering  to  Robert  Curtois,  that  King's  eldest  brother 
Duke  of  Normandy."* 

CHILTON  MANOR  als.  WALDINGFIELD  HALL. 
CARBONELS  WITH  CHILTON  MANOR. 

Chilton  has  been  generally  considered  a  hamlet  of  Great  Waldingfield 
and  the  rector  of  that  parish  received  a  certain  portion  of  the  tithes  of 
Chilton,  but  it  is  now  a  separate  parish  in  Sudbury  union.  The  lordship 
of  Chilton  in  the  time  of  Hen.  II.  belonged  to  William  Carbonel  who  died 
leaving  an  infant  heir  and  a  widow  Alice  who  remarried  Richard  Aguilon. 
There  is  a  deed  still  in  existence  amongst  the  Bodleian  Charters  being  a  grant 
by  William  de  Huntingfield  to  this  Richard  Aguilon  or  Agelliun  and  Alice  his 
wife  of  the  custody  of  the  lands  and  heir  of  William  Carbunel  "  formerly 
husband  of  the  said  Alice,"  also  of  the  Manor  of  Chilton  in  dower  for  the 
term  of  the  life  of  the  said  Alice.5 

There  is  in  the  same  collection  a  charter  of  earlier  date,  c.  1180  (but  ?) 
being  a  grant  by  Roger  son  of  William  de  Huntingfield  to  Gilbert  Carbonel 
of  land  in  Chilton,  Bures  and  Wendeshalam.4 

At  the  end  of  the  i2th  century  we  meet  with  a  grant  by  this  Gilbert 
'  Karbunel '  to  Geoffrey  his  son  of  the  whole  of  his  land  in  Chilton  with 
two  men  of  Middletune  pertaining  to  the  same  land  for  his  service  and 

•  Dorc.  ii.  304.  «  c.  1210-20  Bodl.  Suff.  Ch.  268. 

•  8w>  Ed.  vol.  viii.  341.  «  Bodl.  Suff.  Ch.  267. 


CHILTON.  7I 

homage  and  his  money,  viz.,  gold  and  silver,  which  he  gave  to  them  with 
covenants  for  an  exchange  under  certain  conditions.1 

And  we  find  a  grant  made  about  the  same  time  or  a  little  later  by 
Sampson  Abbot  of  St.  Edmund  to  William  Carbonel  of  a  certain  liberty 
which  was  called  Infangenethef  in  Chilton  which  was  of  the  liberty  of  Eye 
at  an  annual  rent  of  lib.  of  white  incense.2  In  1244  Sir  Geoffrey  Carbonel 
held  a  knight's  fee  here,  and  in  1276  Robert  Carbunel  brought  an  action 
against  Nicholas  le  Ram  and  others  touching  a  fosse  destroyed  here,3  and 
the  following  year  Richard  Carbonel  had  a  grant  of  free  warren.4  John  de 
Carbonel  was  lord  about  1278  and  died  in  1303  being  succeeded  by  his  son 
and  heir  Thomas  who  died  in  1312  when  the  manor  passed  to  his  widow 
Elizabeth  who  lived  till  1325.  John  de  Carbonel  son  of  Thomas  succeeded 
and  died  in  I3335  leaving  a  daughter  Alice  married  to  Ralph  Boteler  or 
Butler  who  left  a  daughter  Margaret  married  to  Thomas  Boteler. 

Margaret  Boteler  had  a  grant  of  free  warren  in  I3936  and  had  a  son 
Sir  Andrew  Boteler  who  had  seisin  in  1413.  His  will  is  dated  1429  and  he 
died  the  following  year  leaving  his  widow  Katherine  who  was  a  dau.  of 
Sir  William  Philip  surviving.  Margery  daughter  and  heir  of  Sir  Andrew 
Boteler  married  William  Crane  of  Stonham  and  thus  carried  this  manor 
into  that  ancient  and  knightly  family.  William  Crane  took  for  his  2nd 
wife  Anne  d.  of  William  Forrecy  (Ferrers)  and  was  succeeded  by  his  son 
and  heir  Robert  Crane  of  Chilton  and  Stonham.  The  feoffment  of  the 
manor  to  Robert  Crane  was  from  John  Clopton  and  others  in  1439  and  will 
be  found  amongst  the  Bodleian  Charters.7  He  married  ist  Agnes  d.  of 
Thomas  Singleton  of  Stonham  Jernegan  and  2ndly  Agnes  d.  of  Tho.  Greene 
of  Creting.  On  his  death  the  manor  passed  to  his  s.  and  h.  Robert 
Crane  who  married  ist  Isabell  d.  of  Robert  Darcy  of  Maiden  Essex. 

Amongst  the  Bodleian  Rolls  will  be  found  the  record  of  a  suit  in  1470 
between  this  Robert  Crane  and  Isabell  his  wife  against  Ralph  West  and 
Katherine  his  wife  concerning  a  toft  and  7  acres  of  land  in  Chilton.8  Robert 
Crane  married  2ndly  Anne  daughter  of  Sir  Andrew  Egard  or  Ogard  of  Buck- 
enham  Knt.  and  died  the  23rd  or  24th  Oct.  1500,'  and  there  is  or  was  a  monu- 
ment in  the  Chilton  Church  to  the  two,  and  also  to  George  Crane  their  son  who 
died  without  issue  in  1491 .  The  arms  of  the  Cranes  were  :  Ar.  a  fesse  between 
three  crosses  bottonee  fitchee,  gu.  Robert  Crane  was  succeeded  by  his 
brother  and  heir  John  Crane  who  married  Agnes  d.  of  Sir  John  Calthorp 
Knt.  and  died  in  1505  when  he  was  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir  Robert. 
There  is  amongst  the  Bodleian  Charters  an  Indenture  made  the  14  April 
24  Hen.  VII.  [1509]  by  which  this  Robert  Crane  demised  to  John  Coole 
of  Sudbury,  mercer,  a  croft  of  arable  land,  &c.,  in  Chilton  for  20  years  at 
an  annual  rent  of  2os.  gd.'°  There  is  also  in  the  same  collection  a  grant  in 
1526  by  Isabella  widow  of  Robert  Siday  of  Great  Waldingfield  and  Ralph 
Parcar  to  this  Robert  Crane  and  others  of  a  tenement  with  a  croft  of  land 
in  Chilton,"  and  a  lease  by  him  dated  the  4  Sept.  19  Hen.  VIII.  to  William 
Jervis  of  Sudbury  of  a  close  containing  7  acres  in  Chilton  for  30  years  at  an 
annual  rent  of  IDS."  also  a  lease  the  4  March  24  Hen.  VIII.  [1532]  by  this 

•  Bodl.  Suff.  Ch.  266  c.  1180.  «  Bodl.  Suff.  Rolls  7. 

•  c.  1182  Bodl.  Suff.  Ch.  6.  '  I.P.M.,  16  Hen.  VII. 

3  Pat.  Rolls,  4  Edw.  I.  24.  '°  Bodl.  Suff.  Ch.  281. 

4  Chart.  Rolls,  5  Edw.  I.  "  20  Jan.  18  Hen.  VIII.  Bodl.  Suff.  Ch. 

*  I.P.M.,  7  Edw.  III.  4.  282. 

*  Chart.  Rolls,     17  Ric.  II.  pt.  ii.  29.  "  Bodl.  Suff.  Ch.  283. 
7  17  Hen.  VI.  Bodl.  Suff.  Ch.  270. 


72  THE    MANORS   OF   SUFFOLK. 

Robert  Crane  to  John  Coole  of  a  field  of  14  acres  lying  in  Chilton  for  20 
years  at  a  rent  of  205.'  In  1534  a  fine  was  levied  of  the  manor  by  William 
Wytouse  and  others  against  the  said  Robert  Crane,1  and  in  1542  against 
him  by  John  Branston  and  others.1 

Robert  Crane  married  ist  Elizabeth  d.  of  Richard  Southwell  of  Wood 
Rising  in  Norf.  and  2ndly  Jane  d.  of  Edward  White  of  Essex  and  his  will 
is  dated  the  27  Feb.  1551.  He  died  shortly  afterwards 4  and  was  succeeded 
by  his  son  and  heir  Robert  Crane  who  married  3  times,  ist  Ursula,  2nd 
Elizabeth  and  3rd  Bridget  d.  of  Sir  Thomas  Jermyn  Knt.  of  Rushbrooke. 
His  will  is  dated  7th  Oct.  1589.  He  died  in  1591.  Amongst  the  Chancery 
Proceedings  of  Q.  Elizabeth  we  find  an  action  by  Dudley  Fortescue, 
Executor  of  Robert  Crane  against  Thomas  Appleton  to  protect  plaintiff  in 
execution  of  his  trust  respecting  the  manor  and  the  advowson  of  the  Church, 
the  free  warren  there  and  the  view  of  frankpledge  and  other  lands  in  Chilton 
and  elsewhere  late  the  estate  of  Robert  Crane  and  devised  by  his  will.5 

Robert  Crane  had  with  other  issue  a  son  Henry  Crane  who  married 
ist  Anne  d.  of  Thomas  Goodwin  from  whom  he  was  divorced,  and  2ndly 
Catherine  d.  of  John  Jernegan  of  Somerley  by  Catherine  his  wife  d.  of  George 
Brook  Lord  Cobham.  He  died  the  ist  Aug.  1586  in  the  lifetime  of  his  father 
on  whose  death  the  manor  passed  to  his  grandson  (son  of  the  said  Henry)  Sir 
Robert  Crane,  who  the  12  May  1625  was  appointed  by  Thomas  Earl  of  Suffolk 
then  Lord  Lieutenant  of  Suffolk  and  Cambridge  a  Deputy  Lieutenant  of 
the  County  of  Suffolk 6  and  was  created  a  Baronet  the  n  May  1627.  He 
became  High  Sheriff  of  the  County  in  1632  and  was  elected  Knight  of  the 
Shire  in  several  Parliaments.  By  his  first  wife  Dorothy  daughter  of  Sir  Henry 
Hobart  Bart.  Lord  Chief  Justice  of  the  Court  of  Common  Pleas,  who  was 
buried  at  Chilton  the  13  April  1624,  he  had  no  issue.  She  is  buried  in  Chilton 
Church  with  the  following  inscription  : — 

D.O.M.S. 

Here  lieth  the  Bodie  of  Dorothy  first  wife  of  Sir  Robert  Crane 
of  Chilton,  Kt.,  daughter  of  S'  Henry  Hobart  of  Blyckling  in  the 

County  of  Norff.,  Kt.  and  Baronet,  sometyme  Lord  Cheefe 

Justice  of  the  Common  Pleas,  who  lived  with  her  said  Husband 

in  great  Love  and  Amity  17  yeares,  and  willingly  yeelded  up  this  Life  in  expectation  of  a 

better  the  nth  day  of  Aprill,  1624. 

Reader,  listen  and  give  eare  :  Wonder  not  at  what  I  say  : 

Vertue  lies  interred  here  Rather  weepe  and  hast  away, 

Under  me  :      I  hide  it    Then  Least  that  thou  a  statue  be 

Seek  it  nowhere  amongst  men  :  With  amazement,  like  to  me. 

From  the  Female  it  is  gone,  If  thou  readest  with  eies  dry, 

Now  that  all  are  dead  in  one.  Thou  a  marble  art,  not  I. 

The  monument  is  mural.  Sir  Robert  is  kneeling  between  his  two 
wives ;  the  above  inscription  is  underneath  the  first.  The  tablets  between 
himself  and  second  lady  are  blanks.  The  three  escutcheons  which 
have  many  quarterings  have  been  much  abused.  The  arms  quartered  are  : 
i  Crane,  2  Mollington,  3  Boteler,  4  Carbonel,  5  Phelips,  6  Erpingham,  7 
Jernegan,  8  Harling,  9  Ingoldsthorp,  10  Fitz  Osborn,  11  Fitz  Rafe,  12 
Mortimer,  13  Gonvyle,  14  Kelvedon,  15  Clifton.  Sir  Robert  Crane  by 
his  second  wife  Susan  daughter  of  Sir  Giles  Alington  Knt.  of  Horseheath 
co.  Cambridge  (whom  he  married  on  the  2ist  Sept.  1624  and  who  remarried 
Isaac  Appleton  of  Holbrook  Hall  in  Waldingfield)  had  five  daughters  and 

•  Bodl.  Suff.  Ch.  286,  287.  «  I.P.M.,  4  Edw.  VI.  84. 

•  Fine,  Mich.  26  Hen.  VIII.  »  C.P.  i.  300. 

«  Fine,  Mich.  34  Hen.  VIII.  '  Bodl.  Suff.  Ch.  289. 


CHILTON.  73 

co-heirs,  namely,  Mary  married  to  Sir  Ralph  Hare  Bart,  of  Stow  Bardolph 
Norf.,  Anne  married  first  to  Sir  William  Airmine  Bart,  of  Osgodby  co. 
Lincoln,  and  secondly  to  John  Lord  Belasyse,  Susan  married  to  Sir 
Edward  Walpole  K.B.  of  Houghton  co.  Norf.  by  whom  he  was  grandfather 
to  the  famous  Sir  Robert  Walpole  K.B.,  Elizabeth  married  to  Sir  Edmund 
Bacon  of  Redgrave  4th  Bart,  grandson  of  Sir  Robert  Bacon  Bart.,  and 
Sarah  who  seems  to  have  died  early  though  mentioned  in  her  father's  will 
which  is  dated  the  13  Feb.  1642.  Sir  Robert  Crane  made  his  will  dated 
7  Oct.  32  Eliz.  and  died  the  I7th  Febr.  1642-3  when  the  Baronetcy  expired 
and  his  estates  became  divisible  between  his  four  daughters  and  co-heirs 
and  Chilton  appears  to  have  been  apportioned  to  Sir  Edmund  Bacon  Bart. 
The  Agreement  for  Partition  which  was  made  between  the  Hon.  Sir 
William  Armine  of  the  1st  part  the  Hon.  Sir  Ralph  Hare  of  the  2nd  part, 
Edmund  Bacon  of  Redgrave  of  the  3rd  part,  and  Edward  Walpole  of  the 
4th  part  is  dated  the  i5th  Dec.  1652.'  Sir  Edmund  had  6  sons  and  ten 
daughters  all  of  whom  save  4  daughters  died  before  him  and  this  manor 
appears  to  have  passed  in  1685  with  the  Baronetcy  to  his  cousin  Sir  Robert 
Bacon  of  Redgrave,  but  of  this  the  writer  has  no  evidence. 

Sir  Robert  Bacon  died  in  1704  and  was  succeeded  by  his  eldest  son 
Sir  Edmund  Bacon  M.P.  for  Norfolk  who  married  Mary  daughter  of  Sir 
Robert  Kemp  Bart,  by  whom  he  had  four  daughters,  the  eldest  of  whom 
Letitia  married  Sir  Armine  Wodehouse  Bart,  and  died  in  1759.  The 
manor  was  then  sold  to  William  Wyndham  of  Felbrigg. 

On  his  death  William  Wyndham  was  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir, 
the  Right  Hon.  William  Wyndham  who  died  in  1824,  and  was  succeeded 
by  his  nephew  and  heir  William  Lukin  who  took  the  name  of  Wyndham. 
He  died  in  1833  and  was  succeded  by  his  son  and  heir  William  Howe  Wynd- 
ham and  in  July  1861  the  manor  was  purchased  for  £660  by  Richard  New- 
man of  Hadleigh  the  present  lord. 

Chilton  Hall  was  formerly  an  extensive  moated  building,  but  it  has 
now  degenerated  into  a  farm  house.  It  was  visited  by  the  Suffolk  Institute 
in  1886.' 

There  are  Court  Rolls  of  the  manor  in  the  Public  Record  Office  as 
follows  :  Courts  and  Halmote  2,  3,  6,  7,  12  to  14,  17  to  20  Edw.  II.  Court 
Rolls,  20  Edw.  II.  i  [4],  8  Edw.  III.  9  to  n  Edw.  III.,  12  to  14  Edw.  III., 
17  to  19  Edw.  III.,  22,  23,  29  to  30,  32,  33,  35  to  37  Edw.  III.,  45  to  48, 
50,  51  Edw.  III.,  i  Rich.  II.,  6  to  8,  n,  12,  14  to  18,  20  to  22  Rich.  II., 
22,  23  Rich.  II.,  4,  5,  14  Hen.  IV.,  i  to  5,  7,  8  Hen.  V.,  i,  10,  18,  21,  29 
Hen.  VI.3 ;  and  amongst  the  Rolls  of  the  British  Museum  1342  to  1378 .4 
Suitors  of  Court  22  Rich.  II.  will  also  be  found  in  the  Public  Record  Office.5 
And  amongst  the  Harleian  Charters  in  the  British  Museum  will  be  found 
a  power  to  give  seisin  of  the  manor  and  Church  in  1413  and  1431. 6  Extract 
from  deeds  relating  to  the  manor  when  in  the  possession  of  Sir  Robert 
Crane  will  be  found  in  the  Bodleian  [4180!  and  also  amongst  the  Harleian 
MSS.» 

Arms  of  Wyndham  :  Az.  a  chevron  between  3  lions'  heads  erased  Or. 


Stow  Bardolph  Muniments.  5  Court  Rolls,  Addenda.       Portfolio  227- 

S.I.  vi.  (xxxix.).  92. 

Portfolio,  203,  23-35,  38.  6  Harl.  49  D.  37,  52  A.  2. 

Add.  Rolls,  1265-1273.  ?  Harl.  639 


74  THE   MANORS   OF   SUFFOLK. 


COCKFIELD. 

|N  the  time  of  the  Confessor  the  Abbot  of  Bury  held  4 
carucates  and  a  half  of  land  as  a  manor.  There  were 
14  villeins,  16  bordars,  2  plought earns  in  demesne  and  12 
belonging  to  the  men,  4  slaves,  8  acres  of  meadow,  a  winter 
mill,  12  beasts,  37  hogs,  and  98  sheep.  The  value  of  the 
manor  was  6  pounds  but  by  the  time  of  the  Domesday 
Survey  it  had  risen  to  8. 
The  bordars  had  then  increased  to  22  and  the  ploughteams  in  demesne 
had  increased  by  one,  but  those  of  the  men  had  come  down  to  6.  There 
were  in  addition  at  the  time  of  the  Norman  Survey  3  rounceys  and  12 
hives  of  bees.  In  Cockfield  there  were  also  21  freemen  with  5  carucates 
of  land  which  4  men  held  of  the  Abbot — Berard  3  carucates,  James  i 
and  Coleman  i.  13  bordars  and  4  slaves.  Amongst  these  there  were  8 
ploughteams,  subsequently  reduced  to  7,  16  acres  of  meadow  and  wood 
for  6  hogs.  These  men  could  all  give  or  sell  their  land,  but  by  soc  and 
commendation  they  were  under  the  Abbot,  except  one  man  over  whom 
he  only  had  soc.  In  Saxon  days  they  were  valued  at  3  pounds,  in  Norman 
times  at  4.  The  township  was  13  quarantenes  long  and  i  league  broad 
and  paid  in  a  gelt  23^.'  In  Domesday  Survey  a  holding  in  Coresfella  is 
mentioned  and  this  no  doubt  is  Cockfield.  This  was  land  held  in  the 
Confessor's  day  by  7  freemen  holding  land  under  Witgar  or  Wisgar  by 
commendation  and  soc  and  sac  consisting  of  3  carucates  and  a  half,  25 
acres  and  10  bordars,  3  ploughteams  and  13  acres  of  meadow  valued  at  3 
pounds.  Of  this  Richard  son  of  Earl  Gislebert*  was  tenant  in  chief  of 
King  William.3 

COCKFIELD  MANOR. 

The  manor  first  mentioned  had  been  vested  in  the  Abbot  of  St.  Edmund's 
by  the  gift  of  Earl  Alfar  to  take  effect  after  the  decease  of  Ethelfled  his 
daughter,  and  then  King  Edgar  gave  to  the  said  Ethelfled  Chelsworth 
Manor  which  she  gave  together  with  Cockfield  to  the  Abbey  according  to 
her  father  the  Earl's  will.  We  learn  from  the  Hundred  Rolls  that 
the  Abbot  of  Bury  held  3  knights'  fees  in  chief  of  the  King  pertaining  to 
Cockfield  of  which  Henry  de  Cokefield  held  one  of  the  said  Abbot,  Thomas 
Weylond  held  another,  John  de  Falsam  held  J  a  knight's  fee  and  Robert 
de  Lyndholt  held  a  4th  of  a  knight's  fee  all  of  the  said  Abbot.4  Ministers' 
accounts  of  land  in  this  place  4  and  5  Edw.  I.  and  also  for  I  to  3  Edw.  III. 
and  26  to  27  Edw.  III.'  will  be  found  in  the  Public  Record  Office.6 

The  Manor  of  Cockfield  Hall  remained  in  the  Abbey  until  the  dissolu- 
tion. An  extent  of  the  manor  in  1271  will  be  found  amongst  the  Inquis. 
quod  damnum.7  In  1275  the  Prior  of  Bury  St.  Edmunds  held.8  In  the 
time  of  King  Hen.  VIII.  the  manor  was  vested  in  the  Drury  family  and 
in  1527  a  fine  was  levied  of  the  manor  by  Sir  Robert  Drury  and  others 
against  William  Drury  and  others'  and  in  1538  another  by  Robert  Drury 

Dom.  ii.  359.  »  I.Q.D.,  55  Hen.  III.  38. 

See  Bures  Manor  in  this  Hundred.  '  See  confirmation  of  grant,  etc.,  made 

Dom.  ii.  392b.  by    Simon    Abbot    of    Bury    on 

H.R.  ii.  142.  payment    of    a    fine,    Originalia, 

Bundle  1109,  No.  14.  3  Edw.  1. 17,  Pat.  Rolls,  3  Edw.  I. 

Bundle    1109,    No.    23,  Bundle    mo,                    9,  4  Edw.  I.  29. 

No.  28  •  Fine,  Easter  19  Hen.  VIII. 


COCKFIELD. 


75 


against  Robert  Drury  of  Bes thorp  in  Norfolk.  The  manor  and  advowson 
were  in  1545  granted  to  Sir  John  Spryng  and  Dorothea  his  wife/  but 
later  it  was  supposed  to  be  escheat  on  account  of  defective  title.2  Sir 
John  Spring  died  the  7  Feb.  15473  and  was  succeeded  by  his  son  Sir  William 
Spring  knt.  of  Pakenham4  who  married  Anne  daughter  of  Sir  Thomas 
Kytson  knt.  and  died  seised  in  1600.  John  Spring  his  eldest  son  suc- 
ceeded and  married  Mary  daughter  of  Sir  John  Trelawny  knt.  of  Trelawny 
in  Cornwall.  He  died  in  1601  leaving  his  eldest  son  Sir  William  Spring  who 
was  knighted  by  James  I.  and  married  Elizabeth  daughter  of  Sir  William 
Smith  of  High  Mount  Hall  in  Essex.  He  was  succeeded  by  his  son  and 
heir  Sir  William  Spring  knighted  by  Chas.  I.  and  created  a  Baronet  in 
1641.  By  his  marriage  with  Elizabeth  daughter  of  Sir  Hamon  L'Estrange 
knt.  he  had  a  son  Sir  William  Spring  who  succeeded  on  his  father's  death 
the  17  Dec.  1654. 

The  manor  passed  before  Sir  William's  death  in  1684  to  Sir  Thomas 
Robinson  of  Kentwell  Hall5  who  died  in  1683  and  was  succeeded  by  his 
son  and  heir  Sir  Lumley  Robinson.  He  died  the  following  year  and  was 
succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir  Sir  Thomas  Robinson6  from  whom  the  manor 
passed  by  purchase  to  John  Moore  whose  will  is  dated  the  26th  Dec.  1713 
and  proved  in  the  Prerogative  Court  26  Jan.  1713.  From  John  it  passed  to 
his  nephew  John  Moore  who  died  in  1753  and  was  succeeded  by  his  son  and 
heir  Richard  Moore  who  died  in  1782.  His  will  is  dated  7  July  1781 
and  was  proved  in  the  Prerogative  Court  27  Nov.  1782.  He  was  succeeded 
by  his  son  and  heir  Richard  Moore  who  was  High  Sheriff  of  the  County  in 
1812  and  died  in  1826  lord  of  the  manor. 

Cockfield  Hall  and  farm  were  subsequently  purchased  by  Samuel 
Buck  of  Hawstead  who  gave  the  land  on  which  the  School  now 
stands  and  after  coming  into  the  hands  of  his  brother  Robert 
Buck  and  his  nephew  Mr.  Corsbie  were  purchased  in  1865  by  T.  Jennings 
of  Newmarket  whose  son  F.  Jennings  recently  resided  at  the  Hall 
or  Manor  House.7  The  Cockfield  Hall  Farm  in  1829  consisted  of  340 
acres.  By  Indentures  of  Lease  and  Release  dated  the  13  and  14  March 
1834  the  latter  made  between  Edward  Wenman  Martin,  Samuel  Bignold, 
William  Montrion,  Francis  Noverre  and  Richard  Morgan,  Wllloughby  Moore, 
John  Wright  and  Thomas  Bignold  the  younger  Cockfield  Hall  Manor  with 
Earl's  Hall  Manor  also  in  Cockfield  were  vested  in  John  Wright  of  Henrietta 
Street,  Covent  Garden,  who  in  1839  ^Y  Indentures  of  Lease  and  Release 
dated  the  8th  and  gth  August  that  year  conveyed  the  same  to  James  Cuddon 
the  elder  of  Norwich.  He  by  his  will  dated  the  26th  Nov.  1850  appointed 
his  sons  James  and  Francis  Thomas  Executors  and  devised  to  them  his 
manors  upon  trust  for  sale.  James  Cuddon  died  on  the  gth  March  1851 
and  his  will  with  five  codicils  was  proved  the  17  June  1851  in  the  Preroga- 
tive Court  of  the  Archbishop  of  Canterbury.  By  an  Indenture  dated  the 
15th  April  1853  James  Cuddon  and  Francis  Thomas  Cuddon  conveyed 

'  Particulars  for  grant  37  Hen.  VIII.  «  See  12  Will.  III.  "An  Act  for  charg- 

D.K.R.  10,  App.  ii.  p.  276.  ing  the  estate  of  Sir  Thomas 

'  ii  Jac.  I.  Exch.  Spec.  Com.  D.K.R.  38,  Robinson  with  £700  for  the  portion 

App.  p.  94.  of  Anne  his  sister  and  for  settling 

3  I. P.M.,  3  Edw.  VI.  65.  her  estate  upon  the  said  Sir  Thomas 

4  See   Netherhall    Manor,    Little    Wald-  Robinson  in  lieu  thereof ." 

ingfield,  in  this  Hundred.  7  S.I.  v.  239, 

5  See    Monks    Melford    Manor,    Melford, 

in  this  Hundred. 


76  THE   MANORS   OF   SUFFOLK. 

both  the  manors  of  Cockfield  alias  Cockfield  Hall  and  the  Manor  of  Earl's 
Hall  in  Cockfield  to  Clarissa  Beach  Manning,  Rose  Frances  Manning, 
Elizabeth  Adelaide  Manning  and  Louisa  Manning  all  of  Upper  Southwick 
Street,  Hyde  Park,  spinsters  as  joint  tenants.  Rose  Frances  Manning 
died  on  the  5th  Feb.  1859  and  by  an  Indenture  dated  the  23rd  Nov.  1869 
Louisa  Manning  then  residing  at  Florence  upon  her  marriage  with  Achelle 
Tanfani  of  Florence  settled  her  third  share  in  the  manors  by  a  conveyance 
to  Trustees  upon  trust  for  sale.  The  Misses  Manning  and  their  Trustees 
subsequently  sold  to  Charsley  whose  Executors  in  1899  sold  the  manor  to 
George  Frederick  Beaumont  F.S.A.  of  the  Lawn  Coggeshall  Essex  in  whom 
the  lordship  is  now  vested. 

Extracts  from  Court  Rolls  of  the  manor  will  be  found  referred  to  in 
the  loth  Report  of  the  Historical  MSS.  Commissioners.1 

EARL'S  HALL  MANOR. 

This  manor  was  so  designated  from  the  Veres  Earls  of  Oxford  who  for 
many  generations  were  its  lords.  Like  the  main  Manor  of  Cockfield  Hall 
it  was  held  by  the  Abbot  of  Bury  and  from  the  Abbot,  Roger  brother  of 
Aubrey  de  Vere  ist  Earl  of  Oxford  received  a  grant  of  the  manor.  Aubrey 
the  brother  succeeded.2  He  was  a  distinguished  character  and  was  made 
Lord  Chamberlain.  He  received  many  important  grants  of  land  from  the 
Crown  and  also  the  Earldom  of  Cambridge,  provided  that  dignity  was  not 
vested  in  the  King  of  the  Scots,  but  if  it  were,  then  his  lordship  was  to 
have  his  choice  of  the  Earldoms  of  Oxford,  Berkshire,  Wiltshire  or  Dorset- 
shire all  which  grants  were  ratified  by  Hen.  II.  his  lordship  being  created 
Earl  of  Oxford  with  the  usual  grant  to  Earls  of  the  third  penny  of  the 
pleas  of  the  county.  His  knights'  fees  were  28,  for  which  he,  in  respect  of 
the  aid  in  the  12  year  of  Hen.  II.,  paid  £20.  He  married  first  Euphemia 
daughter  of  Sir  William  de  Cantilupe  knt.  by  whom  he  had  no  issue,  and 
secondly  Lucia  daughter  and  heir  of  Henry  de  Essex  by  whom  he  had 
several  sons  two  of  whom  Aubrey  and  Robert  were  successively  Earls  of 
Oxford  and  lords  of  this  manor.  The  eldest  Aubrey  2nd  Earl  and  Lord 
Great  Chamberlain  died  in  1214  leaving  no  issue,  though  he  married  Adelizia 
daughter  of  Roger  Bigod  2nd  Earl  of  Norfolk.  Robert  his  brother,  3rd 
Earl,  succeeded.  He  was  one  of  the  25  influential  barons  appointed  to 
enforce  the  observance  of  Magna  Charta,  and  one  of  the  judges  of  the 
Court  of  King's  Bench  in  1220.  He  married  Isabel  daughter  of  Hugh  and 
sister  and  heir  of  Walter  3rd  Baron  de  Bolebic  and  dying  in  1221  was  suc- 
ceeded by  his  son  Hugh  4th  Earl  of  Oxford  and  5th  Lord  Great  Chamberlain. 
Hugh  de  Vere  was  one  of  the  subscribing  barons  to  the  letter  transmitted 
to  the  Pope  complaining  of  the  exactions  of  his  Holiness  upon  this  realm, 
and  sat  in  the  Parliament  32  Hen.  III.  [1248]  wherein  the  King  was 
upbraided  for  his  extravagant  expenditure.  He  married  Hawise  daughter 
of  Saier  de  Quincy  Earl  of  Winchester  and  died  in  1263,'  being  succeeded 
by  his  son  and  heir  Robert  de  Vere  5th  Earl  of  Oxford  and  6th  Lord  Great 
Chamberlain. 

This  nobleman  joined  the  banner  of  Montfort  Earl  of  Leicester  and 
was  with  young  Hugh  de  Montfort  surprised  and  taken  prisoner  a  few  days 
before  the  battle  of  Evesham,  but  made  his  peace  with  the  Sovereign  soon 
afterwards  under  the  "  Dictum  of  Kenil worth  "  and  was  employed  by 

•  Pt.  iv.  61.  3  I.P.M.,  48  Hen.  III.  26. 

•  See  Lavcnham  Manor  in  this  Hundred. 


COCKFIELD. 


77 


Edw.  I.  against  the  Welsh.  He  married  Alice  daughter  and  heir  of 
Gilbert  Lord  Samford  to  whom  on  her  husband's  death  in  1296'  the  manor 
passed  in  dower. 

She  died  in  1317  and  was  succeeded  by  her  son  Robert  de  Vere  6th 
Earl  of  Oxford  and  7th  Lord  Great  Chamberlain  who  distinguished  himself 
in  the  wars  in  Scotland  in  the  24  and  27  years  of  Edw.  I.  [1296-1299]. 
He  married  Margaret  daughter  of  Roger  Mortimer  Earl  of  March  and  had 
a  grant  of  free  warren  in  Cockfield  in  1330'  but  dying  in  April  I33I3  without 
issue  was  succeeded  by  his  nephew  John  de  Vere  the  7th  Earl  and  8th  Lord 
Great  Chamberlain.  A  Fine  was  levied  of  the  manor  in  1336  by  the  Earl 
and  Matilda  his  wife  v.  Sir  William  Crocheman  and  Richard  de  Stoke4 
and  also  in  1342  by  the  Earl  and  Matilda  his  wife  v.  Richard  de 
Stoke  clerk  and  John  Fermer.5 

This  nobleman  was  a  warrior  of  great  renown  and  shared  in  all  the 
glories  of  Edward  the  Third's  martial  reign.  He  was  present  at  both  Crecy 
and  Poictiers  and  lost  his  life  from  fatigue  in  the  English  army  before  the 
walls  of  Rheims.  He  married  Maud  sister  and  heir  of  Giles  Lord 
Badlesmere  and  widow  of  Robert  Fitz  Payn  to  whom  the  manor  passed  in 
dower  after  the  Earl's  decease  24  Jan.  i36o.6  She  died  6  years  later7  and 
was  succeeded  by  her  eldest  son  Sir  Thomas  de  Vere  8th  Earl  and  gth  Lord 
Chamberlain  who  married  Maud  daughter  of  Sir  Ralph  de  Ufford.  He 
made  his  will  at  Bentley,  Friday  August  I  1371  and  directed  his  body  to 
be  buried  in  the  Priory  of  Colne  on  the  north  side  in  the  Chapel  of  St. 
Peter  and  for  his  funeral  expenses  left  £133.  6s.  8^.  To  Maud  his  wife  he  left 
all  his  reliques  then  in  his  own  keeping,  and  a  cross  "  made  of  the  very 
wood  of  Christ's  cross  "  and  also  all  the  furniture  of  his  chapel.  To  Robert 
his  son  he  left  two  basins  of  silver ;  to  Sir  Alberic  de  Vere  his  brother  a 
coat  of  mail  which  Sir  William  de  Wingfield  had  given  him  ;  also  a  new 
helmet  and  a  pair  of  gauntlets.  To  Dame  Joane  de  Wingfield,  to  Sir  John 
Pelham,  to  John  de  Haukwood  twenty  marks,  and  he  appointed  the  before- 
named  persons  his  executors.  He  died  shortly  after  making  his  will 8 
and  was  succeeded  by  his  only  son  Robert  gth  Earl  and  loth  Lord  Chamber- 
lain who  being  under  age  at  his  father's  decease  the  King  committed  the 
custody  of  the  manor  to  Thomas  Tyrell,  John  de  Estbury  and  John  James 
during  his  minority.9  Robert  had  livery  of  his  lands  on  his  coming  of  age 
in  the  6th  year  of  Rich.  III. 

He  was  created  Marquess  of  Dublin  Nov.  n,  1385  and  on  13  Oct.  in 
the  following  year,  Duke  of  Ireland.  The  jealousy  of  the  nobles  was  excited 
by  the  favours  lavished  upon  this  gth  Earl  by  his  weak  Sovereign  and  his 
lordship  had  to  fly  the  country,  but  subsequently  returning  placed  himself 
at  the  head  of  4000  or  5000  men  and  marching  into  Oxfordshire  was  met  at 
Radcot  Bridge  on  the  River  Isis  by  the  Earl  of  Derby  and  Duke  of 
Gloucester  where  however  he  again  had  to  fly  for  safety.  He  was  shortly 
afterwards  sentenced  to  banishment  by  Parliament  and  at  the  same  time 
outlawed  and  attainted.  He  died  from  a  hurt  received  in  hunting  a  wild 
boar  at  Louvain  in  1393. 

He  married  first  Lady  Philippa  de  Courcy  daughter  and  co-heir  of 
Ingelram  Earl  of  Bedford  by  his  wife  the  Princess  Isabel  daughter  of  Edward 


1  I.P.M.,  24  Edw.  I.  62. 

"  Chart.  Rolls,  4  Edw.  III.  37. 

3  I.P.M.,  5  Edw.  III.  71. 

4  Feet  of  Fines,  10  Edw.  III.  44. 

5  Feet  of  Fines,  16  Edw.  III.  34. 


6  I.P.M.,  34  Edw.  III.  84. 
'  I.P.M.,  40  Edw.  III.  38. 
8  I.P.M.,  45  Edw.  III.  45- 
»  Originalia,  45  Edw.  III.  22. 


78  THE   MANORS   OF   SUFFOLK. 

III.  but  repudiating  her  he  married  a  joiner's  daughter  who  came  out  of 
Bohemia  with  Anne  Queen  consort  of  Rich.  II.  but  had  no  issue  by  either 
marriage.  In  the  i6th  Rich.  II.  [1392-3]  theDe  Vere  estates  were  restored 
to  the  last  Earl's  uncle  Aubrey  who  became  loth  Earl  and  though  he  became 
Chamberlain  of  the  Household,  Privy  Councillor,  and  held  many  other 
important  offices,  the  office  of  Lord  High  Chamberlain,  so  long  in  his  family, 
was  bestowed  on  another. 

In  the  21  Rich.  II.  [1397-8]  the  judgment  passed  on  his  nephew  was 
revoked  and  annulled  by  Parliament.  Aubrey  de  Vere  the  loth  Earl 
married  Alice  daughter  of  John  7th  Lord  Fitz  Walter  and  dying  the  23 
Apr.  1400'  was  succeeded  by  his  eldest  son  Richard  de  Vere  nth  Earl  of 
Oxford  who  was  but  14  years  of  age  at  his  father's  decease.  In  1407  he 
assented  to  Philippa  Duchess  of  Ireland  widow  of  the  attainted  Duke 
enjoying  her  dower  out  of  the  entailed  lands  and  he  obtained  a  grant  from 
the  King  by  way  of  compensation  of  lands  which  had  come  to  the  Crown  on 
the  forfeiture  of  Duke  Robert.  It  seems  that  Maud  the  widow  of  the 
8th  Earl  and  mother  of  the  gth  Earl  was  still  living,  and  Dugdale  gives  an 
account  of  how  on  her  giving  out  that  Richard  II.  was  still  living  and 
about  to  come  in  with  an  army  of  French  and  Scots  she  was  committed 
to  prison  and  her  goods  confiscated.  She  died  in  1422  leaving  her  cousin 
Robert  de  Willoughby  her  next  heir.  The  nth  Earl  died  Feb.  15, 
1417'  leaving  by  Alice  his  wife  daughter  of  Sir  John  Sergean  knt. 
and  widow  of  Grey  St.  Aubyn,  two  sons — John  his  successor  and 
Robert  who  married  Joane  daughter  of  Sir  Hugh  Courteney  and  was  father 
of  John  who  married  Alice,  daughter  of  Walter  Kelrington  and  was  father 
of  John  who  ultimately  succeeded  as  isth  Earl  of  Oxford. 

John  de  Vere  the  I2th  Earl  was  knighted  on  the  19  May  1426  by  Hen. 
VI.  when  the  King  himself  received  a  similar  honour  from  his  uncle  the 
Duke  of  Bedford.  In  1429  being  still  under  age  he  had  to  pay  a  fine  of 
£2000  for  marrying  Elizabeth  daughter  of  John  Howard  knt.  the  younger 
without  licence,  but  before  the  close  of  that  year  having  attained  majority, 
he  had  livery  of  his  lands.  He  was  a  staunch  Lancastrian  and  performed 
eminent  services  for  his  sovereign  the  6th  Henry,  but  on  the  accession  of 
Edw.  IV.  he  shared  the  misfortunes  of  his  party  and  was  attainted  with  his 
eldest  son  Aubrey  and  both  were  beheaded  on  Tower  Hill  Feb.  26,  I462.3 
The  Warkworth  Chronicle  thus  concisely  specifies  the  misfortunes  :  "  And 
in  the  Vth  yere  of  Kynge  Edwarde,  the  Erie  of  Oxenforde,  the  Lord  Abrey, 
his  sonne,  and  Sere  Thomas  Todenam  knyght  were  taken,  and  brought 
into  the  Toure  of  Londone,  and  there  was  leyde  to  them  hye  tresone  ; 
and  aftyrwarde  thei  were  brought  before  the  Erie  of  Worscetre,  and  juged 
by  lawe  padowe  that  thei  schuld  be  hade  to  the  Toure  Hylle,  where  was 
made  a  scaffolde  of  viij.  fote  hyzt,  and  ther  was  there  hedes  smyten  of, 
that  alle  menne  myght  see  ;  whereof  the  moste  peple  were  sory." 

Edward  IV.  granted  the  manor  the  same  year  to  Richard  Duke  of 
Gloucester. 

The  I2th  Earl's  second  son  John  de  Vere  was  restored  as  I3th  Earl 
during  the  temporary  triumph  of  the  House  of  Lancaster  in  1470  and  sat 
as  Lord  High  Steward  at  the  trial  of  the  Earl  of  Worcester,  the  nobleman 
who  had  presided  at  the  trial  and  condemnation  of  John  Earl  de  Vere's 
father  and  brother.  As  the  Warkworth  Chronicle  quaintly  puts  it,  "  And 

•  I.P.M.,  i  Hen.  IV.  52.  >  See  Rolls  of  Parliament,  vi.  128,  228. 

•  I.P.M.,  4  Hen.  V.  53. 


COCKFIELD.  79 

thenne  was  takene  the  Erie  of  Worcetre,  whiche  was  arested  and  areynede 
befor  Sere  Jhon  Veere,  the  Erie  of  Oxenforde,  sonne  and  heyre  to  the  forseide 
Erie  of  Oxenforde  whiche  was  behedede  at  the  Toure  Hille  as  before  wry tene ; 
and  so  the  Erie  of  Worcetre  was  juged  be  suche  lawe  as  he  dyde  to  other 
menne  ;  and,  whenne  he  was  dede,  his  body  and  his  hede  was  buryede 
togedyr  at  the  Blacke  Frerys  in  Londone,  with  alle  the  honoure  and 
worschyppe  that  his  frendes  coude  do."  This  Earl  was  unfortunate  at 
the  Battle  of  Barnet,  the  mist  on  Easter  morning  being  so  great  as  to  render 
it  difficult  to  distinguish  friend  from  foe.  The  Chronicle  from  which  we 
have  quoted  above,  relates  that  "  there  was  suche  a  grete  myste,  that  nether 
of  them  myght  see  othere  perfitely."  The  opposing  parties  fought  from 
4  o'clock  in  the  morning  until  nearly  noon  and  the  victory  hung  in  the 
balance.  The  probable  cause  of  the  Lancasterians  losing  was  the  Earl  of 
Warwick  and  his  men  mistaking  the  Earl  of  Oxford  and  his  followers  for 
the  enemy.  The  Earl  of  Oxford  commanded  the  van  of  Warwick's  forces 
and  broke  that  of  the  enemy,  but  wheeling  about  with  a  body  of  800  horse 
to  attack  the  enemy  on  the  main  flank  the  unfortunate  mistake  arose. 
The  old  chronicler  Dr.  John  Warkworth  thus  narrates  the  incident :  "  It 
hapenede  so,  that  the  Erie  of  Oxenfordes  men  hade  uppon  them  ther 
lordes  lyvery,  bothe  before  and  behynde,  which  was  a  sterre  withe  stremys, 
wiche  [was]  myche  lyke  Kynge  Edwardes  lyvery,  the  sunne  with  stremys  ; 
and  the  myste  was  so  thy  eke  that  amanne  myghte  not  profytely  juge  one 
thynge  from  anothere  ;  so  the  Erie  of  Warwikes  menne  schott  and  faughte 
ayens  the  Erie  of  Oxenfordes  menne,  wetynge  and  supposynge  that  thei 
hade  bene  Kynge  Edwardes  menne  ;  and  anone  the  Erie  of  Oxenforde  and 
his  menne  cryed  '  treasoune  !  treasoune  !  '  and  fledde  awaye  from  the 
felde  withe  viij.  c.  menne  ....  and  whenne  the  Erie  of  Warwyke 
sawe  his  brothere  dede,  and  the  Erie  of  Oxenforde  fledde,  he  lepte  one 
horse-backe,  and  flede  to  a  wode  by  the  felde  of  Barnett,  where  was  no 
waye  forthe  ;  and  one  of  Kynge  Edwardes  menne  had  espyede  hyme,  and 
one  came  uppone  hym,  and  kylled  hym,  and  dispolede  hyme  nakede. 
And  so  Kynge  Edwarde  gate  that  felde." 

The  Earl  of  Oxford  fled  to  Scotland  and  from  thence  passed  over  to 
France  where  he  was  particularly  well  received.  The  Warkworth  Chronicle 
ends  abruptly  with  an  interesting  account  of  the  Earl's  descent  on  St. 
Michael's  Mount  Cornwall,  and  of  his  being  ultimately  taken  prisoner  to 
London.  "  And  in  the  same  yere  he  was  in  the  see  withe  certeyne  schippes 
and  gate  grete  good  and  rychesse  and  afterewarde  came  into  westecountre, 
and,  with  a  sotule  poynte  of  we"rre,  gate  and  enteryd  Seynt  Michaels  Mount 
in  Cornwayle,  a  stronge  place  and  a  mygty,  and  can  nozt  be  geett  yf  it  be 
wele  vytaled  withe  a  fewe  menne  to  kepe  hit ;  for  xxti  menne  may  kepe 
it  ageyne  alle  the  world.  So  the  seyd  Erie,  withe  xxti  score  menne  save 
iij,  the  last  day  of  Septembre  the  yere  afore  seyd1  enteryd  fyrst  into  [the] 
seyd  mount,  and  he  and  his  menne  came  doune  into  cuntre  of  Cornwale, 
and  hade  righte  good  chere  of  the  comons,  &c.  The  Kynge  and  his 
counselle  sawe  that  therof  myche  harme  myght  growe,  &c.  ;  comawndyd 
Bodrygan,  scheff  reulere  of  Cornwayle,  to  besege  the  seid  mount.  And  so 
he  dyd ;  and  every  day  the  Erie  of  Oxenfordes  menne  came  doune  undere 
trewis,  spake  with  Bodryngham  and  his  menne  ;  and  at  the  laste  the  seid 
Erie  lacked  vytayle,  and  the  seyde  Bodrygan  suffryd  hyme  to  be  vytailed  ; 
and  anone  the  Kynge  was  put  in  knowlache  therof ;  wherefor  the  seide 

•  13  Edw.  IV. 


8o  THE   MANORS   OF   SUFFOLK. 

Bodrygan  was  discharged,  and  Richard  Fortescu,  squyere  for  the  body, 
by  auchoryte  of  the  Kynge,  toke  uppone  honde  to  lay  sege  to  the  forseide 
mount,  &c.  And  so  gret  dyversione  roose  betwyx  Bodrygan  and  Fortescu, 
whiche  Fortescu  was  schreve  of  Cornwayle,  &c. ;  and  the  seide  Fortescu 
leyed  sege,  &c.,  the  xx.  xiijti.  day  of  Decembre  the  yere  aforseide  ;  and 
for  the  most  party  every  day  eche  of  theme  faughte  withe  othere,  and  the 
seide  Erles  menne  kylled  dyverse  of  Fortescu  menne ;  and  som  tyme 
whennc  thei  hade  welle  y-foughte,  thei  wulde  take  a  trewis  for  one  day 
and  a  night,  and  some  tyme  for  two  or  thre  dayes,  &c.  In  the  whiche 
trewes  eche  one  of  them  spake  and  comaunde  with  other.  The  Kynge 
and  his  counselle  sent  unto  dyverse  that  were  with  the  Erie  of  Oxenforde 
prevely  there  pardones,  and  promysede  to  them  grete  yeftes  and  landes  and 
goodes,  by  the  whiche  dyverse  of  them  were  turned  to  the  Kynge  ayens 
the  Erie  ;  and  so  in  conclusione  the  Erie  hade  nozt  passynge  ane  viij .  or 
ix.  menne  that  wolde  holde  withe  hym  ;  the  whiche  was  the  undoynge  of 
the  Erie.  For  ther  is  proverbe  and  a  seyenge,  that  a  castelle  that  spekythe, 
and  a  womane  that  wille  here,  thei  wille  be  gotene  bothe  ;  for  menne  that  bene 
in  a  castelle  of  warr,  that  wille  speke  and  entrete  withe  ther  enemyes,  the 
conclusione  therof  [is]  the  losynge  of  the  castelle ;  and  a  womanne  that  wille 
here  foly  spokyne  unto  hyre,  if  sche  assent  nozt  at  one  tyme,  sche  wille 
at  another.  And  so  this  proverbe  was  provede  trewe  by  the  seide  Erie  of 
Oxenforde,  whiche  was  fayne  to  yelde  up  the  seyde  mount,  and  put  hyme 
in  the  Kynges  grace  ;  if  he  hade  nozt  do  so,  his  owne  menne  wulde  have 
brought  hym  oute.  And  so  Fortescu  enterd  into  the  seyd  mount,  the  xv. 
day  of  Februarij,  the  yere  afore  sayde,  in  the  whiche  was  vytayle  enogh 
tylle  midsomere  aftere.  And  so  was  the  Erie  aforseyd,  the  Lorde  Bemonde, 
two  brotheres  of  the  seide  Erles,  and  Thomas  Clyfforde,  brought  as  a 
prisonere  to  the  Kynge  ;  and  alle  was  donne  by  ther  oune  foly,  &c.'" 

This  account  is  correct  as  far  as  it  goes  and  is  supported  by  existing 
records.  It  was  when  the  King  saw  clearly  that  Bodrugan  would  not  take 
the  Earl  that  he  by  Letters  Patent  7th  Dec.  1473,  "  Pro  eo  quod  notorius 
rebellis  et  proditor  noster  Johannes,  nuper  comes  Oxonie,  aggregatis  sibi 
quampluribus  malefactoribus  et  pacis  nostre  perturbatoribus  nobis 
rebelhbus,  Montem  Sancti  Michaelis  in  comitatu  Cornubie  ingressi  sunt," 
gave  power  and  authority  to  John  Fortescue,  Sir  John  Crokker  knt.  and 
Henry  Bodrugan  to  reduce  the  Mount  to  his  obedience,  adding  this  clause  : 
"  Damus  etiam  eisdem  Johanni,  Johanni  et  Henrico  et  eorum  cuilibet 
committimus  plenam  potentiam  et  auctoritatem  ad  quascunque  personas 
nobis  in  Monte  predicto  rebelles  et  inobedientes,  prefato  nuper  comite, 
Willelmo  Beaumond  nuper  domino  Bardolf  milite,  Georgio  Veer,  Thoma 
Veer,  Ricardo  Veer,  fratribus  predicti  nuper  comitis,  exceptis,  gratie  nostre 
se  submittentes  et  juramentum  fidelitatis  sue  nobis  facere  volentes,  juxta 
discretiones  suas  ad  gratiam  nostram  admittendi." 

The  offer  of  pardon  to  the  men  of  the  Earl  produced,  as  the  chronicler 
states,  the  desired  effect. 

The  Earl  of  Oxford  and  his  brothers  George  and  Thomas  obtained 
from  the  King  letters  patent  of  pardon  in  1474  as  to  their  lives  only.  The 
Earl  was  sent  a  prisoner  to  Hames  Castle  where  he  was  kept  prisoner  for 
ten  years.  In  1484  he  contrived  to  escape  by  the  connivance  of  James 
Blunt  the  Captain  of  the  Castle  and  joined  Henry  Earl  of  Richmond 
who  had  just  sought  refuge  in  France  prior  to  preparing  for  his  descent  on 

1  Warkworth  Chronicle,  Camden  Soc.  1839.  Pa§e  27- 


COCKFIELD.  81 

England.  The  joy  of  the  Earl  of  Richmond  on  being  thus  supported  is 
described  by  Poly dore  Vergil  in  graphic  terms  :  "  Whan  Henry  saw  therle 
he  was  ravisshyd  with  joy  incredible  that  a  man  of  so  great  nobilytie  and 
knowledge  in  the  warres,  and  of  most  perfyte  and  sownd  fydelytie,  most 
earnestly  bent  to  his  syde,  was  at  the  last  by  God's  assistance  delyveryd 
owt  of  ward,  and  in  so  fyt  tyme  coommyd  to  help  him,  in  whome  he  might 
repose  his  hope,  and  settle  himself  more  safely  than  in  any  other ;  for  he 
was  not  ignorant  that  others  who  had  holden  on  King  Edward  syde  yealdid 
unto  him  by  reason  of  the  evell  state  of  time,  but  this  man  who  had  so  oft 
foughte  for  King  Henry  was  he  thowght  delyveryd  from  that  ward  by  the 
hevenly  help,  that  he  might  have  one  of  his  owne  faction  to  whom  he  might 
safely  commyt  all  thinges  ;  and  therfor  rejoysing  above  all  measure  for 
therle  of  Oxfoorth  is  cooming,  he  began  to  hope  better  of  his  affaires." 
John  Earl  of  Oxford  had  an  important  command  at  the  celebrated  Battle 
of  Bosworth.  On  the  accession  of  the  Earl  of  Richmond  to  the  throne  as 
Hen.  VII.  he  was  richly  rewarded  for  his  fidelity  to  that  sovereign's  house. 
He  was  made  Admiral  of  England,  Constable  of  the  Tower  in  Sept.  1485, 
and  in  Oct.  of  the  same  year  he  had  the  ancient  office  of  his  house  restored 
to  him,  that  of  Lord  Great  Chamberlain. 

John  de  Vere  married  first  Lady  Margaret  Neville  6th  daughter  of 
Richard  Earl  of  Salisbury  by  whom  he  had  a  son  John  who  died  young  in 
the  Tower  of  London  during  his  father's  exile,  and  andly  Elizabeth  daughter 
of  Sir  Richard  Scrope  knt.  and  widow  of  William  Viscount  Beaumont  but 
had  no  issue.  He  died  xoth  March  1513  and  was  interred  in  the  Priory 
of  Colne  under  a  tomb  which  he  had  prepared  for  himself  and  Margaret 
his  first  wife,  there  already  buried.  His  widow  survived  until  1537.  By 
her  will  dated  the  30  May  29  Hen.  VIII.  1537  proved  the  6th  Nov.  following 
she  bequeathed  her  body  to  be  buried  in  the  parish  church  of  Wyvenhoe 
by  the  corpse  of  William  Viscount  Beaumont,  her  first  husband.  Her 
effigy  in  brass  still  remains,  with  the  inscription  :  "Of  your  charitie  pray 
for  the  Soule  of  the  high  and  noble  Lady  Elizabeth  Scroope  first  married 
to  the  noble  lord,  William,  late  Vycount  Beaumont,  Lord  Comyn,  Bardolphe, 
Phelipp  and  Erpingham  ;  and  after  Wife  unto  the  high  and  noble  Lorde 
John  sumtyme  Earl  of  Oxford,  High  Chamberlain  of  England  and  Admiral 
of  the  same,  Vycount  Bulbeck,  Lord  Scales,  Councelor  to  our  Soverayne 
lorde  the  Kyng,  and  knyght  of  the  most  noble  Order  of  the  Garter.  The 
which  Lady  Elizabeth,  departed  to  God,  the  26th  Day  of  June  1537,  on 
whose  Soule,  and  Christen  Souls,  Jesu  have  Mercy."  Her  mantle  is  em- 
blazoned on  each  side  with  the  arms  of  her  family.  An  abstract  of  her 
will  is  in  Dugdale  and  in  the  Testamenta  Vetusta  of  Sir  Nicholas  Harris 
Nicolas  where  a  pedigree  is  appended,  in  which  she  is  erroneously  described 
as  wife  of  John  de  Vere  fourteenth  Earl  of  Oxford  (nephew  of  her  husband) 
whose  wife  was  Anne  or  Agnes  dau.  of  Thomas  Howard  2nd  Duke  of  Nor- 
folk and  who  was  not  a  knight  of  the  Garter.  A  correct  pedigree  of  her 
paternal  relations  is  inserted  in  the  Scrope  and  Grosvenor  Controversy 
where  she  is  described  to  have  had  a  sister  Frances  but  omitting  the  name 
of  her  husband  Sir  John  St.  Clere  knt.  by  whom  she  had  issue  John,  Giles 
and  Elizabeth.  The  next  and  I4th  Earl  of  Oxford  John  de  Vere  nephew 
of  the  deceased  Earl  eldest  surviving  son  of  Sir  George  Vere  knight  the  deceased 
Earl's  brother  succeeded,  and  was  known  as  "  Little  John  of  Campes."  He 
married  Lady  Anne  Howard  3rd  daughter  of  Thomas  2nd  Duke  of  Norfolk 
but  had  no  issue.  He  died  July  14  1526  in  the  lifetime  of  the  Countess  of 
Oxford  when  his  cousin  John  de  Vere  succeeded  as  I5th  Earl.  He  was 

K 


82  THE   MANORS   OF   SUFFOLK. 

son  and  heir  of  John  son  and  heir  of  Robert  uncle  of  the  ijth  Earl,  and  became 
a  1'nvv  CoondDor  and  K.(i.  in  the  reign  of  Hen.  VIII.  He  was  one  of 
those  who  signed  the  articles  against  Cardinal  Wolsey  and  joined  with  the 
King  against  the  Pope  in  the  matter  of  the  divorce  from  Queen  Katherine. 
IK-  married  Elizabeth  daughter  and  heir  of  Sir  Edward  Trussell  knt. 
Banneret  of  Cublesdon  co.  Stafford,  and  with  an  eldest  son  John  who  suc- 
ceeded as  i6th  Earl  had  a  son  Aubrey  (married  to  Margaret  daughter  of 
John  Spring  of  Lavenham)  grandfather  of  Robert  who  ultimately 
succeeded  as  igth  Earl  of  Oxford. 

The  1 5th  Earl  died  the  21  March  1540  and  was  succeeded  by  John 
i6th  Earl.  Davy  makes  Edward  de  Vere  lyth  Earl  the  next  lord  of  the 
manor,  and  Page  goes  even  further  and  states  that  Earl's  Hall  remained 
in  the  De  Vere  family  until  the  extinction  of  the  title  in  that  house  by  the 
decease  of  Aubrey  de  Vere  aoth  Earl  of  Oxford  without  issue  March  I2th 
1702.  Both  Davy's  suggestion  and  Page's  statement  appear  to  be 
inaccurate,  for  the  manor  seems  to  have  passed  in  1548  to  Edward  Duke 
of  Somerset,'  and  about  1554  to  Sir  Wm.  Spring  of  Pakenham  the  son  of 
Sir  John  Spring  of  Cockfield.  It  is  quite  possible  the  estate  was  merely 
vested  in  Spring  by  way  of  mortgage,  but  it  did  no  doubt  ultimately  vest 
in  Sir  William  Spring  as  absolute  owner.  Probably  the  transfer  was  effected 
in  1583  when  we  meet  with  a  fine  levied  of  the  manor  by  Sir  William  Spring 
against  Edward  Earl  of  Oxford.2  Sir  William  Spring  died  in  1599,  when 
the  manor  passed  in  the  same  course  as  the  main  manor  of  Cockfield  to 
this  Sir  William's  grandson  Sir  William  Spring.  In  1609  Sir  Thomas 
Skinner  was  lord  and  he  sold  the  manor  to  Isaac  Wooder.  Davy  informs 
us  that  in  1609  John  Strutt  held  a  part,  and  in  1668  Dame  Elizabeth  Spring 
of  Pakenham  lady  of  the  manor  granted  a  lease  of  it  to  Sir  Thomas  Robinson 
of  Kentwell  Hall.  Sir  Thomas  Robinson  subsequently  acquired  the  fee, 
after  which  the  devolution  is  identical  with  that  of  Cockfield  Hall  Manor 
down  to  James  Cuddon  who  purchased  in  1829.  The  Misses  Manning 
purchased  from  the  executors  of  James  Cuddon  in  1853  this  manor,  but 
Earl's  Hall  farm  containing  333  acres  was  purchased  by  Robert  Martin 
Carss  of  Little  Welnetham  who  sold  it  in  1861  to  William  Baker  Hustler 
who  resided  there  in  1885.  The  devolution  of  the  manor  from  James 
Cuddon  is  identical  with  Cockfield  Hall,  and  it  is  now  vested  like  that 
manor  in  George  Frederick  Beaumont. 

BUTLERS  al.  JACOBBIES  MANOR. 

We  do  not  find  any  further  mention  of  this  manor  than  in  the  hands 
of  the  Spring  family.  Thomas  Spring  died  seised  of  it  the  29  June  1523,' 
and  was  succeeded  by  his  son  Sir  John  Spring  who  died  the  12  Feb.  1548, 
and  was  succeeded  by  his  son  Sir  William  who  died  the  3  Feb.  1599  and 
was  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir  John  Spring  of  Pakenham.  Mr. 
Churchill  Babington  in  a  paper  in  the  Suffolk  Institute  in  1880  Vol.  V.  p. 
242  says  of  this  manor,  "  I  have  been  unable  to  discover  anything  more 
of  this  Butler's  Manor,  but  am  inclined  to  suspect  that  the  Green  now  called 
Button's  Green  is  a  corruption  of  Butler's  Green.  The  house  thereon 
belonging  to  the  Rev.  G.  A.  Langdale,  occupied  by  Mr.  Simkin,  and  also 
the  house  not  far  distant,  known  as  Knight's  Hill,  belonging  to  Mr.  Barne- 
well,  and  occupied  by  Mr.  Edgar,  are  certainly  not  very  modern  and  may 

1  Fine,  Easter,  2  Edw.  VI.  >  I.P.M.,  15  Hen.  VIII.  17. 

•  Fine,  Easter,  25  Eliz. 


COCKFIELD.  83 

probably  be  of  the  seventeenth  century,  but  there  was  a  house  between  the 
two  known  as  the  Old  House  of  which  no  vestige  now  remains,  though  a 
barn  belonging  to  it  was  taken  down  about  twenty  years  ago.  This  I  sus- 
pect may  have  been  the  Manor  House." 

PEPERS  al.  COLCHESTER'S  MANOR. 

This  manor  was  held  originally  by  the  Cockfields.  Lemmerus  de 
Cokefeud  is  the  first  lord  of  whom  we  have  any  note.  He  was  succeeded 
by  his  son  and  heir  Adam  de  Cockfield,  and  we  find  that  Anselm  Abbot  of 
St.  Edmund's  granted  to  this  Adam  and  his  heirs  by  the  service  of  one 
knight,  the  land  in  Cokefeld  and  Lilesey  which  his  father  Lemmerus  held 
in  his  lifetime,  as  the  men  of  St.  Edmund's  swore  and  testified,  in  the 
presence  of  Talbot  the  Prior  and  others. 

Anselmus,  Dei  gratia  Abbas  ecclesiae  Sancti  Edmundi,  omnibus 
suis  successoribus  et  omnibus  hominibus  ejusdem  ecclesiae  Francis  et 
Anglis  prsesentibus  et  succedentibus,  Salutem.  Notifico  vobis  me, 
concessu  totius  conventus,  concessisse  Adae  et  heredibus  suis,  ut 
amodo  teneat  jure  haereditario,  per  servicium  unius  militis,  terram  de 
Kochfeld  et  de  Leleseie  cum  hiis  quae  pertinent,  scilicet,  terram  quam 
pater  suus  tenuit  die  qua  vivus  et  mortuus  fuerat,  et  sicut  juraverunt 
et  testificati  fuerunt  homines  Sancti  Edmundi  Lemmerum  patrem 
illius  habuisse  die  qua  fuerat  vivus  et  mortuus,  in  praesentia  Domini 
Taleboti  prioris,  assistentibus  monachis  Eadnotho  et  Siredo  et 
Wulfrico  et  Ordingo  et  Gotcellino  et  Wlwardo  clerico  et  Rogerio 
Debili  et  Osberno  et  Mellet  et  Egelmero  de  Wheterfeld.  Et 
ut  melius  possit  facere  de  predictis  terns  servitium  unius  militis,  dedi 
ei,  per  concessum  praedicti  conventus  ad  acramentum,  v  solidatas 
terrae  et  iiij.  denariatas  terrae,  scilicet  servitium  de  terra  Aistani  de 
Leleseia  et  servitium  avi  sui  Wlfrici  de  Grotene.  Et  volo  et  precipio, 
ut  ille  et  suus  haeres  ita  teneat  bene  et  in  pace  et  honorifice  sicuti 
sui  pares,  videlicet,  milites  Abbatiae  tenent.  Et  hi  sunt  testes  : 
Wlwardus  dapifer,  Willelmus  filius  Ageh,  Salomon  clericus,  Wlfricus 
presbiter,  Willelmus  presbiter  de  Pachenham,  Herebertus  clericus, 
et  alii.' 

Adam  de  Cokefield  described  in  one  place  as  "  de  Castello  de  Lilesey 
in  Suff."  was  succeeded  by  his  son  Robert  the  issue  of  Adam's  wife  Adeliza. 
Robert  de  Cokefield  died  in  1191  leaving  a  son  Adam  de  Cokefield  who 
succeeded  him  and  three  daurs. :  Alicia  married  to  Bartholomew  Creke  of 
North  Creke  co.  Norf .,  Beatrix  married  to  Sir  William  de  Berners  knt.  and 
Gunnora  married  to  William  Drayton  of  Drayton  co.  Norf.  Adam  de 
Cokefield  married  one  Rohais  subsequently  the  wife  of  Thomas  Erdinton 
of  Erdinton  co.  Warwick  and  died  before  1209  leaving  an  only  dau.  Nesta 
whose  wardship  and  marriage  was  given  by  her  father  to  the  Abbot  of  St. 
Edmund.  He  granted  the  wardship  to  Herbert  Archbishop  of  Canterbury 
who  gave  it  to  Thomas  de  Burgh  brother  of  Sir  Hubert  de  Burgh  the 
Chamberlain  and  in  the  reign  of  Hen.  III.  Justiciary  of  England  and  Earl 
of  Kent.1 

An  award  of  seisin  of  the  manor  (described  as  usual  as  Cockfield  Manor) 
was  in  1209  made  to  "  Margaret  de  Kokefield  "  probably  a  mistake  for 
Nesta  on  the  ground  that  her  father  Adam  had  died  seised.3  Thomas 
de  Burgh  seems  to  have  married  his  ward  Nesta,  and  in  the  3rd  Hen.  III. 
Rohais  widow  of  Adam  de  Cokefield  released  to  Thomas  de  Burgh  and 
Nesta  his  wife  her  dower  in  the  lands  of  her  late  husband  in  Cokefeld, 

1  Liber     Celerarii    Camb.      Univ.     Libr.         •  Chron.  Jocel.  de  Brakelonda  (Camd.  Soc; 
G.g.    4,    4,    fol.  396.      Harl.  230  1840  pp.  72  and  91.) 

fol.  loi.  3  Abbr.  of  PI.  n  John.  14. 


84  THE   MANORS   OF   SUFFOLK. 

Semere  and  Groton,  other  lands  being  assigned  to  her.  Thomas  de 
Burgh  and  Nesta  his  wife  were  benefactors  to  the  priory  of  St.  Anthony 
of  Kersey,'  which  priory  was  founded  probably  by  her  ancestors  abt.  1184, 
the  "  Parvum  Monastenum  de  Kersey  "  being  then  accounted  in  the  Liber 
de  Consuetudinibus  S.  Edmundi  as  half  a  leet  to  the  hundred  of  Cosford. 
It  seems  first  to  have  been  a  hospital  or  free  chapel  but  Nesta  de  Cokefield 
converted  it  into  a  Priory  of  Canons  of  the  order  of  St.  Austin.  Nesta  after 
the  death  of  Thomas  de  Burgh,  increased  her  gifts  to  the  priory,  bestowing 
upon  it  among  other  hereditaments  the  Churches  of  Kersey  and  Lellesley, 
the  former  of  which  was  appropriated  to  the  use  of  the  canons  by  Thomas 
de  Blunderville  7th  Bp.  of  Norwich  in  1227.  The  grant  of  Nesta  de  Coke- 
field  specifies  the  messuage  late  the  hospital  and  30  acres  of  land  adjoining 
and  the  tithes  of  the  mills  of  Cockfield,  Semere,  Lelesey  and  Kersey  to  sus- 
tain the  lights  in  the  Church  of  St.  Anthony.  The  portion  added  by  Thomas 
de  Burgh  consisted  of  3  acres.  In  the  Mon.  Angl.  vol.  i.  533  is  an  engraving 
of  the  seal  of  Nesta  de  Cokefeld  attached  to  her  grant  to  the  priors  ;  the 
original  is  amongst  the  evidences  of  King's  College  Cambridge.  It  is  an  oval 
seal,  representing  a  cock,  and  this  inscription  round  it  :— 

+  SIGIL  :  NESTE  :  DE  :  COCFELD  + 

Nesta  next  became  the  wife  of  John  de  Beauchamp  and  in  1240  they 
added  to  the  donations  made  to  the  priory.  John  de  Beauchamp  died  in 
1240  and  Nesta  married  for  a  3rd  husband  Matthew  de  Leyham,  whose 
family  were  seated  at  Leyham  in  the  neighbourhood  of  Lilesey.  It  was 
probably  on  the  occasion  of  this  marriage  that  Matthew  de  Leyham  with 
others  carried  away  the  goods  of  Rohais  the  mother  who  was  still  alive  and 
for  which  transgression  they  stood  amerced  in  1242.'  This  same  year  Nesta 
and  her  husband  Matthew  de  Leyham3  sold  this  manor  with  5  carucates  of  land 
in  Cockfield  to  the  Abbot  of  Bury,  the  Abbot  releasing  all  claim  to  the  lands 
belonging  to  them  in  Lilesey,  Groton,  Semere  and  Rougham.'  Subsequently 
Henry  de  Cokefeld  held  one  knight's  fee  of  the  Abbot.5  In  1249  we  meet 
with  a  Final  Concord  between  Nicholas  de  Cokfeld  and  others  by  which  the 
right  is  acknowledged  of  Nicholas  to  10  acres  of  land  in  Cockfield,6  and  in 
the  next  reign  we  find  John  de  la  Garderobe  seeking  to  replevy  John  de  Coke- 
feld the  latter's  land  in  Cockfield  against  Alice  late  wife  of  Philip  Spark.7 

But  the  manor  prior  to  this,  namely  in  1315,  belonged  to  Adam  de 
Colchestre,  and  Davy  makes  a  Joan  Peper  widow  to  hold  after  this  but 
without  assigning  a  date.  It  is  clear,  however,  that  an  Adam  de  Colceestre 
died  seised  in  1398  he  then  holding  \  a  fee  of  Roger  de  Mortuo  Mari  Earl  of 
March"  and  another  Adam  Colcestre  died  seised  in  1425  holding  in  like 
manner.9  The  lordship  subsequently  vested  in  Thomas  Spring  who  died 
the  29  June  1523'°  when  it  passed  to  his  son  and  heir  Sir  John  Spring  who 
died  in  1548,  when  it  passed  to  his  widow  Dorothy  and  later  to  Sir  William 
Spring.  In  1588  a  fine  was  levied  of  the  manor  by  John  Sprynge  s.  and  h. 
of  Sir  William  Springe  against  Sir  W.  Spring."  Sir  Wm.  died  seised  in 
1599  being  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir  John  Spring.  Amongst  the 

1  Charts  v.  vi.  Dugdale  Mon.  vi.  593.  «  Bodl.  Suff.  Ch.  290. 

•  Fine,  26  Hen.  III.  2,  5.  r  Close  Rolls,  18  Edw.  II.  5<f. 

•  See  further  as   to    Nesta    de  Cokefield         •  I.P.M.,  22  Rich.  II.  34. 

under     Groton      Manor  in     this         '  I.P.M.,  3  Hen.  VI.  32. 
Hundred.  -  I.P.M.,  15  Hen.  VIII.  17. 

Fine,  26  Hen.  III.  174.  ••  Fine,  Mich.  30,  31  Eliz. 

'  H.R.  ii.  142,  151. 


COCKFIELD.  85 

Duchy  of  Lancaster  Pleadings  will  be  found  particulars  of  a  suit  as  to  relief 
for  a  tenement  in  "  Pipers  "  Manor  in  Cockfield,  Lay  ton  v.  Reynolds, ' 
and  amongst  the  Chancery  Proceedings  in  the  time  of  Q.  Elizabeth  pre- 
served in  the  Record  Office  will  be  found  a  Bill  by  Henry  Collyn  the  elder 
against  Anne  Spring  widow  for  payment  of  money  charged  on  the 
"  Manor  of  Peppers  "  and  a  capital  mansion  house  called  "  Palmer's  " 
and  land  in  Cockfield  conveyed  by  John  Spring  deceased  to  defendant 
his  widow.2  To  John's  widow  Anne  succeeded  Sir  William  Spring. 
Mr.  Churchill  Babington  in  his  Materials  for  a  Hist,  of  Cockfield 
has  the  following  note  as  to  the  devolution  of  this  manor,  the  substance  of 
which  he  states  is  derived  from  Katherine  Jermyn's  "  Insignia  of  Suffolk 
Families  "  in  MSS.  in  the  Library  of  the  Suffolk  Institute  and  from  the 
title-deeds  of  Pepper's  Hall.  "  The  Harveys  appear  to  have  succeeded 
the  Springs  about  the  middle  of  the  seventeenth  century  both  to  the  Hall 
and  to  the  manor.  Francis  Harvey  who  died  in  1691  was  succeeded  by 
James  Harvey,  the  Recorder  of  Colchester.  His  widow  Elizabeth  Harvey 
devised  them  to  the  Rev.  Harvey  Aspin  and  his  heirs.  He  belonged  to  a 
Hampshire  family,  and  took  the  degree  of  LL.B.  in  1740  being  a  member  of 
Corpus  Christi  College  Cambridge.  He  was  related  to  the  Harvey  and 
Calthorpe  family,  and  married  Isabella  Lestrange  of  Bury  St.  Edmund's, 
a  member  of  the  Hunstanton  family  of  that  name.  He  succeeded  to  the 
Harvey  estate  in  1767  and  left  it  to  his  sister  Dorothy  who  in  1761  married 
Nat.  Acton  of  Bramford  [died  1795]  whose  family  was  anciently  seated  at 
Ipswich.  Thus  on  the  death  of  Harvey  Aspin  in  1791,  the  Actons  succeeded, 
and  in  1814  William  Baldwin  of  Sparrow's  Nest,  Ipswich,  formerly  of  Thorpe 
Morieux,  purchased  the  estate  of  Caroline  Acton.  About  this  time  the 
manor  fell  into  disuse,  the  manor-house  was  turned  into  a  farmhouse,  and  the 
estate  was  enfranchised  by  the  Honor  of  Clare.  Mr.  William  Baldwin 
son  of  the  preceding  succeeded  his  father  in  1830.  The  farm  is  now  [1880] 
in  the  possession  (by  purchase)  of  Mr.  J.  T.  Cousens  son-in-law  of  Mr. 
Baldwin." 


1  Duchy  of   Lancaster.    Cal.  to  Pleadings.         '  C.P.  i.  181. 
[43]  Eliz.  2. 


86 


THE    MANORS   OF   SUFFOLK. 


CORNARD  (GREAT). 

|N  King  Edward's  time  the  mother  of  Karl  Morchar  held  3 
irucates  as  a  manor.  There  were  8  villeins,  9  bordars,  8 
slaves,  3  ploughteams  in  demesne  and  8  belonging  to  the 
men,  a  mill,  14  acres  of  meadow,  wood  for  10  hogs,  and  a 
church  li\  ingwithout  land.  There  were  also  4  horses  at  the 
Hall,  18  beasts,  80  hogs  and  363  sheep.  By  the  time  of  the 
Norman  Surveylthere  were  10  villeins,  25  bordars,  9  slaves,  but 
only  i  ploughteam  in  demesne.  The  ploughteams,  however,  of  the  men 
had  risen  to  10. 

The  custody  of  this  manor  was  committed  by  King  William  to  William 
the  Chamberlain  and  Otho  the  Goldsmith  for  the  Crown.1  In  this  place 
the  Abbot  of  Bury  held  2  freemen  with  50  acres  and  i  of  meadow  of  which 
the  value  was  6  ores  both  in  Saxon  and  Norman  times.  These  freemen 
could  sell  or  give  their  lands  but  the  soc  and  all  customs  belonged  to  the 
Abbot.'  Richard  son  of  Earl  Gislebert3  also  held  7  freemen  who  in  the 
Confessor's  time  had  held  under  Wisgar  or  Witgar  by  commendation  and 
soc  and  sac  2  carucates  of  land  and  I  bordar ;  also  5  acres  of  meadow. 
There  had  been  3  ploughteams,  but  in  Norman  days  there  were  only  two. 
The  value  of  Richard's  holding  was  26  shillings  and  8d*  Another  holding 
was  that  of  Ralph  de  Limesi5  namely  a  freeman  (under  Wisgar  by  com- 
mendation only  and  soc)  having  one  carucate  of  land.  There  were  5 
bordars,  i  ploughteam  in  demesne  and  6  acres  of  meadow,  wood  for  4  hogs, 
and  5  beasts.  There  were  then  20  hogs  where  formerly  there  had  been  10 
only,  and  60  sheep  where  formerly  there  had  been  half  that  number,  and 
the  value  of  the  holding  was  20  shillings.6  The  Great  Survey  after  this 
entry  says,  "  It  is  half  a  league  long  and  half  a  league  broad  and  paid  3^ 
in  a  gelt."  What  the  "  it  "  refers  to  is  not  clear.  There  is  no  certain 
evidence  that  all  the  above  entries  are  of  land  in  Great  Cornard,  but  this 
is  the  presumption.  Great  Cornard  and  Little  Cornard  are  not  distinguished 
in  Domesday  Book. 

CORNARD  MAGNA  OR  ABBAS  HALL  MANOR. 

The  manor  became  very  early  vested  in  a  family  who  assumed  the 
name  of  the  parish.  The  first  member  of  the  family  we  meet  with  is  Serlo 
de  Cornerthe  of  Assington  who  was  followed  by  his  son  and  heir  Richard 
de  Cornerd  and  he  by  his  son  and  heir  John  who  was  High  Sheriff  in  the 
time  of  Kings  Richard  and  John.  He  was  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir 
Richard  de  Cornerthe  of  Cavendish  and  he  by  his  son  another  Richard  and 
his  son  and  heir  was  Sir  Richard  de  Cornerd  knt.  Sir  Richard  left  an  only 
daughter  Alice  who  married  Thomas  de  Grey  of  Grey's  Hall  in  Cavendish 
about  the  year  1304.  This  Sir  Richard  de  Cornerd  is  said  to  have  sold  the 
manor  to  the  Convent  of  Mailing  in  Kent,  about  1317  according  to  Page, 
and  about  1318  according  to  Davy,  but  it  could  hardly  have  been  so  early 
as  this,  for  in  a  rental  of  the  date  of  1362  in  the  muniment  room  at  Merton 
Hall,  Norfolk,  cited  by  the  Rev.  Geo.  Crabbe  in  a  paper  in  the  Proceedings 
of  the  Suffolk  Institute/  Roger  de  Grey  is  said  to  be  the  owner.  Probably 


'  Dom.  ii.  2866. 

•  Dom.  ii.  360. 

'  See  Bures  Manor  in  this  Hundred. 

•  Dom.  ii.  392. 


5  See    Overhall    Manor,    Cavendish, 

this  Hundred. 
'  Dom.  ii.  4286. 
'  Vol.  vi.  p.  13. 


in 


CORNARD    (GREAT).  87 

some  confusion  has  arisen  as  to  the  identity  of  the  lands,  for  in  the  eleventh 
year  of  Edw.  II.  [1317-18]  there  was  an  exchange  of  divers  lands  in 
Cornard  Magna,  &c.,  between  the  Abbess  of  Mailing  and  Thomas  de  Grey  ;' 
and  further  we  may  gather  from  a  fine  in  1390  that  the  manor  had  not  at 
that  date  even  left  the  Grey  family.  It  is  between  Thomas  Archbishop  of 
York,  Robert  Bishop  of  London,  Thomas  Earl  of  Gloucester,  Thomas 
Earl  of  Arundell,  Thomas  Earl  of  Warwick  and  Sir  Richard  le  Scrope  against 
Thomas  Grey  parson  of  the  Church  of  Wethersfield  and  relates  to  this  manor.2 
The  manor,  too,  is  included  in  the  Inquis.  p.m.  of  John  de  Monte  Acuto 
Earl  of  Salisbury  as  late  as  I4OO.3 

It  must,  however,  be  remembered  that  in  the  returns  of  lords  of  manors 
in  1316,  the  Abbess  of  Mailing  is  said  to  be  lord  of  Great  Cornerd  even  at 
that  date,  a  date  earlier  than  any  alleged  sale  to  her  by  Thomas  de  Grey. 

In  any  case  the  manor  did  at  some  time  pass,  as  did  also  the  advow- 
son,  to  the  Convent  of  the  Blessed  Virgin,  West  Mailing,  with  which  religious 
community  they  continued  until  the  dissolution.  Court  Rolls  are  still  in 
existence  of  Courts  held  for  the  manor  by  the  Abbess  of  Mailing  5,  6,  8,  9, 
10,  ii  and  12  Hen.  VIII.  and  the  Rolls  of  the  Courts  held  the  17,  18,  19, 
20,  21,  24,  27  and  28  Hen.  VIII.  actually  bear  the  name  of  Elizabeth  Rede 
the  Abbess.  Of  course  the  manor  passed  to  the  Crown  on  the  dissolution 
of  the  religious  houses  and  it  is  usually  stated  that  in  1540  the  Archbishop 
of  Canterbury  obtained  a  grant  of  both  manor  and  advowson  in  exchange 
for  other  property.  We  venture  to  doubt  this,  as  the  Courts  of  the  manor 
held  in  31, 33,  35  and  36  Hen.  VIII.  were  held  by  Thomas  Danyell  who  at  the 
head  of  each  of  the  Rolls  of  these  Courts  is  stated  to  be  then  lord.  The  grant 
to  whoever  made  was  apparently  resumed  by  the  Crown  in  Elizabeth's 
reign.  In  1612  William  Whitmore  and  John  Verdon  are  said  to  have  had 
a  grant  of  the  manor.  In  1624,  however,  the  manor  was  vested  in  John 
Brand  who  held  Courts  for  it  on  the  following  dates  :  6  Oct.  22  Jac.,  3 
April  3  Car.  I.,  16  June  4  Car.  I.,  30  July  4  Car.  I.,  8  Oct.  5  Car.  I.,  29  Oct. 
5  Car.  I.,  10  Dec.  5  Car.  I.,  4  Aug.  7  Car.  I.,  5  Oct.  7  Car.  I.,  31  Oct.  7 
Car.  I.,  ii  Oct.  10  Car.  I.,  i  Oct.  11  Car.  I.,  20  Oct.  12  Car.  I.,  11  Oct. 
13  Car.  I.,  24  Oct.  14  Car.  I.,  2  May  15  Car.  I.,  30  Oct.  15  Car.  I.,  20  April 
16  Car.  I.,  7  Oct.  16  Car.  I.,  22  June  17  Car.  I.,  4  Aug.  17  Car.  I.,  5  Oct. 
18  Car.  I.  The  Courts  held  7  Nov.  19  Car.  I.  and  26  Sept.  20  Car.  I. 
were  held  by  John  Eldred.  No  name  is  given  as  lord  in  the  Roll  of  the 
Court  held  10  Dec.  21  Car.  I.,  but  Thomas  Mott  and  John  Brand  held 
their  first  Court  the  24  Sept.  22  Car.  I.  and  further  Courts  the  28  March 
24  Car.  I.,  5  Oct.  21  Car.  I.,  3  Oct.  1650,  3  Oct.  1651,  16  Dec.  1652,  20 
Oct.  1653,  22  Dec.  1653,  after  which  they  disappear,  and  John  Eldred  holds 
his  first  Court  the  12  Oct.  1654  and  subsequent  Courts  the  loth  April 
1656,  6  April  1657,  J5  Oct-  I65§.  Another  John  Eldred  styled  the  younger 
then  holds  the  following  Courts  :  31  March  1659,  26  March  1660,  21  June 
12  Car.  II.,  26  March  Car.  II.,  4  April  1662,  31-  March  15  Car.  II.,  28  Mar. 
16  Car.  II.,  22  April  17  Car.  II.,  27  May  17  Car.  II.,  27  March  1665,  i 
April  1667,  27  March  1668,  27  Sept.  1669,  19  Oct.  1669,  20  Apl.  22  Car. 
II.,  31  March  23  Car.  II.,  31  March  24  Car.  II.,  18  April  25  Car.  II.,  23 
Apl.  26  Car.  II.,  22  July  26  Car.  II.,  i  April  27  Car.  II.,  24  May  27  Car.  II., 
23  July  27  Car.  II.,  30  Mar.  28  Car.  II.,  26  Mar.  1678,  28  March  1679, 
28  March  1681,  28  March  1682,  26  March  1684,  6  April  1686,  31  March 

1  Brit.  Mus.  Add.  MSS.  19077  p.  259,  "  Feet  of  Fines,  14  Rich.  II.  24. 

et  seq.  3  I.P.M.,  i  Hen.  IV.  n. 


88  THE   MANORS   OF   SUFFOLK. 

1687,  i  Apl.  1690,  -  -  1693,  3  April  1694.  Another  John  Eldred  then 
succeeds  as  lord  and  is  styled  in  the  Rolls  John  Eldred  jun.  He  held  his 
first  Court  the  28  June  1703,  and  subsequent  Courts  on  the  28  July  1703, 
26  Oct.  1703,  10  May  1704,  25  Sept.  1704,  9  Oct.  1705,  22  April  1706, 
21  April  1707,  12  May  1708,  18  April  1709,  5  April  1710,  26  April  1710, 
18  April  1711,  5  May  1712,  27  May  1713,  5  June  1716,  20  May  1718,  26 
May  1720,  7  Sept.  1720,  4  Oct.  1720,  9  May  1721,  24  April  1722,  28 
June  1722,  27  June  1723,  4  June  1724,  27  May  1726,  27  Oct.  1727,  21 
Aug.  1728,  15  Sept.  1729,  14  Oct.  1729,  I  Oct.  1730,  16  May  1732,  9  June 
1732,  14  July  1732.  Mary  Eldred  the  last  lord's  widow  held  Courts  on 
the  12  Feb.  1733,  29  May  1735,  24  June  1735,  12  Aug.  1735,  21  Sept.  1736, 
20  Dec.  1737.  One  Court  was  held  by  Anne  Eldred  spinster,  namely  on 
the  15  Nov.  1738  and  then  the  manor  was  evidently  sold  to  John  Wall 
the  yr.  who  held  his  first  Court  on  the  3  Oct.  1739,  and  subsequent  Courts 
on  the  21  April  1742,  18  May  1742,  21  June  1742,  6  July  1743,  16  Dec. 
1743,  22  Nov.  1749,  8  March  1749,  5  April  1750  and  13  May  1751- ;  and 
Courts  on  the  21  Nov.  1751,  19  Feb.  1752,  20  Oct.  1752,  19  April  1754  and 
I  Aug.  1755  were  held  by  the  said  John  Wall  and  Anne  his  wife. — John 
Wall  died  before  1761  for  Anne  his  widow  held  the  Courts  on  the  29  July 
1761,  25  Aug.  1761,  13  Oct.  1761,  ii  Oct.  1762,  ii  April  1763,  24  Sept. 
1764,  4  Sept.  1765,  18  Nov.  1765,  26  May  1766,  25  Aug.  1766,  23  Sept. 
1766,  19  January  1767,  25  June  1767,  21  May  1768,  18  Aug.  1768,  23  May 
1769,  and  the  8  January  1770.  The  manor  then  passed  to  James  Sparrow 
and  Margaret  his  wife  dau.  and  co-heir  of  the  Rev.  Thomas  Bernard,  Rector 
of  Little  Barfield,  the  Rev.  John  Harrison  and  Ann  his  wife,  John  Goodeal 
and  Elizabeth  his  wife  and  Bridget  Bernard  spinster  who  held  their  ist 
Court  the  26  April  1770  and  their  second  Court  the  24  May  1771.  Subsequent 
Courts  on  the  22  April  1772  and  the  14  April  1773  were  held  by  James 
Sparrow  and  the  Rev.  John  Harrison.  James  Sparrow  died  the  2gth  Oct. 
1777  and  his  eldest  son  the  Rev.  John  Sparrow  having  died  in  1786  and 
his  2nd  son  Thomas  Bernard  in  1793  the  manor  seems  to  have  vested  in 
the  3rd  son — James  Goodeve  Sparrow.  He  married  ist  in  1799  Anne 
youngest  dau.  and  co-heir  of  James  Crowe  of  Lakenham,  Norwich,  and  2ndly 
m  1817  Dorothy  dau.  of  the  Rev.  Basil-Bury  Beridge  of  Algakirk  co. 
Lincoln  and  dying  the  2  Oct.  1838  the  manor  passed  to  his  son  and  heir 
Henry  Weare  Sparrow  and  on  his  death  to  his  brother  Basil  Sparrow  who 
in  1846  married  Julia  dau.  of  James  Scratton  of  Prittewell  Priory,  Essex 
and  on  his  death  in  1880  vested  in  his  son  and  heir  the  Rev.  Basil  James 
Harrold  Sparrow-Beridge  of  Gosfield  Place  Halstead  Essex,  eldest  son  of  Basil 
Sparrow  of  Gosfield  by  Julia  his  wife  dau.  of  John  Scratton  of  Prittlewell 
Essex.  He  in  1882  married  Margaret  Lousia  dau.  of  Henry  Capel  Elliott 
and  in  1883  by  royal  licence  assumed  the  name  of  Beridge. 

Amongst  the  early  Chancery  Proceedings  is  a  suit  concerning  rents  of 
lands  held  of  Cornard  Manor :  John  Cruche  bailiff  v.  Thomas  West.1  And 
amongst  the  State  Papers  is  a  licence  in  1538  to  sell  the  manor  then 
stated  to  be  of  the  yearly  rent  of  £40.*  Oliver  St.  John  and  wife  were  in 
1554  called  upon  to  shew  title  to  the  manor.3 

Court  Rolls  of  Abbas  Hall  Manor  for  1559,  1562,  1567,  1569,  1570, 
1572, 1574, 1576, 1577, 1585, 1593-6, 1598-1600,  and  1602  will  be  found  in  the 

1  E.C.P.,  14  Hen.  VI.  17,  139.  3  Memoranda,  Rolls  i  and    2  Phil,   and 

•  State  Papers,  1538,  ii.  716.  Mar.  Hil.  Rec.  Rot.  35. 


CORNARD    (GREAT).  89 

British  Museum.1    Also  extracts  from  the  Rolls  for  1674-5,  1698,  and 
1711  will  be  found  in  the  same  Collection.2 

GREY'S   MANOR. 

This  manor  at  an  early  date  belonged  also  to  the  Cornards.  It  seems 
to  have  been  held  by  Domina  de  Cornard  in  I3i6,3  but  we  have  no  definite 
particulars  till  the  early  part  of  the  reign  of  Edw.  II.  when  the  manor 
was  vested  in  Thomas  de  Grey  and  Alice  his  wife  daughter  and  heir  of  Sir 
Richard  Cornerd  knt.  Thomas  de  Grey  died  in  I32I4  and  was  succeeded 
by  his  son  and  heir  Sir  Thomas  de  Grey.  The  manor  then  passed  to  William 
West  of  Cornard  who  was  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir  Thomas  West 
who  died  in  I5o8.5  In  his  Inquisition  p.m.  the  manor  is  stated  to  consist 
of  105  acres  of  land  90  acres  of  pasture  30  acres  of  wood,  10  acres  of  marsh 
and  3^.  rent,  and  to  be  held  of  the  King  as  of  the  Honor  of  Clare  at  the 
4th  part  of  a  knight's  fee  and  to  be  of  the  annual  value  of  £23.  6s.  Thomas 
West  was  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir  Edmund  West  one  of  whose 
daughters  and  co-heirs  Margaret  married  Edmund  Daniell  of  Acton  and 
the  other,  Elizabeth,  married  John  Bokenham  who  died  in  1566.  Three 
fines  were  levied  in  the  reign  of  Edw.  VI.  one  of  the  whole  manor  and  the 
other  two  of  a  moiety.  The  first  was  in  1547  by  John  Bokenham  and  others 
against  Robert  Doundes  and  others  f  the  second  in  1549  by  James 
Dounes  and  others  against  the  said  John  Bokenham  ;7  and  the  third 
in  1550  by  George  Felton  against  Edmund  Danyell  and  others.8  A 
fourth  fine  was  in  1592  levied  by  William  Tyffyn  against  John  Daniell. 9 
In  1599  Edmund  Bokenham  of  Great  Thornham  son  and  heir  of  John 
succeeded  his  father,  and  in  1602  sold  the  manor  to  John  Brond  sen.10 
In  1844,  1855,  and  1885  a  Thomas  Fitch  was  owner  of  this  manor. 

In  a  paper  by  the  Rev.  George  Crabbe  on  the  De  Greys  of  Little  Cor- 
nard printed  in  vol.  vi.  p.  38  of  the  Publications  of  the  Suffolk  Institute 
we  find  some  notes  relative  to  the  Cornard  property.  One  note  is  to  the 
effect  that  Thomas  de  Grey  sold  his  Cornard  property  to  his  brother  William 
de  Grey  Esq.  in  1770  for  £5,785 ;  and  in  a  paper  in  the  handwriting  of  Thomas 
2nd  Lord  Walsingham  it  is  stated  that  his  father  the  Chief  Justice  bought  in 
the  year  of  the  general  election,  Grey's  Hall  in  Suff .  for  £5,700.  Also  an  extract 
from  the  Ipswich  Journal  Aug.  2,  1788,  i.e.,  7  years  after  the  death  of  the 
Chief  Justice  whose  estates  passed  to  his  only  son  :  "To  be  sold  by  auction 
at  Garroway's  coffee  house  on  the  2ist  August  a  valuable  freehold  estate 
situate  in  the  parishes  of  Little  Cornerd,  Newton,  and  Assington  comprising 
the  Manor  of  Grey's." 

The  writer  from  the  above  notes  observes  that  it  seems  as  if  a  Manor 
of  Grey's  in  Cornard  had  been  in  the  de  Grey  family  till  1788. 


1  Add.  Ch.  24720-24740.  6  Fine,  Hil.  i  Edw.  VI. 

*  Add.  Ch.  14359-14362.  '  Fine,  Easter  3  Edw.  VI. 

3  Brit.    Mus.    Add.    MSS.  19077    p.  259,          8  Fine,  Mich.  4  Edw.  VI. 

et  seq.  »  Fine,  Hil.  35  Eliz. 

4  I.P.M.,  15  Edw.  II.  22.  I0  Fine,  Mich.  44  and  45  Eliz. 

5  I.P.M.,  24   Hen.    VII.    77,   Add.    MSS. 

19077  p.  272. 


90  THE   MANORS   OF   SUFFOLK. 

CORNARD    (LITTLE). 

| HE  entry  in  Domesday  which  probably  comprised  the  land 
forming  subsequently  the  manors  of  this  place  is  that  of 
the  Encroachments  upon  the  King. 

In  the  Confessor  s  time  Aluric  Campo  held  2  freemen 
under  commendation  only,  in  the  Abbot  of  Bury's  soc,  but 
after  the  Conquest  Wisgar  encroached  thereon  before 
the  agreement  with  Richard  son  of  Gislebert  was  made 
under  which  the  latter  then  held.  These  freemen  had  2  carucates 
of  land  and  40  acres,  4  bordars,  5  slaves,  3  ploughteams  in  demesne,  wood 
for  30  hogs,  8  acres  of  meadow,  3  horses,  also  a  church  living  with  15  acres 
of  free  land,  the  whole  valued  at  20  shillings.  By  the  time  of  the  Great 
Survey  the  number  of  bordars  had  increased  to  u,  but  the  slaves  were  one 
less,  the  3  ploughteams  in  demesne  were  then  between  the  lord  of  the 
demesne  and  his  men ;  the  horses  seem  to  have  disappeared,  but  in  their 
place  we  find  4  beasts,  30  hogs  and  no  sheep  and  the  value  had  been  raised 
to  6  pounds.  It  (which  we  presume  to  mean  Little  Cornard)  was  8  quaran- 
tenes  long  and  4  broad  and  paid  in  a  gelt,  whoever  held,  24^.' 

MANOR  OF  LITTLE  CORNARD. 

This  manor  was  held  in  1333  by  John  Somersham  of  Weld  co.  Herts 
who  also  held  the  Manor  of  Peacocks  in  Little  Cornard.  It  is  stated  in 
the  able  paper  of  Mr.  Crabbe,  to  which  we  have  already  referred,  that  the 
Manor  of  Little  Cornard  must  soon  after  have  passed  to  the  De  Greys  and 
he  bases  this  on  the  statement  in  Sir  Roger  de  Grey's  will  of  the  22  Dec. 
1371  that  he  "  eit  enfeoffe  Monsieur  William  Baude  [and  others]  en  les 
Manores  de  Cavendysshe  peti  Cornerthe,"  &c.,  but  we  venture  to  doubt 
whether  this  was  the  case.  The  manor  referred  to  in  Sir  Roger's  will  was 
more  probably  that  of  Cawstons  or  Caxtons  in  Little  Cornard  of  which  he 
undoubtedly  was  seised  at  the  time  of  making  the  feoffment  referred  to. 
The  Manor  of  Little  Cornard  probably  passed  to  John  Somersham's 
daughter  and  co-heir  Margery  who  married  William  Ashe  of  Weld  whose 
will  was  proved  the  5  July  1411.  They  had  a  son  John  Somersham  who 
was  living  in  1411  but  died  without  issue,  and  a  daughter  Elizabeth  whose 
will  is  dated  the  29  Apr.  1455.  She  married  Thomas  de  Frowyke  whose 
will  was  proved  the  17  May  1448.  Their  son  Henry  Frowyke  was  lord  of 
this  manor  and  Peacocks  and  probably  sold  the  same  to  his  cousin  Sir 
Thomas  de  Frowyke  of  Gunnersbury  who  was  the  son  of  Sir  Henry  de 
Frowyke  brother  of  Sir  Thomas  de  Frowyke  who  married  the  granddaughter 
of  John  Somersham. 

Sir  Thomas  de  Frowyke  married  Joan  daughter  and  heir  of  Richard 
Sturgeon  and  by  his  will  proved  the  10  November  1485  he  settled  this 
manor  upon  his  wife  for  life  with  remainder  to  his  younger  son  Thomas 
in  tail  with  an  ultimate  remainder  to  his  eldest  son  Henry  in  tail.  Sir 
Thomas  Frowyke  the  son  succeeded  on  the  death  of  his  mother 
in  1500.  He  was  Chief  Justice  of  the  Common  Pleas  and  died  without 
issue  the  17  Oct.  1506  when  the  manor  under  the  entail  created  by  his 
father's  will  passed  to  his  nephew  Thomas  Frowyke  son  of  his  brother 
Sir  Henry  Frowyke  of  Gunnersbury  who  had  died  in  his  younger  brother's 
lifetime  on  the  3  Oct.  1504  and  whose  will  was  proved  the  15  Nov.  1505. 

1  Dom.  ii.  448. 


CORNARD     VLITTLE).  9I 

In  the  Inquis.  p.m.  of  this  Sir  Henry  Frowyke  it  is  stated  that  he  held  the 
Manor  of  Little  Cornard  and  the  advowson  (it  must  then  have  been  in 
remainder  only)  of  the  King  as  of  the  Manor  of  Clare  by  an  unknown 
service  and  the  value  was  £20  a  year  and  that  Thomas  was  his  son  and 
heir.1  The  manor  seems  to  have  actually  passed  to  his  2nd  son  Henry 
(the  eldest  Thomas  being  probably  a  Priest  and  taking  the  Manor  of  Peacock) 
whose  will  is  dated  the  5  Feb.  1520.  He  died  apparently  without  issue 
and  the  manor  passed  to  his  sister  Elizabeth  married  to  Sir  John  Spelman* 
and  then  to  their  son  and  heir  Henry  Spelman.  Before  1596  the  manor  had 
passed  from  the  Spelmans  to  the  White  family,  for  in  that  year  Peter  and 
John  White  conveyed  it  to  Edward  Curtis  and  John  Chayce.  In  1637 
it  was  held  by  Sir  Robert  Crane  of  Chilton  and  passed  in  that  year  to  the 
Newman  family  after  which  it  seems  to  have  passed  out  of  existence,  but 
it  may  be  the  manor  is  now  vested  in  William  Prigg  of  Great  Cornard. 

Releases  and  acquittances  for  homage,  &c.,  in  this  manor  in  1298  and 
1299  will  be  found  amongst  the  Harleian  Charters  in  the  British  Museum.3 

MANOR  OF  CAWSTON  OR  CAXTON'S  MANOR. 

This  manor  belonged  to  the  Caxton  family  before  it  came  to  the  De 
Greys,  but  it  seems  to  have  been  held  in  the  time  of  King  John  by  Sir 
Peter  Braunch  in  right  of  his  wife  Joan.  Richard  Caketon  had  free  warren 
in  Little  Cornard  and  Bures  in  1296-70.*  From  the  Caxtons  the  manor 
appears  to  have  passed  to  Sir  Richard  Cornerd  and  on  the  marriage  of  his 
daughter  Alice  to  Sir  Thomas  de  Grey  son  of  John  de  Grey  of  Cavendish 
to  have  passed  into  the  De  Grey  family.5 

Alice  survived  Sir  Thomas,  and  on  the  Patent  Rolls  will  be  seen  a  com- 
mission on  complaint  of  this  Alice,  described  as  late  wife  of  Thomas  de 
Grey,  that  William  Botevellyn  and  others  entered  the  Manor  of  Cornerthe, 
meaning  no  doubt  this  Caxton's  Manor,  broke  the  doors  and  windows  of 
her  houses  and  drove  away  n  horses,  16  oxen,  a  bull,  12  cows,  and  160  sheep 
worth  £50  and  carried  away  other  goods.6  On  the  same  Rolls  and  the  same 
year  there  is  a  commission  issued  no  doubt  on  what  was  a  kind  of  counter- 
charge by  William  Boteryleyn.  He  complains  that  Alice  late  wife  of  Thomas 
de  Grey,  Thomas  her  son  and  others  drove  away  10  horses,  12  colts,  8  oxen, 
a  bull,  20  cows  and  120  sheep  worth  £100  at  Little  Cornard  and  carried  away 
other  goods.7  William  was  not  nearly  so  moderate  in  his  estimate  of  value 
as  his  fair  adversary  Alice. 

There  is  an  early  rental — "  Caxton.  Rental  d'ni  Thorn,  de  Grey 
milit  de  ten'tibus  suis  que  q'nd'  fuer'  Ric'i  de  Caxston  p'tinent  '  ad 
man '  s'm  in  Cometh  p'ua."  It  seems  a  somewhat  moot  point  whether 
the  manor  passed  direct  from  Richard  Caxton  to  Sir  Thomas  Grey  or 
through  Sir  Richard  Cornerd  and  his  daughter.  The  above  extract  does 
not  seem  inconsistent  with  either  supposition.  From  another  rental  of 
the  lands  of  John  Pecok  in  Cornerth  Parva  dated  the  28  Edw.  III.  [1354] 
"  Thomas  de  Grey  Miles  holds  lands  lately  acquired,  which  were  those  of 
Walter  Caxton."  This  is,  of  course,  an  entry  relating  to  Sir  Thomas  the 
son  of  Sir  Thomas  de  Grey  and  does  not  of  necessity,  nor  indeed  probably, 

'  I.P.M.,    21   Hen.  VII.  97;    Brit.    Mus.         <  Chart.  Rolls,   54  Hen.  III.  i ;    H.R.  ii. 

Add.  MSS.  19077  p.  276.  153,  195. 

'  Her  will  was  proved  the  10  Feb.  1556-7,         s  See  De  Grey's  Manor,  Cavendish,  in  this 

and  his  the  3  Feb.  1545.  Hundred. 

3  Harl.  54  A.  29,  Harl.  45  F.  i.  6  Pat.  Rolls,  4  Edw.  III.  pt.  i. 

'  Pat.  Rolls,  4  Edw.  III.  pt.  i. 


92  THE   MANORS   OF   SUFFOLK. 

relate  to  the  manor.  The  last  mentioned  Sir  Thomas  de  Grey  married 
Isabel  eldest  daughter  and  co-heir  of  Fulk  Baynard  of  Merton  and  had 
Mi-rton  Manor  in  Norfolk  and  other  places  for  her  share  in  her  father's 
estate.  At  Sir  Thomas  Grey's  death  the  manor  passed  to  his  eldest  son 
Sir  Roger  Grey,  who  held  his  ist  Court  for  the  Manor  of  Caxton  37  Edw.  III. 
[1363]  and  married  Margaret  daughter  of  Sir  Roger  Clifton  and  brother  of 
Sir  Adam.  Sir  Roger  Grey  by  his  will  proved  in  1371  declares  that  he  had 
enfeoffed  Sir  William  Bawde  Priest  and  others  of  his  Manor  of  Little  Cor- 
nerth  (more  accurately  Caxton  Manor  in  Little  Cornard)  and  ordered 
his  father  Sir  Thomas  Grey's  debt  to  be  paid  and  that  Alice  his  wife  should 
have  an  annuity  of  20  marks  per  annum  and  Mr.  Thomas  Grey  his  brother 
another  of  the  same  sum,  and  the  manor  of  Little  Heneye  with  lol.  per 
annum  to  go  to  two  Priests  yearly ;  the  profit  of  his  Manor  of  Hadeston 
or  Bernwell  to  raise  portions  for  his  two  daughters,  and  if  Thomas  his  son 
should  die  before  either  of  his  daughters'  marriages  then  their  fortunes  to 
be  at  the  disposition  of  Sir  William  Bawde.  The  will  is  dated  at  Dover 
and  is  in  French. 

The  following  year  1372  an  assignation  of  dower  was  made  out  of 
Caxton's  Manor  to  Margaret  the  widow  of  Sir  Roger.  The  document 
contains  a  description  of  the  portion  of  the  manor  house  assigned  to  her 
and  is  given  by  Mr.  Crabbe  in  his  account  of  the  De  Greys  already  referred 
to.  It  is  interesting  as  showing  the  kind  of  accommodation  at  the  time 
which  the  manor  afforded. 

"  Caxton.  To  wit.  Assignment  of  the  dower  of  the  wife  of  Dominus 
Roger  de  Grey,  knight,  anno  46. — First,  there  are  delivered  to  her,  within 
the  site  of  the  manor,  one  grange  next  the  gate  ;  one  chamber  next  Strau- 
hous  ;  one  cattle  shed  on  the  north  part,  with  one  chamber  next  the  under 
solar ;  Item,  one  other  chamber  in  the  dairy  ("  Deieria  ")  (?)  on  the  north 
part ;  Item,  one  parcel  of  the  cart  house  on  the  south  part,  and  a  dove  cote 
in  common.  Item,  there  is  delivered  to  her  that  part  of  the  garden  which 
lies  on  the  west  part,  as  it  is  divided  by  the  other  boundaries  ;  excepting 
the  lord  shall  water  his  beasts  there,  and  shall  have,  if  he  wishes  it,  water 
for  his  expense  there.  Item,  there  is  delivered  to  her  common  rights 
('  communia ')  in  the  court  of  the  said  manor,  to  administer  her  goods 
and  chattels  there,  with  free  ingress  and  egress.  Sum  of  the  value  per 
annum  beyond  the  reprises — nothing." 

Then  follows  the  description  and  value  of  the  lands  assigned  as  the 
dower  which  is  valued  in  the  whole  at  xili.  ixs.  vid.  called  also  the  third 
part  of  the  Manor  of  Caxtones.  Mr.  Crabbe  adds,  "  From  the  above  we 
can  picture  to  ourselves  the  manor  house  which  no  doubt  was  surrounded 
by  yards,  gardens,  orchards  and  farm  buildings.  A  gate  [house]  with  a 
granary  next  it  leads  to  the  Court.  [The  lady  has,  in  common  with  the 
lord's  family,  when  they  reside  at  the  manor,  the  use  of  the  hall,  the  chapel, 
the  kitchens  and  offices.]  For  her  private  use  she  has  a  chamber  next  the 
lord's  parlour  or  solar  and  for  her  servants  a  chamber  next  the  straw- 
house,  and  a  chamber  next  the  dairy.  For  the  farming  of  her  share  of 
the  demesne  she  has  a  cattle  shed,  a  barn  and  part  of  the  cart-house.  A 
specified  part  of  the  garden  is  assigned  her ;  it  has  a  pond  or  moat  where 
the  lord  may  water  his  cattle." 

Thomas  the  son  and  heir  died  a  minor  without  issue.1  He  had  two 
sisters — Margaret  married  to  Sir  Thomas  Shardelowe  and  Joan  married  to 
Thomas  Pynchbek.  Margaret  had  died  in  1382  the  year  before  her  brother 

•  I.P.M.,  7  Rich.  II.  41. 


CORNARD   (LITTLE).  93 

without  issue  and  Joan  died  subsequently  leaving  a  son  Richard  who  died 
under  age  and  the  manor  passed  to  Thomas  de  Grey  the  brother  of  Sir 
Roger  who  died  seised  before  1404,  for  in  that  year  Fulk  de  Grey  son  of 
Fulk  de  Grey  and  of  Margaret  his  wife  and  nephew  and  heir  to  Thomas  de 
Grey  had  livery.  He  married  Eleanor  Barnardeston. 

In  the  eighth  year  of  King  Hen.  VI.  [1429-30]  the  Court  of  the  manor 
was  held  by  Sir  Robert  Clyfton  and  Alice  his  wife  probably  as  guardians 
of  William  de  Grey  the  infant  heir  of  Fulk  de  Grey.  Fulk  de  Grey  the  son 
was  succeeded  by  his  son  William  de  Grey  who  married  Christina  daughter 
and  co-heir  of  John  Manning  of  Great  Elingham.  By  his  will  the  3  Nov. 
1474  he  ordered  his  body  to  be  buried  in  St.  Peter's  Church,  Merton  by 
the  side  of  Christina  his  wife.  The  stone  is  in  the  middle  aisle  and  has 
5  escutcheons,  the  first  with  the  arms  of  Grey,  the  second  Grey  quartering 
Baynard,  the  third  Grey  again,  the  fourth  is  Manning,  and  the  fifth  Grey 
impaling  Manning,  and  an  inscription  which  is  given  by  Blomefield.1  His  son 
William  de  Grey  succeeded.  He  was  married  twice,  first  to  Mary  daughter 
of  Sir  Henry  Bedingfield  of  Oxburgh  co.  Norf.  and  2ndly  to  Grace  daughter 
of  Thomas  Teye  widow  of  Francis  Hethe  of  Worlington  to  whose  two 
daughters  he  was  guardian.  He  died  the  12  Feb.  10  Hen.  VII.  leaving 
his  son  and  heir  Thomas  aged  15. 2  Against  the  north  wall  of  the 
Church  of  Merton  is  a  monument  to  this  William  de  Grey  and  his  two 
wives,  his  effigies  in  armour  with  the  arms  of  Grey  and  Baynard  quartered. 
He  is  in  a  kneeling  posture,  having  his  helmet  lying  by  him,  a  scrowl  and 
Grey's  arms  quartering  Baynard,  over  his  head  behind  him  are  his  5 
sons  in  loose  gowns  with  a  disrobed  scrowl  over  their  heads.  Opposite 
to  him  is  Mary  Bedingfield,  his  first  wife,  kneeling  with  her  three  daughters 
behind  her.  Over  her  head  is  another  imperfect  scrowl  and  the  arms  of 
Grey,  quartering  Baynard,  impaling  Bedingfield,  quartering  Tudenham. 
Behind  them  is  Grace  Teye,  his  second  wife,  and  behind  her  their  two 
daughters  with  dishevelled  hair.  Over  her  has  been  a  scrowl  besides  the 
arms  of  Grey  quartering  Baynard  impaling  Teye  of  Essex.  A  fesse  in  chief 
between  three  martlets  and  in  base  a  chevron.  Thomas  de  Grey,  eldest  son  of 
William  by  his  first  wife  succeeded  as  lord  on  his  father's  death,  and  held 
Courts  for  this  manor  to  the  time  of  his  death,  his  last  Court  being  held  the  21 
Nov.  2  and  3  Phil,  and  Mary  [1555].  He  married  Elizabeth  daughter  of 
Sir  Richard  Fitz-Lewes  knt.  but  had  no  children,  according  to  Blomefield. 
After  his  wife's  death  he  was  ordained  Priest  and  lived  till  1556,  being 
ultimately  buried  with  his  wife  in  the  south  aisle  of  Merton  Church  where 
against  the  wall  is  an  inscription  on  a  brass  plate  as  follows  :— 

In  this  He  lyeth  buried  under  one  stone 
Thomas  de  Grey  Esquire  and  Elizabeth  his 
Wife,  Dawghter  of  Sir  Rycharde  Fitz-Lewes 
Knight  and  after  her  desease  made  himselfe 
Preast  and  so  lived  xli.  yeares  and  departed 
Out  of  this  Lyfe  the  first  of  Septembre  1556. 

Arms  :  De  Grey  quartering  Baynard,  impaling  Fitz-Lewes,  A  chev. 
between  3  trefoils. 

William  Grey  a  member  of  a  branch  of  the  family  living  at  or  near 
Cornard  was  lord  in  1556,  in  fact  succeeded  on  the  death  of  Thomas  de  Grey 
the  Priest,  and  in  the  sixth  year  of  Queen  Eliz.  was  still  lord.  On  his  death, 

'  Hist,  of  Norf.  i.  579,  fol.  ed.     Illustrated         5  Inquis.  u  Hen.  VII.  1204. 
in  Church  Heraldry  of  Norfolk,  vol.  ii., 
141. 


94  THE   MANORS   OF   SUFFOLK 

probably  in  1572,  the  manor  reverted  to  Robert  de  Grey  of  Merton  the  son 
of  Edmund  de  Grey  who  was  according  to  Mr.  Crabbe  the  son  of  Thomas 
de  Grey  the  priest  but  according  to  Blomefield,  his  brother.  Amongst 
the  Chancery  Proceedings  in  the  time  of  Elizabeth  we  meet  with  a  claim 
by  Thomas  Graye  under  a  settlement  to  an  annuity  granted  by  Robert 
Gray  out  of  his  manor  of  Caxstone  to  plaintiff  and  the  heirs  male  of  his 
body.1 

We  find  in  1586  that  the  heading  of  the  Court  is  "  Curia  Joh'  is  ffortes- 
cewe  Armig'i  firmarij  Rob'ti  de  Graye  Armig'i—  Mr.  Crabbe  suggests, 

and  no  doubt  the  surmise  is  correct,  that  John  Fortescue  got  a  lease  of  the 
manor  in  the  interest  of  Robert  de  Grey  and  to  prevent  it  falling  into  the 
hands  of  the  Government,  for  Robert  de  Grey  on  account  of  his  recusancy, 
besides  enormous  fines  forfeited  by  law  all  the  goods  and  chattels  and 
two-thirds  of  the  profits  of  his  estates.  By  1597-8  the  manor  had  come 
back  to  Robert  de  Grey,  for  he  is  called  lord,  and  the  Court  is  held  in  his 
name.  He  married  Anne  daughter  of  Sir  Thomas  Lovell  of  Harling,  knt. 
and  died  the  28  Feb.  1600,  being  buried  in  the  chancel  of  Merton  Church.  By 
his  will  in  1600  he  leaves  his  manors,  of  which  "  Cackstones  "  is  one,  in  trust 
for  his  son  William.  But  "  if  William  fortune  to  dye  before  he  comyth 
to  the  age  of  one  and  twenty  yeares  "  then  the  said  manors  are  to  go  to 
"  Thomas  de  Grey  the  sonne  of  WiU'um  de  Grey  late  of  Lytle  Cornard  and 
to  his  heirs  male."  On  the  yth  Aug.  1601  the  Queen  "  did  demyse  and 
graunte  unto  Danyell  Curtis  gent,  for  21  years  the  manor  and  woods  of 
Caxtons  in  Cornerd,  p'cell  of  the  lands  and  possessions  of  Rob'te  de  Grey 
of  Marten  Esquier,  recusant  deceased  "  for  payment  and  satisfaction  of 
the  fines  due  to  the  Crown  for  his  recusancy,  the  manor  then  being  in  the 
tenure  and  occupation  of  Danyel  Curtis  gent,  and  two  others.  However, 
in  1604  James  I.  discharged  William  de  Grey  from  all  the  fines  due  by  his 
father,  and  on  the  26  May  3  James  I.  [1605]  we  find  "  Sir  William  de  Graye 
knt.  son  and  heir  of  Robert  de  Graye  Arm."  holding  a  court  for  the  Manor 
of  Caxton's. 

This  Sir  William  Grey  married  Anne  daughter  of  Sir  James  Calthorp  of 
Cockthorp  knt.  and  died  Oct.  19, 1632  seised  of  the  manor  and  lies  buried  in 
the  Chancel  of  Merton  Church  by  his  father's  side.  By  an  Inquisition  p.m. 
taken  at  Norwich  the  4  Jan.  8  Car.  [1632]  Sir  William  Grey  was  found  to 
have  died  seised  of  this  manor  valued  at  £3.  6s.  Sd.  Amongst  the  papers  in 
the  muniment  room  at  Merton  is  a  paper  in  this  Sir  William  de  Grey's 
handwriting  stating  that  the  value  of  "  the  ffarms  and  rentes  of  the  Manor 
of  Caxtons  "  was  in  1624  £163.  75.  gd. 

Sir  Robert  Grey  son  and  heir  of  Sir  William  was  20  years  of  age  at 
his  father's  death  and  was  knighted  with  Christopher  Athoe  of  Bichamwell 
by  Charles  the  First  June  23,  1641.  He  married  Elizabeth  daughter  and 
co-heir  of  William  Bridon  of  Ipswich  and  died  the  20  Oct.  1644  having 
had  issue  one  son,  William,  who  died  a  minor,  and  two  daughters  Barbara 
and  Anne.  Sir  Robert  Grey  was  succeeded  by  his  brother  James  Grey 
who  married  Eliz.  daughter  of  Sir  Martin  Stutevile  of  Dalham  knt.  They 
are  buried  under  a  black  marble  in  the  Chancel  of  the  Church  of  Merton 
with  the  following  inscriptions  :— 

Quarterly  of  six  :  i,  Grey,  viz.,  Barry  of  6  with  an  amulet ;  2, 
Cornerd  ;  3,  Baynard  ;  4,  A  Bend  ;  5,  Barnardiston ;  6,  Manning,  impaling 
Stuteville,  a  Saltire  engrailed  ermine,  surmounted  by  the  crest  of  Grey. 

•  C.P.  i.  341. 


CORNARD   (LITTLE).  95 

Exuviae. 

Viri  Honorabilis  Jacobi  de  Grey  Armigeri,  Filij 
Secundi  Gulielmi  de  Grey  militis,  et  Dominae 
Annae  Uxoris  suae,  qui  ex  Elizabetha,  Filia 

Martini  Stutfield  de  Dalham  in  Agro 

Suffolciensi  militis,  charissima  Sponsa  prolem 

Reliquit,  Gulielmum  de  Grey  Armigerum,  Filium 

Unicum,  Elizabethan!,  Susannam  et  Annam 
Filias  ;  et  tertio  Die  mensis  Junij  Anno  Dni :  M.DCLXV.  Spiritual  Deo  reddidit  et  in 

Pace  hie  requiescit,  Carnis  Resurrectionem 
Expectans  Gloriosam,  in  Adventu  Salvatoris 

Domini  nostri  Jesu  Christi. 

In  memoriam  Conjugis  clarissimi 

Et  merentissimi 

Marmor  hoc 
Reponendum  curavit. 

Also  under  this  stone  lieth  the  body  of  Elizabeth  de  Grey  Daughter 
of  Sir  Martin  Stutevile  of  Dalham  in  the  County  of  Suffolk  knt. 
She  departed  this  Life  upon  the  I5th  day  of  September  1696  in  the 
Both  year  of  her  age,  her  whole  Life  having  bene  a  continued 
Example  of  great  Vertu  and  Prudence. 

William  de  Grey  their  only  son  succeeded  and  held  his  first  Court  for 
this  manor  the  16  May  1677.  There  is  a  note  of  his  at  Merton  as  follows  : 
"  Quitt  Rent  Caxton's  Manor.  Md.  The  settled  Rents  of  my  Rentall,  which 
are  payable  every  Mich,  come  to  yeerly  £3.  135.  2%d."  He  was  a  Burgess 
in  Parliament  for  Thetford  in  1685,  and  married  Elizabeth  sister  and  co- 
heir of  Thomas  Bedingfield  of  Darsham.  He  died  in  1687,  being  succeeded 
by  his  son  and  heir  Thomas  de  Grey  who  was  member  of  Parliament  for  Thet- 
ford in  1705  and  again  in  1708.  He  married  Elizabeth  daughter  of  William 
Wyndham  of  Felbrigge  in  Norfolk,  and  had  besides  other  issue,  a  son  and 
heir,  Thomas  de  Grey,  educated  at  Christ  College,  Cambridge,  and  after- 
wards in  the  Secretary  of  State's  office.  He  represented  the  county  of 
Norfolk  in  1768,  and  on  his  death  the  manor  passed  to  his  brother, 
Sir  William  de  Grey.  Mr.  Crabb  states  that  in  1769  the  annual  value  of 
Caxton's,  then  the  property  of  Thomas  de  Grey,  and  being  in  extent  269  acres, 
was  £115. 

Sir  William  Grey  was  a  lawyer  of  some  eminence — Chief  Justice  of 
the  Common  Pleas  in  1771  and  advanced  to  the  Peerage  as  Baron  Walsing- 
ham  of  Walsingham  co.  Norfolk  the  17  Oct.  1780.  He  married  Mary 
daughter  of  William  Cowper  of  The  Park  co.  Hertford  and  dying  in  1781 
was  succeeded  by  his  son  Thomas  2nd  Baron  Walsingham  who  married 
Augusta  Georgiana  Elizabeth  only  daughter  of  Sir  William  Irby  ist  Lord 
Boston.  The  2nd  Baron  Walsingham  occupied  for  20  years  the  office  of 
Chairman  of  the  Committees  of  the  House  of  Lords,  and  was  granted  by 
the  Prince  Regent  upon  retiring  in  1814,  a  pension  of  £2,000  a  year  for  life. 
He  died  the  i6th  Jan.  1818  and  was  succeeded  by  his  son  George  3rd  Baron 
who  married  Matilda  eldest  daughter  of  Paul  Cobb  Methuen  of  Corsham, 
but  had  no  issue.  He  was  burnt  to  death,  together  with  his  wife,  at  their 
house  in  Harley  Street  the  26  Apr.  1831,  and  was  succeeded  by  his  brother 
Thomas  4th  Baron,  in  holy  orders,  Archdeacon  of  Surrey,  prebendary  of  Win- 
chester and  Rector  of  Fawley  Hants,  and  of  Merton,  Norfolk.  He  married 
Elizabeth,  youngest  daughter  of  the  Hon.  and  Right  Rev.  Brownlow 
North,  Bishop  of  Winchester  and  dying  the  7th  Sept.  1839  was  succeeded 
by  Thomas  5th  Baron  Walsingham,  who  married  Augusta  Louisa  eldest 
daughter  of  Sir  Robert  Frankland  Russell  Bart.,  and  had  by  her  a  son 
Thomas  who  on  the  death  of  his  father  in  1870  succeeded  to  the  lordship 


96  THE   MANORS   OF   SUFFOLK. 

of  Caxton's  Manor  as  6th  Baron  Walsingham  and  the  same  is  now  held  by 
him. 

The  Court  Rolls  of  this  manor  are  preserved  at  Merton.  They  begin 
1277  and  end  1619  and  are  as  follows  :  5,  10  and  13  Edw.  I.,  ist,  i2th, 
i8th  Edw.  II.,  38,  39,  51  Edw.  III.,  4th  to  19  and  23  to  50  Edw.  III., 
ist  to  18  Rich.  II.,  7th,  gth,  i$th  Hen.  IV.,  2nd,  3rd,  6th,  7th  Hen.  V., 
8  to  38th  Hen.  VI.,  4th  and  I2th  Edw.  IV.,  2nd  and  7th  Hen.  VII.,  10,  19, 
27,  3ist,  35th  Hen.  VIII.,  2nd  and  3rd  and  3rd  and  4th  Phil,  and  Mary, 
6th,  28th,  4Oth  Elizabeth,  3rd  to  i6th  James.  Notes  of  certain  Courts 
3rd  James  to  1720,  as  also  Rentals  of  this  manor  in  1475,  c.  1480,  1486-7, 
1515-16,  2  and  3  Phil,  and  Mary,  3rd,  I3th,  i6th  James  I.,  1626,  29,  33, 
77,  78,  81,  87,  91  are  likewise  at  Merton. 

PEACOCK'S  HALL  MANOR. 

This  manor  together  with  the  advowson  seems  to  have  been  held  in 
the  I3th  century  by  the  Weylands.  A  fine  was  levied  respecting  these 
in  1287  by  Richard  de  Weyland  against  Thomas  de  Weyland.1  In 
1320  we  meet  with  another  fine,  John  le  Tornour  of  Redbourne  chaplain 
v.  John  son  of  Robert  Pecok  of  Redbourne  senior  and  Matilda  his  wife  of  the 
advowson  and  part  of  the  manor  (Robert  son  of  Herbert  Weyland,  William 
de  Symplyngford  and  Joan  his  wife,  Olivia  de  Stratton  and  Clementina 
his  wife  appon  clam).1  Thirteen  years  later  manor  and  advowson  were 
vested  in  John  Somersham  of  Asham  lord  of  Cornard. 

The  advowson  of  Little  Cornard  seems  always  to  have  pertained  to  this 
manor  and  continued  to  do  so  at  least  until  1792  ;  consequently  the  presenta- 
tions thereto  may  be  of  some  help  in  determining  the  Lords.  William  Ashe 
married  Margaret  daughter  and  co-heir  of  John  Somersham,  but  in  1368 
John  Pecok  was  Patron  and  certainly  presented  to  the  living  in  1371  and 
John  Swanburne  in  1392. 

William  Ashe's  daughter  Elizabeth  married  Thomas  Frowyke  and  he 
presented  in  1426.  His  will  was  proved  the  17  Mar.  1448  and  he  was 
buried  at  St.  Mimms.  In  1449  Elizabeth  Frowyke  presented.  Her  will 
is  dated  the  29  April  1455.  Her  son  and  heir  Henry  Frowyke  appears  as 
lord  in  1461,  no  doubt  on  the  death  of  his  mother,  and  probably  sold  this 
manor  and  advowson  in  1471  to  his  cousin  Thomas  Frowyke  the  son  of  Sir 
Henry  brother  of  Thomas  Frowyke  who  had  married  Elizabeth  Ashe.  The 
assurance  seems  to  have  been  effected  by  a  fine  levied  by  Thomas  Frowyke 
of  London  and  Joan  his  wife,  John  Warde  citizen  and  alderman  of  London, 
Thomas  Bledlowe  of  London,  John  Ward  of  London,  and  Reginald  Asshe 
of  London  v.  Henry  Frowyke  and  Joan  his  wife.3  Sir  Thomas  was  of  Gunners- 
bury  and  his  will  was  proved  the  10  Nov.  1485.  He  married  Joan  daughter 
and  heir  of  Richard  Sturgeon.  Davy  seems  to  think  that  Henry  Frowyke 
did  not  sell  this  manor  but  that  it  descended  to  his  son  Thomas  of  Old 
Fold  in  1475,  but  as  Dame  Joan  the  widow  of  Henry's  cousin  Sir  Thomas 
presented  in  1490  the  above  statement  is  probably  correct.  The  manor 
on  Sir  Thomas  Frowyke's  death  passed  to  his  son  Sir  Thomas  Frowyke 
Chief  Justice  of  the  Common  Pleas  who  died  the  17  Oct.  1506  when  the 
manor  passed  to  his  nephew  Thomas  Frowyke  who  was  probably  a  Priest. 
This  Thomas  was  the  son  of  Sir  Henry  Frowyke  whose  will  was  proved 
15  Nov.  1505  by  his  second  wife  Margaret  daughter  of  Sir  Ralph  Leigh 
and  widow  of  Walter  Ford,  and  on  Thomas  Frowyke's  decease  the  manor 

1  Feet  of  Fines,  15  Edw.  I.  61,  >  Feet  of  Fines,  n  Edw.  IV.  25. 

•  Feet  of  Fines,  14  Edw.  II.  42. 


CORNARD     (LITTLE).  97 

passed  to  Sir  Michael  Fisher  knt.  of  Elstow  co.  Beds.,  who  had  married 
Margaret  the  only  child  of  Sir  Henry  Frowyke  by  his  first  wife  Joan  daughter 
of  John  Danvers,  the  husband  therefore  of  Thomas's  half  sister.  A  fine 
was  levied  of  the  manor  in  1530  by  William  Marten  and  others  against 
this  Sir  Michael  Fisher  and  others.1  On  Sir  Michael  Fisher's  death  his 
widow  held  for  life,  and  on  her  death  the  manor  passed  to  her  grandchild 
Agnes  the  daughter  of  her  son  Sir  John  Fisher  knt.  by  Anne  daughter  of 
John  ist  Lord  Mordaunt.  Agnes  Fisher  married  Oliver  St.  John  created 
Lord  St.  John  of  Bletshoe.  On  the  Memoranda  Rolls  i  and  2  Phil,  and 
Mary  is  an  order  that  Oliver  St.  John  and  his  wife  shew  title  to  the  Manor 
of  Cornard  (Peacock's  no  doubt)2  and  in  1565  they  were  deforciants  in  a 
fine  levied  of  the  manor  by  Edmund  Felton3  who  had  purchased  the 
property.  By  1583  the  manor  had  passed  to  Thomas  Felton.  Mr.  Crabbe 
cites  a  document  at  Merton  Hall  written  in  the  time  of  James  I.  which 
certainly  demonstrates  this.  It  states  that  "  Mr.  ffelton  about  the  xxvth 
yere  of  the  late  Queen  [Elizabeth]  was  desirous  or  rather  importunate  to 
hyer  the  manno'  of  Cawsones  in  Suff.  belonging  to  one  Robert  de  Gray,  a 
recusant,  the  same  adioyning  to  a  manno  of  ffelton's  called  Peacock  Hall 
since  solde  awaie  by  him."  A  fine  of  the  manor  in  1584  was  levied  of  the 
manor  by  Nicholas  Grymshawe  (probably  as  a  trustee)  against  the  said 
Thomas  Felton4  for  9  years  later  the  said  Thomas  Felton  sold  the  manor 
to  Peter  White5  who  four  years  later  sold  the  same  to  Edward  Curtis.6 

There  is  a  fine  in  1588  of  the  "  Cornard  Manor  "  levied  by  William 
Tyffen  and  others  against  John  Fortescue  and  others.7 

Amongst  the  Chancery  Proceedings  of  the  reign  of  Queen  Elizabeth 
will  be  found  an  action  by  this  Edward  Curtis  and  John  Chase  against 
Thomas  Felton  Eleanor  his  wife  and  others  as  to  deeds  in  connection  with 
the  Manor  of  Cornard  otherwise  Peacock's  Hall  and  lands  in  Great  and 
Little  Cornard  formerly  the  estate  of  Edward  Felton.8 

Daniel  Curtis  was  apparently  lord  in  1607  for  he  then  presented  to 
the  living.  In  1633  Thomas  Blyth  presented  and  in  1637-8  the  manor 
belonged  to  Sir  Robert  Crane  of  Chilton  knt.  who  in  that  year  conveyed  it 
for  £2,320  to  Thomas  Newman  of  Little  Cornard  and  Margaret  his  wife.  The 
latter  died  the  27  May  1664  and  the  former  was  buried  16  August  1680. 
Thomas  Newman  succeeded  and  presented  in  1681 .  The  next  presentation  to 
the  living  in  1714  was  made  by  Laurence  Gibbon.  Later  Katharine  Gibbon, 
Thomas  Newman,  Mary  Newman  and  Elizabeth  Grossman  presented,  and 
in  1792  Edward  Green  and  Elizabeth  his  wife  and  John  Newman.  One 
of  the  Newmans,  Ann,  in  1749  married  Robert  Sparrow  and  Newman 
Sparrow  their  son  built  the  present  Peacock  Hall  in  1798  and  was  living 
there  in  1800. 

Two  generations  of  Sparrows  succeeded  and  the  manor  and  property 
passed  by  purchase  in  1875  to  George  Munford.  It  next  vested  in  Durrante 
Cardinal  and  was  then  acquired  by  George  Coote  who  held  the  same  in 
1896  and  from  him  it  passed  to  and  is  now  vested  in  William  Prigg  of  Great 
Cornard. 

SERLES  MANOR. 

Guy  Corbet  brother  of  Sir  Robert  Corbet  seems  to  have  had  the  lord- 
ship in  1426.  Guy  Corbet  made  his  will  in  1433  and  died  the  same  year 

1  Fine,  Mich.  22  Hen.  VIII.  5  Fine    Trin.  35  Eliz. 

'  Memoranda,  i    and   2    P.  and  M. ;  Hil.  6  Fine,  HiL,  39  Eliz. 

Rec.  Rot.  35.  '  Fine,  Hil.  30  Eliz. 

3  Fine,  Easter,  7  Eliz.  8  C.P.  i.  212. 

4  Fine,  Trin.  26  Eliz. 


98  THE   MANORS   OF   SUFFOLK. 

leaving  his  widow  Joan  and  a  son  afterwards  Sir  Robert  Corbet.  The 
widow,  who  held  in  dower,  died  in  1439,  and  the  Inquisition  p.m.  then 
taken  included  80  acres  of  land,  5  of  meadow,  2  of  wood  and  525.  i$d.  of 
rent  in  Little  Cornard  and  Bures  held  as  of  the  Honor  of  Hatfield  Peverell. ' 
Sir  Robert  Corbet  succeeded  and  died  in  1478*  when  the  manor  passed  to 
his  son  and  heir  Robert  who  was  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir  Robert 
Corbet.'  Robert  Corbet  was  succeeded  by  Sir  Richard  Corbet  who  died 
25  June  1524*  leaving  a  son  Richard  who  died  in  1544  when  the  manor 
apparently  went  to  another  Richard  Corbet,  for  in  1555  a  fine  of  it  was 
levied  by  William  Humberton  and  others  against  him.  Later  the 
manor  was  purchased  by  Robert  Gurdon.  The  devolution  subsequently 
is  identical  with  Assington  Manor  and  is  not  therefore  here  given. 

CATCHELEIGH,  APPULGARYS,  FOLYBROK  and  CANEWORTH  MANORS. 

These  appear  to  have  been  subsidiary  manors  to  Caxton's  and  to  have 
become  merged  in  it.  We  meet  with  Caneworth  Manor  under  the  name 
"  Cannewykes  Manor  "  in  a  fine  levied  in  1307  by  Richard  son  of  Henry 
son  of  Nicholas  de  St.  Edmund's  and  Isabella  his  wife  against  John 
de  Lincoln  and  Edmund  de  Neketon.5  In  the  muniment  room  at 
Merton  there  are  records  of  the  Courts  of  "  ffulybrok  "  held  1328-9  and  a 
Rental  of  1475  states  that  "  ffolybrok  "  is  situated  in  Bures,  though  it  is 
part  of  Caxton's.  Robertus  Lay  de  ffulybrok  is  mentioned  in  a  Court  of 
4  Edw.  IV. 

There  are  records  of  the  Courts  of  Appylgare  held  21  and  23  Rich.  II. 
and  in  a  Rental  about  1354  Dominus  Willielmus  Appilgare  is  mentioned, 
a  member  of  the  family,  no  doubt,  from  which  the  manor  derived  its  name. 
The  Court  Rolls  of  Caneworth,  4  and  5  Edw.  III.,  are  also  preserved  at 
Merton.  It  does  not  appear  that  any  separate  Court  of  any  of  these  small 
manors  was  held  after  the  time  of  Rich.  II.,  and  a  Rental  of  Caxton's  Manor 
about  1480  is  headed  "Caxtones  in  Cornerth  p'va  cum  Catcheleigh  appul- 
garys  et  ffolybrok."  An  earlier  Rental  in  1443  had  the  heading  "  Caxton 
in  Cateheleigh  Appulgares  Holybrok."6 


I.P.M.,   Joan  wife  of  Guy  Corbet,  17         5  Feet  of  Fines,  i  Edw.  II.  34. 

Hen.  VI.  24.  "  The  de  Greys  of  Little  Cornard,  by  the 

I.P.M.,  18  Edw.  IV.  19.  Rev.   Geo.  Crabbe,  Suff.   Inst.  vi. 

I.P.M.,  i  and  2  Hen.  VIII.  30,  31. 
I.P.M.,  16  Hen.  VIII.  33. 


EDWARDSTONE. 


EDWARDSTONE. 


99 


|N  the  Confessor's  time  Godwin  son  of  Alfer  held  under  the 
King  4  carucates  of  land  as  a  manor  with  soc.  There  was 
a  church  living  with  30  acres  of  free  land.  The  details 
of  the  holding  were  as  follows  :  10  villeins,  7  bordars,  6 
slaves,  3  ploughteams  in  demesne,  6  belonging  to  the  men, 
8  acres  of  meadow,  wood  for  10  hogs,  a  winter  mill,  2 
horses  at  the  Hall,  17  beasts,  60  hogs,  80  sheep,  all  valued  at 
100  shillings. 

At  the  time  of  the  Great  Survey  the  value  had  risen  considerably, 
for  it  was  placed  at  7  pounds,  the  manor  being  then  held  by  Hubert  of 
Robert  Malet  the  tenant  in  chief.  The  villeins  had  by  degrees  come  down 
first  to  9  and  then  to  6,  but  the  bordars  had  increased  by  6.  There  were 
2  fewer  slaves  and  the  ploughteams  in  demesne  were  only  two  and  those 
of  the  men  but  3,  while  there  was  but  one  horse  at  the  Hall. 

One  looks  in  vain  for  any  evidence  of  actual  rise  in  value  in  these 
figures,  and  besides  there  were  but  n  beasts  in  place  of  17,  37  hogs  in  place 
of  60  and  22  sheep  in  lieu  of  80. 

In  this  place  there  were  also  9  socmen  having  half  a  carucate  of  land, 
with  formerly  a  whole  ploughteam  but  then  but  half  a  team,  all  included 
in  the  above  valuation.  The  manor  was  6  quanxntenes  in  length  and  6  in 
breadth  and  paid  in  a  gelt  lod.  whoever  the  tenant  might  be.' 

EDWARDSTONE  MANOR. 

The  Hubert  who  held  the  manor  of  Robert  Malet  in  the  time  of  William 
the  Conqueror  was  no  doubt  Hubert  de  Munchensi  or  Montchensey.  The 
family  came  into  England  at  the  Conquest  and  we  find  the  name  on  the  Roll  of 
Battle  Abbey.  Hubert  gave  about  the  year  1114  the  Church  of  Edwardstone 
and  all  its  appurtenances  lands  and  tithes  in  the  same  town,  2  acres  of 
land  near  the  church  and  divers  properties  in  other  parishes  to  the  Monastery 
of  Abingdon  in  Berkshire.  He  also  made  various  grants  of  lands 
to  the  monks  of  Eye  andThetford.  "  It  is  said  that  this  Hubert,"  observes 
Dugdale,  "  had  issue  Warine  de  Munchensi,  and  he  another  Hubert  which 
is  likely  enough  to  be  true  ;  for  in  1187  it  appears  that  Hubert  de  Mun- 
chensi was  in  ward  to  the  Bishop  of  Ely  with  his  land  at  Stretford,  part  of 
the  Honor  of  Henry  de  Essex.  At  the  same  time  also  Agnes  de  Munchensi 
(widow  of  Warine  as  I  guess)  daughter  of  Payne  Fitz-John  then  sixty  years 
of  age  had  three  sons,  viz.,  Ralph  and  William  both  knights  and  Hubert  a 
clerk  ;  as  also  two  daughters,  the  one  married  to  Stephen  de  Glanville 
and  the  other  to  William  Painell,  her  lands  at  Holkam  in  Norfolk  being 
then  valued  at  eleven  pounds  per  annum." 

The  Hubert  entered  on  the  Domesday  Survey  seems  to  have  had  a 
grandson  Hubert  and  this  is  the  man  often  mistaken  for  his  grandfather. 
Davy  who  probably  followed  Gipps  and  Blomefield  makes  Warin  to  be 
the  son  of  the  Domesday  Hubert,  while  Page  makes  Hubert,  the  son  of  the 
Domesday  Hubert  to  have  this  manor.  Of  course  the  difficulty  might 
be  met  by  supposing  the  second  Hubert  to  be  the  brother  of  Warin. 

We  find  that  Hubert  the  grandson  was  a  benefactor  about  the  year  1160 

1  Dom.  ii.  304. 


ioo  THE   MANORS   OF   SUFFOLK. 

to  the  Abbey  of  Colne  in  Essex,  the  Convent  of  which  appointed  two  monks 
to  pray  for  his  father's  soul  in  their  church  of  Edwardstone,  and  afterwards 
to  pray  for  Hubert's  soul  and  those  of  his  heirs  in  the  church  of  Colne. 
The  monks  who  had  been  placed  by  Hubert  the  elder  at  Edwardstone  were 
removed  by  Abbot  Wakelin  to  Colne  in  Essex  which  was  also  a  cell  to 
Abingdon  and  in  their  stead  two  secular  priests  continued  to  pray  in  the 
Church  of  Edwardstone  according  to  the  will  of  Hubert  the  younger.  The 
impropriation  of  the  great  tithes  of  the  parish  was  given  to  Colne  by  Hubert 
and  so  remained  until  the  dissolution.  "  It  is  probable,"  says  Page,  "  here 
was  no  more  than  a  residence  for  the  officiating  monks  ;  and  the  endow- 
ments of  this  cell  were  annexed  in  1559  to  the  see  of  Ely  in  exchange  with 
the  Crown  for  some  valuable  manorial  property.  The  Bishop  of  Ely 
pays  to  the  Vicar  of  this  church  after  the  rate  of  twelve  pence  a  day,  or 
£18.  55.  per  annum."1  The  second  Hubert  married  according  to  Gipps, 
Muriell  daughter  of  Peter  de  Valoignes  and  had  issue  by  her  William 
de  Munchensi  who  was  a  great  soldier  and  in  high  esteem  with  Edw.  I.  and 
the  whole  Kingdom ;  but  according  to  Morant  and  the  Davy  MSS.  this 
Hubert  had  a  son  and  heir  William  and  he  a  son  and  heir  Warin 
de  Munchensi  who  was  the  great  soldier  in  the  time  of  Edw.  I.  In  fact,  Davy 
introduces  another  generation.  The  Warin  who  was  son  of  the  Domesday 
tenant  in  chief  according  to  Dugdale  married  Agnes  daughter  of  Payn 
Fitz-John  and  brother  of  Ralph  and  had  issue  not  only  Hubert  but 
also  a  son  Sir  William  de  Munchensi  to  whom  Hen.  II.  at  the  end  of  his 
reign  made  various  grants  of  land  in  Norfolk.  He  was  the  father  of  Warin 
and  William.  Warm  had  lands  in  Suffolk,  for  in  1250  the  King  enfeoffed 
to  him  all  the  liberties  belonging  to  the  lands  of  Ralph  de  Munchensi 
his  uncle  whose  heir  he  was,  all  which  were  first  granted  by  Hen.  II., 
amongst  which  the  tenants  in  Winfarthing  co.  Norfolk  were  excused  from 
the  Sheriff's  turn  and  from  toll  and  from  serving  upon  any  juries  out  of 
their  manor,  and  he  had  assize  of  bread,  ale  and  wine  with  combleet 
allowed  him,  and  this  further  privilege  that  the  King's  bailiffs  should 
not  enter  his  baliwick  of  Winfarthing  to  take  any  distress  but  the  bailiff 
of  that  baliwick  should  do  it.  This  Sir  Warin  de  Munchensi  died  in  1255 
being  then  reputed  to  be  one  of  the  most  noble,  prudent  and  wealthy  men 
in  all  the  realm  ;  his  inventory  amounted  to  2,000  marks,  a  prodigious 
sum  for  that  time.  The  younger  son  William  de  Munchensi  had 
Edwardstone  Manor. 

It  is  clear  that  a  William  de  Montchensi  had  the  lordship  of  this  manor 
in  the  time  of  Edw.  I.  The  descents  from  this  man  vary  according  to 
various  writers.  Gipps's  account  is  absurd  on  the  face  of  it,  but  it 
will  be  better  to  give  this  and  point  out  the  inaccuracies.  Gipps  says 
speaking  of  this  William  he  "  was  a  great  soldier  and  in  high  esteem  with 
Edw.  I.  and  the  whole  Kingdom  as  appears  from  a  MS.  in  Sir  Symonds 
Dews's  Library,  which  gives  this  account  of  his  death :  '  Ds  Will  de 
Montchansey  obsidebat  quoddam  Castrum  in  Wallia,  et  dum  ipse  et 
Familia  sua  quendam  Murum  effodebant,  ut  in  dictum  Castrum  pateretur 
Ingressus,  cecidit  Murus  super  ipsum  et  Familiam  suam,  et  ita  in  Amari- 
tudine  Cordis,  tamen  Vultu  incomposito,  Tributum  Mortis  persolvebat. 
In  cujus  Casu  tota  Gens  Anglicana  condoluit,  quia  Miles  strenuus  et  fortis, 
et  in  Bello  circumspectus  ab  omnibus  habebatur. — Collect.  Hist.  D.  Sym. 
Dews  1126.'  This  William  de  Montchansey  marry 'd  .  .  .  the  daughter 

1  Page,  Hist,  of  Sufi.  937. 


EDWARDSTONE.  101 

of  Dalbany  Earl  of  Arundel  by  whom  he  had  issue  2  sons  Waryne,1  the  eldest, 
who  died  without  issue,  and  Willm  who  marry'd  Beatrix  the  daughter  of 
Willm.  Beauchamp  and  relict  of  Tho.  Fitz-oates  by  whom  he  had  issue  one 
son  Tho.  born  32  Edw.  3  who  was  the  father  of  Sr.  Tho.  de  Montchansey 
who  marry'd  Beatrix  the  daughter  of  Sir  Edmd.  Vauncey  and  by  her  had 
Jane  his  sole  daughter  and  heir  marry'd  to  Sir  Richd.  Waldegrave.  Sr. 
Tho.  dy'd  29  Hen.  6.  Now  this  William  de  Montchensi  who  lived  in  the 
time  of  Edw.  I.  had  in  the  early  part  of  that  monarch's  reign  a  grant  of 
free  warren  in  Edwardstone2  and  died  in  I2863  being  succeeded  by  his 
son  and  heir  William.  This  last  William  is  probably  the  William  de 
Montecaniso  of  Edwardstone  mentioned  during  the  lifetime  of  his  father 
in  the  Close  Rolls  in  I2754  and  with  his  wife  Beatrice  in  I2785  and 
together  with  others  mentioned  as  heirs  of  William  de  Bello  Campo  of 
Bedeford  and  of  Amicia  his  wife.6  He  is  also  probably  the  person  stated 
in  the  Patent  Rolls  in  1286  to  have  received  a  pardon  for  trespass.7 

Notwithstanding  the  pardon  he  seems  to  have  continued  in  prison 
for  4  years.  On  the  Patent  Rolls  in  1290  there  is  a  grant  to  Eleanor  the 
King's  Consort  of  the  lands  of  William  de  Monte  Caniso  of  Edwardston 
in  prison  for  trespasses.8  The  following  year,  however,  he  is  released,  for 
on  the  same  Rolls  we  find  a  mandate  from  the  King  to  the  Abbot  of  St. 
Edmunds  to  restore  him  the  arms,  vessels,  robes,  jewels  and  debts  owing 
to  him  and  taken  into  the  Abbot's  hands  by  reason  of  his  late  trespasses 
because  William  de  Monte  Caniso  is  about  to  go  to  Acre  in  the  service  of 
God.9  Ministers'  accounts  of  William's  lands  here10  will  be  found  in  the 
Public  Record  Office." 

William  died  about  1302"  ?  leaving  (it  is  apprehended)  not  a  son 
Thomas  as  stated  by  Gipps  but  a  son  William  who  died  in  i3ig13 
seised  of  the  manor  stated  in  the  Close  Rolls  of  that  year  to  be  held 
in  chief  as  of  the  Honor  of  Eye14  and  in  his  Inquisition  post  mortem  will 
actually  be  found  an  extent  of  the  manor.  He  left  a  son  William  who  at 
the  time  of  his  father's  decease  was  an  infant,  and  the  custody  of  the  manor 
seems  to  have  been  committed  to  Queen  Isabella  who  granted  the  manor 
during  the  minority  of  the  heir  to  John  de  Hothum  bishop  of  Ely. 

The  Bishop  of  Ely  in  1322  by  deed  16  September  demised  to  Sir  Robert 
de  Bures  and  Andrew  his  son  the  wardship  of  the  manor  "  held  during  the 
minority  of  Sir  William  de  Mountchenesey.'"5  William  attained  21  and 
died  in  1337  leaving  Thomas  his  son  or  brother  his  successor.16 

On  the  Close  Rolls  of  this  year  will  be  found  an  order  to  the  Escheator 
to  give  full  seisin  to  this  Thomas  de  Montecaniso  son  of  William  of  the 
Manor  of  Edwardstone  as  William  held  in  his  demesne  as  of  fee  of  the 
King  as  of  the  Honor  of  Eye  which  being  then  in  the  hands  of  Queen  Isabella 
she  committed  the  manor  (in  her  hands  by  reason  of  the  minority  of  William's 
heir)  to  John  de  Hothum  bishop  of  Ely  to  hold  until  the  heir  should  come 

1  This  was  the  man  who  was  so  wealthy         '  Pat.  Rolls,  19  Edw.  I.  18. 

that   he  was    called    the  English         °  24  to  25  Edw.  I. 

Croesus   and  died   worth  upwards         '  Bundle  1090,  No.  4. 

of  200,000  marks.  3  I.P.M.,  30  Edw.  I.  38. 

=  H.R.  ii.  143,  153.  3  I. P.M.,  13  Edw.  II.  26 ;  I.Q.D.,  10  Edw. 

3  I.P.M.,  14  Edw.  I.  27.  II.  54. 

'Close  Rolls,  3  Edw.  II.  5^.  «  Close  Rolls,  13  Edw.  II.  6. 

5  Close  Rolls,  6  Edw.  I.  7.  5  Ancient  Deeds  in  Public  Record  Office 

6  Ib.  5-  C.  1755- 

'  Pat.  Rolls,  14  Edw.  I.  9.  "  I.P.M.,  n  Edw.  III.  18. 

8  Pat.  Rolls,  18  Edw.  1. 2 ;  19  Edw.  I.  21. 


102  THE   MANORS   OF   SUFFOLK. 

of  age.    The  honor  had  come  into  the  King's  hands  on  the  death  of  John 
Earl  of  Cornwall.    Thomas,  William's  son  was  next  heir  and  of  full  age.1 

There  is  evidently  something  wrong  here  if  William  de  Montchensy 
last  mentioned  is  intended,  for  he  was  a  minor  in  1322,  it  is  not  easy  to 
see  how  his  son  could  have  been  of  full  age  in  1337.  Assuming  the  father 
to  have  come  of  age  in  1323,  which  is  the  very  earliest  possible  date  con- 
sistently with  the  demise  of  the  Bishop  of  Ely  in  1322,  the  son  must  have 
been  born  to  his  father  at  the  somewhat  early  age  of  7  ! 

Thomas  de  Montchensy  probably  settled  the  manor  and  advowson 
in  1360,  for  we  meet  with  the  following  fine  that  year  :  Sir  Ralph  de  Hemen- 
hale,  John  Edmund  and  Roger  Aubrey  v.  Sir  Thomas  de  Mountchensy.  * 
He  died  shortly  after  and  was  succeeded  by  his  son  Thomas  and  he  by 
his  son  Sir  Thomas  who  married  Beatrix  the  daughter  of  Sir  Edmund 
Vauncey  and  died  according  to  Gipps  29  Hen.  VI.  [1451]. 

If  Sir  Thomas  Montchensy  died  as  late  as  stated  by  Gipps  he  must  have 
parted  with  the  manor  in  his  lifetime,  for  his  daughter  and  heir  married 
Sir  Richard  Waldegrave  Lord  of  Bures  and  Silvesters,  and  according  to  the 
Davy  MSS.  Sir  Richard  Waldegrave  granted  the  manor  to  Michael  Blundell 
in  1420,  with  what  object  is  not  stated,  but  probably  by  way  of  Settle- 
ment. The  manor  is  contained  in  the  Inquisition  post  mortem  (and  an 
extent  given)  of  Sir  Richard  Waldegrave  who  died  the  2  May  I434-3  Jane, 
Sir  Richard's  wife,  survived  and  held  the  manor  till  her  death  in  1450 4 
when  she  was  succeeded  by  her  son  and  heir  Sir  William  Waldegrave,  and 
the  manor  continued  in  the  family  till  the  time  of  the  Sir  William  Walde- 
grave who  died  in  1613  by  whom  it  was  sold  in  1598  to  John  Brand  of 
Boxford  a  wealthy  clothier.5  Robert  Brand  Prior  of  Norwich  who  died 
in  1542  first  advanced  the  Brands  and  so  became  founder  as  it  were  of 
the  Brands  of  Edwardstone.  The  intermediate  descents  of  the  manor 
between  the  last  two  mentioned  Sir  William  Waldegraves  will  be 
found  under  Smallbridge  Manor  in  Bures  and  are  not  therefore 
here  repeated ;  but  we  may  mention  that  this  manor  is  specifically 
included  in  the  Inquisition  post  mortem  of  Sir  Wm.  Waldegrave  who  died 
the  30  Jan.  1527*  of  Sir  George  who  died  the  8  July  1528'  and  of  Sir  William 
who  died  the  7  November  1554,*  and  is  the  subject  of  a  fine  levied  in  1601 
by  Thomas  Walton  against  the  above  named  John  Brand.9  John  Brand 
did  not  long  enjoy  the  estate  for  he  died  in  1610  and  was  succeeded  by  his 
son  and  heir  Benjamin  Brand  who  died  before  1619.  On  the  flat  stone 
in  the  north  aisle  of  Edwardstone  Church  is  the  following  inscription  : — 

To  the  precious  memory  of  Benjamin  Brand  of  Edwardstone 
Hall  Esqr.  and  Elizabeth  his  wife  ;  whom,  when  Providence  after  35 
years  conjunction  divided,  death  after  12  days  divorcement  reunited  : 
who,  leaving  their  rare  examples  to  6  Sons  and  6  Daughters  (all  nursed 
with  her  unborrowed  milk)  blest  with  poor  mens  prayers,  embaulmed 
with  numerous  tears,  lye  here  reposed. 

Benjamin  Brand  was  succeeded  by  his  cousin  and  heir  John  Brand 
who  was  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir  John  Brand  who  died  in  1674  leaving 
an  only  child  Elizabeth  who  married  Sir  Robert  Kemp  Bart,  who  sold  the 
manor  in  1714  to  William  French  citizen  and  draper  of  London  who  was  lord 

•  Close  Rolls,  ii  Edw.  III.  pt.  i.  23.               •  I.P.M.,  19  Hen.  VIII.  44. 

•  Feet  of  Fines,  34  Edw.  III.  19.  '  I.P.M.,  20  Hen.  VIII.  18. 

•  I.P.M.,  13  Hen.  VI.  27.  •  I.P.M.,  i  and  2  P.  and  M.  92. 

•  I.P.M.,  2i  Edw.  IV.  53.  '  Fine,  Mich.  43,  44  Eliz. 
:  Fine,  Mich.  40,  41  Eliz. 


EDWARDSTONE.  103 

and  patron  here.1  William  French  by  his  will,  which  was  proved  in  London 
on  the  i2th  Jan.  1738,  devised  the  manor  with  the  rest  of  his  landed  estate 
to  William  Sheldon  the  son  of  his  niece  Ann  Sheldon  and  he  or  probably  his 
son  (for  the  Vendor  was  Wm.  Sheldon  jun.)  in  1794  sold  the  manor  together 
with  the  advowson  and  estate  to  Thomas  Dawson  of  the  family  of  Dawson 
of  Easington  co.  Durham.  He  was  born  in  1747  and  his  mother  was  one 
of  the  Forsters  of  Rothbury,  co.  Northumberland.  He  married  Anne  dau. 
of  Thomas  Manning,  and  on  his  death  in  1807  was  succeeded  by  his  s.  and  h. 
Charles  Dawson  born  in  1777.  He  died  in  1853  and  by  his  will  the  manor 
was  devised  to  his  sister  the  widow  of  William  Shepherd  of  Bradbourne 
co.  Kent,  on  whose  death  in  1864  the  manor  passed  to  her  grandson. 

An  abstract  of  a  survey  of  the  manor  will  be  found  amongst  the  MSS. 
of  the  Brit.  Mus.2  as  will  also  an  extent  of  the  lands  held  of  this  manor  by 
Sibton  Abbey3  and  a  Rental  of  the  manor  in  i68o.4 

Arms  of  Montchensy  :  Or,  three  escutcheons  barry  of  six  varee  and 
gules  : — of  Brand,  eyther  vert  a  griffin  passant,  and  a  chef  or ;  or,  Azure, 
two  swords  in  saltire  argent,  hilted  in  base  or,  a  bordure  engrailed  of  the 
last. 

LYNNES  MANOR  al.  ALGOOD'S. 

This  small  manor  was  probably  called  after  a  family  holding  in  the 
time  of  Henry  V.  There  is  preserved  amongst  the  Bodleian  Charters  a 
grant  by  Elizabeth  relict  of  John  Lynne  of  Edwardston  to  John 
Chilton  of  Colchester  and  John  Lynne  of  Edwardston  of  certain 
lands  in  Edwardston  and  Great  and  Little  Waldingfield.5  And 
certain  grants  in  the  same  collection  explain  the  origin  of  the 
title  Algoods  and  practically  indicate  the  period  from  which  the  manor 
was  so  called.  The  ist  is  dated  the  26  Jan.  9  Hen.  V.  [1421]  and  is  a  con- 
firmation by  John  Chilton  of  Colchester  and  John  Lynne  of  Edwardston 
to  John  Algood  of  Colchester  and  others  of  all  their  lands  and  tenements 
in  Edwardston,  Great  and  Little  Waldingfield,  Groton  and  Meldynge.6 
The  2nd  is  dated  the  7th  March  14  Hen.  VI.  [1435-6]  and  is  a  grant  by 
Geoffrey  Hervy  de  Fornham  All  Saints  and  Peter  Gervays  of  Sudbury  to 
John  Algood  of  Colchester  and  others  of  their  whole  right  and  claim  in 
lands,  rents,  &c.,  formerly  of  John  Adam  and  afterwards  of  John  Lynne 
in  Edwardston,  Great  and  Little  Waldingfield  and  Meldyng.7  The  3rd  is 
dated  the  29  June  28  Hen.  VI.  [1449-50]  and  is  a  lease  of  John  Algood  of 
Colchester,  Ellen  his  wife  and  Peter  Creke,  clerk  to  Sir  Robert  Corbet  knt., 
Thomas  Wode  and  others  of  all  their  lands,  rents,  &c.,  which  they  acquired 
by  the  gift  and  feoffment  of  John  Chilton  of  Colchester  and  John  Lynne  of 
Edwardston  situated  in  Edwardston,  Great  and  Little  Waldingfield,  Groton 
and  Meldynge.8  A  Rental  of  John  Algood  jun.  for  lands,  &c.,  in  Edwardston, 
Great  and  Little  Waldingfield  the  9  April  4  Edw.  IV.  [1464]  and  29  Hen. 
VIII.  [1537]  will  be  found  amongst  the  Rolls  in  the  Bodleian.9 

In  the  time  of  Elizabeth  the  manor  belonged  to  Thomas  Apleton, 
Appleton  or  Apulton  of  Waldingfield  the  son  of  William  Apleton  and  Rose  his 
wife  daughter  and  co-heir  of  Robert  Sexton  of  Lavenham  by  Agnes  sister  of 

1  He  is  supposed  to  have  left  a  yearly  rent  4  Add.  MSS.  19198. 

charge  of  £2   out   of   Edwardston  s  Bodl.  Suff.  Ch.  197. 

Hall  for  the  poor  of  the  parish,  and  6  Bodl.  Suff.  Ch.  296. 

the   amount   is  still  distributed  in  7  Bodl.  Suff.  Ch.  299. 

bread  on  Easter  Monday.  8  Bodl.  Suff.  Ch.  303. 

*  Add.  MSS.  19197.  '  Bodl.  Suff.  Rolls  10,  n. 
»  Add.  MSS.  34560. 


104  THE    MANORS   OF   SUFFOLK. 

Sir  Thos.  Jermyn  of  Rushbrook.  Thomas  Apleton  married  Mary  2nd 
daughter  and  co-heir  of  Edward  Isaacke  of  West  Court,  Kent.  The 
A  pultons  had  held  land  in  Edwardston  many  generations  earlier  than  this, 
for  we  find  that  Thomas's  great  grandfather  and  namesake  had  by  Deed 
the  I  Oct.  13  Hen.  VII.  [1497]  confirmed  to  John  Smith  and  others  two 
messuages  and  the  crofts  adjacent  and  one  piece  of  meadow  in  Edwardston.1 
Two  years  later  the  20  May  15  Hen.  VII.  [1500]  we  find  a  lease  by  this 
Thomas  Apulton  and  others  to  John  Colman  and  others  of  certain  crofts 
and  lands  in  Edwardston  and  Great  Waldingfield.1 

On  the  death  of  Thomas  Apulton  in  1603'  the  manor  passed  to  his 
son  and  heir  Sir  Isaac  Apulton  knt.  The  descent  of  this  Sir  Isaac 
Apulton  from  John  Apelton  of  Great  Waldingfield  1416  is  given  in  the 
Additional  Suffolk  Pedigrees  to  the  edition  of  the  "Visitations  of  Suffolk  " 
by  Walter  C.  Metcalfe  1882,  pp.  180,  181,  and  by  Mr.  J.  J.  Muskett  in 
his  exceptionally  valuable  account  of  the  "  Manorial  Families  of  Suffolk," 
vol.  I,  p.  329.  Sir  Isaac  Apulton  married  Mary  daughter  of  the  unfortunate 
Anthony  Cage  of  Long  Stow  co.  Cambridge  and  died  in  1608*  being 
succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir  Isaac  Apulton  who  married  Dame  Susan 
relict  of  Sir  Robert  Crane  of  Chilton  Bart,  and  dau.  of  Sir  Giles  Allington 
of  Horseheath,  and  died  without  issue  leaving  his  three  sisters  his  co-heirs. 5 

A  fine  was  in  1549  levied  of  the  manor  by  William  Cordell  and  others 
against  Nicholas  Rokewood.6 

TEWES  OR  TUES  MANOR  al.  TENDRING. 

This  small  manor  belonged  to  the  Tendrings  and  passed  to  the 
Apultons.  Thomas  de  Tendring  and  Emma  his  wife  had  lands,  tenements 
and  services  here  in  1339'  and  in  1467  John  Tendring  represented  the 
family.  In  the  following  century  it  passed  to  Thomas  Apulton  of  Walding- 
field and  to  his  son  and  grandson  as  just  mentioned  in  relation  to  the  Manor 
of  Lynnes. 

1°  J537  a  fine  was  levied  of  this  manor  by  William  Page  against  Richard 
Yaxle  and  others8  under  which  the  manor  vested  in  the  said  William  Page 
who  in  1554  sold  the  same  to  Edward  Apulton.  Edward  Apulton  was 
a  younger  brother  of  William  Apulton  of  Little  Waldingfield  and  married 
Alice  dau.  of  Firmyn  Rokewood  of  Euston.  He  made  his  will  dated  the 
31  Aug.  1580'  and  died  without  issue  when  this  manor  apparently  passed 
to  his  nephew  Thomas  Apulton  or  Appleton  lord  of  the  Manor  of  Lynnes. 


1  Bodl.  Suff.  Ch.  302.  s  For   the  Appleton   family,  see   further 

'  Bodl.  Suff.  Ch.  301.  account    under    Holbrook    Manor, 

'Will   P.C.C.    32  Bolein    I  March   1603,  Little  Waldingfield,  in  this  Hundred. 

proved  i6May  following.— Muskett.         6  Fine,  Hil.  3  Edw.  VI. 
«  Will  8  Sept.  1608,  proved  the  12  July         '  Close  Rolls,  14  Edw.  III.  pt.  i.  (yd). 
1609.    P.C.C.  70  Dorset*..— Muskett.         '  Fine,  Mich.  29  Hen.  VIII. 

'  Proved  icNov.  1580.    P.C.C.  41  ArundelJ. 
— Muskett, 


GLEMSFORD.  105 


GLEMSFORD. 

N  Saxon  times  the  main  manor  was  given  by  Leofsin  to  the 
Abbot  of  Ely  with  8  carucates  of  land.  There  were  16 
villeins,  18  bordars,  and  5  slaves,  3  ploughteams  in  demesne 
and  7  belonging  to  the  men,  12  acres  of  meadow,  wood  for 
5  hogs,  i  mill,  3  horses  at  the  Hall  and  8  beasts.  Also  a 
Church  living  with  30  acres  of  free  land.  By  the  time  of  the 
Domesday  Survey  there  had  merely  been  added  to  the  manor 
200  sheep  and  32  hogs.  There  was  also  one  socman  with  8  acres.  The  whole 
had  been  formerly  valued  at  10  pounds  but  then  the  value  was  increased 
to  16.  The  manor  was  i  league  long  and  8  quarantenes  broad  and  it  paid 
in  a  gelt  15^.'  The  only  other  manor  in  Saxon  and  Norman  times  was 
that  held  in  the  Confessor's  days  by  Blackwin  under  Siward's  commenda- 
tion with  30  acres  valued  at  6  shillings.  At  the  time  of  the  Great  Survey 
this  was  held  by  Garius  of  Ranulf  Peverell  the  tenant  in  chief,  but  the 
soc  was  in  St.  Etheldreda.* 

GLEMSFORD  MANOR. 

Page  in  his  History  of  Suffolk,  following  Kirby,  says  the  lordship  of 
this  parish  at  the  period  of  the  Norman  Survey  was  vested  in  Odo  de  Cam- 
pania a  near  relative  of  King  William,  who  was  by  him  created  Earl  of 
Albemarle  and  Holderness  and  his  large  inheritance  passed  to  Stephen 
his  son  and  heir.  Where  Kirby  acquired  his  information  does  not  appear, 
as  he  cites  no  authority ;  but  whatever  the  source  it  may  be  confidently 
asserted  that  the  whole  statement  is  a  delusion. 

Odo  de  Campania  never  had  anything  to  do  with  the  Manor  of  Glems- 
ford,  nor  indeed  with  any  land  whatsoever  in  the  parish  of  Glemsford. 
Page  next  informs  us,  and  this  time  fortunately  he  is  correct,  that  in  the 
reign  of  Edw.  I.  it  (the  manor)  was  appropriated  to  the  Church  of  Ely 
and  some  rents  are  still  paid  to  the  Bishop  of  that  See  who  has  the 
patronage  of  the  Church  of  St.  Mary  in  Glemsford.  From  the  Hundred 
Rolls  we  learn  that  both  Glemsford  and  Hartest  Manors  were  held  by  the 
Bishop  of  Ely  in  chief  of  the  King  and  pertained  to  the  Barony  of  Ely 
at  that  time,  they  having  been  given  in  f rankalmoign  ;3  also  that  the 
Bishop  held  pleas  in  these  manors.4 

The  Bishop  of  Ely  had  a  grant  of  free  warren  in  respect  of  the  Manor 
of  Glemsford  in  1361.  In  1600  Martin  Heton  Bishop  of  Ely  alienated  the 
manor  to  the  Queen  and  10  years  later  it  was  granted  by  the  Crown  to 
Prince  Henry,  but  in  1617  it  reverted  to  the  King.  It  was  in  the  i8th 
century  purchased  by  John  Moore  who  died  in  1753'  leaving  a  son  and 
heir  Henry  Moore  who  died  unmarried  in  1769  and  was  succeeded  by  his 
brother  and  heir  Richard  Moore  who  died  in  1782  and  was  succeeded  by 
his  son  and  heir  Richard  Moore.6  He  died  the  23rd  November,  1826, 
when  the  manor  passed  to  his  son  Willoughby  Moore,  by  whom  and  his 
mortgagees  the  manor  was  sold  in  1834  to  John  Wright,  from  whom  five 
years  later  it  was  acquired  by  Edmund  Stedman.  It  belonged  sub- 
sequently to  Robert  Frost  Stedman,  Sidney  Pattinson  (1875),  Henry 

'  Dom.  ii.  382.  s  The  Courts  were  held  by  Mary  Moore, 
*  Dom.  ii.  4166.  widow,  from  1763  to  1762. 

3  H.R.  ii.  142,  150.  6  See  Netherhall  Manor,  Cavendish,  in  this 

4  H.R.  ii.  143.    '  Hundred. 

N 


106  THE   MANORS   OF   SUFFOLK. 

William  Eaton  afterwards  Lord  Cheylesmore  (1876-1888),  Joseph 
Beaumont  (r888),  on  whose  death  in  1889  it  came  to  his  son  George 
Frederick  Beaumont  F.S.A.  of  The  Lawn,  Coggeshall  in  Essex,  to  whom  It 
still  belongs. 

Ministers'  account  of  the  Bishop  of  Ely's  temporalities  in  Glemsford 
14  Edw.  I.  [1286]  and  26  to  28  Edw.  I.,1  17  to  18  Edw.  I.  or  III.,'  will  be 
found  in  the  Public  Record  Office'  and  an  inquisition  of  lands  of  the  Bishop 
in  Glemsford  in  1356  amongst  the  MSS.  of  the  British  Museum.4 

Extracts  from  Court  Rolls  of  the  manor  passing  land  from  the  lord 
to  John  Tebbe  and  his  heirs  according  to  the  custom  in  the  2Oth  year  of 
Hen.  VII.  will  be  found  in  the  Bodleian5;  and  amongst  the  Proceedings  in 
Chancery  in  the  time  of  Queen  Elizabeth  is  an  action  for  discovery  of  the 
terms  for  a  lease  by  Eustace  Strutt  to  Henry  Frost  of  a  customary  tene- 
ment called  Patches,  part  of  this  manor6 ;  also  in  the  Bodleian,  Abstracts 
of  Fines  and  Amercements  20  Car.  I.  and  27  Car.  I.'  Surveys  of  the  manor 
will  be  found  in  the  Cambridge  University  Library.8 

METHOLD'S  AND  WIMBOLD'S  MANOR. 

The  Methwolds  held  about  the  time  of  Hen.  VII.  this  manor,  and 
amongst  the  Suffolk  Charters  in  the  Bodleian  will  be  found  a  note  of  a 
grant  at  a  Court  of  this  manor  :  "  Methwolds  and  Wymbolds  held  the 
Tuesday  on  the  feast  of  St.  Dionisius  7  Hen.  VIII.  [1515]  by  William  Mede- 
wold  Esq.,  granted  to  Margery  Jakis  widow  one  tenement  called  '  Cul- 
stone  '  with  a  garden,  &c.,  by  the  service  of  6s.  8d.  annually  and  one  capon."9 

William  Methwold  was  lord  in  1515,  for  we  find  a  Surrender  of  a  little 
meadow  made  by  John  Hall  at  a  Court  held  "by  William  Medewold  Esq." 
to  the  use  of  one  Walter  Berdfeld.10 

William  Methwold  by  deed  dated  34  Hen.  VIII.  [1542]  sold  all  his 
lands  and  tenements  in  this  parish  called  Methwold's  and  Wymbold's  to 
John  Smith  then  of  Cavendish,  but  a  member  of  the  family  of  that  name 
seated  at  Langford  in  Norfolk.  The  manor  passed  from  John  Smith  to  his 
son  and  heir  John  Smith.  From  this  John  Smith  the  manor  passed  to  George 
Smith  who  in  1569  sold  it  with  that  of  Callis  to  John  Allen,"  who  held 
his  first  Court  for  this  manor  and  the  Manor  of  Callis  al.  Tylnes  on  the  28 
July  n  Eliz."  A  Bond  of  this  John  Allen  to  John  Jermyn  of  Debden  31 
Eliz.  for  £70  will  be  found  amongst  the  Bodleian  Charters.'3  Exchequer 
Depositions  were  taken  at  Bury  St.  Edmunds  in  1590  in  an  action  by  Henry 
Rowning  and  others  against  John  Alen  or  Allen  respecting  the  customs  of 
this  manor  and  that  of  Callys  and  as  to  encroachments  on  waste.  John 
Allen  evidently  was  in  difficulties  and  he  mortgaged  this  manor  and  that 
of  Callis  or  Tylnes  to  Thomas  Appleton  who  ultimately  entered  into 
possession  and  held  Courts  ;  for  we  find  amongst  the  Chancery  Proceedings 
of  the  time  of  Queen  Elizabeth  an  action  by  Thomas  Twyne  against  Thomas 
Appleton  to  redeem  and  to  refrain  Appleton  from  holding  Courts,  &c.,  of 
these  manors  and  as  to  a  customary  messuage  called  '  The  Coate '  mort- 
gaged by  John  Alen  dec.  to  defendant  and  left  by  will  to  the  plaintiff.'4 

Bundle  1132,  No.  9.  •  Dd.  viii.  24. 

Ib.  »  Bodl.  Sufi.  Ch.  338. 

Ib.  1135,  No.  6.  I0  Bodl.  Suff.  Ch.  339. 

30  Edw.  III.  Add.  MSS.  6165.                         "  Fine,  Trin.  n  Eliz. 

Bodl.  Suff.  Ch.  332.  "  Bodl.  Suff.  Ch.  345. 

C.P.  iii.  2.  •»  Bodl.  Suff.  Ch.  346. 

Bodleian  Suff.  Rolls,  15  Chart.  349.               "  C.P.  iii.  154. 


GLEMSFORD.  107 

These  proceedings  disclose  the  fact  that  by  the  date  of  the  action  John 
Alen  had  died  and  by  his  will  had  devised  the  manors  to  Thomas  Twyne,  of 
course  subject  to  the  mortgage  to  Thomas  Appleton.  It  appears,  however, 
from  some  Exchequer  Depositions  taken  at  Melford  in  1621  in  an  action 
by  Mary  Appleton  against  Walter  Chamberleyne  that  there  had  been  a  sale 
of  lands  in  Glemsford  by  Allen  to  Appleton.  By  the  date  of  this  action,  1611, 
Thomas  Appleton  had  died  and  the  proceedings  were  by  his  widow  Mary. 

We  find  that  Sir  Isaac  Appleton  in  1598  obtained  this  manor  from 
Thomas1  and  died  seised  in  1608  (but  whether  then  as  mortgagee  or  as 
absolute  owner  is  not  quite  clear)  leaving  a  son  Isaac  Appleton  his  heir 
who  died  without  issue. 

CALLIS  al.  TYLNES  MANOR. 

Little  is  known  respecting  this  small  manor.  It  was  no  doubt  called 
after  the  Caleys  family  who  for  many  generations  held  land  in  Glemsford. 
The  will  of  Thomas  Caleys  1439  is  amongst  the  Suffolk  Charters2  as  is  also 
the  Decree  of  the  Dean  of  Arches  concerning  this  will.3  In  1450  we  find  a 
quit  claim  by  Walter  Whytebred  to  John  Dalton  and  others  of  all  right  in 
this  manor  and  lands  in  Glemsford,  Cavendish,  Boxstead  and  Stanstead, 4 
and  in  1507  amongst  the  Bodleian  Charters  is  a  grant  by  Walter  Caleys 
al.  Imworth  son  and  heir  of  Thomas  Caleys  to  Walter  Cotton  and  others 
of  lands  in  Glemsford,  Cavendish,  Boxstead  and  Stanstead  but  not 
apparently  of  the  manor.  In  1509  there  is  amongst  the  Bodleian  Suff. 
Charters  a  note  of  a  grant  from  the  Manor  of  "  Calais  "  in  Glemsford  to 
Walter  Toppyng  of  land  opposite  "  Mille  strete  "  in  Glemsford,  24  Hen.  VII. 5 
In  1569  John  Allen  by  fine6  obtained  the  manor  from  George  Smith  at  the 
same  time  he  acquired  the  Manor  of  Methold's  and  Wimbold's  and  on  the 
28  July  ii  Eliz.  held  his  first  Court  for  these  manors.7  Allen  mortgaged  to 
Thomas  Appleton  or  sold  and  in  any  case  Thomas  Appleton  had  possession  in 
1598  when  a  fine  was  levied  against  him  by  Isaac  Appleton.8  This  Isaac  was 
the  son  and  heir  of  Thomas  and  died  seised,  when  he  was  in  1609  succeeded 
by  his  son  and  heir  Isaac  Appleton  who  died  without  issue. 

There  is  notice  of  an  action — Thomas  Twyne  and  J as.  Ellis  and  others 
on  the  Exchequer  Depositions  taken  at  Glemsford  in  1624  respecting  a 
right  of  way  from  "  Tilneis  Wood  "  through  a  yard  then  belonging  to  the 
defendant  James  by  "  Turrell's  Hall  "  into  Brook  Street.  The  plaintiff 
Thomas  Twyne  was  the  son  of  Thomas  Twyne  (whose  will  is  referred  to 
in  the  action)  who  was  the  devisee  under  the  will  of  John  Allen  the  former 
lord  of  this  manor.  In  1837  the  manor  belonged  to  James  Sparke  of  Bury, 
Timothy  Holnies  of  Bury  and  John  Jackson. 

GLEMSFORD  al.  PEVERELLS  MANOR. 

In  1356  Richard  de  Muneworth  and  Joan  his  wife  recovered  a  manor 
and  lands  here  from  John  de  Gefford  and  Thomas  Glemesford.  We  find 
later  Hugh  de  Glemsford  lord,  and  in  1428  that  John  de  Glemsford  held  a 
4th  of  a  fee  from  Hugh  de  Glemsford.  He  died  in  1437,  and  in  1497  William 
Felton  of  Sudbury  died  seised  of  the  manor.  In  the  Inquisition  p.m. 
of  this  William  the  manor  is  said  to  be  worth  £5,  and  to  be  held  of  John 
Colthe  as  of  the  Manor  of  Greys  in  Cavendish.  It  is  found  that  William 

1  Fine,  Easter,  40  Eliz.  5  Bodl.  Suff.  Ch.  335. 

*  Bodl.  Suff.  Ch.  311.  6  Fine,  Trin.  n  Eliz. 

'  Ib.  312.  '  Bodl.  Suff.  Ch.  345. 

4  Bodl.  Suff.  Ch.  319.  8  Fine,  Easter,  40  Eliz. 


io8  THE   MANORS   OF    SUFFOLK. 

Felton  died  seised  the  23rd  Dec.  9  Hen.  VII.  and  that  Edmund  Felton 
aged  32  is  his  son  and  heir.1  Edmund  Felton  died  seised  the  13  May  1519  * 
and  was  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir  Edmund  Felton  of  Pentlow  who 
died  the  10  Dec.  1542  when  George  son  and  heir  of  Edmund  succeeded.  On 
the  death  of  George  Felton,  his  son  and  heir  Edmund  succeeded.3 

Collections  for  the  history  of  Glemsford  will  be  found  amongst  the 
MSS.  of  the  British  Museum4  and  Deeds  relating  to  the  place  amongst 
the  Charters  of  the  British  Museum.5  Ministers'  accounts  of  land  here  in 
the  time  of  Edw.  I.  are  in  the  Public  Record  Office6  as  are  also  Ministers' 
accounts  of  lands  in  the  time  of  Edw.  II.7 


1  I.P.M.,  10  Hen.  VII.  1014.  5  Add.     Ch.     27226,     27229,     27231-5, 
*  I. P.M.,  ii  Hen.  VIII.  27237,  27239,  27241,  27244. 

1  SeeTrobetts  or  Trucketts  Manor  in  Box-  *  Bundle  1124,  No.  8. 

stead  in  this  Hundred.  '  Bundle  995,  No.  14. 
«  Add.  MSS.  5847,  6165. 


GROTON. 


109 


GROTON. 

HERE  was  here  but  one  manor,  though  100  acres  in  Groton 
were  held  as  belonging  to  the  Manor  of  Cornard  in  early 
times.  The  main  manor  was  held  in  Saxon  times  by  the 
Abbot  of  Bury,  and  he  was  not  disturbed  at  the  Conquest. 
The  holding  consisted  of  i  carucate  and  a  half  as  a  manor, 
8  villeins,  5  bordars,  i  ploughteam  in  demesne,  2  belonging 
to  the  men,  i  acre  of  meadow,  wood  for  10  hogs,  a  winter 
mill,  i  rouncey,  6  beasts,  16  hogs  and  30  sheep.  There  were  also  2 
freemen  with  half  an  acre  of  land  which  they  could  give  away  or  sell,  6 
bordars,  i  ploughteam  and  i  acre  of  meadow. 

Formerly  the  value  was  30  shillings,  but  in  the  time  of  the  Domesday 
Survey  40.  It  was  7  quarantenes  long  and  4  broad.  There  were  also  12 
freemen  who  could  give  or  sell  their  lands  which  consisted  of  i  carucate 
in  the  Confessor's  days.  The  value  was  20  shillings,  and  the  Abbot  had 
soc,  commendation  and  service  and  the  payment  in  a  gelt  was  8^.' 

The  holding  in  Groton  which  belonged  to  Cornard  Manor  was  4  socmen 
with  100  acres  and  3  bordars.  Among  these  was  a  ploughteam.  The 
whole  had  in  Saxon  times  been  valued  at  10  pounds,  but  later  in  Norman  days 
at  26  shillings  and  8^.  by  tale.  It  was  six  quarantenes  and  3  perches  long 
and  4^  quarantenes  and  4  perches  broad  and  paid  io^d.  in  a  gelt.  The  soc 
was  in  the  township  and  the  holding  at  the  time  of  the  Domesday  Survey 
was  that  of  Earl  Morchar's  mother  which  William  the  Chamberlain  and 
Otho  the  Goldsmith  kept  in  hand  for  the  King.2  Richard  son  of  Earl 
Gislebert3  had  here  a  freeman  by  commendation  and  soc  and  sac  who 
had  10  acres  of  land  valued  at  2od.4  and  the  only  other  holdings  were 
encroachments  upon  the  King.  Thus  this  Richard  son  of  Earl  Gislebert 
held  a  freeman  formerly  under  Robert  son  of  Wimarc  by  commendation  only 
with  60  acres  of  land,  formerly  4  bordars  then  one,  formerly  i  ploughteam 
then  none,  and  i  acre  of  land,  all  formerly  valued  at  10  shillings  and  then 
at  18.  On  this  land  Roger  de  Orbec  encroached,  and  held  it  under  Richard 
son  of  Gislebert,  and  Richard's  men  claimed  it  as  belonging  to  the  fee  of 
Wisgar  predecessor  in  title ;  but  according  to  the  testimony  of  the  Hundred, 
it  never  had  belonged  to  that  fee  either  by  commendation  or  by  soc.5 

GROTON  MANOR. 

The  Abbot  of  Bury  leased  this  manor  to  Robert  de  Cokefeld 
son  of  Adam  son  of  Lemmerus6  for  life,  and  on  his  death  Abbot  Sampson 
3rd  of  Rich.  I.  granted  a  fresh  lease  to  Robert's  son  Adam  de  Cokefield  for 
life.  Adam  married  Rohais  and  had  issue  an  only  child  Nesta  who 
married  ist  Thomas  de  Burgh.  Adam  de  Cokefield  having  died  about 
1209  Rohais  his  widow  released  to  the  said  Thomas  de  Burgh  and  Nesta 
his  wife  her  dower  in  the  lands  of  her  late  husband  in  this  parish,  Cockfield 
and  Semere  other  lands  being  assigned  to  her  in  lieu  thereof.  After  the 
death  of  Thomas  de  Burgh  this  Nesta  married  John  de  Beauchamp  and 
finally,  Matthew  de  Leyham.  In  the  26th  Hen.  III.  this  Matthew  de 
Leyham  and  Nesta  his  wife  granted  to  the  Abbot  of  St.  Edmunds  five 


'  Dom.  ii.  3596. 

*  Dom.  ii.  287. 

3  See  Bures  Manor  in  this  Hundred. 

'  Dom.  ii.  3726. 


^  Dom.  ii.  4476. 
6  See  Peper's  Manor, 
Hundred. 


Cockfield,    in  this 


no  THE   MANORS    OF   SUFFOLK. 

carucates  of  land  in  Cockfield  the  Abbot  releasing  to  them  all  claim  to  the 
lands  belonging  to  his  monastery  in  this  parish,  Lindsey,  Rougham  and 
Semere. 

Nesta  de  Leyham  died  without  issue  by  any  of  her  husbands,  about 
the  year  1248,  when  the  King  commanded  Edmund,  Abbot  of  St.  Edmunds 
to  restore  to  Bartholomew  de  Creke,  Ralph  de  Berners  and  William  de 
Bellomonte  the  Manors  of  Groton  and  Semere  to  which  the  Abbot  had  no 
title  except  through  Henry,  late  Abbot  of  St.  Edmunds  who  had  intruded 
whilst  Nesta  [to  whom  the  said  Bartholomew,  Ralph  and  William  were 
cousins  and  heirs]  was  in  extremis,  by  reason  of  a  lease  granted  by  Matthew 
de  Leyham  her  husband,  against  her  will,  to  John  de  Cramaville.1 

The  Abbot  continued  in  possession,  for  in  1286  a  writ  of  right  was 
brought  for  the  recovery  of  the  lands  by  John  de  Creke,  Ralph  Berners  and 
Godfrey  de  Bellomonte  the  then  heirs  of  Nesta,  descended  from  her  three 
aunts  Alicia,  Beatrix  and  Gunnora  and  it  would  seem  to  have  been  decided 
by  duel  in  their  favour  for  the  Abbot's  champion  was  overcome.  The 
descent  of  the  inheritance  from  Nesta  to  the  claimants  is  set  forth  in  these 
words  : — 

"  Et  de  ipsa  Nesta  quia  obiit  sine  haerede  de  se  resortiebatur  jus,  &c., 
quibusdam  Aliciae,  Beatrici  et  Gunnorae,  ut  amitis  et  haeredibus.  Et  de 
praedicta  Alicia  descendit  jus  perpartis  suae  cuidam  Roberto  ut  filio  et 
haeredi  :  et  de  ipso  Roberto  cuidam  Bartholomaeo  ut  filio  et  haeredi :  et 
de  ipso  Bartholomaeo  cuidam  Roberto  ut  filio  et  haeredi :  et  de  ipso  Roberto, 
quia  obiit  sine  haerede  de  se,  descendit  jus  &c.,  cuidam  Galfrido  ut  fratri 
et  haeredi :  et  de  ipso  Galfrido,  quia  obiit  sine  haerede  de  se,  isti  Johanni 
qui  nunc  petit,  ut  fratri  et  haeredi. 

"  Et  de  praedicta  Beatrice  descendit  jus  perpartis  suae  cuidam 
Radulfo  ut  filio  de  haeredi :  et  de  isto  Radulfo  cuidam  Willielmo  ut  filio 
et  haeredi :  et  de  ipso  Willielmo  quia  obiit  sine  haerede  de  se,  descendit 
jus  &c., cuidam  Radulfo  ut  fratri  et  haeredi :  et  deipso  Radulfo,  isti  Radulfo 
qui  nunc  petit,  ut  filio  et  haeredi. 

"  Et  de  praedicta  Gunnora  descendit  jus  perpartis  suae  quibusdam 
Aliciae  et  Agneti  ut  filiabus  et  haeredibus  :  et  de  predicae  Agnete,  quia 
obiit  sine  haerede  de  se,  descendit  jus  perpartis  suae  predictae  Aliciae  ut 
sorori  et  hoeredi :  et  de  ipsa  Alicia  descendit  jus  &c.,  cuidam  Willielmo  ut 
filio  et  haeredi  :  et  de  ipso  Willielmo,  isti  Godefrido  qui  nunc  petit  similiter 
&c.,  ut  filio  et  haeredi." 

The  Table  on  the  opposite  page  will  perhaps  best  illustrate  the 
descents : — 


1  Close  Rolls,  32  Hen.  III.  5  in  dorso. 


•3  >  *  '•=  u  c                                            B 

3   C  to   §        «                                                               O 

c 

o 

II       CJ      j=  - 

W 

w> 

E 

M 

•o 

a 

Q 

1>     CL, 

&«i 

a 

g 

e 

<-d 

o 

g 

a 

M 

'I 

5      -a 

j-  T3  ^ 

o 

£ 

4J        T3                                           fri  t— 

SN 

|| 

O       fi                               «-  c  o  0  -c 

V 

o 

m 

2 
o 

4B  8   d£  « 

d                                                            T3    O         T3 

'0                                        II 

II 

in 

d 

1 

a 

If                            *  u^     § 

il  s  B  D.              §"•*•"• 

3 

*i*                                   K         w         P                      Ot3                                                w  *  S  »?  ^  B 

"o 

.2         C    C                                ^"S1"1                                                                                    (^S1*-® 

*™uO»fi                                3     **^                II                              «      c  ^  TJ  o       o  [r] 

S 

^^  Jw"                                                         •-       £J*  °<~  B"^       I'           ^ 

XI 

«     §                                                 '1^'i'Sx^S^      2"  - 

J- 

S     W 

.2  53 

oj                                           c,  y                                                                  U      Jl  •  >^,.  .   c  _. 

o 

H—) 

S3    C 

2 

—"3  s                                                          7.  °  fc  °,°i-i 

•  r*      Ml 

1 

1«                            ii*!"8! 

S 

en  -o 

rt  ^    Q    rt    w  W 

M 

lid,           ju|             K° 

ifil 

.3 

u 
1 

J.  g"  g>  ,J 

Q 

~s 

PQ 

P^CQO^W                             ;--pp'O                              o'"1*- 

.t3    u  *«   C                                !?   4) 
C/2  "D    O  •*»                                     *O 

«t 

H 

« 

,2 

fe 
H 

«               ^ 

0 

0 

O  I-H 
1-1 

M 

0 

—  «JS   -                         1 

•o       E 

w 

u 
w- 

Q 

£                  d  §  0  jT  os    . 
E   «f  0,      -S  "-o  f  <-  e  " 

°H5T    ,flfrS0.g-s 

o  .4  i-       «;  -j=  £  iT  f  °  i2 

.c  (J     .        tv.-s  £  •=  -o 

£,>     > 

a       « 
J«l 

3   -3 

ii    f1- 

d  oo 

D    M 

l»" 
1  J 

II             -a 

—                        u 

W 
PQ 

H  «   " 

&W 

•<  ^  K  •>  «  -a  2 

i/i                   O*                     f) 

~l 

"©"o 

II 

0 

II  — 

"O     J'vo  JJ 

in  +j 

M 

~1 

c£ 

• 
«     1       § 

O    a) 

?             C             1 

_a        jj         ^> 

MH 

0 

42 

it 

3*| 

1 

SJ 

^ 

o 

•    V 

—  d 

! 

if 

*j"T3         "  '„      . 
JJ    O          >,  O    O                 N 

IM 

O 

| 

B    rt    ^ 

"o*i  "^ 

Igjlli 

1             f 

w                     'Si 
»2*.  v 

1 

H 

H 

{" 

jf  ^     .^  *5        J  T3 

.S 

|| 

«*  x"^8- 

O    U 

^      •  ^j      •    t« 

"T3 

e    2    z-S  3               -1" 

.  "  a,  "  o 

M 

1—  1 

~2'e>i 

II                                             cQ 

2  J3 

B        jf  0. 

N 

"? 

S-gj 

"o  V  j^  ^ 

S 

O      IS 

H->     (j-d 

I 

fe 


B^^J 


-§•«  £  » 
«      OTS 


H2  THE    MANORS  OF    SUFFOLK. 

In  1292  Geoffrey  de  Bellomonte  had  a  grant  of  free  warren  here1 
and  died  the  following  year  without  issue,  lord  of  a  third  part  of  Groton 
and  Semere  leaving  a  widow  Cecilia  and  Sir  John  de  Bellomonte  his  brother 
and  heir.1 

Sir  John  died  about  1297  when  Alice  his  widow  claimed  half  the 
moiety  in  dower,  and  subject  to  her  right  the  interest  passed  to  Richard  de 
Bellomonte  son  and  heir  who  held  the  same  in  1299.  From  1297  to  1316 
the  Abbot  of  St.  Edmunds  seems  to  have  held  the  portion  not  held  by 
Richard  de  Bellomonte  and  about  the  latter  date  seems  to  have  acquired 
the  whole.  On  the  dissolution,  this  manor  passed  to  the  Crown  and  in 
1544  was  granted  to  Adam  Winthorp3  son  of  Adam  Winthorp  of  Lavenham 
and  Joane  Burton  his  wife.  The  purchaser  was  a  citizen  and  clothworker 
of  London  and  Master  of  this  company  in  1551.  He  married  first  Alice 
daughter  of  —  Henny  who  died  in  1533,  when  the  following  year  he  married 
Agnes  daughter  of  Robert  Sharpe  of  Islington  co.  Middlesex,  and  in  1557 
executed  a  settlement  of  the  manor  giving  life  estates  to  himself  and  Agnes 
his  wife  and  entailing  the  same  on  his  second  son  John.4  He  made  his 
will  the  20  Sept.  1562  which  contains  the  following  clause  as  to  this  manor : 
"  Item.  I  do  give  unto  Alice  my  wife  all  that  my  Manor  of  Groton  with 
the  advowson  of  the  benefice  there  with  all  and  singular  woods,  lands  and 
tenements  courts  and  profits  of  courts  rents  and  services  with  all  and 
singular  the  appurtenances  and  commodities  whatsoever  they  be  to  the 
said  manor  belonging  or  in  any  wise  appertaining  during  her  natural  life. 
And  after  the  decease  of  the  said  Agnes,  I  will  and  give  all  that  my  foresaid 
manor  with  the  advowson  of  the  benefice  with  the  appurtenances  as  is 
aforesaid  unto  John  Wyntropp  my  son  and  to  his  heirs  male  of  his  body 
lawfully  begotten  and  for  lack  of  such  issue  male  of  the  said  John  lawfully 
begotten  I  will  the  said  manor  and  the  advowson  of  the  benefice  with  their 
appurtenances  shall  be  and  remain  with  Adam  Wyntrop  my  son  and  to  the 
heirs  male  of  his  body  lawfully  begotten.  And  for  default  of  such 
issue  of  the  said  Adam  I  will  all  and  singular  the  premises  with  their  appur- 
tenances to  remain  unto  William  Wyntropp  my  son  and  the  heirs  male 
of  his  body  lawfully  begotten.  And  for  lack  of  such  issue  of  the  said  William 
I  will  and  give  all  the  said  premises  with  their  appurtenances  before 
rehearsed  unto  my  four  daughters,  that  is  to  say,  Alice,  Bridget,  Mary  and 
Susan  and  to  their  heirs  then  living  and  when  the  said  manor  shall  so  descend 
and  come."  The  Testator  died  gth  Nov.  1562  and  his  will  was  proved 
the  15  of  January  following.5  He  was  buried  in  Groton  Church  with  the 
following  inscription  in  brass  :  "  Here  lyeth  Mr.  Adam  Winthorp  Lorde 
and  patron  of  Groton  whiche  Departed  owt  of  this  Worlde  this  ix.  day  of 
November  in  the  yere  of  cure  Lorde  God  MCCCCCLXIJ."  It  seems 
the  plate  was  removed,  but  was  restored  in  1878  by  the  Hon.  Robert  C. 
Winthorp  of  Boston  in  New  England,  Adam's  descendant  in  the  eighth 

1  Chart.  Rolls,  20  Edw.  I.  33.  «  Pat.  Rolls,  4  and  5  P.  &  M.  pt.  xi.  18.    A 

•  Extent.     Moiety.    Cecilia    de    Ferariis  COPV,  of  this  settlement  is  given  in 

sometime    wife     of     Godfrey    de  Musketts     Manorial    Families    of 

Bellomonte  (I.P.M.,  21  Edw.  I.  49.) 

•  Particulars    for    grant   35    Hen.    VIII.         !  Will.     Prerogative  Court,  Canterbury  2. 

loth  Report  of  the  D.K.,  App.  ii.  Cneyre. 

p.  305;  Pat.  Rolls,  35  Hen.  VIII. 
pt.  xiv.  5.  See  copy  grant 
Musket t's  Manorial  Families  of 
Suff.  i.  15. 


GROTON.  113 

generation.      On  an  altar  monument  contiguous  to  the  South  wall  of  the 
Chancel  in  the  Churchyard  is  the  following  inscription  : — 

Ccelum  Patria  Christus  Via. 
Hie  jacet  Corpus  Adami  Winthrop  Armigeri  filij. 
Adami  Winthorp  Armigeri  qui  hujus  Ecclesiae 

Patroni  fuerunt  et  Dni.  Manerij  de  Groton. 

Praedictus  Adamus  Films  uxorem  duxit  Annam 

Filiam  Henrici  Browne  de  Edwarduston,  per 

Quam  habuit  unum  Filium  et  quatuor  Filias. 

Hanc  vitam  transmigravit  Anno  Dni.  1623. 

^Etatis  suae  70  Anna  vero  uxor  ejus  obijt 

1628,  Hie  quoque  consepulta  est. 

John  Winthorp  the  2nd  son,  but  the  eldest  son  by  Adam's  2nd  marriage, 
succeeded  accordingly,  barred  the  entail  in  1594'  and  sold  the  manor  to 
his  brother  Adam  Winthorp,  and  his  son  John  in  1609  when  he  engaged 
in  a  plantation  in  the  South  of  Ireland.  Adam  was  a  lawyer  and  county 
magistrate  and  the  writer  of  the  Diary  to  be  seen  in  "  Life  and  Letters  of 
John  Winthorp."  He  had  no  issue  by  his  first  wife  Alice  daughter  of 
William  Still  of  Grantham  co.  Lincoln  and  sister  of  Dr.  John  Bull,  Bishop 
of  Bath  and  Wells,  but  had  4  children  by  his  2nd  wife,  Anne  daughter  and 
co-heir  of  Henry  Browne  of  Edwardstone,  and  dying  in  1623  was  succeeded 
by  his  eldest  son  John  Winthorp  who  removed  from  Groton  to  Boston  in 
New  England  and  became  Governor  of  Massachusetts  Bay  Colony.*  In 
1631  he  sold  the  manor  to  Thomas  Waring.  Thomas  Waring  was  succeeded 
by  Richard  Waring  ;  and  Thomas,  (who  was  probably  the  son  of  the  second 
son  and  heir  of  Richard  Waring),  died  about  the  year  1769  aged  84  or 
thereabouts.  He  devised  the  manor  to  his  cousin  Walter  Waring  M.P. 
for  Coventry  who  died  about  1781  leaving  an  only  son  who  died  without 
issue.  About  1780  the  manor  was  acquired  by  the  Rev.  Seymour  Leeke, 
who  held  it  for  some  eight  or  nine  years.  In  1804  the  manor  was  pur- 
chased by  Sir  William  Rowley  Bart,  of  Tendring  Hall,  Stoke  by  Nayland, 
after  which  the  devolution  is  identical  with  Nayland  Manor  in  this 
Hundred. 

CASTELINS  OR  CASTELYNS  MANOR. 

This  was  the  lordship  of  Sir  Gilbert  Chastelym  who  died  seised  22 
Edw.  I.  and  was  succeeded  by  his  son  Thomas  de  Chastelyn  who  died 
about  1331  and  was  succeeded  by  his  son  William  and  he  by  his  son  John 
who  died  in  1375  leaving  a  daughter  and  heir  Joan  married  to  Robert 
Knyvet  to  whom  this  manor  was  released  by  trustees  in  the  5th  year  of 
Rich.  II.  Joan  died  also  in  1375,  but  Robert  Knyvet  survived  till  abt.  I42O.3 
Probably  he  married  after  the  death  of  Joan  for  amongst  the  Early  Chancery 
Proceedings  we  find  a  suit  by  Ellen  late  wife  of  Robert  Knyvet  aga'nst 
Thomas  Knyvet.4  Robert  Knyvet  was  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir 
John  Knyvet5  who  died  without  issue  in  1451,  when  the  manor  passed  to 
his  brother  and  heir  Thomas  Knyvet  of  Stanway.  Davy  makes  this 
Thomas  Knyvet  die  in  1486  and  to  be  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir  Edward, 
but  this  is  absurd,  for  as  he  makes  both  John  and  Thomas  to  be  sons  of  Joan 

1  Pat.  Rolls,  36  Eliz.pt.  xiii.  31;  Fine,  Mich.         3  I.P.M.,  Robert  Knyvett,  7  Hen.  V.  26, 
36, 37  Eliz.  tenement     called     Castelaines     in 

•  See  his  "  Life  and  Letters,"  1587-1649,  Groton. 

2  vols.  '  E.C.P.,  6  Hen.  IV. ;  2  Hen.  VI.  5,  7. 

5  See  Sanderford's  in  Great  Waldinfield  in 
this  Hundred. 

o 


THE   MANORS  OF   SUFFOLK. 

who  married  Robert  Knyvet  and  died  in  1375,  Thomas  the  son  must  have 
died  in  years  after  his  mother.    Davy  missed  out  a  generation. 

Thomas  Knyvet  the  son  of  Robert  died  in  1459.  His  will  is  dated  the 
4th  Oct.  1458  and  in  it  he  directs  his  body  to  be  buried  in  the  Chancel  of 
the  Church  of  All  Saints  at  "  Staneweye  "  between  his  wives.  To  John 
Knyvet  his  son  and  heir  he  devises  his  Manors  of  Grotene  in  Suffolk,  Dun- 
hall  and  Staneweye  in  Essex  and  Ramsdenbelehouse  with  the  advowson  of 
the  Church.  He  mentions  his  daughter  Margaret  wife  of  Robert  Baynard 
and  constitutes  his  sons  Nicholas  and  Robert  and  John  Wright  his 
executors.  The  will  was  proved  the  2ist  July  1459.  There  is  an  Inquisi- 
tion p.m.  this  year  respecting  i  tenement,  60  acres  of  land,  40  of  pasture, 
10  of  wood,  and  underwood  and  i8s.  rent  in  Groton  held  as  of  Kersey 
Priory  and  this  is  probably  the  Manor  of  Castleyn.'  He  was  followed  by 
his  son  and  heir  John  Knyvet  aged  37  at  his  father's  death  and  we  find  an 
Inquisition  p.m.  of  him  in  1481  in  which  the  manor  is  included  by  name, 
"  Castelyn  in  Groton  Manor  as  of  Kersey  Priory,"  practically  identifying 
this  Castelyn  with  the  property  described  in  the  Inquisition  of  Thomas 
Knyvett  already  referred  to.2  John  Knyvet  died  in  I48o.3  His  will  is 
dated  1476  and  it  was  proved  in  1486.  He  was  succeeded  by  his  grandson 
Edward  Knyvet  the  son  of  John's  eldest  son  Thomas  Knyvet  who  had  died 
in  his  father's  lifetime.  Davy  states  that  in  1486  Edward  Knyvet  and 
Anne  his  wife  had  a  release  made  to  them  of  the  manor  by  trustees.  The 
release  referred  to  is  dated  the  6  Sept.  4  Hen.  VII.  [1488]  and  is  by  William 
Clopton,  Thomas  Rokewode,  Edmund  Fetone  and  William  Eyr  to  Edward 
Knevitt  and  Anna  his  wife,  William  Pykenham  clerk,  Henry  Wentworth, 
George  Hopton,  and  Reginald  Touneshend  knights  and  Philip  Calthorp 
and  Henry  Tey.4 

The  manor  passed  to  Elizabeth  daughter  and  heir  of  Edward  Knyvet 
on  his  death  the  4  Feb.  1500.  She  was  married  to  John  Rainsforth  and 
died  the  4  Feb.  1508,'  when  the  manor  passed  to  the  next  heirs,  Thomasine 
wife  of  Sir  William  Clopton,  Elizabeth  wife  of  John  Clopton,  and  Katherine 
Roydon.6  In  1536  a  fine  was  levied  of  the  manor  by  Francis  Clopton 
against  John  Clopton,  the  fine  including  the  Manor  of  Saundeford 
in  Waldingfield  and  tenements  in  Great  and  Little  Waldingfield,  Groton, 
Boxford,  Acton  and  Edwardstone.7  In  1548  Francis  Clopton  son  and  heir 
of  Sir  William  Clopton  succeeded  to  Thomasine's  share  and  his  will  is  dated 
1558.*  In  1575  William  Clopton  nephew  of  Francis,  then  described  as  of 
London,  granted  to  the  Queen  all  his  right  and  interest  in  this  manor  and 
other  manors,9  but  the  grant  was  not  to  take  effect  so  long  as  the  said 
William  paid  405.  yearly  to  the  Exchequer.  The  deed  is  dated  the  15  Feb. 
1575.  William  Clopton  of  Groton  a  younger  son  of  Richard  Clopton  of 
Melford  by  Margery  Playter  was  the  first  of  the  family  who  built  and  lived 


•  I.P.M.,  37  Hen.  VI.  18. 

•  I.P.M.,  20  Edw.  IV.  90. 
1  I.P.M.,  20  Edw.  IV.  90. 

4  Harl.  480.  49. 

5  We  have  followed  the  Davy  MSS.  here ; 

but  it  should  be  mentioned  that  the 
manor  is  included  in  the  Inquis. 
p.m.  of  Richard  Lewkener  who 
died  the  13  Feb.  1502  (I.P.M.,  18 
Hen.  VII.) 

•  I.P.M.,  24  Hen.  VIII. 

'  Fine,  Trin.  28  Hen.  VIII. 


*  There  is  a  fine  of  the  manor  levied  in 
1550  between  John  Holyer  and 
William  Clopton  (Fine,  Easter,  4 
Edw.  VI.)  and  another  the  follow- 
ing year  between  the  said  John 
Holyer  and  Robert  Wythersby  and 
others  (Fine,  Mich.  5  Edw.  VI.). 
There  is  a  third  fine  levied  in  1565 
by  Edward  Colman  against  John 
Hollyer  and  hi?  wife.  Fine,  Easter, 
7  Eliz. 

»  Harl.  48  D.  27. 


GROTON.  115 

at  Castleyns.     He  spent  his  patrimony,  and  married  Mary  eldest  daughter 
of  Edward  Walgrave  of  Lawford  in  Essex. 

The  Rev.  C.  Grove,  Rector  of  Hemingston  is  the  next  person  we  meet 
with  as  lord.  He  died  in  1769  having  devised  the  manor  to  his  nephew 
John  Spurgeon.  He  was  succeeded  by  Sarah  his  widow  who  died  in  1812 
when  the  Rev.  John  Grove  Spurgeon  her  eldest  son  succeeded.  He  died  in 
1829  when  it  passed  to  his  son  and  heir  Farrer  Grove  Spurgeon  who  assumed 
the  name  of  Farrer  and  sold  the  manor  to  the  Rev.  G.  A.  Dawson,  rector 
of  Edwardstone.  He  married  Louisa  Pilkington,  and  died  in  1848,  when 
it  passed  to  his  son  and  heir,  Thomas  Pilkington  Dawson,  who  married 
Emma  King  King,  and  died  in  1867,  when  it  passed  to  his  son  and  heir, 
Cuthbert  Pilkington  Dawson,  who  married  Edith  Martin,  and  sold  the 
manor  in  1897  to  Thomas  Benjamin  Worters,  the  present  owner. 


Ii6  THE   MANORS   OF    SUFFOLK. 


HARTEST. 

HE  great  holding  in  Hartest  in  Saxon  days  was  that  of 
the  Monastery  of  Ely,  the  lordship  having  been  given  to 
this  house  by  the  parents  of  Leofson  on  his  entering  the 
monastery.  The  holding  consisted  of  5  carucates  of  land  as 
a  manor.  There  were  12  villeins,  14  bordars  and  4  slaves, 
2  ploughteams  in  demesne  and  5  belonging  to  the  men, 
10  acres  of  meadow,  wood  for  6  hogs,  4  horses  at  the 
Hall,  20  beasts,  25  hogs  and  60  sheep.  Also  a  church  living  with 
80  acres  of  free  land.  The  value  of  the  whole  was  6  pounds,  but  by 
the  time  of  the  Norman  Survey  the  value  was  placed  at  n,  though 
the  only  alteration  in  the  details  given  was  an  increase  by  one  of  the 
ploughteams  belonging  to  the  men.  It  was  one  league  long  and  halt  a  league 
broad  and  paid  in  a  gelt  lod.  There  were  also  here  4  socmen  with  30 
acres  of  land,  and  half  a  ploughteam  valued  at  5  shillings  ;  and  a  socman 
with  a  carucate  of  land  and  i  ploughteam  valued  at  20  shillings  which 
was  let  by  the  Abbot  to  Berners  the  Engineer.1  The  only  other  holding 
mentioned  in  the  Domesday  Survey  was  that  of  Richard  son  of  Earl 
Gislebert  who  had  2  freemen  under  Wisgar  by  commendation  and  soc  and 
sac,  with  2  carucates  of  land,  and  3  bordars,  2  ploughteams  and  8 
acres  of  meadow,  valued  at  2  pounds.* 

HARTEST   MANOR. 

The  Manor  of  Hartest  remained  with  the  Monastery  of  Ely  until 
the  dissolution,  when  it  became  appropriated  to  the  Bishopric  of  Ely, 
from  whom  it  was  alienated  in  1561,  being  taken  by  the  Queen  in  exchange 
for  certain  impropriations.  From  the  Hundred  Rolls  we  learn  that  the 
Bishop  of  Ely  had  free  warren  here  and  claimed  gallows  and  other  rights 
in  the  time  of  Edw.  I.3  The  manor  is  included  in  a  fine  levied  in  1569  by 
William  Waldegrave,  John  Heigham  and  others  against  Elizabeth  Drury 
widow  and  others.4 

Ministers'  accounts  of  the  Bishop's  temporalities  in  Hartest  14  Edw.  I. 
and  26  to  28  Edw.  I.  will  be  found  in  the  Public  Record  Office5 ;  and  an 
Inquisition  of  the  Bishop's  lands  here,  30  Edw.  III.,  amongst  the 
Additional  MSS.  of  the  British  Museum.6  In  the  Exchequer  Special 
Commissions  particulars  will  be  found  of  the  Sovereign's  woods  in  Hartest 
Manor  30  Eliz.,  44  Eliz.,  2  Jac.I.,and  Spoils  of  woods  in  the  manor,  3  Jac.  I.7 
Amongst  the  Exchequer  Depositions  taken  at  Hartest  in  1608  will  be 
found  particulars  of  a  suit  by  William  Wright  against  Thomas  Cole  and 
others  touching  the  surrender  of  lands  called  Lydwalles  and  brickhouse 
parcel  of  the  manor. 

In  1609  the  manor  was  granted  by  the  Crown  to  George  Salter 
and  John  William  Salter.  In  1844  it  was  vested  in  George  Weller  Poley 
of  fipxstead  Hall,  and  for  the  descent  from  that  gentleman  to  the  present 
time  see  Boxstead  Hall  Manor  in  this  Hundred. 


1  Dom.  ii.  382.  s  Bundle  1132,  No.  9,  10. 

•  Dom.  ii.  392*     '  '  Add.  MSS.  6165. 

•  H.R.  ii.  143,  153.  <•  '  D.K.R.  38  App.  p.  40,  68,  74,  76. 
4  Fine,  Easter,  ii  El/*- 


LAVENHAM. 


117 


LAVENHAM. 

|N  the  time  of  the  Confessor  there  were  two  considerable 
manors  in  Lavenham.  One  was  held  by  Ulwin,  King 
Edward's  thane,  who  had  6  carucates  of  land  with  soc  and 
sac.  There  were  n  villeins,  24  bordars,  6  slaves,  4 
ploughteams  in  demesne,  9  belonging  to  the  men,  10  acres  of 
meadow,  wood  for  100  hogs,  5  horses  at  the  Hall,  24  beasts, 
1 60  hogs,  200  sheep,  60  goats,  5  hives  of  bees  and  i  arpent 
of  vineyard.  There  was  also  a  socman  who  could  not  give  nor  sell  with 
i  carucate  of  land  and  5  bordars,  2  ploughteams  and  3  acres  of  meadow. 
The  whole  was  valued  at  10  pounds,  but  by  the  time  of  the  Domesday  Survey 
the  value  had  risen  to  15  pounds.  There  were  then  7  villeins  only,  but  the 
bordars  had  risen  to  38.  Two  of  the  ploughteams  of  the  men  had  disappeared, 
as  had  4  of  the  horses  at  the  Hall,  and  the  hogs  were  fewer  by  95,  but  in 
some  respects  there  was  growth.  For  instance  one  more  beast,  20  more 
goats  and  i  additional  hive  of  bees.  The  socman  had  a  mill.  The  manor 
was  a  league  long  and  half  a  league  broad  and  paid  in  a  gelt  J^d.1 

The  Domesday  tenant  in  chief  was  Aubrey  de  Vere.  This  Aubrey 
also  held  by  encroachment  on  the  King  3  freemen  under  Ulwin,  Aubrey's 
predecessor  in  title,  by  commendation  only  in  the  soc  of  St.  Edmund,  and 
they  had  60  acres  and  formerly  had  2  ploughteams  but  then  only  one. 
This  holding  was  valued  at  6  shillings.2 

The  other  manor  here  was  that  of  Frodo  the  Abbot  of  St.  Edmund's 
brother.  It  had  been  held  in  the  Confessor's  time  by  Alvey  under  the 
Abbot  with  soc  and  consisted  of  2  carucates  of  land.  This  Alvey 
could  not  sell  without  the  licence  of  the  Abbot.  Frodo  held  it, 
the  Conqueror  claiming  it  as  appertaining  to  his  fee,  saying  that  it 
had  been  delivered  to  him.  There  were  in  this  manor  5  bordars, 
i  slave,  2  ploughteams  in  demesne  and  2  belonging  to  the  men, 
3  acres  of  meadow,  2  horses  at  the  Hall,  12  hogs,  40  sheep,  valued 
at  40  shillings.  By  Norman  supervision  the  value  had  increased  to  4 
pounds  in  the  time  of  the  Great  Survey,  and  there  were  then  12  beasts 
additional  and  102  sheep  as  against  40,  but  the  hogs  had  dropped  from 
12  to  4.  This  manor  was  half  a  league  long  and  4  quarantenes  broad  and 
paid  in  a  gelt  i%d.3 

LAVENHAM  MANOR. 

Mr.  Kirby  has  much  to  answer  for.  He  has  supplied  material  for  all 
the  local  guide  books  and  scrappy  histories  of  particular  places  which  have 
appeared,  and  few  have  even  ventured  to  depart  from  his  words  which  have 
been  accepted  as  of  equal  weight  with  a  regular  record.  His  statement  is 
that  Lavenham  was  one  of  the  221  lordships  in  Suffolk  given  by  King  William 
the  Conqueror  to  Robert  Malet  but  he  forfeited  by  joining  Robert 
eldest  son  of  the  Conqueror  in  the  2nd  year  of  Hen.  I.  when  the  King  gave 
it  to  Aubrey  de  Vere. 

The  error  has  been  perpetuated  and  appears  in  that  useful  Gazetteer 
of  White  published  in  1885.  Lavenham  having  formed  one  of  the  lord- 
ships of  Malet  is  an  entire  delusion.  Shortly  after  the  Battle  of  Hastings 
William  the  Conqueror  rewarded  his  brother-in-law  Aubrey  de  Vere  with 

1  Dom.  ii.  418.  '  Dom.  ii.  355. 

•  Dom.  ii.  449. 


n8  THE  MANORS    OF   SUFFOLK. 

the  grant  of  this  and  other  manors.  This  Aubrey  de  Vere  lies  buried  in 
the  Priory  of  Colne  in  Essex  which  he  and  his  wife  founded,  as  appears  by 
the  following  inscription  given  by  Weever  :  "  Here  lyeth  A  ul  faery  the 
first  Earl  of  Guines  sonne  of  Alphonnes  de  Vere,  the  whyche  Aulbery  was 
the  founder  of  this  place  and  Bettrys  hys  wyf  syster  of  kyng  William  the 
Conquerour." 

The  manor  remained  in  the  De  Veres  Earls  of  Oxford1  from  the  time  of 
the  Norman  Conquest  to  the  death  of  Edward  the  i7th  Earl  of  Oxford 
in  1604  when  it  was  sold,  not  to  Paul  D'Ewes  as  Page  states  but  to  Sir 
Thomas  Skinner.  This  last  de  Vere  who  was  lord  of  Lavenham  was  a 
noted  spendthrift  and  his  extravagance  seems  to  have  brought  about 


LAVEHHAH  HALL. 


the  sale  of  the  manor.  Stow  relates  that  "  he  rode  to  his  house  in  London 
with  80  gentlemen  in  liveries  of  Reading  tawney  and  chains  of  gold  about 
their  neck  ;  and  with  100  tall  yeomen  in  like  livery  without  chains  but 
having  a  blue  boar  embroidered  on  the  left  shoulder." 

The  Earls  of  Oxford  held  Lavenham  Manor  in  chief  of  the  King  as 
appertaining  to  their  Barony2  and  had  gallows  and  free  warren,  &c.,  here 
in  early  days.3 

Robert  de  Vere,  5th  Earl,  had  in  1290  a  charter  for  a  fair  once  every 
year  upon  the  eve,  day  and  morrow  of  Whitsuntide  or  Pentecost,  but  it 
was  early  discontinued  and  another  held  on  Michaelmas  Day,  which  last 
fair  was  at  one  time  in  great  repute  for  butter  and  cheese  in  very  large 
quantities4;  and  an  extent  of  the  manor  will  be  found  in  his  Inquisition  p.m.  in 
1296.'  His  widow  Alice  dau.  and  heir  of  Gilbert,  Lord  Saundford  had 
the  manor  assigned  to  her  in  dower,  and  Robert  the  son  6th  Earl  of  Oxford 
in  1329  had  a  charter  from  the  King  for  his  tenants  of  Lavenham  to  pass 
toll  free  throughout  all  England.6  Amongst  the  Bodleian  Charters  will 
be  found  a  writ  of  Edw.  III.  to  the  bailiff  of  St.  Edmund  reciting  a  grant 
to  Robert  de  Vere  Earl  of  Oxford  releasing  his  tenants,  &c.,  of  the  Manor 
of  Lavenham  from  paying  toll  throughout  the  kingdom  and  commanding 
the  bailiff  not  to  molest  or  distrain  for  toll  when  the  said  tenants  come  to 

1  See  Earl's  Hall  Manor,  Cockfield,  in  this  Hundred.         4  Chart.  Rolls,  18  Edw.  I.  18. 

•  H.R.  ii.  142,  150.  «  I.P.M.,  24  Edw.  I.  62. 

1  H.R.  ii.  143,  152, 153,  Chart.  Rolls.  4  Edw.  III.  37.         *  Chart.  Rolls,  3  Edw.  III.  32. 


LAVENHAM. 


119 


St.  Edmunds.1  This  charter  was  confirmed  by  Queen  Elizabeth  in  the 
year  of  her  reign.  Robert  de  Vere  the  6th  Earl  died  in  1331'  and  was 
succeeded  by  his  nephew  JohndeVere  7th  Earl  of  whom  the  King  took  homage 
for  the  Manors  of  "  Laueham  Overhall  and  Laueham  Netherhall "  in  Laven- 
ham  this  same  year.3 

In  1336  John  de  Vere  enfeoffed  Sir  William  Crocheman  and  Richard  de 
Stoke  of  Lavenham  Overhall,  Lavenham  Netherhall  and  Aldham  Manors  said 
to  be  held  in  chief,  and  they  pursuant  to  the  terms  of  the  grant  regranted 
to  him  John  de  Vere,  Matilda  his  wife  and  his  heirs.  The  licence  to  make 
the  alienation  will  be  found  on  the  Patent  Rolls.4  In  1341  John  enfeoffed 
Richard  de  Stoke  and  John  Fermer  of  the  same  manors  in  order  that  they 
might  regrant  them  to  him  and  Matilda  his  wife  in  tail,5  and  the  fol' owing 
year  a  fine  was  levied  accordingly  by  John  de  Vere  7th  Earl  of  Oxford 
and  Matilda  his  wife  v.  Richard  de  Stoke  clerk  and  John  Fermer.6 

In  1342  a  commission  was  issued  on  complaint  of  John  de  Vere  7th 
Earl  of  Oxford  that  Ralph  de  Mendham  parson  of  the  Church  of  Argham 
and  others  carried  away  his  goods  at  Lavenham  and  assaulted  his  servants 
John  Taillour  and  John  Ferour  there.7  In  1360  Netherhall  and  Overhall 
are  mentioned  in  the  Inquisition  post  mortem  of  John  de  Vere  7th  Earl  of 
Oxford*  and  a  grant  of  the  custody  of  the  Hall  and  Park,  &c.,  this  year  will 
be  found  amongst  the  Harleian  Charters.9  In  1371  the  King  assigned  to 
Matilda  widow  of  Thomas  de  Vere  8th  Earl  of  Oxford  the  Manor  of  Over- 
hall  as  to  2$li.  145.  3%d.  and  the  Manor  of  Netherhall  as  to  ^li.  35.  2d. 
in  dower.10  In  1384  there  is  on  the  Patent  Rolls  a  licence  to  enfeoff  William 
Bishop  of  Winchester  and  others  of  Lavenham  Manor,"  but  we  find  both 
Manors  of  Overhall  and  Netherhall  mentioned  in  the  Inquisition  post 
mortem  of  Matilda  widow  of  Thomas  de  Vere  8th  Earl  of  Oxford  in  1412," 
also  in  1417  in  that  of  Richard  de  Vere  nth  Earl  of  Oxford'3 ;  and  in  1442 
John  i2th  Earl  of  Oxford  received  a  grant  of  a  market  and  fair  in  Lavenham.14 
Again  in  1452  the  Manors  of  Netherhall  and  Overhall  were  mentioned 
in  the  Inquisition  post  mortem  of  Alice  late  Countess  of  Oxford.15  The 
two  manors  are  named  on  the  Patent  Rolls  in  1462  as  forfeited,  and  the 
Crown  appointed  during  pleasure  John  Wykes  as  receiver  and  approver 
of  Lavenham  Manor  and  Park  he  receiving  the  accustomed  fees  from  the 
issues  of  the  same.'6  The  same  year  King  Edward  IV.  granted  the  manor 
to  his  brother  Richard  Duke  of  Gloucester'7  afterwards  King  Richard  III. 
The  grant  to  the  Duke  of  Gloucester  is  made  to  him  and  his  heirs  male,  and 
appears  on  the  Patent  Rolls  in  1471. l8  The  Duke  soon  after  settled  the 
manor  in  special  tail  by  which  means  it  passed  to  the  Crown.  On  the 
Duke  coming  to  the  Throne  he  gave  the  Manor  of  Lavenham  with  many 
other  estates  in  special  tail  to  Sir  John  Howard  knt.,  who  having  continued 


1  22  Feb.  4  Edw.  III.  Bodl.  Suff.  Ch.  352. 
*  I.P.M.,  5  Edw.  III.  7.    See  Earl's  Hall 
Manor  in  Cockfield  in  this  Hundred. 

3  Originalia,  5  Edw.  III.  40. 

4  Pat.  Rolls,  10  Edw.  III.  pt.  i.  36. 

5  Pat.  Rolls,  15  Edw.  III.  pt.  ii.  28. 

6  Feet  of  Fines,  16  Edw.  III.  30. 

'  Pat.  Rolls,  16  Edw.  III.  pt.  ii.  i6rf. 

'  I.P.M.,  34  Edw.  III.  84. 

'  Harl.  57  C.  n. 

10  Originalia,  45  Edw.  III.  26.    See  I.P.M. 

Thomas  Earl  of  Oxford,  45  Edw.  III. 

45.     The  Manors  of  Lavenham  and 


Netherhall  are  mentioned  in  1366 
in  the  inquisition  post  mortem  of 
Matilda  wife  of  John  de  Vere  yth 
Earl  (I.P.M.,  40  Edw.  III.  38). 

"  Pat.  Rolls,  8  Rich.  II.  pt.  ii.  16. 

"  I.P.M.,  14  Hen.  IV.  17. 

"  I.P.M.,  4  Hen.  V.  53. 

14  Chart.  Rolls,  20  Hen.  VI. 

'5  I.P.M.,  3o  Hen.  VI.  14. 

16  Pat.  Rolls,  2  Edw.  IV.  pt.  i.  21. 

17  Rolls  of  Parliament  vi.  228. 
Pat.  Rolls,  20  Hen.  VI. 

18  Pat. .Rolls,  ii  Edw.  IV.  pt.  ii.  22. 


120  THE    MANORS    OF  SUFFOLK. 

faithful  to  the  House  of  York  during  the  reigns  of  Hen.  VI.  and  his  brother 
Edw.  IV.  was  at  the  same  time  made  by  Rich.  III.  Earl  Marshall  of 
England  and  Duke  of  Norfolk.' 

Amongst  the  Harleian  Charters  we  find  a  deed  dated  the  i  July  6 
Edw.  IV.  [1466]  by  which  John  de  Vere  afterwards  i3th  Earl  of  Oxford 
grants  the  manor  to  James  Arblaster  and  John  Power.1 

In  1475  there  is  on  the  Patent  Rolls  a  grant  to  Elizabeth  Queen  of 
England,  Richard  Bishop  of  Salisbury  and  William  Dudley  dean  of  the 
Chapel  of  the  Household  and  their  assigns  of  the  lordship  of  Lavenham 
Manor  late  of  John  I2th  Earl  of  Oxford  in  the  King's  hands  by  reason  of 
John's  forfeiture.5  Of  course  on  the  accession  of  Hen.  VII.  John  de  Vere 
who  had  commanded  the  archers  of  the  vanguard  at  Bosworth  and  there 
materially  contributed  by  his  valour  and  skill  to  the  great  victory  of  the 
House  of  Lancaster,  was  reinstated  as  I3th  Earl  of  Oxford  and  had  restored 
to  him  all  his  family  estates.  He  had  ignored  the  forfeiture,  for,  as  we 
have  said,  amongst  the  Harleian  Charters  is  a  conveyance  by  him  to 
James  Abblaster  and  John  Power,  no  doubt  as  trustees,  of  this  manor 
and  that  of  Preston.4  In  1548  a  fine  was  levied  of  this  and  other  manors 
by  Edward  Duke  of  Somerset  and  others,  (no  doubt  as  trustees),  against 
John  Earl  of  Oxford.5 

Of  Edward  de  Vere  iyth  Earl  of  Oxford  a  tale  is  told  by  facetious  Fuller 
of  how  he  endeavoured  to  free  his  Manor  and  Park  of  Lavenham  by  an 
unrighteous  bargain  with  the  church.  He  was  a  noted  character  in  the  time 
of  Elizabeth,  and  had  for  a  wife  Anne  daughter  of  William  Cecil  the  celebrated 
Lord  Treasurer  Burghley.  He  was  said  to  have  been  the  first  person  to 
introduce  perfumes  and  embroidered  gloves  into  England  and  presenting 
a  pair  of  the  latter  to  Queen  Elizabeth  her  majesty  was  so  delighted  with 
the  novelties  that  she  had  her  own  picture  painted  with  these  gloves  on. 
It  must  not  be  supposed  from  this  that  he  was  by  any  means  an  effeminate 
character.  At  least  he  showed  no  signs  of  such  when  he  sat  in  judgment 
on  Mary  Queen  of  Scots  in  1586  nor  when  he  commanded  in  the  fleet 
equipped  to  oppose  the  Armada  in  1588.  He  is  said  to  have  been  one  of  the 
wits  of  the  period  in  which  he  lived  and  to  have  been  distinguished  alike  by 
his  patriotism  and  chivalrous  spirit.  In  the  tournaments  of  Elizabeth's 
reign  he  was  pre-eminently  conspicuous,  and  upon  two  occasions  was 
honoured  with  a  prize  from  the  hand  of  the  Queen,  being  conducted  armed 
by  ladies  into  the  presence  chamber  for  the  purpose  of  receiving  the  high 
reward.  Walpole  says  that  he  attained  reputation  as  a  poet  and  was 
esteemed  the  first  writer  of  comedy  in  his  time. 

We  have  been  somewhat  particular  because  the  story  told  by  Fuller 
seems  rather  inconsistent  with  the  general  character  of  the  I7th  Earl  as 
usually  entertained.  Fuller,  of  course,  was  prejudiced  in  all  matters  relating 
to  the  church,  and  may  have  somewhat  exaggerated  and  the  new  rector  have 
mistaken  the  Earl's  meaning.  It  may  be  mentioned  that  at  the  time  of 
the  presentation  referred  to,  the  Earl  would  not  have  been  more  than  about 
28  years  of  age.  When  he  was  but  23  Gilbert  Talbot  thus  writes  of  him 
to  the  Earl  of  Shrewsbury :'  "  My  lord  of  Oxforth  is  lately  growne  into 
great  credite  for  the  Q.  Majestie  delitithe  more  in  his  parsonage  and  his 

1  Pat.  Rolls,  i  Rich.  III.  pt.  i.  18 ;  D.K.R.         '  Pat.  Rolls,  15  Edw.  IV.  pt.  ii.  10. 

o.    App.  ii.  p.  113  ;   Pat.  Rolls,  2         4  i  July,  6  Edw.  IV.  Harl.  57  C.  14. 

Rich.  III.  pt.  ii.  22.  5  Fine,  Easter,  2  Edw.  VI. 

1  Harl.  57  C.  14.  *  May  nth  1573,  Illustrations  of  British 

History  ii.  p.  100, 


LAVENHAM.  121 

daunting  and  valientnes  than  any  other  .  .  .  if  it  were  not  for  his 
fyckle  head  he  would  passe  any  of  them  shortly."  The  character  given  of 
him  in  one  of  the  Harleian  MSS.  is :  "He  was  a  man  in  minde  andbodey, 
absolutely  accomplished  with  honourable  endowments."1  Fuller's  tale 
is  this  :  When  Lavenham  living  fell  void  "  which  deserved  a  good  Minister 
being  a  rich  Parsonage  and  needed  one,  it  being  more  than  suspicious  that 
Dr.  Reinolds  late  incumbent  (who  ran  away  to  Rome)  had  left  some  super- 
stitious leaven  behind  him,  the  Earl  of  Oxford  being  Patrone  presents 
Mr.  Copinger3  to  it,  but  adding  withal,  that  he  would  pay  no  tithes  of  his 
Park,  being  almost  half  the  land  of  the  Parish.  Copinger  desired  to  resign 
it  again  to  his  Lordship  rather  than  by  such  sinful  ingratitude  to  betray  the 
rights  of  the  Church.  Well !  if  you  be  of  that  minde,  then  take  the  tithes 
(saith  the  Earl) ;  I  scorn  that  my  estate  should  swell  with  Church  goods. 
However  it  afterwards  cost  Master  Copinger  sixteen  hundred  pounds  in 
keeping  his  questioned  and  recovering  his  detained  rights  in  suit  with  the 
Agent  for  the  next  (minor)  Earl  of  Oxford  and  others  all  which  he  left  to 
his  Churches  quiet  possession  being  zealous  in  God's  cause,  but  remise  in 
his  own.  He  lived  forty-five  years  the  painfull  Parson  of  Laueham  in 
which  Market  Toune  there  were  about  nine  hundred  communicants  amongst 
whom  all  his  time  no  difference  did  arise  which  he  did  not  compound." 
This  Edward  Earl  of  Oxford  made  a  settlement  dated  the  30  January 
1575  which  is  still  extant.  It  was  made  to  Thomas  Earl  of  Sussex,  Robert 
Earl  of  Leicester,  Thomas  Cecill  esq.  Sir  William  Cordell  knt.,  and  Thomas 
Bromley  esq.  Solicitor  General,  as  trustees,  and  included  divers  manors  and 
estates.  It  recites  that  the  Earl  intends  by  the  Queen's  licence  to  travel 
beyond  the  seas ;  that  he  has,  as  yet,  no  issue  and  that  should  he  die  his 
whole  possessions  would  pass  to  his  sister  Lady  Mary  '  Veer,'  saving  the 
life  interest  of  his  Countess,  and  those  estates  specially  entailed  on  his 
grandfather's  heirs  male.  To  avert  this  impoverishment  of  "  that  auncient 
Erldome  house  and  famylie  of  Oxenforde,"  the  Earl  "  remembrynge  and 
considerynge  the  longe  contynaunce  of  his  saide  house  and  famylie  in  the 
name  of  the  Veers,  whereof  he  is  lyneallye  discended,  in  the  grace  and  favour 
of  the  kings  and  princes  in  whose  tymes  they  have  lived,  and  in  alliance 
and  kindred  with  moste  of  the  ancient  nobilitie  of  this  realme,  and  in  the 
good  will  and  good  lykinge  of  the  Cominaltie  of  the  same  realme  ;  and  having 
therefore  a  speciall  desire  and  reason  to  preserve  contynue  and  leave  all 
or  the  most  parte  of  his  possessions  "  to  such  person  as  in  his  opinion  is 
most  likely  to  continue  the  line  "  most  like  to  his  noble  auncestors  "  he 
entails,  subject  to  the  payment  of  his  debts,  of  a  marriage  portion  of  £3000 
to  each  daughter  he  may  have  (failing  male  issue)  and  of  his  sister's  portion 
under  his  father's  will,  the  whole  estate  specified  on  his  cousins  in  tail 
male,  viz.,  Hugh  son  and  heir  apparent  of  Aubrey  Vere,  John  of  Robert 
Vere,  John,  Francis,  Robert  and  Horatius  sons  of  Geoffrey  Vere. 

Annexed  is  a  long  schedule  of  the  Earl's  debts  headed  by  £3457  "  to 
the  Quene's  maiestie."  Among  the  creditors  are  goldsmiths,  jewellers, 
mercers,  upholders,  embroiderers,  haberdashers,  armourers,  drapers,  tailors 
and  shoemakers.  Burghley,  the  Earl's  father-in-law,  is  authorized  to  pay 
any  debts  omitted  from  the  list.3 

There  are  two  actions  in  the  Star  Chamber  in  the  time  of  Hen.  VIII. 

•  Harl.  4189.  Henry  Copinger,  of  Buxhall,  by  Agnes 

•  i  He  was  Henry  Copinger,  Prebendary  of  daughter  of  Sir  Thomas  Jermyn. 

York,  and  elected  Master  of  Mag-         3  14  Rep.  Hist.  Com.  pt.  ix.  277,  amongst 
dalen  College,'  Cambridge,   son   of  the  Round  MSS. 

p 


122  THE  MANORS  OF  SUFFOLK. 

by  Anne  Dowager  Countess  of  Oxford,  widow  of  John  the  I4th  Earl,  one 
against  Robert  Rochewode  and  the  other  against  John  Cooppyng  and 
others  as  to  killing  of  game  and  assault  in  Lavenham  Park.1  It  does  not 
appear  at  what  date  the  manor  passed  to  the  Skinners  though  it  is  usually 
said  to  be  about  1608,  but  it  seems  to  have  been  in  reality  much  earlier,  for 
we  find  that  an  annual  sum  of  2  shillings  and  9  pence  (amongst  other  quit 
rents)  given  by  Sir  Thomas  Skinner  out  of  the  Manor  of  Lavenham  to 
Emmanuel  College  Cambridge  March  2,  30  Eliz.  1587,  three  years  after 
the  founding  of  tne  College.  Edmund  de  Vere  17  Earl  of  Oxford  mortgaged 
the  Manors  of  Overhall  and  Netherhall,  Lavenham,  for  £4300  by  deed  dated 
May  1583  the  description  being  "  All  those  the  Manors  of  Overhall  and 
Netherhall  with  the  appurtenances  in  Lavenham,  Thorpe  Morieux,  Ash- 
field,  Preston,  Brent  Eleigh,  Acton,  Melford,  Shimpling  and  Alpheton." 
The  mortgage  was  to  Richard  Peacocke  and  Rowland  Martyn,  leather 
sellers,  and  pursuant  to  it  a  fine  was  duly  levied  in  Trinity  Term  25  Eliz. 

About  1608  Sir  Thomas  Skinner,  Lord  Mayor  of  London,  held  the 
manor ;  indeed  this  year  he  had  licence  to  alienate  it  to  Isaac  Woder,  and 
by  a  deed  dated  the  15  Nov.  6  Jac.  [1608]  he  conveyed  the  "  Mannours  of 
Overhall,  Netherhall,  Lavenham  and  Lanam  "  to  Isaac  Woder  of  Gray's 
Inn  Esquire  for  £2400.*  Isaac  Woder  by  Deed  dated  the  3  January  9 
Jac.  I.  [1611]  conveyed  the  same  to  Paul  D'Ewes  for  £2500.  The  grant  is 
of  "  all  the  manors  of  Overhall,  Netherhall  and  Lavenham  al.  Lanham  al. 
Lanam  and  the  advowson  of  Lavenham  (except  land  called  '  Lavenham 
Parke  ')  containing  by  estimation  20  acres  and  also  lands  which  were  long 
since  conveyed  by  and  from  Sir  Thomas  Skinner  knt.  and  the  said  Isaac 
to  Doctor  Langworth.'  Sir  Thomas  Skinner  seems  to  have  appointed  one 
Christopher  Goodwyn,  a  messenger  of  the  Court  of  Wards  and  Liveries,  to  be 
steward  of  the  manor,  for  we  find  amongst  the  Chancery  Proceedings  in 
the  time  of  Elizabeth  that  this  Christopher  Goodwyn  brings  an  action  against 
Thomas  Skynner  and  Edward  Baker  to  be  quieted  in  the  possession  of 
the  stewardship  or  keeping  of  the  Courts  of  Lavenham  said  to  have  been 
granted  to  plaintiff  by  Thomas  Skynner  late  Lord  Mayor  of  London  deceased 
father  of  the  defendant  Skynner  lord  of  the  said  manor.4 

There  is  the  record  of  an  action  between  Thomas  Skinner  and  Sir 
Thomas  Skinner,  knt.  his  son  and  Henry  Copinger  clerk  then  Parson  of 
Lavenham  in  which  the  Court  of  Chancery  ordered  that  Thomas  Skinner 
and  Sir  Thomas  Skinner  the  trustees  should  tender  and  pay  yearly  to  the 
said  Henry  Copinger  and  his  successors  £40  a  year  in  lieu  of  all  tithes, 
growing  &c.  upon  Lavenham  Park  to  be  paid  quarterly,  and  if  a  whole 
year  became  due  and  remained  unpaid,  the  said  rate  should  cease,  and 
tithes  in  kind  become  payable.  From  this  it  would  appear  as  if  a  Thomas 
Skinner  father  of  Sir  Thomas  Skinner  had  the  manor  prior  to  1608,  but  as 
Thomas  Skinner  is  described  in  the  action  as  an  alderman  of  the  City  of 
London  he  is  probably  the  same  as  Sir  Thomas  Skinner  the  Lord  Mayor. 

Paul  D'Ewes  the  purchaser  was  a  member  of  the  ancient  houses  of 
Cleve  and  Home  in  Gelderland  sometime  lords  of  Kessell  in  that  Duchy. 
Adrian  des  Ewes  2nd  son  of  Gerard  des  Ewes  the  last  lord  of  Kessell  became 
heir  of  the  family,  his  eldest  brother  dying  young.  He  came  to  England 
in  the  time  of  Hen.  VIII.  and  died  of  the  sweating  sickness  which  swept 
over  London  in  1551.  He  married  Mary  the  daughter  of  John  van  Loe 

•  StarC.P.Hen.VIII.Bundlc27,ii3.28,2.         •  Karl,  in  H.  38. 

•  Karl.  85  H.  33.  «  C.P.  i.  344. 


LAVENHAM.  123 

of  Antwerp  and  left  one  son  Gerard  who  settled  in  Essex  and  became  lord  of 
the  Manor  of  Gaynes  there.  He  married  Grace  the  daughter  of  John  Hind 
of  Cambridgeshire,  by  whom  he  had  3  sons,  Paul  and  John  who  both  died 
young,  and  a  second  Paul,  who  was  his  heir.  This  Paul  was  one  of  the  six 
clerks  in  Chancery  and  married  Cicilia  the  sole  daughter  and  heir  of  Richard 
Symonds  of  Croxfield  in  Dorsetshire,  by  whom  he  left  one  son,  the  celebrated 
antiquary,  Symonds  D'Ewes,  who  was  knighted  at  Whitehall  Dec.  6, 1626, 
and  created  a  Baronet  July  5, 1627.  When  Paul  D'Ewes  made  his  purchase 
of  Lavenham  Manor,  Mary  the  widow  of  Sir  Thomas  Skinner  was  still  living 
and  was  in  fact  in  occupation  of  Lavenham  Hall,  which  she  had  as  part 
of  her  jointure,  consequently  the  sale  had  to  be  made  expectant  on  her 
interest.1  Articles  of  Agreement  between  Paul  D'Ewes  and  Edmund 
Browne  as  to  reparations,  &c.,  at  Lavenham  in  1623,  will  be  found  amongst 
the  Harleian  MSS.2  and  in  the  same  Collection  will  be  found  particulars  of 
an  arbitration  between  him  and  William  Playne  as  to  a  fine  for  lands  in 
Lavenham3  and  old  papers  relating  to  a  suit  between  him  and  tenants  of 
Lavenham  as  to  pulling  down  all  the  houses  of  the  borough.4 

There  is  also  amongst  the  same  MSS.  an  agreement  in  Chancery 
between  Paul  D'Ewes  as  lord  of  the  manor  and  the  inhabitants  of  Lavenham 
as  to  the  custom  of  the  town  as  tenants  to  be  dispunishable  for  waste. 5 
In  1615  a  claim  was  made  by  the  Crown  on  Paul  for  forfeiture  of  the  manor, 6 
but  without  any  disturbing  result,  as  the  following  year  he  settled  and 
entailed  the  lordship.7  Acquittances  for  homage  of  Manors  in  Lavenham 
in  1621,  1624,  1628,  1632,  1633,  1634  and  1635  will  be  found  amongst  the 
Harleian  Charters,8  and  an  account  of  the  fines  collected  at  a  Court  Baron 
for  Paul  D'Ewes  in  1622  are  amongst  the  MSS.  in  the  same  Collection.9 

Paul  D'Ewes  died  in  1630  and  was  succeeded  by  his  son  Sir  Symonds 
D'Ewes  one  of  the  most  industrious  literary  activities  of  his  age.  Sir 
Symonds's  work  has  not  received  that  attention  which  it  deserves.  Only 
those  who  have  carefully  gone  through  his  numerous  abstracts  of  docu- 
ments and  papers  of  every  conceivable  character  still  preserved  amongst 
the  Harleian  MSS.  in  the  British  Museum,  can  form  any  true  estimate 
of  the  value  of  his  labours.  His  abstracts  of  the  wills  supposed  to  be 
preserved  at  Bury  St.  Edmunds  alone  are  of  great  worth,  as  many  of  the 
originals  have  long  since  disappeared. 

Sir  Symonds  D'Ewes  added  to  the  Lavenham  property,  inherited  from 
his  father,  by  the  purchase  of  148  acres  further  part  of  Lavenham  Park 
from  Thomas  Skynner.  A  receipt  for  the  purchase  money  which  was  £1500 
will  be  found  amongst  the  Harleian  MSS.10  An  examination  of  this  Thomas 
described  as  the  son  of  Sir  Thomas  Skinner  of  "  Lannun  Park  "  is  mentioned 
in  the  State  Papers."  Charles  Skinner  seems  to  have  had  an  annuity  out 
of  the  Park,  and  there  is  an  acquittance  by  him  in  1649  also  in  the 
Harleian  Collection."  A  Deed  of  Covenants  between  Sir  Symonds  D'Ewes 
and  John  Scott  on  a  demise  of  the  Hall  and  part  of  the  Park  in  1636-7,  and 
a  petition  of  Sir  Symonds  to  Lord  Coventry  Lord  Keeper  concerning  the 
tithes  of  Lavenham  Park,  will  also  be  found  amongst  the  Harleian  MSS.'3 

1  Harl.  MSS.  362  fol.  41.  "  Harl.  49  E.  13,  14  E.  19,  E.  32,  35,  E.  22, 

*  Harl.  98.  E.  43. 

3  Harl.  98.  »  Harl.  99. 

4  Harl.  597.  'o  Harl.  97. 

5  Harl.  99.  »  j6i6  p.  351. 

*  13  Jac.  I.  Memoranda  Rolls,  Hil.  Rec.        "  Harl.  97. 

Rot.  226.  -3  Harl.  97,  98. 

'  Harl.  i ii  F.  35. 


124  THE   MANORS  OF  SUFFOLK. 

Sir  Symonds  D'Ewes1  married  first  Ann,  sole  daughter  and  heir  of  Sir 
William  Clopton  of  Kent  well  Hall  in  Long  Melford  by  whom  he  had  a  son 
Clopton  who  died  an  infant  in  1631  and  a  daughter  Cecilia  who  was  heir 
to  her  mother's  estate  and  married  Thomas  Darcy  by  which  marriage  the 
Darcys  came  to  Kentwell  Hall.  His  2nd  wife  was  Elizabeth  daughter  of 
Sir  Henry  Willoughby  of  Risby  co.  Derby,  Bart,  (who  afterwards  married 
Sir  John  Wray  of  Glentworth  co.  Lincoln,  Bart.),  by  whom  he  had  issue 
Sir  Willoughby  D'Ewes  2nd  Bart.  Sir  Symonds  after  the  death  of  his  father 
Paul  moved  to  Stowlangtoft  and  died  in  1650.  Sir  Symonds  D'Ewes  appears 
to  have  been  under  the  necessity  of  borrowing  money  from  Arthur  Barnar- 
diston  and  there  are  a  series  of  deeds  charging  in  effect  the  Manor  of 
Lavenham  to  the  amount  of  £1100  in  his  favour.  These  deeds  are  amongst 
the  Harleian  Charters.  The  first  is  a  lease  dated  3  June  17  Charles  I.  [1641] 
between  Sir  Symonds  D'Ewes  of  the  one  part  and  Arthur  Barnardiston 
of  the  Inner  Temple  esquire  of  the  other  part.  In  consideration  of  £600  Sir 
Symonds  leases  the  Manor  of  Stowlangtoft  and  also  the  Manors  of  Lavenham, 
Overhall,  and  Netherhall  for  21  years  at  a  peppercorn  rent,  determinable  : 
"  If  said  Arthur  Barnardiston  and  Arthur  Barnardiston,  Thomas 
Barnardiston,  Anne  Barnardiston  and  Mary  Barnardiston,  being  all  four 
the  children  of  the  said  Arthur  Barnardiston  and  Thomas  Bradshaw  they 
or  any  of  them  [?  shall  so  long  live]  or  (if  it  shall  happen  that  the 
said  Arthur  Barnardiston  the  elder  shall  marry  agayne  and  have  any 
child  or  children  by  any  future  wife  or  wives.)  If  in  such  case  also  any 
such  wife  of  the  said  Arthur  Barnardiston  the  father,  or  any  child  or  chil- 
dren which  he  the  said  Arthur  the  elder  shall  hereafter  begett  or  any  one  of 
them  or  of  any  other  the  forementioned  persons  shall  remayne  and  be 
liveing  att  the  ennd  and  expiration  of  Seaven  yeares  of  the  foresaid  tearme 
of  one  and  twenty  yeares  (the  said  seaven  yeares  to  bee  accompted  and 
take  theyre  inception  from  the  foresaid  feast  day  of  the  Annunciation  of 
the  Blessed  Virgin  Mary  commonly  called  Lady  day  last  past  before  the 
date  of  these  presents)."  The  terms  of  the  deed  are  extremely  vague. 

Another  deed  dated  the  4  June  17  Car.  I.  [1641]  between  Arthur 
Barnardiston  and  Sir  Symonds  D'Ewes  recites  the  last  lease  for  21  years 
and  contains  a  grant  by  Arthur  Barnardiston  to  Sir  Symonds  D'Ewes 
(for  divers  good  considerations)  of  the  said  manors  for  7  years  part  of  the 
21  years  at  a  peppercorn  rent.  The  effect  of  the  two  deeds  was  to  give 
Arthur  Barnardiston  a  charge  on  the  manors  for  securing  £1100. 

Another  deed  dated  the  16  May  24  Charles  I.  (1648)  between  Arthur 
Barnardiston  described  as  of  Hedingham  ad  Castrum  al.  Castle  Heding- 
ham  co.  Essex  and  Sir  Symonds  D'Ewes  after  reciting  the  Lease  of  3  June 
17  Car.  I.  recites — "  And  whereas  he  the  said  Sir  Symonds  D'Ewes  doth 
by  these  presents  acknowledge  that  by  reason  of  some  extraordinary 
occasions  and  through  the  troublesomeness  of  the  times  he  could  not  well 
pay  unto  the  said  Arthur  Barnardiston  the  elder  (notwithstanding  that 
the  said  Arthur  and  his  fouresaid  children  are  at  present  in  life)  the  four- 
said  summe  of  eleaven  hundred  pounds  at  the  time  and  place  before  men- 
tioned and  according  to  the  purport  true  intent  and  meaning  of  the  foure- 
said last  recited  Indenture  without  much  prejudice  to  him  the  said  Sir 
Symonds  in  his  outward  estate  and  that  thereupon  he  the  said  Sir  Symonds 
hath  neglected  to  pay  the  said  summe  of  Eleaven  hundred  pounds,"  Sir 
Symonds  is  allowed  to  rent  the  premises  for  7  years  more  and  if  after  the 

1  See  Stowlangtoft  Manor  in  Blackbourn  Hund. 


LAVENHAM.  125 

expiration  of  this  period  he  should  pay  to  Arthur  Barnardiston  and  his 
heirs  or  to  Thomas  Bradshaw  and  his  heirs  £1100  then  the  lease  from  Sir 
Symonds  should  be  void. 

Sir  Willoughby  D'Ewes  was  an  infant  at  the  time  of  his  father's  death 
and  his  mother  was  his  guardian.1  He  married  Priscilla  eldest  daughter  of 
Francis  Clinton  als.  Fines  of  Stourton  co.  Lincoln  and  died  in  1685  leaving  a 
son  and  heir  Sir  Symonds  3rd  Bart,  who  married  Delariviere  one  of  the 
daughters  and  coheirs  of  Thomas  2nd  Lord  Jermyn  by  whom  he  had  issue 
two  sons  Jermyn  and  Willoughby  and  4  daughters — Delariviere  married  to 
Thomas  Gage  eldest  son  of  Sir  William  Gage  of  Hengrave  Bart.,  Mary  to 
George  Tasburgh  of  Norfolk  and  Harriet  and  Merriell.  Sir  Symonds  D'Ewes 
the  3rd  Bart,  died  in  1722  and  was  succeeded  by  his  son  Sir  Jermyn  as  4th 
Bart,  who  died  unmarried  in  1731 .  The  manor  was  then  purchased  by  John 
Moore  of  Long  Melford  who  died  in  1753  and  was  succeeded  by  his  son 
Richard  Moore  who  died  in  1782,  when  the  manor  passed  to  his  widow  Mary. 
Davy  says  that  on  her  death  in  1814  she  was  succeeded  by  her  son  and  heir 
Richard  Moore  whose  Trustees  sold  the  manor  to  the  Rev.  Geo.  Richard 
Pye  who  was  lord  in  1841.  But  Kirby  says  that  in  1764  Henry  Moore 
was  lord,  and  in  1829  and  1835  makes  the  Rev.  James  Pye  to  be  lord,  as 
does  Page  in  1847.  White  in  1855  makes  Geo.  Richard  Pye  lord.  The 
manor  now  belongs  to  Frederick  James  Underwood  of  the  Common, 
Sevenoaks,  Kent. 

Conveyances,  &c.,  of  the  Manors  of  Overhall  and  Netherhall  with  the 
advowson  in  1583, 1608,  1612, 1632, 1641  and  1648  are  amongst  the  Harleian 
Charters.2  Accounts  of  Edward  Porter  bailiff  of  Lavenham  Manor  will  be 
found  in  the  Harleian  MSS.3  and  on  the  Patent  Rolls  for  1475  will  be  found 
a  grant  for  life  to  Sir  John  Howard  knt.  of  the  office  of  steward  of  Lavenham 
Manor  and  £10  yearly  for  the  said  office  from  the  manor,4  and  the  same  year 
a  grant  for  life  to  John  Rysby  of  the  office  of  bailiff  of  the  manor  reserving 
the  accustomed  fees  to  the  King's  receiver  there ; 5  also  the  same  year  a 
grant  for  life  to  Thomas  Camellor  of  the  office  of  receiver  of  the  manor  in 
the  King's  hand  in  consequence  of  the  forfeiture  of  John  Earl  of  Oxford 
receiving  10  marks  yearly  from  the  issues  and  profits.6  A  compotus  of 
the  manor  1511-12  will  be  found  amongst  the  Harleian  Rolls  in  the  Brit. 
Mus.7 

A  Book  of  Court  Rolls  1631  is  in  the  Harleian  Collection8  and  the 
Court  Rolls  themselves  from  1635  to  1650  and  1660  to  1667  are  amongst 
the  Rolls  of  the  same  Collection9  with  extracts  from  Court  Rolls  1497  to 
1608.'° 

The  manor  court  elected  the  Headborough  of  the  town  of  Lavenham 
and  the  capital  Burgess  paid  to  the  lord  of  the  manor  a  common  fine  by 
ancient  custom  of  eight  shillings  and  four  pence.  From  "  time  to  the 
contrary  of  which  the  memory  of  man  is  not  "  there  have  been  6  capital 
Burgesses  and  the  custom  was  that  as  often  as  any  of  them  by  death  or 
any  other  deprivation  were  removed  those  capital  Burgesses  who  survived 
chose  fit  inhabitants  and  tenants  within  the  borough  successors  in  the 
room  of  those  deceased  or  removed.  An  extract  from  a  Court 

1  State  Papers  1684,  Cal.  of  Comp.  1962.  *  Pat.  Rolls,  15  Edw.  IV.  pt.  iii.  16. 

'  Harl.  57  H.  18,  85  H.  23,  in  H.  38,  57  7  Harl.  Roll,  A.  15. 

H.  37,  in  H.  16,  28,  in  H.  17.  "  Harl.  362. 

•Harl.  6709.  '  Harl.  Rolls,  H.  16-19. 

«  Pat.  Rolls,  15  Edw.  IV.  pt.  ii.  8,  4.  '°  Harl.  55  H.  30,  37. 
*  Pat.  Rolls,  15  Edw.  IV.  pt.  ii.  19. 


ia6  THE  MANORS  OF  SUFFOLK. 

held  for  the  Manor  of  Lavenham  by  Richard  Moore  the  26  April 
1775  before  John  Mudd  Deputy  Steward  of  Isaac  Paske  Gent. 
Steward  which  is  given  by  McKeon  in  his  "  Inquiry  as  to  the  Charities  of 
Lavenham "  shows  how  the  election  was  usually  made  and  how 
practically  the  Court  of  the  Manor  was  the  centre  from  which  the  govern- 
ment of  the  town  was  derived.  The  election  of  the  Burgesses  was  actually 
made  in  Court.  In  the  Record  of  the  Court  referred  to,  after  reciting  the 
mode  of  government  by  Burgesses  as  mentioned  above,  it  proceeds  "  and 
because  all  the  said  capital  Burgesses  are  dead  except  the  said  Brooke 
Branwhite,  Edward  Coldham,  and  Charles  Squire,  And  the  said  Edward 
Coldham  and  Charles  Squire  are  removed  out  of  the  said  Borough  of  Laven- 
ham, Therefore  the  said  Edward  Coldham  and  Charles  Squire  are  at  this 
Court  removed  from  their  said  office  of  capital  Burgess.  And  the  said 
Brooke  Branwhite  hath  chosen  Samuel  Coote,  Thomas  Watts,  Philip 
Sturgeon,  Thomas  Kitbourn  and  John  Studd  capital  Burgesses  in  the  room 
of  those  deceased  and  amoved,  which  said  Samuel  Coote,  Thomas  Watts, 
Philip  Sturgeon,  Thomas  Kitbourn  and  John  Studd  are  sworn  in  open 
Oourt  to  do  all  those  things  which  on  this  behalf  belong  to  them  and  most 
conducive  to  the  public  good  of  this  Manor  and  Burgh." 

The  tenants  of  the  manor  have  various  privileges  as  is  not  surprising 
considering  what  a  powerful  family  so  long  occupied  the  position  of  lord. 
They  and  it  seems  also  other  inhabitants  of  the  town  have  always  been 
exempt  from  serving  any  Court  held  for  the  Hundred  of  Babergh,  and 
though  they  have  been  oftentimes  summoned  to  serve,  "  the  Earl  of  Oxford 
and  their  own  officers  (as  the  author  of  the  "  Magna  Britannia  "  states) 
have  always  commanded  the  contrary,  so  they  took  themselves  exempt." 
It  seems  that  no  exemption  has  been  claimed  in  modern  times.  The 
custom  of  the  manor  is  Borough-English,  that  is  that  the  younger  sons 
inherit  the  lands  and  tenements  of  which  their  fathers  died  seised  in  the 
event  of  their  dying  intestate.  "  This  custom  called  '  Burrough-English  ' 
is,"  says  Hawes  in  his  "  History  of  Framlingham  '"  "  contrary  to  the 
positive  laws  of  God1  and  inverts  the  very  order  of  nature  ;  it  was  originally 
introduced  into  this  kingdom  by  a  wicked  and  adulterous  practice  amongst 
the  barbarous  Saxons  ;  for  the  lords  of  certain  lands  which  held  of  them  in 
Villenage  did  usually  in  those  pagan  and  barbarous  times  lye  with  their 
tenants'  wives  the  first  night  after  marriage.3  And  this  usage  was  continued 
after  those  very  lands  were  purchased  by  freemen  who  in  time  obtained 
this  custom  on  purpose  that  their  eldest  sons  (who  might  be  their  lord's 
bastards)  should  be  incapable  to  inherit  their  estates."  Modern  research 
has  rather  blown  on  the  fanciful  idea  as  to  the  existence  of  the  lord's  right 
referred  to,  and  as  to  the  origin  of  the  custom  of  Borough-English. 

The  original  manor  house  is  supposed  to  have  stood  close  to  what  is  now 
called  Lavenham  Hall,  and  some  few  years  ago  its  extensive  ruins  were  still 
visible  and  the  piece  of  land  called  and  known  by  the  name  of  Saffron 
Pans  or  Panes  was  the  garden  attached  to  the  original  mansion  house. 
Particulars  of  a  case  between  one  Baxton  and  Sir  Symonds  D'Ewes  as  to 
this  piece  of  land  about  1644  will  be  found  amongst  the  Harl.  MSS.4  A 
large  park  which  occupied  nearly  half  the  parish  was  attached,  and  the 
manor  house  was  occasionally  the  residence  of  the  Earls  of  Oxford  from 

'  P-  389,  390-  '  Pref.  Mod.  Rep.  vol.  3. 

•  Deut.  xxi.  15,  16,  17,  Gen.  xxix.  26,  i         •  Harl.  99. 
Kings  xi.  22,  I  Chron.  v.  I. 


LAVENHAM.  127 


the  very  earliest  times  to  the  opening  of  the  lyth  century.  The  hall  was 
at  one  time  the  centre  of  an  important  industrial  place,  for  Lavenham  was 
famous  for  the  manufacture  of  blue  cloth,  though  even  more  so  for  the 
making  of  yarn  from  wool  and  says  and  calimancoes  till  the  fashion  arose 
among  the  ladies  for  wearing  Spanish  leather  for  their  shoes. 


128  THE  MANORS    OF  SUFFOLK. 


LAWSHALL  MANOR. 

| HE  lordship  and  advowson  anciently  belonged  to  the  Abbot 
and  Convent  of  Ramsay  in  Huntingdonshire,  by  virtue  of  a 
grant  made  by  Alfwinus  the  son  of  Bricius  in  the  year  1022. 
It  was  held  with  8  carucates  of  land  as  a  manor  with  soc. 
In  the  Confessor's  time  there  were  14  villeins,  12  bordars, 
4  slaves,  2  ploughteams  in  demesne  and  10  belonging  to  the 
men,  8  acres  of  meadow  and  i  rouncey.  There  was  a  church 
living  with  30  acres  of  free  land,  and  the  whole  was  valued  at  8  pounds. 
By  the  time  of  the  Great  Survey  the  value  was  placed  at  12  pounds,  and 
there  were  2  more  villeins,  and  one  more  slave  but  2  bordars  less.  We 
find  also  an  additional  ploughteam  in  demesne  and  10  beasts,  30  hogs, 
100  sheep,  and  12  goats.  The  manor  was  a  league  long  and  half  a  league 
broad  and  paid  in  a  gelt  15^.' 

The  manor  continued  in  the  holding  of  the  Abbot  and  Convent  of 
Ramsey  until  the  dissolution  being  held  of  the  King  in  chief  and  as  per- 
taining to  the  barony  of  Ramsey.1  The  Abbot  claimed  to  have  gallows 
and  free  warren  here,  as  we  learn  from  the  Hundred  Rolls3  and  Charters 
relating  to  these  lands  of  the  Abbey  here  in  1254-1353  will  be  found  in  the 
Brit.  Museum4  and  the  Accounts  of  the  Reeve  bailiff  and  collector  of  these 
lands  7  Edw.  I.  to  2  Hen.  V.  will  be  found  in  the  Public  Record  Office.3 
Court  Rolls  of  the  manor  while  in  the  possession  of  the  Abbey  of  Ramsey 
will  also  be  found  in  the  Record  Office  for  the  following  years — 38,  40,  41 
Edw.  III.  2  Rich.  II.  i  to  4,  14  Hen.  VII.  6  to  9,  n,  12,  25  and  26  Hen. 
VIII.6  and  a  Court  Roll  for  1466  is  in  the  British  Museum.7 

There  is  preserved  amongst  the  ancient  deeds  in  the  Record  Office  a 
direction  by  Hen.  II.  to  the  Sheriff  and  ministers  of  Suffolk  ordering  them 
to  allow  Lawshall  a  town  of  St.  Benedict  Ramsey  and  all  its  men  to  be 
quit  of  shire  and  hundred  Courts  and  pleas,  and  all  other  suits  except 
murders  and  theft  and  that  it  shall  have  soc  and  sac,  toll  and  team  and 
infangtheif  and  all  other  customs  as  in  the  time  of  King  Henry  his  grand- 
father.8 The  date  is  about  1155. 

Also  amongst  these  deeds  is  a  Bond  dated  in  1269  in  20  marks  by 
William  Herberd  of  Lawshall  Manor  to  the  Abbot  of  Ramsey  to  maintain 
the  sons  and  messuage  of  late  Alexander  Hemning  in  as  good  or  better 
state  than  when  he  first  had  access  to  the  wife  of  the  said  Alexander.  For 
this  and  other  things,  the  said  abbot  and  convent  have  granted  him  the 
custody  of  the  boys  and  tenement  until  any  of  the  said  boys  come  to  the 
age  at  which  by  the  custom  of  Lawshall  Manor  he  can  hold  land,  and  then 
he  shall  have  half  the  land  and  messuage  and  the  other  half  shall  remain 
to  the  said  William  and  his  wife  for  her  life  and  after  her  decease  the  said 
William  shall  have  nothing  further  therein.9 

Amongst  the  fines  we  meet  with  one  of  Lawshall  Manor  in  1318  levied 
by  Thomas  de  Hanningfeld  and  Isabella  his  wife  against  Thomas  Maun- 
devill.10 

Dom.  ii.  3786.  *  Portfolio  203,  97. 

H.R.  ii.  142,  153.  '  Add.  Roll  34933. 

ii.  143,  153,  195.  •  A.  6288. 

Add.  Ch.  34259-34264.  •  53  Hen.  III.  A.  7487. 

Bundle  1001,  Nfo.7-i7;  Bundle  1002.  No.  "  Feet  of  Fines,  12  Edw.  II.  17. 
1-7- 


LAWSHALL  MANOR.  129 

At  the  dissolution  the  manor  was,  together  with  the  advowson,  granted 
by  the  Crown  to  John  Either.  Particulars  for  the  grant  are  in  existence,  and 
referred  to  in  the  Deputy  Keeper's  loth  Report.1  The  disgusting  bribery 
and  the  grabbing  after  the  monastic  property  is  well  shown  up  in  a  letter 
by  one  William  Woode  to  Cromwell,  asking  to  have  by  gift  or  purchase  a 
farm  of  £8  a  year  at  Lawshall,  which  he  had  of  the  Abbey  of  Ramsey. 
He  promises  to  bequeath  to  Cromwell  all  he  gets  through  him.2 

The  manor  does  not  seem  to  have  remained  long  with  Rither,  for  in 
1547  ne  s°ld  it  together  with  the  advowson  to  Sir  William  Drury 3 
and  on  the  Memoranda  Rolls  for  1571  is  a  claim  by  the  Crown  on  Elizabeth 
Drury  widow,  and  Henry  her  son  for  forfeiture  of  the  manor.4 

Near  the  Church  was  an  old  brick  house  formerly  belonging  to  the 
Drurys  with  their  arms  in  brick  over  one  of  the  doors  and  the  date  1557. 
There  is  an  entry  in  the  Parish  Register  of  this  place  under  the  year  1578 
as  follows  :  "  It  is  to  be  remembred  that  the  Queens  highnesse  in  her 
progresse  riding  from  Melford  to  Bury  5°  Aug.  Reg.  R.  20  an.  Dni. 
1578  dined  at  Lawshall  Hall  to  the  great  rejoycing  of  ye  said  Parish  and 
the  Country  thereabouts." 

The  name  "  Elizabeth  Drewry  "  of  Lawshall  appears  in  the  list  of 
Papist  Recusants  in  1595.  "  She  hath  byn  prisoner  to  Sir  John  Heygham 
knt."  She  must  have  been  wife  of  Robert  Drury  of  Lawshall  2nd  son  of 
Sir  William  Drury  of  Hawstead.  We  meet  with  a  fine  levied  in  1581  in 
respect  of  rent  from  the  manor  between  Henry  Drury  and  Sir  Wm.  Drury,5 
and  in  1588  Henry  Drury  apparently  disposed  of  the  manor  to  Thomas 
Lovell.6  In  1598  we  meet  with  a  fine  of  "  Lawcell  Manor,"  which  is  not 
unlikely  this  manor.  It  was  levied  between  Robert  Lee  and  Robert 
Gouldinge  and  others.7 

In  1734  both  manor  and  advowson  were  vested  in  Thomas  Lee,  to 
whom  succeeded  Baptist  Lee  of  Livermere  Parva  who  died  the  23  March 
1768  and  devised  the  same  to  his  nephew  Nathaniel  Lee  Acton.  He 
married  ist  Susanna  Miller  eldest  daughter  of  Sir  Thomas  Miller  of  Chi- 
chester  Bart,  who  died  without  issue  the  5  April  1789  ;  and  2ndly  Penelope 
eldest  daughter  of  Sir  Richard  Rycroft  of  Penshurst  Bart,  who  died 
without  issue  the  5  November  1819.  Nathaniel  Lee  Acton  survived  until 
1836,  when  dying  seised  of  the  manor  and  advowson  they  passed  to  his 
eldest  sister  and  heir,  who  survived  but  a  few  months  and  then  passed  to 
his  next  sister  Harriot,  Lady  Middleton  widow  of  Sir  William  Fowle  Middle- 
ton  Bart,  of  Shrubland  Park,  who  was  succeeded  by  her  son  Sir  William 
Fowle  Middleton  2nd  Bart,  who  married  the  Hon.  Anne  Cust,  youngest 
sister  of  Earl  Brownlow  and  died  in  1860  without  issue,  when  the  manor 
passed  to  Sir  George  Nathaniel  Broke  Middleton  the  son  of  Sir  Philip  Bowes 
Vere  Broke  Bart,  of  Broke  Hall  by  Sarah  Louisa  his  wife  daughter  of  Sir 
Wm.  Fowle  Middleton  ist  Bart,  he  inheriting  under  the  will  of  his  maternal 
grandfather  the  said  Sir  William  Fowle  Middleton.  By  royal  licence  the  17 
July  1860  he  assumed  the  surname  of  Middleton  after  that  of  Broke.  He  was 
made  C.B.  and  a  knight  of  the  Medjedie  for  his  services  in  command  of 
the  "  Gladiator  "  during  the  war  with  Russia,  and  married  Albinia-Maria 
2nd  daughter  of  Thomas  Evans  of  Lyminster  but  died  in  1887  without 

App.  ii.  p.  262,  37  Hen.  VIII.  s  Fine,  Easter,  23  Eliz. 

'  State  Papers,  1539,  566.  6  Fine,  Hil.  30  Eliz. 

3  Fine,  Trin.  i  Edw.  VI.  7  Fine,  Trin.  40  Eliz. 
'  M.  13  Eliz.  Mich.  Rec.  Rot.  81. 


130  THE    MANORS   OF    SUFFOLK. 

ue,  when  the  manor  passed  to  hi*  niece  Jane  Anna,  the  eldest  daughter 
of  his  brother  Charles  Acton  Vere  Broke  [who  had  married  Anna  Maria 
3rd  daughter  of  John  Hamilton  of  Sundrum,  Aryshire,  and  died  in  1855]. 
She  married  James  St.  Vincent  Sumarez  4th  Baron  Do  Sumarez,  who 
is  the  present  lord  of  the  manor  and  patron  of  the  living  and  resides  at 
Shmbland  Park. 

Amongst  the  Chancery  Proceedings  of  the  time  of  Eliz.  is  a  claim 
by  John  Elye  and  Mary  his  wife  against  George  Barrell  to  lands  held  of 
Lawshall  Manor  late  the  estate  of  Alice  Anderwood,  mother  of  the  plaintiff 
Mary  ;'  and  an  action  by  Margaret  Golding  widow  against  William  Bradley 
and  others  as  to  a  messuage  and  lands  also  held  of  the  manor  of  which 
defendant  Edward  Rookwood  was  lord.* 

Lawshall  Hall  is  an  interesting  old  brick  edifice  standing  close  to  the 
church.  The  walls  are  in  some  places  6  feet  thick  and  many  of  the  original 
features  of  the  old  place  have  been  retained.  There  are  some  curious 
underground  passages  which  tradition,  as  usual,  declares  to  be  of  most 
extensive  character,  connecting  the  place  with  Coldham  Hall  about  a  mile 
distant.  The  most  interesting  portion  of  the  Hall  is  what  was  probably 
the  Chapel.  It  is  pleasing  to  find  that  this  interesting  old  mansion  is  well 
preserved  and  is  in  such  good  hands  as  Mr.  Baker  and  his  niece  Miss  Harvey. 


1  C.P.  i.  272.  '  C.P.  i.  354- 


MELFORD  (LONG).  I3I 


LONG  MELFORD. 

pNG  MELFORD  is  the  largest  village  in  extent  and 
population  in  Suffolk,  and  acquired  the  affix  Long  by 
reason  of  it  consisting  mainly  of  one  street  almost  a  mile 
long.  The  name  Melford  was  derived  from  the  Mill  ford, 
the  site  of  which  was  where  the  main  bridge  now  stands, 
the  mill  being  one  of  the  water-mills  mentioned  in  the 
survey  of  the  parish  in  Domesday  Book. 
Melford  in  Saxon  times  formed  part  of  the  great  possession  of  Earl 
Alfric,  the  son  of  Withgar  or  Wisgar  as  the  name  appears  in  the  Great 
Survey,  or  Widgar  as  it  appears  in  the  Abbot's  Chartulary.  This  Thane, 
who  was  styled  the  "  famous  Earl,"  had  the  custody  for  Queen  Emma, 
mother  of  the  Confessor,  of  the  franchise  of  the  eight  hundreds  and  a  half 
later  known  as  the  Liberty  of  St.  Edmund.  The  Manor  of  Melford  was 
given  by  Earl  Alfric  to  the  Abbey  of  St.  Edmund  in  the  time 
of  Leofstan,  who  was  the  Abbot  of  that  monastery  from  1044  to  1065. 
The  Chartulary  of  Abbot  John  de  Norwold  made  in  1287  recites  this  grant 
as  follows  : — 

"  Earl  Alfric,  son  of  Widgar,  presented  Melford  to  St.  Edmunds  as 
stated  in  the  Register  S.P.  fol.  32  in  these  words  :  '  In  the  time  of  St. 
Edmund  King  and  Confessor,  and  of  Leofstam  the  Abbot,  Alfric  the  son 
of  Witgar  the  famous  Earl  gave  Melford  to  St.  Edmund  and  gave  a  manor 
to  this  church  and  to  St.  Edmund,  and  to  Leofstan  the  Abbot  :  and  he 
conveyed  to  them  the  induction  of  this  church  in  perpetuity  and  bound 
his  son  Withgar  to  the  same,  so  that  their  charter  then  came  into  the  hands 
of  the  monks.'  '  This  Alfric  the  Thane  was  an  important  character  in  the 
time  of  the  Confessor.  He  was  the  kinsman  of  Alfar  and  of  Leofgion,  a  noble 
lady,  as  appears  by  her  Testament  written  in  Anglo-Saxon.  The  Collegiate 
Church  of  St.  John  the  Baptist  at  Clare,  afterwards  removed  to  Stoke  by 
Clare,  was  founded  by  him  with  the  consent  of  his  son  Withgar.  The 
Honor  of  Clare  was  composed  chiefly  of  the  great  possessions  of  this  Thane 
in  Suffolk  and  Essex. 

In  Saxon  times  the  lordship  was  held  by  the  Abbot  of  St.  Edmunds 
with  12  carucates  of  land. 

In  the  Confessor's  time  40  acres  of  this  land  were  held  by  Walter  of 
the  Abbot,  and  there  were  37  villeins,  25  bordars,  8  ploughteams  in 
demesne,  20  belonging  to  the  men,  16  slaves,  50  acres  of  meadow,  wood  for 
60  hogs,  2  mills,  30  beasts,  140  hogs,  and  2  socmen  with  80  acres  of  land. 
By  the  time  of  the  Great  Survey  there  were  but  10  bordars  and  2  of  the 
ploughteams  in  demesne,  and  7  of  those  belonging  to  the  men  had  disappeared; 
but  on  the  other  hand  there  were  3  rounceys,  300  sheep,  12  hives  of  bees  and 
40  forest  mares  additional.  The  above  Walter  also  held  of  the  Abbot 
one  (sic)  with  40  acres  and  2  ploughteams.  Over  them  the  Abbot  had  com- 
mendation and  sac  and  soc  and  all  customs,  nor  could  they  ever  give  or 
sell  these  lands  without  the  Abbot's  consent.  There  was  also  a  church 
living  with  2  carucates  of  land,  4  villeins,  9  bordars,  2  ploughteams 
belonging  to  the  Church  and  2  to  the  men. 

In  Saxon  times  this  manor  was  valued  at  20  pounds,  but  at  the  time 
of  the  Domesday  Survey  at  30.  It  was  18  quarantenes  long  and  I  league 
broad,  and  paid  in  a  gelt,  whoever  might  be  the  holder,  20^.'  In  a  survey 

'  Dom.  ii.  359. 


132  THE    MANORS   OF   SUFFOLK. 

made  of  the  Melford  Manor  as  held  by  the  Abbot  of  St.  Edmunds  in  1287 
compiled  from  the  report  of  Salomon  of  Rochester,  Thomas  de  Sudington, 
Richard  de  Boiland  and  Walter  de  Hopton,  the  King's  justiciaries  itinerant 
the  particulars  are  given  as  follows  : — "  The  Abbot  of  St.  Edmunds  as  Lord 
of  Melford  holds  a  manor  in  this  vill  from  the  King  in  chief,  by  a  free  grant  in 
perpetuity,  as  well  by  the  right  of  his  lordship  of  St.  Edmund.  And  there 
are  in  the  same  800  acres  of  arable  land  243.  of  mowing  meadow,  53  acres 
of  separable  pasture  and  360  acres  of  wood.  And  he  has  rights  over  this 
manor  of  Furca'  and  Trimberell  ;*  also  of  Bussellus,5  Lagen,4  and  other 
measures ;  and  to  hold  in  frank  pledge  and  to  impound  all  trespassers  ; 
and  he  has  rights  of  Barony  :  and  ne  has  also  the  right  of  use  of  his  vassals' 
working  cattle  :  and  he  has  Infrangtheif5,  free  warren  over  his  lordship, 
two  water-mills,  and  free  right  of  Boar  and  Bull.6 

"  The  advowson  and  gift  of  the  Church  of  Melford  also  belongs  to 
the  Abbot ;  and  this  church  is  endowed  with  236  acres  of  land,  10^  acres 
of  meadow,  n  acres  of  pasture  and  4  acres  of  woodland  from  the  gift  of 
Alfric,  son  of  Widgar  formerly  the  lord  of  the  said  barony.  The  said  Abbot 
also  possesses  in  this  township  in  the  said  lordship  600  acres  of  arable  land 
which  his  villeins  hold  of  him  with  their  messuages ;  he  also  has  four  acres 
of  land,  which  his  cottars  hold  of  him." 

The  great  Saxon  Manor  of  Melford  became  in  course  of  time  divided 
into  6  manors,  not  including  the  Manor  of  Kentwell,  which  is  separately 
entered  in  the  Domesday  Survey.  All  save  Luton's  and  Woodford's 
continued  in  the  Abbot  of  Bury  until  the  Dissolution  of  the  Monasteries, 
except  that  Monks  Melford  Manor  was  in  1199  vested  in  the  Hospital  of 
St.  Saviour  without  the  north  gate  of  Bury  and  continued  in  this  Institution 
also  until  the  Dissolution. 

The  Abbot  had  the  grant  in  Melford,  in  1235,  °f  a  weekly  market  on 
Thursday,  and  a  yearly  fair  to  last  3  days,  viz.,  on  the  vigil,  day,  and  morrow 
of  the  Holy  Trinity  unless  the  said  market  and  fair  should  be  to  the  hindrance 
of  neighbouring  markets  and  fairs,7  and  he  also  had  free  warren  there.8 
Many  of  the  abbots  made  the  Hall  their  occasional  retreat  from  the  incessant 
contentions  which  seemed  to  be  the  necessary  sphere  of  the  Head  of  so 
powerful  a  monastic  house  in  the  Middle  Ages.  Often  these  houses  suffered 
damage  during  a  vacancy,  when  the  temporalities  vested  in  the  King,  and 
from  the  Hundred  Rolls  of  1275  we  find  that  John  Walraven,  Escheator  of 
the  King,  destroyed  the  cattle  and  damaged  the  park  at  Melford,  whilst 
the  manor  was  in  the  King's  hands  after  the  decease  of  Edmund  the  Abbot. 
It  is  obvious  that  the  record  related  to  an  incident  which  occurred  in  the 
previous  reign,  no  doubt  between  1256  and  1257  in  the  interval  of  the 
abeyance  of  the  Abbacy  in  the  reign  of  Hen.  III. 

Amongst  the  Harleian  MSS.9  is  the  copy  of  a  lease  made  in  1534,  in 
which  the  last  Abbot  of  Bury,  John  Reeve  al.  Melford,  a  native  of  the  village, 
elected  abbot  in  1514,  lets  the  Manor  of  Melford  called  Melford  Hall  with 
"  the  feadyngs  of  the  comon  called  Melford  Grene,  longyng  to  the  sayde 

1  Or  gallows  on  which  he  could  hang  felons.  5  Or  the  right  to  pass  judgment  for  any 
'  Or  the  right  of  pillory  on  which  he  could  theft  committed,  or  any  thief  taken, 

punish   misdemeanours,    and    also  within  his  manor. 

scolds    and    nagging     women    by  6  That  is,  he  could  depasture  those  animals 

ducking.  at  will  in  the  meadows  or  lands  of 

1  Or  the  right  to  control  all  measures  in  every  person  within  his  manor. 

his  manor,  his  own  bushel  to  be  '  Chart.  Rolls,  19  Hen.  III.  5. 

the  standard  for  all.  '  H.R.  ii.  143. 

4  Or  the  measure  for  liquid.  '  Harl.  308. 


MELFORD    (LONG).  133 

Manour.  And  also  closes  whereof  the  on  is  called  Parkefelde  and  the 
other  is  called  the  Horse  Pasture  and  two  meadowes,  the  one  called  Smal 
Medowe,  and  the  other  called  Parke  Medowe  lying  in  Melford  aforeseyd 
in  the  seyd  counte  of  Suffolk  :  except  oute  take  and  reservyd  unto  the 
seyd  Abbott  and  hys  successors  on  of  the  best  Chaumbers  within  the  seyd 
manour  wyth  ffree  ingate  and  outegate  into  and  fro  the  same  at  all  tymes 
at  hys  pleasure  duryng  all  the  seyd  terme  of  the  seyd  lease  "  for  the  term 
of  30  years  to  Dame  Frances  Pennington.  In  this  lease  it  is  covenanted 
that  the  said  Dame  Fraunces  shall  pay  45.  a  year  to  the  abbot,  45.  a  year  to 
the  bailiff  of  Babergh  Hundred,  and  45.  a  year  "  to  the  crosse  berer  of  the 
seyd  abbot  and  his  successors,  on  of  the  best  chambers  within  the  seid 
maner  wyth  ffree  ingate  and  outegate  in  to  and  fro  the  same  at  all  tymes 
at  hys  pleasure  duryng  all  the  seyd  terme  of  the  seid  lease,"  and  "  shall 
fynde  at  hir  costs  and  charges  the  seid  abbott  or  his  officers  comying  onys 
in  the  yeere  to  the  courte  and  leete  of  the  seid  abbott  at  the  seid  manner  to 
be  kept,  sufficient  met  and  drynk,  with  bedding  in  ther  chambre,  hey  and 
otys  for  their  horses,  by  all  the  seid  terme,  for  that  tyme  beyng  there  at 
the  seid  courte  and  lete."  On  the  part  of  the  abbot  and  convent  it  is 
covenanted  to  do  all  needful  repairs  to  the  houses  of  the  said  manor ;  to 
permit  Dame  Fraunces  to  have  500  of  wood  yearly  out  of  the  woods  in  Mel- 
ford  and  to  have  the  feeding  of  the  Little  Park,  "  so  that  the  same  Dame 
Fraunces,  not  her  assignes,  do  non  harm  on  to  the  spring."  On  taking 
possession  of  the  manor,  the  said  Dame  Fraunceys  was  to  have  delivered 
to  her  "  the  chaff e  and  strawe  of  all  the  corne  growyng  of  eleven  acres  of 
grownde,"  and  the  "  implements  of  house,"  which  were  to  be  re-delivered 
at  the  expiration  of  the  lease. 

Within  five  or  six  years  from  the  date  of  this  instrument  the  Abbey  of 
St.  Edmund  was  dissolved,  its  last  abbot  had  died  of  a  broken  heart,  and 
the  Manor  of  Melford,  with  the  other  possessions  of  the  abbey  had  become 
vested  in  the  Crown. 

LONG   MELFORD   MANOR. 

This  was  granted  in  1545  by  the  Crown  to  Sir  William  Cordell,  a  family 
which  had  been  seated  from  an  early  period  in  the  County.  Sir  William 
was  the  son  of  John  Cordell  the  son  of  Robert  Cordell  of  London,  merchant' 
and  his  mother  was  Emma  daughter  of  Henry  Webbe  of  Kimbolton  in 
Huntingdonshire.  He  was  a  man  of  considerable  attainments  as  a  lawyer, 
filling  the  important  office  of  Master  of  the  Rolls  in  the  time  of  Elizabeth. 
He  was  also  appointed  a  Privy  Councillor  with  a  grant  of  the  privilege  of 
twelve  retainers.  In  1538  being  elected  a  member  of  Parliament  for  Suffolk 
he  was  chosen  to  be  Speaker  and  received  the  honour  of  knighthood.  In 
1578  Sir  William  entertained  Queen  Elizabeth  at  Melford  Hall.  Church- 
yard, the  chronicler  of  this  progress  of  the  Queen,  says,  "  There  were  two 
hundred  young  gentlemen,  clad  all  in  white  velvet,  and  three  hundred  of 
the  graver  sorts,  apparelled  in  black  velvet  coates,  and  fair  chaynes,  all 
ready  at  one  instant  and  place,  with  1,500  serving-men  more,  on  horseback, 
well  and  bravely  mounted,  in  good  order  ready  to  troope  and  a  noble  sight 
to  behold.  And  all  these  waited  on  the  sheriff,  Sir  William  Spring,  during 
the  Queen's  majesties  abode  in  those  parties,  and  to  the  very  confines  of 
Suffolke  ;  but  before  her  highness  passed  into  Norfolke,  there  was  in  Suffolke 
such  sumptuous  feasting  and  bankets  as  seldom  in  any  part  of  the  world 

1  The  Howard  MSS.  state  that  John  Cordell  was  the  2nd  son  of  Edmund  Cordell  of  Edmonton 
co.  Middlesex,  and  that  he,  Jolm,  was  buried  at  Melford  the  7  Jan.  1563. 


134  THE    MANORS   OF    SUFFOLK. 

hath  been  seen  before.  The  Maister  of  the  Rolls,  Sir  Wm.  Cordell,  was  one 
of  the  first  that  begaine  this  great  feasting  and  did  light  such  a  candle  to 
the  rest  of  the  shire  that  many  were  glad,  bountifully  and  franckly,  to  follow 
the  same  example,  with  such  charges  and  costs,  as  the  whole  traine  were 
in  some  sorte  pleased  therewith." 

Sir  William  Cordell  is  supposed  to  have  drawn  up  the  Statutes  of  St. 
John's  College,  Oxford,  by  desire  of  the  founder,  Sir  Thomas  Whyte,  who 
appointed  him  visitor  of  the  College  during  his  life.  He  was  an  encourager 
of  learned  men,  and  through  his  aid  Christopher  Laxton  was  able  to  pro- 
duce the  ist  English  Atlas  and  William  Lambarde  dedicated  to  him  his 
famous  book  entitled  "  Archaionomia  "  a  System  of  Saxon  Laws  in  Latin 
1568  in  which  he  acknowledges  the  many  obligations  he  was  under  to  Sir 
William.  In  1553  he  had  a  grant  of  the  dissolved  hospital  of  St.  Saviour's  at 
Bury  and  the  Manor  of  Long  Melford  was  confirmed  to  him  in  1554.'  The 
Patent  of  Confirmation  of  26  Nov.  1554  is  at  Melford  Hall,  according  to 
Sir  Wm.  Parker,  who  states  that  it  contains  the  grant  of  the  demesne  and 
Manor  of  Melford  otherwise  Long  Melford  with  the  park  of  Long  Melford 
in  Suffolk,  with  all  rights  appurtenant  thereto,  as  held  by  the  dissolved 
Abbey  of  St.  Edmund's,  Bury,  to  hold  the  same  of  the  Queen  and  her 
successors  of  her  manor  of  East  Greenwich  in  Kent.  Also  the  advowson 
and  presentation  of  the  parish  church  of  Melford.  Also  the  mansion-house 
called  Melford  Lodge  in  Long  Melford  Park,  with  all  the  deer  in  the  said 
park  with  right  of  free  warren.  Also  the  capital  messuage  of  Melford  Hall 
(the  old  Hall  on  the  site  of  the  presenf),  with  two  closes  of  land  and  pasture 
called  Parkfield,  and  horse  pasture  and  two  meadows  called  Small  Medow  and 
Park  Medow  with  all  buildings,  gardens,  belongings,  &c.,  as  lately  in  the 
occupation  of  Dame  Fraunces  Pennyngton  widow  and  afterwards  in  the 
occupation  of  Francis  Johnson.  Various  lands  are  then  specified,  and  all 
other  farms,  messuages,  lands,  &c.,  in  Melford  and  Acton  and  the  manor  and 
rights  of  Court  of  Melford,  and  the  right  of  market  and  fair.  The  grant  also 
included  some  of  the  lands  and  tithes  which  had  been  alienated  from  Melford 
Church  by  Abbot  Sampson's  grant  to  St.  Saviour's  Hospital.  Amongst  the 
Chancery  Proceedings  in  the  time  of  Elizabeth  will  be  found  an  action  as 
to  the  adjustment  of  accounts  of  William  Necton  as  receiver  of  estates 
late  of  Sir  Wm.  Cordell.1 

Sir  Wm.  Cordell  married  Mary  daughter  and  heir  of  Richard  Clopton 
of  Forehall,  Melford,  but  died  without  leaving  issue  the  ijth  May,  1581,  and 
was  buried  in  the  chancel  of  Melford  Church  the  19  June  1581.  One 
panel  of  the  inscription  on  his  monument  runs  thus  :— 

Hie  Gulielmus  habet  requiem,  Cordellus,  avito 

Stemmate  Vir  clams  ;  clarior  Ingenio. 

In  studiis  primes  consumpsit  fortiter  annos  ; 

Mox  et  Causarum  strenuus  Actor  erat. 

Tanta  Illi  Doctrina  inerat,  Facundia,  tanta, 

Ut  Parlamenti  publica  Lingua  foret. 

Postea  factus  Eques,  Reginae  arcana  Mariae 

Consilia,  et  Patrije  grande  subibat  opus. 

Factus  est  et  Gustos  Rotulorum  ;  urgente  senectl, 

In  Christo  moriens,  coepit  ad  astra  viam. 

Pauperibus  largus,  victum,  vestemque  ministrans, 

Insuper  Hospitii  condidit  llle  Domum. 

1  Originalia  I  and  2  P.  and  M.  3  Pars  Rot.         •  C.P.  ii.  276. 
31.     See  I  M.  3  Pars  Rot.  40. 


MELFORD    (LONG).  135 

The  inscription  is  thus  quaintly  rendered  by  Fuller  : — 

"  Here  William  Cordal  doth  in  rest  remain, 
Great  by  his  birth,  but  greater  by  his  brain  ; 
Plying  his  studies  hard  his  youth  throughout, 
Of  causes  he  became  a  pleader  stout ; 
His  learning  deep  such  eloquence  did  vent, 
He  was  chose  Speaker  of  the  Parliament. 
Afterwards  knight  Queen  Mary  did  him  make, 
And  counsellor,  state-work  to  undertake  ; 
And  Master  of  the  Rolls.     Well  worn  with  age, 
Dying  in  Christ  heaven  was  his  utmost  stage. 
Diet  and  clothes  to  poor  he  gave  at  large 
And  a  fair  almshouse  founded  on  his  charge." 

By  his  will  dated  the  ist  January  1580,  he  devised  lands  and  tithes  for  the 
support  of  the  hospital  for  a  warden  and  twelve  brethren  which  he  had 
founded  in  Melford  and  endowed  with  the  lands  which  belonged  to  the 
dissolved  hospital  of  St.  Saviour  at  Bury  St.  Edmunds,  and  which  afterwards 
received  a  royal  grant  of  incorporation.  He  gave  a  life  interest  in  his 
Melford  property  to  his  wife,  then  to  his  sister  Jane,  wife  of  Richard  Alington 
2nd  son  of  Sir  Giles  Alington  of  Horseheath  co.  Cambridge  for  her  life  and 
then  entailed  the  same  on  his  brothers  Francis  and  Edward  with  remainder 
to  the  heirs  of  his  sister  Jane  Alington  then  a  widow.1  The  charity  given 
by  Sir  William  Cordell's  will  was  confirmed  by  letters  patent  in  the  33  year 
of  Q.  Elizabeth.  The  charity  is  still  in  existence  and  consists  of  a  warden 
and  12  brethren  and  two  sisters  to  attend  upon  them.  The  warden  is 
supplied  with  a  gown  and  suit  of  black  cloth,  and  two  pairs  of  shoes  yearly ; 
and  each  one  of  the  brethren  has  a  suit  of  black  cloth,  and  two  pairs  of 
shoes  yearly,  and  a  gown  every  alternate  year.  There  is  a  common  hall 
wherein  they  dine,  and  to  each  brother  is  allowed  lib.  of  meat,  i  quart  of 
beer,  and  an  allowance  of  bread,  daily.  The  warden  is  allowed  double 
commons,  but  receives  compensation  instead  thereof  in  money.  The 
two  sisters  have  a  similar  allowance  of  provision,  but  are  not  supplied  with 
any  kind  of  clothing  from  the  funds  of  the  charity,  nor  do  they  dine  at 
the  same  table  with  the  warden  and  brethren.  The  will  directs  that  each 
brother  shall  receive  2OS.  by  equal  quarterly  payments,  the  warden  405. 
and  each  sister  405.  ;  but  these  payments  have  been  increased.  The 
Hospital  consists  of  a  quadrangle,  and  is  divided,  so  far  as  regards  three  sides, 
into  12  separate  lodgments  for  the  12  brethren,  who  have  each  a  keeping 
room  and  bed  chamber ;  the  fourth  side  contains  the  common  hall,  the 
warden's  apartments,  and  accommodation  for  the  two  sisters,  together  with 
kitchen,  brewhouse,  &c.  The  whole  is  kept  in  excellent  repair ;  and 
the  income  of  the  charity  is  applied  in  maintaining  and  clothing  the  inmates. 
The  total  expenditure  averages  upwards  of  £800  per  annum. 

Particulars  of  the  lands,  houses,  &c.,  granted  by  Sir  Wm.  Cordell  for 
the  endowment  of  the  Hospital  and  the  Statutes  and  Rules  will  be  found 
amongst  the  Lansdowne  MSS.  in  the  Brit.  Mus.  and  the  Tanner  MSS.  in 
the  Bodleian.2 

A  letter  of  John  Spring  as  to  the  Hospital  with  his  pedigree  will  be 
found  amongst  the  Additional  MSS.  in  the  Brit.  Museum.3  We  find  amongst 
the  Chancery  Proceedings  of  the  time  of  Elizabeth  an  action  for  discovery 
of  effects,  &c.,  in  a  suit  between  Jane  Alington,  George  Carge  and  Edward 

1  Lansd.  MSS.  Brit.  Mus.  66,  50.  3  Add.  6402. 

•  Lansd.  66,  49,  51 ;  Tanner  cxxxvii.  53. 


136  THE    MANORS    OF    SUFFOLK. 

Cordell  executors  of  Sir  William  Cordell,  and  Dame  Mary  Cordell  and  George 
Moore,  concerning  which  Sir  \Yilliam  Cordell  devised  to  his  wife  for  life.' 

Francis  Cordell  died  in  1586'  without  issue,  before  he  had  livery  of 
the  estate,  as  also  did  Edward  in  1594.*  Jane  Alington,  then  a  widow, 
levied  a  fine  of  the  manor  against  Peter  Crisell  and  others  in  1599*  and  died 
on  the  4th  January  1602  leaving  two  daughters  co-heirs,  Mary  who  married 
Sir  John  Savage  knt.  of  Clifton  co.  Chester,  and  Cordelia  married  to  Sir 
John  Stanhope  knt.,  and  was  mother  of  Philip  ist  Earl  of  Chesterfield. 
During  Jane's  holding  an  action  was  brought  in  1599  by  John  Wrighte 
and  Anne  his  wife,  late  wife  of  Robert  Alington,  against  her  and  another, 
to  be  quieted  in  possession  of  the  farm  in  Melford  which  Robert  Alington 
had  hired  of  Jane  Alington  widow,  sister  and  heir  of  Sir  W.  Cordell.5 

This  manor  passed  to  Sir  John  Savage,  in  right  of  his  wife  Mary,  and 
his  son  Thomas  succeeded  in  1609.  Amongst  the  State  Papers  will  be 
found  a  grant  in  1610  from  Sir  Thomas  Savage  to  Wm.  Noy  the  well-known 
lawyer  of  an  annuity  of  £5  issuing  out  of  the  manor  as  a  retaining  fee.6 
Sir  Thomas  Savage  married  Elizabeth,  eldest  daughter  and  eventual  co- 
heir of  Thomas  Lord  Darcy  of  Chiche  which  Lord  Darcy  was  created  the 
5th  July  1621  Viscount  Colchester  and  elevated  the  4  Nov.  1626  to  the 
dignity  of  Earl  Rivers,  both  honours  to  revert  in  default  of  male  issue 
to  his  son-in-law  Sir  Thomas  Savage  and  his  male  issue  who  was  himself 
created  two  days  afterwards  Viscount  Savage  of  Rock  Savage  in  the  County 
of  Chester.  Lord  Savage  resided  at  Melford  Hall,  and  had  a  licence  granted 
to  himself  and  wife  to  impark  lands  in  Melford  in  i6i2.7  It  seems  that 
the  grant  was  by  letters  patent  and  was  of  340  acres  of  park  and  warren 
round  Melford  Hall,  with  the  deer  therein  and  full  rights  of  chase  and 
warren.  Amongst  the  Memoranda  Rolls  7  Car.  I.  will  be  found  a  claim 
by  Thomas,  Viscount  Savage,  of  liberty  within  the  manor.8  We  learn 
something  of  the  home  life  of  the  party  there  from  that  voluminous  writer 
James  Howell,  who  lived  for  some  time  at  the  Hall  as  tutor  in  the  family. 
Writing  in  1619  to  Daniel  Caldwall  he  say :  "  My  dear  Dan, — Though 
considering  my  former  condition  in  life  I  may  now  be  called  a  countryman, 
yet  you  cannot  call  me  a  rustic  (as  you  would  imply  in  your  letter)  as  long 
as  I  live  in  so  civil  and  noble  a  family,  as  long  as  I  lodge  in  so  virtuous 
and  regular  a  house  as  any  I  believe  in  the  land,  both  for  aeconomical  govern- 
ment and  the  choice  company  ;  for  I  never  saw  yet  such  a  dainty  race  of 
children  in  all  my  life  together.  I  never  saw  yet  such  an  orderly  and 
punctual  attendance  of  servants,  nor  a  great  house  so  neatly  kept ;  here 
one  shall  see  no  dog  nor  cat  nor  cage  to  cawse  any  nastiness  within  the 
body  of  the  house.  The  kitchen  and  gutters  and  other  offices  of  noise  and 
drudgery  are  at  the  fag  end  ;  there's  a  back  gate  for  the  beggars  and  the 
meaner  sort  of  swains  to  come  in  at.  The  stables  butt  upon  the  park, 
which,  for  a  chearful,  rising  ground,  for  groves  and  browsing  ground  for 
the  deer,  for  rivulets  of  water,  may  compare  with  any  for  its  highness  in 
the  whole  land.  It  is  opposite  to  the  front  of  the  great  house,  whence  from 
the  gallery  one  may  see  much  of  the  game  when  they  are  a  hunting.  Now 
for  the  gardening  and  costly  choice  flowers,  for  ponds,  for  stately  large 

1  C.P.  i.  29.  4  Fine,  Trin.  41  Eliz. 

•  He  was  buried  at  Long  Melford  the  12  '  Chancery  Proceedings,  /.  Eliz.  iii.  219. 

Nov.  1586.  '  State  Papers,  1610,  633. 

1  Edward  married  Eliz.  or  Anne  dau.  of  '  Originalia,  10  Jac.  I.  3  Pars  Rot.  167. 

-  Harrison,  and  she  was  buried  '  M.  Mich.  Rec.  Rot. 

at  Long  Melford  the  30  Oct.  1586. 


MELFORD    (LONG).  137 

walks  green  and  gravelly,  for  orchards  and  choice  fruits  of  all  sorts,  there 
are  few  the  like  in  England.  Here  you  have  your  Bon  Christian  pear  and 
Bergamot  in  perfection  ;  your  Muscatel  grapes  in  such  plenty  that  there 
are  some  bottles  of  wine  sent  every  year  to  the  King  ;  and  one  Mr.  Daniel, 
a  worthy  gentleman  hard  by,  who  hath  been  long  abroad,  makes  good 
store  in  his  vintage.  Truly  this  house  of  Long  Melford,  tho'  it  be  not  so 
great,  yet  it  is  so  well  compacted  and  contrived  with  such  dainty  con- 
veniences every  way,  that  if  you  saw  the  landskip  of  it  you  would  be 
mightily  taken  with  it,  and  it  would  serve  for  a  choice  pattern  to  build  and 
contrive  a  house  by. 

Your's,    J.    H. 
May  20,  1619.'" 

Lord  Savage  died  in  1635  and  was  buried  at  Macclesfield,  leaving  his 
widow  Elizabeth  surviving,  who  in  1641  was  created  Countess  of  Rivers 
for  life.  She  was  a  Roman  Catholic,  and  the  owner  not  only  of  this  manor, 
but  also  of  St.  Osyth  Priory  in  Essex,  and  large  estates  in  Cheshire  through 
her  father  and  Lady  Lumley.  Her  losses  during  the  Civil  War  are  said  to 
have  exceeded  those  of  any  person,  not  even  excepting  Lord  Arundel  of 
Wardour.  An  Essex  mob  sacked  the  Essex  Priory  and  stripped  the  house, 
even  pulling  off  the  lead  from  the  roof,  and  it  is  said  they  did  not  leave  a 
window  or  door  in  the  place.  The  furniture  of  the  costliest  description 
and  the  plate  and  valuables  to  a  great  amount  were  carried  off  or  destroyed 
by  the  mob,  and  the  Countess  fled  for  her  life  to  her  mansion  house  at 
Melford,  whither  she  was  pursued.  Here  again  she  made  her  escape,  but 
the  havoc  done  by  the  mob  was  very  extensive,  the  hall  being  also  com- 
pletely rifled. 

Peck  in  his  "  Desiderata  Curiosa "  thus  describes  the  sacking  of 
Melford  Hall :  "  The  2Oth  August  1642  the  King  having  left  the  Parlia- 
ment and  thereby  a  loose  reine  being  putt  into  the  mouth  of  the 
unruly  multitute,  many  thousands  swarmed  to  the  pulling  down  of  Long 
Melford  House,  a  gallant-seat  belonging  to  the  Countess  of  Rivers  :  and 
to  the  endangering  of  her  person  and  she  being  a  recusant,  they  made  that 
their  pretence,  but  spoyle  and  plunder  was  their  ayme.  This  furie  was 
not  only  in  the  rabble,  but  many  of  the  better  sort  behav'd  themselves  as 
if  there  had  been  a  dissolution  of  all  government.  No  man  could  remain 
in  his  own  house  without  feare,  nor  bee  abroad  with  safetie." 

The  losses  of  the  Countess  at  St.  Osyth  and  Melford  were  estimated  at 
£100,000,  but  those  who  had  a  more  intimate  acquaintance  with  the  richness 
of  the  furniture,  the  amount  of  costly  hangings  and  choice  paintings  and 
plate,  placed  the  damage  nearer  £150,000,  to  say  nothing  of  the 
destruction  wrought  in  Melford  Park.  On  fleeing  from  Melford  the 
Countess  attempted  to  find  refuge  in  Bury  St.  Edmunds,  but  the  gates  were 
shut  against  her,  and  only  after  considerable  difficulty  did  she  obtain  refuge 
for  the  night  in  the  gates,  the  following  morning  escaping  to  London.  She 
obtained  leave  to  go  abroad,  but  while  preparing  to  start,  her  coach  horses 
were  taken  from  her.  Early  in  1650  owing  to  the  persecutions  of  the 
Fairfax  party,  she  was  arrested  for  debt  and  notwithstanding  the  claim 
of  privilege  as  a  Peeress  was  committed  tc  prison.  Most  of  the  Countess's 
property  in  Essex  was  sequestrated  and  sold  and  she  was  obliged  to  com- 
pound for  her  estates  by  paying  a  fine  of  £16,979.  gs.  lod. 

Amongst  the  State  Papers  are  petitions  to  compound  for  two-thirds  of  a 

1  HowelTs  Letters,  loth  Ed.  1737,  p.  86. 


138  THE    MANORS    OF    SUFFOLK. 

messuage  and  park  in  Melford  by  Elizabeth  Countess  Dowager  of  Rivers  in 
1648.'  She  died  shortly  afterwards — in  fact,  on  the  gth  of  March  the  same 
year  she  was  sent  to  prison,  and  was  succeeded  by  her  son  John  2nd  Viscount 
Savage  and  Earl  Rivers.  He  married  1st  Catherine  daughter  of  William 
Parker,  Lord  Morley  of  Monteagle  by  whom  he  had  issue  with  other  children, 
a  son  Thomas.  His  2nd  wife  was  Mary  daughter  of  Thomas  Ogle  of  South 
Dissington  in  Northumberland.  John  2nd  Lord  Rivers  was  as  unfortunate 
as  the  old  Countess  his  mother,  and  shortly  before  his  death  became  a 
prisoner  in  the  Bench  Prison  in  Southwark.  He  died  however  at  Frodsham 
Castle  on  the  loth  Oct.  1654  and  on  the  night  after  his  death  his  house  was 
destroyed  by  fire.  Leaving  no  will,  the  administration  of  his  personal 
estate  was  granted  to  John  Watts  his  principal  creditor.  Melford  Manor 
however  passed  to  his  widow.  Thomas,  the  eldest  son  and  3rd  Earl  was, 
in  right  of  his  mother,  co-heir  of  the  Baronies  of  Morley,  Monteagle  and 
Marshal.  The  Melford  estates  having  been  in  mortgage  for  some  time  to 
Sir  John  Cordell,  knt.,  in  fact,  from  the  time  of  the  ist  Earl  Rivers,  were 
sold  to  Sir  Robert  Cordell.  It  appears  that  the  Rivers  owed  him  £20,488. 12S. 
and  for  this  sum  and  an  additional  amount  of  £8,511.  8s.  paid  by  Sir  Robert 
to  them,  they  conveyed  to  him  the  estate  with  all  appurtenant  rights, 
and  the  advowson  of  Melford  Church  and  the  right  of  nomination  of  the 
warden  and  brethren  of  the  Hospital  of  the  Holy  Trinity.  In  addition  to 
the  purchase  money  there  was  an  annuity  of  £100  a  year  charged  on  the 
estate  to  a  Mary  Savage  which  continued  to  be  paid  to  1690.  Thus  the 
Melford  Hall  Manor  again  became  the  estate  of  the  Cordells.  Sir  Robert 
Cordell  was  created  a  Baronet  in  1660,  but  the  title  and  the  name  became 
extinct  on  the  death  of  his  grandson  Sir  John  Cordell  who  was  killed  by  a 
fall  from  his  horse  in  1704. 

Sir  Robert  Cordell's  will  is  dated  the  18  Dec.  1679  an(^  he  left  to  his 
heir  John  "  all  the  deere  in  Melford- Parke,  and  the  great  Saphire  Jewell  " 
and  half  of  his  household  stuff,  plate  excepted.  To  his  grandson  John,  son 
of  the  above  John,  his  great  silver  basin  and  ewer,  and  to  his  wife  Dame 
Margaret  half  of  his  household  stuff .  His  son  Sir  John  Cordell  inherited  the 
Melford  Hall  estate,  and  his  will  is  dated  the  26  Aug.  1690  by  which  he 
appointed  his  wife  Dame  Elizabeth  his  executrix  and  divisesto  his  son  John 
his  estates,  but  provides  that  his  widow  shall  reside  at  Melford  Hall  until  their 
son  was  of  age  or  married.  Dame  Elizabeth  Cordell  died  in  1709.  Sir  John 
was  killed  by  a  fall  as  already  stated  in  1704,  at  the  early  age  of  27.  He  had 
married  Eleanora  daughter  of  Joseph  Haskin  Stiles  merchant  of  London 
but  died  without  issue  leaving  his  two  sisters  Elizabeth  and  Margaret  his 
co-heirs.  Elizabeth  married  Thomas  King,  of  Great  Thurlow,  who  was 
killed  in  a  duel  in  1698  and  his  widow  died  in  1706,  leaving  an  only  son 
who  died  unmarried,  when  Margaret  became  sole  heir  to  her  brother's 
estate.  She  married  Charles  Firebrace  eldest  son  of  Sir  Basil  Firebrace  Knt. 
and  Bart,  whose  only  sister  Hester  married  Basil  Fielding,  4th  Earl  of 
Denbigh.  Charles  Firebrace  inherited  in  his  wife's  right.  There  is  an 
action,  particulars  of  which  are  in  the  Exchequer  Depositions,  in  1722,  1723, 
1724  at  Melford  respecting  the  Rectory  and  Parish  of  Melford — lease  of 
tithes  granted  by  Dr.  Matthew  Bisby  to  Sir  Robert  Cordell,  Bart,  and  John 
Cordell  his  son — Melford  Park,  woods  called  "  Firmage  "  and  "  Spelthorn  " 
&c. — James  Johnson,  Charles  Firebrace  and  others.  A  letter,  too,  by  this 
Sir  Charles  Firebrace  to  Tanner  as  to  a  caveat  against  Mr.  Johnson,  Rector 
of  Melford,  annexing  a  pew  to  his  house  in  172!  will  be  found  amongst  the 

'  State  Papers,  Cal.  of  Comp.  1648,  p.  1857. 


MELFORD    (LONG).  139 

Tanner  MSS.  in  the  Bodleian.'  Sir  Charles  Firebrace  died  in  1727  and  was 
succeeded  by  his  only  son,  Sir  Cordell,  who  was  elected  a  Knight  of  the  Shire 
for  Suffolk  in  1737  and  remained  a  member  of  the  House  until  his  death  in 
1759.  Sir  Cordell  Firebrace  married  Bridget  relict  of  Edward  Ewer  of 
Ipswich  and  3rd  daughter  of  Philip  Bacon  2nd  son  of  Sir  Nicholas  Bacon 
Bart,  of  Shrubland  Hall,  but  dying  the  28  Nov.  1759  without  issue  the 
manor  passed  under  his  will  to  his  widow  who  re-married  the  Hon.  Wm. 
Campbell  of  Lyston  Hall  co.  Essex  uncle  to  the  Duke  of  Argyle  and  died 
the  10  July  1782  at  the  age  of  80.  In  1785  Melford  Hall  and  the  estate 
were  sold  under  the  will  of  Lady  Firebrace  to  Sir  Harry  Parker,  Bart,  eldest 
son  of  Admiral  Hyde  Parker  a  member  of  an  old  Devonshire  and  royalist 
family.  It  is  a  singular  coincidence  that  as  early  as  1336  a  William  le  Parker 
should  have  been  connected  with  Long  Melford.  He  is  described  as  of  this 
place  in  the  Patent  Rolls  of  Edw.  III.* 

Sir  Harry  Parker  married  Bridget  daughter  of  William  Cresswell  of 
Cresswell  co.  Northumberland  and  dying  the  15  Jan.  1812  was  succeeded 
by  his  elder  son  Sir  William  Parker,  at  whose  death  the  21  April  1830  un- 
married, the  manor  passed  to  his  brother  Sir  Hyde  Parker,  M.P.  for  West 
Suffolk,  who  died  the  21  March  1856  and  was  succeeded  by  his  cousin  Sir 
William  Parker  gth  Bart.,  who  married  Sophia  Mary  2nd  daughter  of 
Nathanial  Clarke  Barnardiston  of  The  Ryes,  Sudbury,  and  dying  in  1891, 
the  manor  passed  to  his  son,  the  Rev.  Sir  William  Hyde  Parker  loth  Bart, 
who  is  the  present  lord. 

Extracts  from  the  Court  Rolls  in  1670  will  be  found  in  the  Brit. 
Museum.3 

Of  the  old  manor  house  little  is  known,  but  from  a  lease  made  by  the 
last  Abbot  of  Bury  it  is  clear  that  a  part  of  the  house  was  brick ;  some  portion 
was  a  timber-framed  erection  with  the  usual  clay  wattle  between,  for  the 
repair  of  which  the  tenant  was  bound  to  find  all  manner  of  clay  and  straw 
made  and  laid  ready.  Sir  William  Parker  says  :  "  The  mansion  was  moated 
round  on  the  west,  north  and  east ;  on  this  latter  side,  as  on  the  others, 
the  moat  rah  straight  ;  the  present  semicircular  dry  moat  being  a  much 
later  alteration.  In  the  front  of  the  house  beyond  the  sundial  there  stood 
a  gate  house,  the  foundations  and  paving  of  which  still  exist  undisturbed 
a  short  distance  under  the  surface.  The  present  park  was  then  divided  into 
many  field  inclosures,  as  those  called  Long  Pasture,  Horse  Pasture,  Nether 
Home  Fields,  &c.,  the  site  of  the  fences  of  which  can  be  yet  traced  by  any 
one  who  knows  the  history  of  their  old  positions."4 

Sir  Wm.  Cordell  erected  the  present  mansion,  which  however  has 
received  many  alterations.  Sir  Wm.  Parker  in  1873  gives  an  interesting 
description  of  its  then  condition. 

Arms  of  Cordell  :  Gules,  a  chevron,  ermine,  betw.  three  griffins'  heads 
erased,  arg. — of  Firebrace  :  Azure,  on  a  bend  or,  three  crescents,  sable, 
betw.  two  roses,  argent,  seeded  or,  barbed  vert. — of  Parker  :  Sa.  a  buck's 
head  caboshed,  betw.  two  flaunches,  arg. 

MONKS  MELFORD  OR  MELFORD  MONACHORUM. 

This  was  given  in  Saxon  times  by  Alfric  son  of  Witgar,  to  the  Abbot 
of  St.  Edmund  who  in  1199  granted  it  to  the  Hospital  of  St.  Saviour  without 

'  Tanner  xx.  73.  3  Add.  Ch.  10552. 

*  Pat.  Rolls,  10  Edw.  III.  pt.  ii.  2od.  4  History  of  Melford,  p.  310. 


I4o  THE    MANORS    OF   SUFFOLK. 

the  Northgate  of  Bury.  The  charter  of  the  Abbot  was  confirmed  by  King 
John  and  approved  by  a  Bull  of  Pope  Celestine  III.  with  the  concurrence 
of  the  Bishop  of  Norwich  and  the  Archbishop  of  Canterbury. 

The  endowment  consisted  of  a  warden,  12  chaplains,  6  clerks,  12  poor 
men  and  12  poor  women.  The  manor  held  by  the  Hospital,  according  to 
an  entry  in  the  Register  of  Abbot  John  of  Norwold  in  1286-7,  consisted  of 
136  acres  of  arable  land,  7  acres  of  mowing  meadow,  3  acres  and  a  half  of 
pasture,  and  4  acres  of  wood.  The  hospital  also  had  72  acres  of  arable 
land,  i  acre  of  mowing  meadow  and  3  roods  of  wood  which  the  villeins 
held  with  their  messuages  from  the  said  manor,  and  also  two  cottars,  who 
held  this  manor  and  a  rood  and  a  half  of  land  with  their  houses.  Some 
interesting  leases  of  the  manor  will  be  found  in  Sir  William  Parker's  Hist, 
of  Long  Melford.1 

On  the  Dissolution  this  manor  passed  to  the  Crown  and  was  in  1545 
granted  to  William  Clopton.*  The  family  is  supposed  to  have  taken  their 
name  from  the  parish  of  Clopton  in  the  Hundred  of  Samford  and  to  have 
given  it  to  a  manor  in  Wickhambrook  before  the  Conquest.  The  hamlet 
Clopton  of  Wickhambrook  occurs  in  Domesday  Survey.  The  Cloptons 
had  large  possessions  in  Suffolk,  Essex,  and  Cambridge,  and  allied  them- 
selves with  several  distinguished  families.  Sir  Symonds  D'Ewes,  whose 
pedigree  of  the  family  is  amongst  the  Harl.  MSS.  in  the  Brit.  Mus.,  and 
who  was  particularly  interested  in  the  family,  having  married  one  of  the 
members,  has  in  a  quaint  way  referred  to  the  alliances  :  "  The  unworthiest 
match  that  ever  any  Clopton  had  was  the  alliance  of  Sir  Wm.  Clopton  of 
Kentwell  with  Johan  daughter  of  Sir  William  Marrow  knt.  an  alderman 
of  the  City  of  London  in  the  time  of  Hen.  VII.,  and  the  noblest  match 
was  that  of  John  Clopton,  son  and  heir  of  the  said  Sir  William  Clopton, 
with  Elizabeth  daughter  of  John  Roydon  Esq.  and  Margaret,  his  wife 
daughter  of  Thomas  Knyvet  Esq.,  of  Great  Stanway,  Essex,  and  the 
co-heir  of  many  great  and  ancient  families." 

The  manor  granted  to  William  Clopton  was  to  be  held  of  the  Crown 
in  chief  by  the  fortieth  part  of  a  knight's  service  and  an  annual  payment 
of  325.  4%d.  at  Michaelmas.  The  contents  of  the  manor  are  thus  given  : 
A  pightle  called  Le  Barneyard  containing  by  estimation  i  acre.  A  close  of 
arable  land  next  to  the  Barneyard  with  the  site  of  the  manor  house,  6£ 
acres.  A  building  called  Le  Tiled  Barne.  Four  inclosures  of  meadow 
and  pasture  called  Bargate  Field,  Crow  Medow,  Middlefield,  and  Prestly- 
field  containing  together  58  acres.  A  parcel  of  land  and  marsh  called  Le 
Cangle  containing  £  acre.  A  pasture  on  Kentwell  Down  near  the  park 
containing  4^  acres  and  27  perches.  Five  parcels  of  land  and  pasture 
between  the  mansion  house  and  the  cross  called  Clopton's  Cross.  Two 
groves  of  wood  between  the  mansion  house  and  the  road  leading  to  Bury. 
Also  all  tithes  of  hay,  grass  and  grain  and  all  other  tithes  of  the  above 
lands  ;  and  also  all  other  tithes  of  land  from  the  tenement  called  Bochers 
on  the  east  side  of  the  said  road  to  the  end  of  Melford  Park.  A  further 
account  says  :  "  To  this  manor  belongs  a  Court  from  3  weeks  to  3  weeks, 
and  many  rents  of  Assize  of  free  tenants  and  divers  customary  or  copyhold 
tenants,  whose  fines  are  arbitrary  ;  but  only  one  tenement  lately  [i.e., 
circa  1640]  in  tenure  of  William  Miller  deceased  which  is  claimed  to  be 
certain  upon  every  alienation  and  descent." 

1  Pp.  24-29.  App.    II   p.    192 ;    and   the  Grant 

1  Particulars  for  this  Grant  will  be  found  itself,  Originalia,  37  Hen.  VIII.  7 

in    the    Record   Office,  D.K.R.   9.  Pars  Rot.  37. 


MELFORD   (LONG).  141 

William  Clopton,  the  purchaser  of  Monks  Melford,  married  Margaret 
daughter  of  Sir  Thomas  Jermyn  of  Rushbrook,  knt.,  by  whom  he  had 
issue  Thomas  Clopton,  John  Clopton,  Francis  Clopton,  William  Clopton, 
Walter  Clopton,  Henry  Clopton,  Edmund  Clopton  and  6  daughters.  A 
deed  amongst  the  Harl.  Charters  dated  the  igth  July  31  Hen.  VIII.  [1539] 
effected  an  arrangement  between  Sir  Thomas  Jermyn  and  John  Clopton 
and  Elizabeth  his  wife  on  the  marriage  of  Margaret  Jermyn  with  William 
Clopton.  Four  hundred  marks  were  paid  by  Sir  Thomas  Jermyn,  200  to 
John  Clopton  and  200  to  the  executors  of  Sir  William  Clopton  in  satis- 
faction of  a  charge  of  Dame  Thomasine  Clopton.  An  additional  100  marks 
was  also  paid  to  satisfy  the  portions  of  8  of  the  children  of  the  said  John 
Clopton  and  Elizabeth  his  wife.1 

Acquittance  for  homage  of  this  manor  1552  will  be  found  amongst 
the  Harleian  Charters  in  the  Brit.  Mus.,2  and  also  for  the  year  1635. 3 
William  Clopton  died  the  17  Aug.  1562,  and  was  succeeded  by  his  eldest 
surviving  son  and  heir  Francis  Clopton.  In  1564  the  2  Jan.  6  Eliz.,  he 
made  a  conveyance  of  the  manor  to  Sir  Ambrose  Jermyn  and  Ralph  Cootes 
clerk,  in  trust  for  certain  purposes,4  and  married  Anne  d.  of  Robert  Crane. 
He  died  in  1578  without  issue,  when  the  manor  passed  to  his  brother 
William  Clopton.  He  married  Anne  d.  of  Edward  Elms  of  Linford  co. 
Norf.,  and  died  in  1588  without  issue,  being  succeeded  by  his  half-brother 
Thomas  Clopton  second  but  eldest  surviving  son  of  his  father's  second 
marriage  to  Mary  daughter  of  George  Perient.  He  married  Mary  daughter 
of  Sir  William  Waldegrave  of  Smallbridge  ancestor  of  the  present  Lord 
Waldegrave.  Amongst  the  Chancery  Proceedings  in  the  time  of  Q.  Elizabeth 
will  be  found  an  action  by  Anne  Clopton  widow  against  Thomas  Clopton 
and  others  respecting  the  Manors  of  Kentwell  and  lands  in  Melford,  Manor 
of  Melford  Monachorum  or  Monks  Melford  and  tithes  in  Melford.5 

Thomas  Clopton  by  his  will  in  1598  left  to  his  wife  Mary  Waldegrave 
"  the  use  and  occupacion  of  all  his  waineskott  and  glasse  in  and  about  his 
mancion  to  be  and  remaine  as  they  then  were,  and  by  noe  meanes  to  be 
removed  or  altered  ;  and  also  the  occupyinge  of  the  hanginges  of  tapestry 
whiche  serve  for  his  grete  chamber  of  his  saide  house  for  forty  yeres,  yff 
the  saide  Mary  shall  so  longe  live."  He  then  entailed  the  same.  He  lies 
buried  in  the  Kentwell  chapel,  near  the  door  of  which  is  a  brass  plate 
with  the  following  inscription  : — 

Depositum  Thomae  Clopton  Armiger,  sub  hoc  marmore  tumulati 

Filii  et  Haeredis  (quatuor 

grandioribus  natu  Fratribus,  Thoma,  Francisco, 

Willielmo,  et  Georgio  sine  Prole  extmctis), 

Willielmi  Clopton  Armigeri  et  Marias  Filiae 

•  Georgii  Perient,  generosi,  secundas  suas  con- 

jugis  iste  Thomas,  ex  Maria  uxore  suo  Filia 

tercia  Willielmis  Waldegrave  Militis,  et 
Elizabethae  Mildmay  Consortis  suae  duobus 
susceptis  Filiis,  Willielmo  Clopton  milite 
et  Waltero  Clopton  Armigero  ;  et  filiabus 
totidem  Elizabeth!  et  Maria  nuncupatis 
placide  in  Domino  obdormivit  die  xi.  Febr.  A°.  Dnii 
MCXCVII.  A°.  xl.  Regin.  Eliz.  superstite  relicta 

eadem  Maria,  quae  duobus  Viri  clarissimi 
morte  non  exactis  annis  die  xix.  Decembr.  A".  Dni. 
MCXCIX".  A°.  xlii.  Reginae,  ejusdem,  ultimum  Naturae 
debitum  persolvit ;  et  sepelitur  in  Ecclesia 
Sancti  Martini  Westmonasteriensis. 

'  Harl.  55  H.  46.  4  Draft  in  Harl.  MSS.  Brit.  Mus.  995 

•  Harl.  48  D.  38-39.  5  C.P.  i.  188; 

3  Harl.  49  E.  40. 


i42  THE    MANORS    OF  SUFFOLK. 

At  the  time  of  Thomas's  death  his  son  William  Clopton  was  an  infant, 
and  amongst  the  Harleian  MSS.  in  the  Brit.  Mus.  is  a  memorandum  of  Sir 
William  Waldegrave  the  elder  his  guardian  as  to  his  entrance  on  Melford  Green, 
in  dispute  with  Sir  Thomas  Savage  as  parcel  of  the  Manor  of  Monks  Melford.1 
Sir  William  Clopton  married  first  Anne  daughter  of  Sir  Thomas  Barnardis- 
ton  of  Clare  Priory, knt.,  "a  gentlewoman  of  exact  beauty  and  comliness  and 
of  exemplary  piety,"  who  died  at  the  early  age  of  20;  and  2ndly,  Elizabeth 
daughter  of  Sir  Giles  Alington  of  Horseheath,  and  widow  of  Sir  Henry 
Pallavicini  of  Babraham  in  the  County  of  Cambridge.  He  was  knighted 
by  King  James  at  Newmarket  in  1613  and  died  n  March  1618,  at  the  age 
of  27.  He  had  two  sons  by  his  2nd  wife,  Edward  and  William,  but  they 
died  infants  in  1618  and  1619.*  By  his  first  wife  he  had  an  only  daughter 
Anne,  who  became  at  the  early  age  of  thirteen  the  wife  of  the  celebrated 
antiquary  Sir  Symonds  D'Ewes,  Bart.  Very  interesting  particulars  respect- 
ing their  courtship  will  be  found  in  the  Autobiography  of  Sir  Symonds 
D'Ewes.  On  Sir  William  Clopton's  death  the  manor  passed  to  his  widow 
Elizabeth  who  remarried  Sir  John  Tracy.  Amongst  the  Harleian  MSS. 
in  the  Brit.  Mus.  is  a  statement  of  accounts  between  this  Sir  John  Tracy 
and  his  tenants  of  the  farm  of  Monks  Melford3  and  a  grant  by  him  and  his 
wife  Elizabeth  with  Sir  Symonds  D'Ewes  to  Sir  Roger  Martin,  a  copyholder 
of  the  manor,  of  authority  to  cut,  fell,  and  stub  up  30  Pollards  or  Boiling 
trees  in  i65O.4 

Sir  Symonds  D'Ewes  had  several  children  by  his  marriage  with  Anne 
Clopton,  but  they  all  died  in  infancy,  except  Cecilia,  or  Sissellia.  Their 
first  son  named  Clopton  "  a  goodly  sweet  child  born  "  died  soon  after  birth 
through  "  the  cursed  ignorance  or  neglect  of  such  as  were  employed  " 
about  the  lady  during  her  lying  in.  Two  other  sons  twin  born,  survived 
but  a  few  hours  after  their  premature  birth  which  was  occasioned  "  by  some 
hurt  to  Lady  D'Ewes  by  travelling  in  her  coach  in  Bury  Street  "  during  the 
festival ;  and  their  fourth  son  also  named  Clopton  died  before  it  was 
two  years  old  of  the  rickets,  which  were  produced  "  by  their  pitching 
upon  a  proud,  fretting  ill-conditioned  woman  for  a  nurse  "  and  aggravated 
by  the  unskilful  treatment  of  "  Dr.  Despotine,  an  Italian  physician  at 
Bury."5  Lady  D'Ewes  died  of  the  small  pox  in  1641  and  the  distressing 
circumstances  are  fully  detailed  in  her  husband's  Autobiography. 

The  following  year  the  sorrowing  husband  married  the  daughter  of 
Sir  Henry  Willoughby  and  dying  in  1650  was  succeeded  in  his  title  and 
paternal  estates  by  his  son  Sir  Willoughby  D'Ewes,  but,  as  both  Sir  Wm. 
Parker  and  Mr.  Tymms  in  their  account  of  Kentwell  Hall  say,  Kentwell 
Hall  Manor  descended  to  Lady  D'Ewes'  daughter  Cecilia  or  Sissilia,  and  was 
carried  by  marriage  to  her  husband  Sir  Thomas  Darcy  Bart,  of  St.  Osyth, 
Essex,  who  came  to  reside  at  Kentwell  Hall,  and  was  created  a  baronet  in 
1660,  at  which  period  he  made  considerable  repairs  in  the  interior  of  the 
Hall.  Lady  Darcy  died  the  29  May  1661,  without  issue,  and  was  buried 
in  the  Kentwell  chapel  in  Melford  Church  on  the  ist  June  following. 

As  the  Manor  of  Monks  Melford  was  derived  in  the  same  way  as  Kent- 
well,  there  can  be  little  doubt  that  it  followed  the  same  line  of  devolution 
as  Kentwell,  but  the  Davy  MSS.  certainly  enter  Sir  Willoughby  D'Ewes 
as  lord  on  the  death  of  his  father  Sir  Symonds  D'Ewes.  The  matter  is 
free  from  doubt,  and  Davy's  error  is  apparent  from  the  particulars  of  sale 

•  Harl.  97.  «  Harl.  98. 

•  I. P.M.,  i  Car.  I..  No.  71  (1625).  '  Tymms,  in  the  Suff.  Int.,  vol.  2,  p.  69. 
'  Harl.  98. 


MELFORD    (LONG). 


143 


in  1676-7,  when  Sir  Thomas  Darcy  sold  to  Thomas  Robinson.  These 
particulars  are  headed  "  The  Manors  of  Kentwell  and  Monks  Melford  with 
the  lands  thereunto  belonging."  The  Particulars  which  are  given  by  Sir 
William  Parker  are  as  follows  : — 


ACRES. 


IN  THE  LANDLORD'S  OWN  HANDS. 


VALUE  OF  RENTAL. 
£  s.    d. 


150          Park,  orchards,  gardens  and  yards,  about  150 

acres  at  155.  per  acre 112  10    6 

50          Park  lay  and  Maypole  field,  about  50  acres  at 

13$.  40!.  per  acre 32    o    o 

21          Crow  meadow,  part  arable  and  tithe  free,  21 

acres  at  2os.  per  an 21     o    o 

37          Upper   Monks   and   small   crofts,    most   tithe 

free,  about  37  acres  at  145.  per  acre  . .      . .       25     o     0 
2          The  hop-ground,  stocked  and  planted,  near  2 

acres,  at  £3.  55.  per  acre        6  10     o 

The  tithe  of  hay,  corn,  &c.,  of  800  acres  of  land 

belonging  to  Monks  Manor 3100 

Free  and  copyhold  rents  of  both  manors  . .      . .       14    o    o 


260 

ACRES. 

210 

260 

80 

65 
55 

12 

682 
41 

IO 
25 
76 


£242    o    o 


LET  TO  TENANTS. 


VALUED  RENTAL. 
£   S.  d. 

Zeph.  Lungley,  for  Monks  Manor,  mostly  tithe- 
free,  about  210  acres  at  los.  an  acre . .  . .  100  o  o 

Robert  Golding,  for  the  Kell  farm,  about  260 

acres  at  6s.  per  acre 82  o  o 

Ditto  for  another  tenement,  and  lands,  80 

acres  at  6s.  per  acre  25  o  o 

John  Park,  about  65  acres  at  6s.  per  acre . .      . .       20    o    o 

Wm.  Smith,  of  Stanstead,  about  55  acres  at  ^6s. 

per  acre 1600 

Edward  Smith,  of  Stanstead,  about  12  acres  at 

75.  6d.  per  acre  4  10  o 


Robert  Golding,  for  underwood,  of  about  41 
acres  at  6s.  8d.  per  acre- 

Ditto,  for  underwood,  10  acres,  tithe  free,  at 
8s.  6d.  per  acre  

Edward  Johnson,  for  underwood,  25  acres  at 
7$.  6d.  per  acre  

Widow  Muggins,  for  a  tenement  and  yard 


13  13    4 

492 


9    7 

I    10 


6 
o 


1,018  total  A. 


Total  £518  10    o 


Kentwell  Hall  was  described  as  a  "  very  faire  brick  house  with  12 
wainscot  rooms,  the  park  stored  with  above  150  deere,  a  double  dovehouse, 
fish  ponds,  and  other  conveniencys,  besides  timber  on  the  grounds  and 
woods  considerable."  The  purchaser  Thomas  Robinson  was  Prothonotary 
of  the  Court  of  Common  Pleas,  and  was  subsequently  knighted  and  created 
a  Baronet  by  Chas.  II.  in  1681-2.  Two  years  later  the  unfortunate  Baronet 
lost  his  life  by  leaping  out  of  his  chamber  window  in  the  Temple  to  avoid 
the  fury  of  a  fire  which  had  broken  out  near  his  chambers.  He  was  succeeded 
by  his  son  Sir  Lumley  Robinson  who  died  in  1684,  and  the  manor  passed 
to  his  son  Sir  Thomas  Robinson  3rd  Bart.,  who  married  Elizabeth  daughter 
of  Sir  Thomas  Hare  of  Stow  Bardolph,  and  sold  the  manor  to  John  Moore. 
He  by  his  will  bequeathed  to  the  minister  and  churchwardens  of  Melford 
for  the  time  being  the  sum  of  £100  in  trust  to  purchase  lands  and  tenements 


144  THE    MANORS    OF  .SUFFOLK. 

and  distribute  the  rents  thereof  annually  among  20  poor  old  men  or  widows 
above  the  age  of  60  years,  who  do  not  take  alms  of  the  parish  and  who 
frequent  the  Church  of  England.  John  Moore  died  in  1714  and  the  manor 
passed  to  his  nephew  John  Moore  who  died  in  1753,  when  it  passed 
to  his  son  Richard  Moore  who  died  in  1782,  when  the  manor  passed  to  his 
son  Richard  Moore,  who  was  High  Sheriff  of  the  County  in  1812,  and 
in  1823  sold  the  manor  to  Robert  Hart  Logan,  merchant,  of  London.  He 
married  Nancy  daughter  and  co-heir  of  Robert  Sarvice,  and  in  1828  served 
the  office  of  High  Sheriff  of  the  County.  In  1835  ne  unsuccessfully,  but  in 
1837  successfully  contested  the  Western  Division  of  Suffolk.  He  died 
suddenly  on  the  13  April  1838,  and  in  the  same  year  the  manor  was  purchased 
by  the  trustees  of  Captain  Edward  Starkie  Bence,  second  son  of  Col.  Bence, 
then  a  minor.  The  manor  is  now  vested  in  Edward  Starkie  Bence. 

Amongst  the  Harleian  Charters  in  the  Brit.  Mus.  is  said  to  be  a  bond 
on  purchase  of  this  manor  in  1540.'  Pardons  on  alienation  of  the  manor 
will  be  found  in  the  same  collection,  1589  and  1634,'  and  a  grant  of  an 
annuity  in  1599  from  the  manor  is  also  in  the  same  collection.3 

Of  Monks  Manor  house  Sir  Wm.  Parker  says,  "  On  Monks  Manor  there 
formerly  stood  a  manor  house,  concerning  which  no  descriptive  records 
remain,  except  that  it  continued  to  be  named  in  the  abuttals  of  the  priests' 
house  or  college  as  Monks  Manor  house,  with  barn,  buildings  and  yards. 
Its  site  was  therefore  somewhere  near  the  north-east  end  of  the  church, 
probably  where  part  of  the  broken  ground  in  Kentwell  Park,  near  the 
churchyard,  indicates  the  position  of  former  buildings  ;  and  a  house  which 
presumably  was  this  manor  house  is  shown  as  standing  on  that  spot  near 
the  college  or  priests'  house  in  the  Melford  Manor  maps  of  1613  and  1615, 
and  also  on  an  old  map  of  1677.  The  date  of  its  erection  and  of  its  destruc- 
tion are  equally  uncertain,  though  perhaps  from  some  context  it  may  be 
surmised  that  it  was  pulled  down  towards  the  close  of  the  I7th  century. 
It  is  mentioned  in  one  document  as  still  standing  in  1674." 

Arms  of  Robinson  :  Vert,  on  a  chevron,  betw.  three  bucks  trippant,or, 
three  cinquefoils,  gules. 

LUTON'S  MANOR. 

This  was  held  of  the  Abbot  of  St.  Edmunds  in  free  socage  for  16  pence 
a  year  in  lieu  of  all  services,  and  after  the  dissolution  of  the  Abbey  it  is 
described  as  held  on  the  same  terms  "  from  the  Crown  and  from  the  Hundred 
of  Babergh  which  hundred  was  formerly  parcel  of  the  ancient  possessions  of 
the  Abbot  of  St.  Edmunds."  It  passed  in  1354  from  Sir  John  de  Luton 
to  John  Littel  and  Marole  his  wife.  A  grant  from  William  fil.  Radulfi 
de  Elmeswelle,  John  de  Luton  and  Margery  his  wife  of  lands  in  Melford 
in  the  time  of  Edw.  II.-Edw.  III.  will  be  found  amongst  the  Stowe 
Charters  in  the  British  Museum.4  In  1380  it  was  vested  in  Sir  Thomas 
Clopton.  He  married  Katherine  de  Mylde  the  heiress  of  Wm.  de  Mylde 
and  died  in  1383,  when  the  manor  passed  to  his  widow  who  remarried 
Sir  William  Tendringknt.  Alice  the  issue  of  this  last  marriage  married  Sir 
John  Howard,  who  was  the  father  of  Sir  Robert  Howard  the  father  of  John 
Howard  ist  Duke  of  Norfolk.  Lady  Tendring,  the  Mylde  heiress,  made  her 
will  the  24  Feb.  1403,  and  left  to  the  High  Altar  of  Melford  a  marc.  To 
Thomas,  her  husband's  chaplain,  half  a  marc.  To  Margaret  her  maid  a  marc. 

1  Harl.  48  D.  31.  '  Harl.  51  H.  32. 

'  Harl.  51  H.  29,  53  H;  9.  «  Stowe  Ch.  246. 


MELFORD  (LONG).  145 

To  her  two  gentlemen  chamberlains  each  40  pence.  To  John  her  husband's 
cook  40  pence.  To  Thomas  the  baker  40  pence.  To  her  daughter  Alice 
who  became  a  great  heiress  and  the  ancestress  of  the  Howards  she  left  all 
her  headgear,  except  two  fillets  of  pearls  of  lesser  value,  and  all  her  kever- 
chefs,  also  a  furred  cloak  and  other  furs,  a  long  chest  and  her 
napery,  &c.  To  Sir  William  Clopton  her  son1  by  her  first  marriage 
she  left  a  piece  of  silver  or  covered  cup  with  six  silver  shells  ;  a  bed  of  white 
worsted  stained  with  figures  of  men  and  women,  and  another  bed  and 
mattress  ;  a  Paris  napkin  with  a  long  towell  of  the  same  workmanship  ; 
a  green  vestment  for  a  chaplain  ;  a  missal ;  and  a  book  called  a  Byble ; 
a  piece  of  silver  called  a  stondynggepec  with  a  cover  with  the  head  of  a 
leopard  ;  and  a  chest  called  the  great  cofre.  Finally  she  left  to  every 
beggar  coming  to  her  funeral  two  pence. 

On  Katherine  Tendring's  death  the  manor  passed  to  her  son  William 
Clapton  who  made  considerable  purchases  of  property  from  his  cousin 
Sir  Wm.  Clopton  of  Wickhambrook.  He  married  twice,  first  Margery 
daughter  of  Sir  Roger  Drury  by  whom  he  had  issue  Wm.  Clopton  who 
died  young,  and  other  children ;  and  2ndly  Margery  daughter  and  heir  of 
Elias  Franceys,  from  which  latter  marriage  descend  the  three  families 
of  Clopton  settled  at  Kentwell  Hall,  at  Castelins  in  Groton  and  at  Lyston 
in  Essex.  Amongst  the  Harleian  Charters  are  the  following  deeds  in  1406 
and  1407  :— 

Sciant  p'sentes  quod  ego  Will'us  Clopton  filius  et  heres  Thome  Clopton 
militis  dedi,  &c.  Will'mo  Mylde  de  Clare  et  Rogero  Reue  de  Melford  omnia 
ilia  terras  que  vocant'  Luytones  in  villis  de  Melford,  Schymplynes  et 
Alpheton  que  michi  descendebant  jure  hereditar'  post  mortem  predict' 
Thome  et  Kat'ine  uxoris  sue  Habend'  &c.  Hiis  testibz  Johne  Rookwoode, 
Waltero  Glemesford,  Johne  Hoo  et  aliis.  Dat'  apud  Melford  p'dictam 
vicesimo  tercio  die  mensis  marcij  anno  R.  R.  Henrici  quarti  post  con- 
questum  octavo.2 

Sciant  quod  nos  Willm's  Mylde  de  Clare  et  Rogerus  Reue  de  Melford 
dimisimus  Willielmo  Clopton  filio  Thome  Clopton  milit'  et  Margerie  uxore 
ejusdem  Willi  Clopton  omnia  ilia  terras  que  vocant'  Luytones  in  villis  de 
Melforde,  Schymplyng  et  Alpheton  que  "habuimus  ex  dono  p'fat'  Willielmi 
Clopton  and  que  fuer'nt  Thome  Clopton  patris  p'dicti  Willielmi,  Habend' 
&c.  Hiis  testibz  Roger  Drury  milit',  Johe  Rookwode,  Roberto  Cook, 
Waltero  Glemysforde,  Johe  Hoo  et  aliis.  Dat'  apud  Melforde  p'dict :  die 
Mercurij  prox'  post'  festum  ....  Anno  R.  R.  Henrici  quarti  post 
conquestum  octavo.3 

William  Clopton  died  in  1446  and  his  effigy  is  in  the  recessed  tomb 
in  the  north  aisle  of  the  choir  of  the  church.  He  resided  at  Lutons  for  it  is 
mentioned  as  his  dwelling-house  in  his  will.  The  manor  then  passed  to  his 
son  and  heir  John  by  his  second  marriage.  He  was  a  hot  Lancasterian  and 
with  difficulty  saved  his  head.  Together  with  the  Earl  of  Oxford,  his  son 
Aubrey,  William  Tyrell  and  Sir  Thomas  Tuddenham  he  found  himself  in  the 
Tower  on  the  charge  of  corresponding  with  Margaret  of  Anjou.  All  the 
prisoners  above  mentioned  were  beheaded  on  Tower  Hill  Feb.  22nd  1461 
except  Clopton,  who  managed  to  escape.  He  had  served  the  office  of  High 
Sheriff  of  Suffolk  and  Norfolk  in  1451-2  and  having  married  Alice  sister  of 
Sir  Robert  Darcy  of  Maldon,  Essex,  died  in  1497.  His  will  is  dated 

1  Her  elder  son  Thomas  Clopton  had  died  "  Harl.  48  D.  12. 
shortly  after  his  father  and  in  his  3  Harl.  54  A.  22. 
mother's  lifetime. 


146  THE    MANORS    OF   SUFFOLK. 

the  4  Nov.  1494,  and  is  curious  as  it  illustrates  the  customs  of  the  age.  He 
particularises  the  mortuary  fees  to  be  paid  in  kind  at  his  burial,  and  indicates 
what  the  custom  of  Melford  was.  The  frequent  scandals  which  arose 
respecting  these  mortuary  fees  occasioned  the  passing  of  the  Act  of  21 
Hen.  VIII.,  regulating  and  controlling  not  only  these  fees,  but  also  the 
probate  duties  of  the  Ecclesiastical  Courts.  Sir  Wm.  Parker,  in  his  History 
of  Long  Melford,  mentions  that  there  are  instances  where  in  furtherance 
of  the  claim  of  the  clergy  to  the  best  suit  of  clothes  which  had  belonged 
to  the  deceased,  the  officiating  priest  at  the  grave  side  tore  off  the  doublet 
of  a  mourner  declaring  it  had  belonged  to  the  dead  man.  John  Clopton  says 
in  his  will,  "Also  I  wull  that  the  parson  have  my  best  hors  at  hys  eleccion 
for  hys  mortuary,  according  to  the  lawdabill  custome  of  the  towne." 
His  will  is  mostly  filled  with  bequests  for  masses  for  his  soul  and  the  souls 
of  others,  and  has  a  gift  of  his  Bible  in  English  to  his  friend  William  Pyken- 
ham  Rector  of  Hadleigh  who  was  Archdeacon  of  Suffolk  in  1471.  On 
Wm.  Clopton's  death  the  manor  passed  to  his  eldest  son  Sir  William 
Clopton.  Sir  Wm.  Clopton  married  three  times,  1st  Johan  dau.  of  Sir 
William  Marrow  knt.  an  alderman  of  the  City  of  London,  and  had  issue  John 
Clopton,  William  Clopton  and  other  children  ;  andly,  Elizabeth  one  of  the 
daughters  of  Thomas  Say  and  one  of  the  sisters  and  co-heirs  of  William 
Say  of  Lyston  Hall,  co.  Essex,  by  whom  he  had  issue  William  Clopton 
father  of  W'illiam  Clopton,  father  of  Thomas  Clopton  of  Lyston  Hall ; 
and  thirdly,  Thomasine  daughter  of  Thomas  Knyvet  of  Great  Stanway 
co.  Essex  by  whom  he  had  issue  Francis  Clopton,  Richard  Clopton  (the 
father  of  William  Clopton  of  Castelins  Manor  in  Groton)  and  other  children. 

William  Clopton  made  his  will  the  I4th  October  1530  by  which  he  be- 
queathed to  his  eldest  son  John  "  all  the  hanginges  within  the  haule,  parlure, 
and  greate  chamber,  with  the  beddinge,  quysschyns-,  tables,  formes  and  stoles 
within  them  ;  and  the  stuff e  of  my  chapell,  as  auter  clothes,  boke,  chalesce 
and  vestmentes  being  and  servyng  on  or  for  the  workyndayes  within  the 
saide  chappell."  He  also  leaves  certain  costly  vestments  to  the  use  of 
Melford  Church,  but  some  to  be  "  at  the  commandement  of  hym  that  God 
schall  provide  to  be  my  heyre  male  and  dwell  at  my  place  at  Lewtons  and 
such  tyme  as  schall  fortune  to  be  any  marige  at  my  saide  place,  and  imme- 
diately after  to  be  delyvered  unto  the  chirchwardens  ayen."  He  has  a 
peculiar  bequest  as  to  a  cross  of  gold  which  apparently  had  some  remark- 
able properties.  After  the  death  of  his  3rd  wife  Thomasine  dau.  of  Thomas 
Knyvet  who  survived  him,  he  leaves  his  cross  of  gold  "  which  I  where 
dayly  abowtte  my  necke  "  to  his  son  John  and  his  heirs  male  as  an  heirloom 
with  this  proviso  :  "  upon  the  condicion  that  they  and  every  of  them 
dow  lenne  the  same  crosse  unto  women  of  honeste,  being  with  child, 
the  tyme  of  ther  laboure  ;  and  immediatly  to  be  surely  delivered  up 
ayen. '  He  devises  to  his  wife  for  her  life  his  Manor  and  Place  of 
"  Lewtons,"  where  he  dwells  and  entails  it  afterwards.  He  died  in  153?, 
in  his  8oth  year  and  was  buried  in  Melford  Church,  as  he  directs,  near  his 
first  two  wives.  The  stone  slab  for  him  which  has  lost  the  brass  and  has 
only  one  shield  left  for  his  first  wife  Joane  Marrow  has  been  removed 
from  its  original  place  in  the  Chancel  floor  in  front  of  John  Clopton's 
tomb  into  the  north  aisle.1 

John  Clopton  Sir  William's  son  succeeded  on  the  death  of  the  latter's 
widow  Thomasine  Knyvet.  He  married  Elizabeth  one  of  the  daughters 

1  Parker's  Hist,  of  Melford,  p.  178. 


MELFORD   (LONG).  147 

of  John  Roy  don  and  of  Margaret  his  wife  the  younger  daughter  of  Thomas 
Knyvet.  SirSymondsD'Ewes  was  exceedingly  proud  of  this  match  which 
he  considers  the  "  noblest  match  that  he  ever  yet  found  any  Clopton 
enjoyed."  He  says  :  "  Whether  she  was  heir  to  John  Roydon,  her  father, 
I  cannot  yet  undoubtedly  discover.  Most  certain  it  is,  the  coat  armour 
of  Roydon,  being  chequy  argent  and  gules,  over  all  a  cross  azure,  stands 
yet  in  a  glass  at  Lutons  Hall  in  the  parish  of  Melford,  being  the  Clopton's 
chief  seat  commonly  called  Kentwell,  both  in  the  east  window  of  the  great 
parlour,  and  in  the  south  window  of  the  hall,  very  anciently  set  up  and 
enquartered  with  Clopton  and  other  coat-armours." 

In  1539  we  meet  with  three  deeds  preserved  amongst  the  Harleian 
Charters  dealing  with  the  manor.  They  are  as  follows  : — 

Carta  qua  Johannes  Clopton  de  Melford  in  com.  Suff.  arm.  et  Willel- 
mus  filius  ejus  concedunt  Henrico  Francklyng  manerii  de  Lutons,  Wod- 
house,  Wodfowle  et  Blak  in  com.  Suff.  Dat.  the  29  July  31  Hen.  VIII. 
This  deed  is  signed  by  John  William  Clopton.  The  second  is  an  Indenture 
of  Henry  Francklyng  agreeing  to  pay  to  Elizabeth  widow  and  executrix 
of  John  Clopton  of  Melford  Esquire  lately  deceased,  an  annuity  of  £30  out 
of  the  manors  of  Lutons,  Wodhouse,  Wodfoulde  and  Blake  and  from  other 
lands  in  co.  Suffolk  until  the  Manor  of  Newenham  Halle  in  Essex  with  other 
manors  and  land  of  the  yearly  value  of  £50  be  assured  to  her.  Dat.  the  30 
July  31  Hen.  VIII.  [1529].  There  is  a  deed  by  which  the  said  Henry 
Francklyng  grants  to  John  Clopton  this  manor  and  the  Manors  of  Wodhouse 
W'odfoulle  and  Blake.  John  made  a  will  a  few  days  before  his  death  on  the 
5  Oct.  1541,  whereby  he  bequeathed  to  his  wife  Elizabeth  (Roydon)  "  the 
hangynges,  beddinge,  testores,  and  all  oder  the  appurtenances  withyn  the 
grett  chamber,  and  as  muche  brede  corne  and  ale  corne  as  shall  fynd  hyr 
howse  oone  hole  yere  after  my  decesse."  The  will  was  proved  the  5  Nov. 
1541,  John  Clopton,  the  testator,  having  died  on  the  2ist  October.  His 
widow  Elizabeth  remarried  one  Robert  Withersby  and  she  survived  her 
son  William,  who  had  a  grant  of  the  Manor  of  Monks  from  the  Crown  in 
1545.  Subsequent  to  this,  the  devolution  of  this  manor  is  the  same  as  Monks 
Melford  Manor  down  to  nearly  the  close  of  the  i8th  century  when  Richard 
Moore  succeeded  his  father  who  died  seised  in  1782.  Amongst  the  Harleian 
Charters  will  be  found  a  covenant  in  1591  by  Thomas  Clopton  of  Melford 
and  Wm.  Clopton  of  Groton  with  Sir  Wm.  Waldegrave  of  Smallbridge, 
Sir  John  Heigham  of  Barrow,  William  Waldegrave  son  and  heir-apparent 
of  the  said  Sir  Wm.  Waldegrave  and  Thomas  Waldegrave  second  son  of  the 
said  Sir  William  Waldegrave  in  consideration  of  the  marriage  of  the  said 
Thomas  Clopton  with  Mary  one  of  the  daughters  of  Sir  William  Waldegrave 
and  to  secure  a  competent  jointure,  to  levy  a  fine  of  the  Manors  of  Lutons, 
Kentwell,  Woodhouse  and  Woodfoules  in  Melford.  The  deed  is  dated 
the  2oth  Jan.  33  Eliz.  and  a  fine  was  levied  of  the  manor  the  same  year  by 
the  trustees  against  Thomas  Clopton.1  The  fine  was  duly  levied  between 
William  Waldegrave  and  Thomas  Clopton  in  Trinity  Term  the  same  year. 

A  fine  of  Melford  Manor  and  Luton  Manor  in  1534  will  be  found 
amongst  the  Harleian  Charters  in  the  Brit.  Mus.* 

WOOLHOUSE,   WOODFOULE   AND   ALSO  BLARES   MANORS. 

Wodefoyle  or  Woodfowles,  a  reputed  manor  of  Kentwell  no  doubt 
derives  its  name  from  an  ancient  family  of  Melford,  for  we  find  that  as 

'  Fine,  Hil.  33  Eliz.  *  Harl.  45  G.  7. 


148  THE   MANORS   OF   SUFFOLK. 

early  as  1280  a  Matilda  Wodefoyle  held  land  parcel  of  the  Manor  of  Kent- 
well  as  tenant  of  Sir  William  de  Valence.  This  manor  was  held  of  the 
Earl  of  Sussex  and  of  his  Manor  of  Shimpling  for  2  shillings  a  year.  Sir 
William  Parker  mentions  that  as  to  a  part  of  this  manor  there  exists  a  notice 
that  in  the  I3th  of  Edw.  IV.,  1476,  one  Walter  Jermayn  held  Woodhouse 
for  135.  ^d.  a  year,  and  he  requested  to  be  allowed  the  sum  of  IDS.  $d.  for  a 
thousand  of  wood  which  in  that  year  had  been  made  in  the  grove  called 
Woodhouse,  and  which  had  been  wrongfully  included  in  his  hire.  The 
parson  of  Stanstead  on  this  occasion  took  a  hundred  of  wood  for  his 
tithe.1  It  seems  that  John  Clopton  son  and  heir  of  William  Clopton  died 
seised  of  these  manors  in  1497,  when  they  passed  to  William  Clopton  his 
son  and  heir.  Amongst  the  Harleian  Charters  are  three  deeds  relating  to 
this  manor  in  the  year  1539.  The  ist  is  dated  the  29  July  31  Hen.  VIII., 
and  is  a  grant  by  John  Clopton  of  Melford  and  William  Clopton  his  son 
and  heir  to  Henry  Francklyng.  The  second  is  a  deed  dated  the  30  July  31 
Hen.  VIII.  whereby  the  said  Henry  Francklyng  agreed  to  pay  to  Elizabeth 
Clopton  widow  and  executrix  of  John  Clopton  of  Melford  an  annuity  of 
XXX  pounds  out  of  these  manors  "  Wodhouse,  Wodsone  and  Blake  " 
and  out  of  lands  &c.  which  the  said  Henry  Francklyng  had  in  towns  and 
parishes  of  Melford,  Stansted  and  Shimpling.2  The  third  is  dated  the  ist 
Aug.  31  Hen.  VIII.,  and  is  a  grant  by  the  said  Henry  Francklyng  to  John 
Clopton.3 

On  John  Clopton's  death  in  1578  the  manors  passed  to  his  brother 
and  heir  William  Clopton  and  on  his  death  in  1588  to  his  brother  and  heir 
Thomas  Clopton  and  on  his  death  in  1597  to  his  son  and  heir  Sir  William 
Clopton  who  died  in  1618  when  they  passed  to  Sir  William  Clopton  son  of 
Sir  William,  at  whose  death  in  1625  the  manors  passed  to  his  uncle  Walter 
Clopton. 

Amongst  the  Harleian  Charters  will  be  found  a  covenant  for 
levying  a  fine  in  1591  of  the  two  former  manors  and  of  Lutons  and  Kent- 
well.4  The  covenant  is  dated  the  20  May  33  Eliz. 

Blakes  seems  to  have  been  little  more  than  a  messuage,  as  it  was 
held  of  the  Abbot  of  St.  Edmunds  at  6  pence  a  year. 

CRANEVYLES  al.  CRAINAVILES  MANOR. 

Very  little  is  known  of  this  manor  It  is  apparently  the  subject  of  a 
fine  levied  in  1390  by  Richard  Mucheldenere  and  Margaret  de  Ekerton 
against  Alice  de  Bryene3 ;  and  Thomas  Spring  of  Lavenham  died  seised  of 
it  in  1523,  when  it  passed  to  his  son  and  heir  Sir  John  Spring  who  died  in 
1547,  when  it  passed  to  Sir  William  Spring  of  Pakenham,  after  which  we 
lose  sight  of  the  manor  entirely.  It  is  possibly  the  land  mentioned  in  the 
extent  of  the  Manor  of  Melford  taken  in  1442  thus:  "  John  Mannock held 
130  acres  of  land  at  Cranfield  and  2  water  mills  under  one  roof  on  the  bank 
of  the  river  dividing  Suffolk  from  Essex  which  said  land  formerly  belonged 
to  John  de  Cranvile  and  previously  to  Sir  Guy  Bryan  knight  "  referred 
to  this.  Still  it  was  not  then  mentioned  as  being  held  as  a  separate 
manor. 

KENTWELL. 

This  manor  was  held  in  the  Confessor's  time  by  Algar  under  Seward 
of  Maldon  with  2  carucates  of  land  and  soc.  There  were  7  villeins,  I  bordar, 

'  P.  171  note.  '  Harl.  57  H.  19. 

•  Harl.  50  E.  12.  »  Feet  of  Fines,  14  Rich.  II.  35. 

'  Harl.  50  E   13. 


J 


J 
J 


- 


MELFORD  (LONG). 


149 


4  ploughteams,  2  in  demesne  and  2  belonging  to  the  men,  8  acres  of  meadow, 
i  horse  at  the  Hall,  5  beasts,  30  hogs  and  80  sheep.  These  were  valued 
at  40  shillings.  The  increase  in  value  was  rather  marked  by  the  time  of  the 
Great  Survey,  for  it  was  then  placed  at  4  pounds  which  the  altered  details 
hardly  seemed  to  justify.  The  villeins  had  decreased  by  3,  but  the  bordars 
had  increased  by  2.  It  is  true  there  were  8  beasts,  40  hogs  against  5  and 
30,  but  on  the  other  hand  there  was  one  ploughteam  less  belonging  to  the 
men  and  30  fewer  sheep. 

The  Domesday  tenant  in  chief  was  Frodo,  the  Abbot  of  St.  Edmunds' 
brother.1 

Frodo  left  two  sons  Alan  and  Gilbert.  Of  their  family  there  is  not  much 
on  record,  but  about  the  period  of  from  1145  to  1148  a  person  named  Galeus 
held  this  manor  ;  for  in  a  Bull  of  Pope  Eugenius  IIL,  endowing  the  Abbey 
of  Bury  with  certain  tithes,  it  was  decreed  that  the  Manor  of  Melford 
should  pay  a  sum  of  20  shillings  a  year  and  the  land  of  Galeus  in  Melford 
was  to  pay  10  shillings  a  year  ;  and  as  at  that  time  there  was  no  other 
property  in  Melford  which  could  have  been  assessed  in  such  proportion 
to  the  Melford  Manor,  except  the  then  existing  manor  of  Kentwell,  it 
may  be  taken  that  Galeus  was  the  owner  of  this  lordship. 

KENTWELL  HALL  MANOR. 

The  de  Kentwells  were  probably  descendants  of  Frodo  the  brother  of 
the  Abbot  and  were  lords  until  the  middle  of  the  I3th  century.  In  1224  the 
manor  was  held  by  Gilbert  de  Kentwell,  and  on  the  Close  Rolls  we  find  in  1225 
an  order  restraining  Isaac  of  Norwich  the  Jew  from  removing  goods  and 
chattels  on  the  land  of  this  Gilbert  de  Kentwell.2  Further  in  1245  William 
de  Kentwell  died  seised  of  9  curucates  of  land  in  Melford.3  The  same  year 
we  find  on  the  Originalia  Rolls  an  order  to  the  sheriff  to  receive  seisin  from 
William  son  of  Hugh  and  Amabil  his  wife  of  land  in  Kentwell,  which  the 
King  bought  (and  freeing  Richard  Wastehus  from  the  custody  of  same),  with 
a  certain  vestment  and  ornaments  in  the  chapel  there.4  In  1251  the  manor 
was  in  the  King's  hands  and  was  granted  by  Hen.  III.  to  Sir  William  de 
Valence  son  of  Hugh  de  Brun  Earl  of  March  by  Isabel  his  wife  widow  of 
King  John.5  The  grant  which  is  dated  the  8  Feb.  35  Hen.  III.  was  made  so 
that  William  de  Valence  should  receive  £17,  for  which  sum  the  manor  was 
extended.  It  was  subject  to  an  annual  fee  of  £5o.6  Below  is  an 
extract  from  the  Court  Rolls  of  the  manor  dated  the  Feast  of  the  Purifica- 
tion of  the  Virgin  Mary  3  Hen.  V.  [1416]  regarding  homage  to  be  paid  at 
the  death  of  Hugh  Bokenham  who  held  certain  lands  in  Thelnetham. 

The  manor  as  included  in  this  grant  is  recorded  in  the  Abbot's  Chartulary 
of  Melford  of  1287  as  a  manor  comprising  360  acres  of  arable  land,  4  acres  of 
mowing  meadow,  5  acres  of  pasture,  17  acres  of  wood,  a  windmill  and  a 
warren,  besides  52  acres  which  his  villeins  held  from  him.  Four  persons  are 
specially  named  as  holding  between  them  50  acres  of  the  lord's  land, 
three  of  whom  were  allowed  to  sublet.  The  four  tenants  are  thus  described  : 

"  Stephen  de  Sidulvemere  holds  of  the  said  Sir  William  XX  acres  of 
land  for  his  undertenants  at  20  pence  a  year. 

'  John,  son  of  Capell,  holds  of  the  said  Sir  William  X  acres  of  land  for 
his  undertenants  at  10  pence  a  year. 


1  Dom.  n.  355. 

'  Close  Rolls.  9  Hen.  III.  pt.  ii.  3. 

3  I.P.M.,  29  Hen.  III.  44. 

4  O.,  29  Hen.  III.  i. 


1  Grant,  Harl.  58  H.  17 ;  Chart.  Rolls,  33 
Hen.  III.,  Pars  altera  12,  35  Hen. 
III.  12. 

6  Karl.  58  H.  17. 


150  THE   MANORS   OF  SUFFOLK. 

"  William  Maupas  holds  for  himself  and  his  parceners  a  messuage  and 
X  acres  of  land  for  10  pence  a  year. 

"  Matilda  Wodefoyle  holds  of  the  same  Sir  William  X  acres  of  land 
for  10  pence." 

Though  in  the  Melford  Chartulary  the  Abbot  of  Bury  as  lord  paramount 
of  Melford  included  De  Valence  in  the  rolls  of  lu's  free  tenants,  exacting  from 
him  a  small  yearly  rent  in  free  socage  in  lieu  of  all  services,  the  account 
goes  on  to  state  that  this  particular  manor  was  held  by  Sir  William  in 
chief  from  the  King.  The  manor  was  certainly  held  of  the  King  in 
chief  and  of  the  Castle  of  Norwich  by  the  fourth  part  of  a  knight's 
service,  and  later  by  a  further  payment  of  65  shillings  a  year  to  the 
governor  of  the  Castle* 

This  William  de  Valence  was  a  man  of  great  account  in  the  days  of  the 
3rd  Henry  to  whom  he  was  very  nearly  allied,  being  in  fact  his  half-brother 
by  his  mother.  He  was  made  Constable  of  Goderich  Castle  and  Pembroke 
Castle  and  Warden  of  the  Town  and  Castle  of  Hertford  in  1247.  Dugdale 
gives  an  account  of  this  lord:  "The  King,"  says  he,  "solemnizing  the. 
festival  of  St.  Edwards'  translation  in  the  Church  of  Westminster  with  great 
state,  sitting  on  his  royal  throne,  in  a  rich  robe  of  Baudekyn,  and  the 
crown  on  his  head,  caused  this  William  (with  divers  other  young  noblemen) 
to  be  brought  before  him  and  girt  him  with  the  sword  of  knighthood,  and 
whilest  he  thus  sate  in  his  royal  seat,  casting  his  eye  upon  him  who  penned 
down  all  particulars  of  the  great  solemnity,  he  called  him  nearer,  and 
commanded  him  to  sit  upon  the  middle  step,  betwixt  his  chair  and  the 
floor,  and  said  to  him  :  '  Hast  thou  taken  notice  of  all  these  things,  and 
perfectly  committed  them  to  memory  ? '  He  answered,  '  Sir,  I  have  so, 
deeming  this  famous  ceremonial  worthy  to  be  recorded.'  Wrhereupon  the 
King  replied :  '  I  am  fully  satisfied  that  God  Almighty,  as  a  pledge  of  his 
farther  favours  and  benefits,  hath  vouchsafed  to  work  one  glorious  miracle 
this  morning,  for  which  I  give  him  thanks.  I  therefore  entreat  thee,  and 
intreating  require,  that  thou  record  these  things  exactly  and  fully,  and 
write  them  in  a  book,  lest  that  the  memory  of  them  should  in  time  be 
lost.'  And  having  so  said  invited  him  with  whom  he  had  this  discourse 
to  dinner  that  day  with  three  of  his  fellows ;  commanding  likewise, 
that  all  other  monks,  who  then  came  thither,  with  the  whole 
convent  of  Westminster,  should  at  his  charge  be  that  day  feasted  in  the 
publick  refectory  there."  And  again  :  "  About  that  time,  this  William 
de  Valence,  residing  at  Hertford  Castle,  rode  to  the  Parke  at  Haethfel, 
belonging  to  the  Bishop  of  Ely,  and  there  hunting  without  any  leave,  went 
to  the  bishop's  manor  house,  and  readily  finding  nothing  to  drink  but 
ordinary  beer,  broke  open  the  buttery  doors,  and  swearing  and  cursing  the 
drink,  and  those  who  made  it ;  after  all  his  company  had  drunk  their 
fills  of  the  best  wine  in  the  cellars,  pulled  out  the  spigots  out  of  the  vessels, 
and  let  out  the  rest  upon  the  floor ;  and  that  a  servant  of  the  house 
hearing  the  noise,  and  coming  to  see  what  the  matter  was,  they  laughed 
him  to  scorn,  and  so  departed." 

He  was  driven  out  of  the  kingdom  with  his  brothers  in  1258  by  the 
Barons,  but  returned  two  years  later  with  their  consent  and  led  one  of  the 
three  bodies  of  the  royal  army  at  the  Battle  of  Lewes  in  1264  after  which 
he  fled  to  France,  but  returned  the  following  year  with  John  Earl  of  Warenne 
and  Hugh  Bigod,  and  the  battle  of  Evesham  re-establishing  the  power  of 
the  King,  he  benefited  greatly  from  the  royal  favour  and  had  large  grants 


MELFORD  (LONG). 


from  the  Crown.  He  took  the  Cross  in  1268  and  became  a  Crusader  in 
1270,  but  returned  in  1273. 

Amongst  the  Ancient  Deeds  in  the  Public  Record  Office  is  a  Release 
by  Alice  late  the  wife  of  Thomas  son  of  Nigel  de  Listen  clerk  to  Sir  William 
de  Valence  Earl  of  Pembroke  of  all  right  in  the  lands  and  tenements  which 
he  had  by  demise  of  the  said  Thomas  in  Melford,1  and  a  grant  by  John  de 
Lansele  to  Sir  William  of  2  acres  in  the  Millfield  in  Melford  ;2  also  a  grant 
by  Henry  son  of  William  de  Elmeswelle  to  Thomas  son  of  Nigel  de  Liston, 
clerk,  of  land  called  '  Varelond '  between  Sir  William  de  Valence's  land 
and  the  road  from  Melford  Church  to  Kentwell  tigh  called  '  Haylokestye  ' 
in  Melford  ;3  and  another  grant  by  the  same  to  Thomas  son  of  Nigel  de 
Liston  clerk,  Alice  his  wife  and  John  and  Simon  their  sons  of  land  called 
'  Varelond  '  between  land  of  Sir  Wm.  de  Valencia  and  the  road  from 
Henry's  house  to  the  tigh  of  Kentwell  called  '  Haylokestye  '  in  Melford.4 
There  are  other  grants  in  Melford  preserved  of  this  Sir  William.5  The 
Hundred  Rolls  state  that  William  de  Valence  held  the  manor  in  chief  of 
the  King  for  one  knight's  fee  by  gift  of  Hen.  III.6  and  he  claimed  also  to 
have  free  warren  in  the  hamlet  of  Kentwell.7 

William  de  Valence  was  made  Guardian  and  Lieutenant  of  England 
in  1285,  Joint  Commissioner  for  Armament  of  the  kingdom  in  1292,  and 
Chief  Plenipotentiary  to  treat  with  France  in  1296.  This  year  he  was 
slain  in  the  wars  in  France,  when  his  remains  were  conveyed  to  England 
and  interred  in  Westminster  Abbey  under  a  splendid  monument.  On  his 
tomb  his  arms  are  repeated  as  a  pattern  in  diamond-shaped  panels,  ena- 
melled in  gold  and  colours  in  copper.  These  are  alternately  Gules,  three 
lions  passant  regardant,  Or  ;  and  barry  Argent  and  Azure,  an  orle  of  mart- 
lets, Gules.  These  arms  are  again  repeated  on  the  cushion  beneath  the 
head  of  the  recumbent  figure.  The  shield  he  holds  only  shows  the  second 
coat  of  arms  and  on  the  azure  bars  is  a  delicate  running  pattern  in  gold, 
and  on  the  argent  bars  a  similar  tracery  pattern,  rather  broader  ;  and  the 
outlines  of  the  martlets  are  picked  out  in  gold.8 

William  de  Valence  married  Joane,  daughter  and  eventually  heir  of 
Warine  de  Mounichenst  by  Joane  his  wife,  second  sister  and  coheir  of 
Anselme  Marshal  Earl  of  Pembroke. 

Sir  Wm.  Parker  in  his  History  of  Melford  states  that  he  married  Joane 
daughter  of  William  de  Montchensy  by  his  wife  Dionysia  (daughter  and  heir 
of  Nicholas  de  Anesty).  Gage  in  his  History  of  Thingoe  Hundred  says  that 
Dionysia  was  the  only  child  of  William  de  Mountchensi,  that  she  married 
Hugh  de  Vere  and  died  without  issue  when  her  fee  descended  to  Aymer  de 
Valence  son  and  heir  of  Joane  cousin  of  William  Mountchensi,  and  that  after 
the  death  of  Aylmer  it  came  to  the  Earl  of  Athol  in  right  of  his  wife  Joane 
Comyn  sister  of  Aymer.  Sir  William  de  Vallence's  first  son  John  died 
young,  his  second,  William,  was  killed  by  the  Welsh  in  his  father's  lifetime, 
and  the  Earl  was  succeeded  by  his  3rd  son  Aymer  de  Valence  2nd  Earl  of 
Pembroke. 

On  the  Patent  Rolls  of  1298,  a  Commission  will  be  found  as  to  persons 
who  broke  the  park  of  this  Aymer  at  Kentwell,  hunted  and  carried  away 
deer  from  his  park  there.9 


'  A.  3469. 
"  A.  3520. 

3  A.  3781. 

4  A.  3530. 

3  A.  3330,  3604,  3908,  3964. 


6  H.R.  ii.  142,  150,  194. 

'  H.R.  ii.  143,  153,  195- 

8  Parker,  Hist,  of  Melford,  p.  169. 

'  Pat.  Rolls,  26  Edw.  I.  22d. 


152  THE  MANORS  OF  SUFFOLK. 

Aymer  de  Valence  sold  the  manor  in  1306  to  John  de  Eddeworth  for 
life,  and  on  the  Patent  Rolls  will  be  found  a  pardon  to  him  for  acquiring 
for  life  from  Aymer  de  Valencia  the  manor  without  licence,  it  being  held 
in  chief  of  the  King.1  On  the  Originalia  Rolls  is  the  licence  the  same 
year  for  John  de  Eddeworth  to  retain  the  manor  of  the  King  for  life.* 

Aymer  was  in  the  wars  of  Scotland  in  the  time  of  Edw.  I.  and  being 
with  the  King  at  Burgh  upon  the  Sands  just  before  his  death,  was  one  of 
those  to  whom  the  King  recommended  his  son,  and  enjoyned  him  not  to 
suffer  Piers  de  Gaveston  again  to  enter  the  kingdom.  He  subsequently 
joined  the  coalition  against  the  power  of  Gaveston,  and  assisted  at  the 
siege  of  Scarborough  Castle,  in  which,  upon  its  surrender,  the  favourite 
was  made  prisoner,  and  was  soon  after  beheaded  by  order  of  the  Earl  of 
Warwick,  at  Blackton  Hill  near  Warwick.  Aymer  was  a  joint  Special 
Ambassador  to  France  in  1302,  1307,  and  1312,  and  Guardian  and 
Lieutenant  of  Scotland  in  1307  and  1314,  Joint  Ambassador  to  the  Pope 
Clement  V.  in  1309  and  to  Pope  John  XXII.  in  1316,  Warden  of  the  Hun- 
dreds of  Claydon  and  Bosmere  in  1319,  and  Guardian  and  Lieutenant  of 
England  in  1320.  On  one  of  his  journeys  to  Rome  he  was  made  prisoner 
by  John  Moilley  a  Burgundian,  and  sent  to  the  Emperor,  when  he  had  to 
give  20,000  pounds  of  silver  for  his  ransom,  by  reason  as  Moilley  alleged 
that  "  he  himself  having  served  the  King  of  England  had  not  been  paid  his 
wages."  In  1321  he  was  one  of  the  lords  who  sat  in  judgment  upon  Henry 
Plantagenet  Earl  of  Lancaster,  and  condemned  that  person  to  death. 
"  But  this  mercenary  and  time-serving  act  of  infamy,"  it  is  said,  was 
speedily  atoned  for  by  his  son's  death,  which  occurred  two  years  after 
in  France,  where  attacking  Queen  Isabel  he  was  murdered  the  23  June  1324. 3 
The  untimely  fate  of  the  last  and  youthful  Earl  of  Pembroke  in  1389  was 
very  generally  by  the  superstition  of  the  age  attributed  to  a  divine  judgment 
upon  the  family  for  this  sentence,  and  it  was  observed  that  subsequently 
to  that  judgment  none  of  the  Earls  of  Pembroke  saw  his  father,  nor  any 
father  of  them  took  any  delight  in  seeing  his  children.  He  married  first 
Beatrice  daughter  of  Ralph  de  Nele,  Constable  of  France,  2ndly  the  daughter 
of  the  Earl  of  Barre,  and  3rdly  Mary  daughter  of  Guy  de  Chastillion,  Earl 
of  St.  Paul  and  a  great-granddaughter  maternally  of  Hen.  III.,  but  had  no 
issue.  He  was  buried  in  Westminster  Abbey  and  his  estates  passed 
to  his  sisters  as  coheirs,  and  on  partition  Kentwell  Manor  was  assigned  to 
David  de  Strabolgi,  Earl  of  Athol  and  Joane  his  wife,  one  of  the  daughters 
and  coheirs  of  John  Comyn  feudal  lord  of  Badenagh,  and  Joane  his  wife, 
one  of  the  sisters  and  coheirs  of  Aymer.4  On  his  death  in  1327'  the  manor 
passed  to  his  son  David  de  Strabolgi,  Earl  of  Athol,  2nd  Baron,  who  at  his 
father's  decease  was  but  19  years  of  age,  and  Henry  de  Beaumont  paid  a 
thousand  marks  for  his  wardship  and  marriage.  The  young  nobleman  was 
held  in  such  high  esteem  by  the  King  that  Edw.  III.  in  the  first  year  of 
of  his  reign — immediately  after  the  death  of  his  father — and  notwithstand- 
ing his  minority,  allowed  him  to  do  homage,  and  have  livery  of  his  lands. 
He  lost  no  time  in  getting  rid  of  Kentwell  Manor,  for  we  find  in  1332,  he 
obtained  licence  to  grant  to  Robert  Gower  for  life,6  and  the  following  year 
executed  a  release  to  Robert,  then  Sir  Robert  Gower,  of  all  his  right  in 
the  manor.7  David  de  Strabolgi  however  does  not  then  appear  to  have 

1  Pat.  Rolls,  34  Edw.  I.  5.  4  Close  Rolls,  19  Edw.  II.  14,  7,  3. 

•  O.,  34  Edw.  I.  Ri.  7;  I.P.M.,  34  Edw.  »  Extent.    I.P.M.,  I  Edw.  III.  85. 

I.  169.  *  Pat.  Rolls,  6  Edw.  III.  pt.  iii.  I. 

>  Extent:      I.P.M.,  17  Edw.  II.  75.  '  7  Edw.  III.,  Harl.  MSS.  299. 


MELFORD  (LONG). 


153 


parted  with  his  whole  interest  in  the  manor,  for  we  find  on  the  Originalia 
Rolls  of  1335  a  demise  only  to  Robert  Gower  for  his  life.1  This  year  the 
Earl  of  Athol  joined  the  Scots,  and  an  entry  on  the  Close  Rolls  throws  a 
little  light  on  the  subject :  After  reciting  a  licence  to  David  de  Shalbogi  to 
grant  to  Robert  Gower  "  for  the  life  of  the  King  and  his  heirs,"  with 
reversion  at  Robert's  death  to  the  Earl  and  his  heirs  and  seizure  by  the 
Sheriff  for  the  King  in  consequence  of  the  Earl  having  joined  the  Scots  it 
was  ordered  that  the  manor  be  restored  to  Robert.2 

This  David  2nd  Baron  Strabolgi  was  of  a  shifty  character,  wavering 
between  the  sentiments  of  his  father  and  grandfather,  the  latter  of  whom 
had  sided  with  the  Scots  and  been  sentenced  to  death  in  Westminster  Hall 
as  a  traitor,  and  in  respect  of  his  descent  from  royal  blood  had  not  been 
drawn  as  usual  with  traitors  but  set  on  horseback  and  hanged  upon  a 
gibbet  50  feet  high,  his  head  fixed  on  London  Bridge  and  his  body  burnt 
to  ashes ;  and  the  former  of  whom  had  taken  an  active  part  on  the  English  side 
in  the  wars  with  the  Scots.  David  the  2nd  Baron  was  at  one  time  engaged 
against  the  English  forces  and  at  another  with  them  in  these  constant 
conflicts,  but  eventually  fell  fighting  under  the  English  Sovereign.  He 
married  Katherine  Beaumont  and  died  in  1335. 3 

David  the  2nd  Baron  was  succeeded  by  his  son  David  3rd  Baron 
Strabolgi  and  Earl  of  Athol,  who  at  the  death  of  his  father  was  but  3  years 
old.  In  1338  Sir  Robert  Gower  obtained  from  the  King  a  confirmation  of 
the  release  by  the  2nd  Baron  Strabolgi  of  the  manor,  the  same  being  then 
in  the  King's  hands,  in  consequence  of  the  minority  of  the  heir,4  and  in  1349 
on  the  death  of  Sir  Robt.  Gower,  the  King  committed  to  Katherine 
Countess  of  Athol,  the  widow  of  the  2nd  Baron  Strabolgi,  the  custody  of 
this  manor  to  hold  during  the  minority  of  his  (Sir  Robert's)  heir,  rendering 
20  marks  per  annum.3 

On  the  death  of  Sir  Robert  Gower  one  moiety  of  the  manor 
passed  to  Catherine,  one  of  his  daughters  and  coheirs,  who  died  in  I366,6 
and  the  other  moiety,  and  ultimately  the  whole,  passed  to  Joan  sister  and 
heir  of  Catherine,  wife  of  William  Neve  of  Wyting,  and  he  and  his  wife 
had  a  pardon  granted  in  1366  for  having  entered  on  the  Kentwell  Hall 
property  on  the  death  of  Catherine  Gower,  without  process  from  the  King's 
Court,  and  they  were  restored  after  the  seizure  by  the  King  on  payment 
of  ioos.7  The  order  for  seisin  to  be  given  to  William  Neve  and  Joan  his 
wife  of  this  moiety  is  on  the  Originalia  Rolls,8  and  William  Neve  and  his 
wife  recovered  seisin  against  David  de  Strabolgi  Earl  of  Athol,  of  the 
manor  except  12  acres  and  £4  rent  in  Kentwell  the  same  year.9  After 
the  death  of  Neve,  his  wife  married  Thomas  Styward  of  London,  pewterer, 
and  in  1368  he  and  his  wife  granted  the  manor  to  John  Gower,  the  poet,10 
who  had  obtained  a  licence  to  acquire  the  same."  John  Gower  did  not  long 
retain,  for  in  1372  he  conveyed  the  manor  to  Sir  John  Cobham  and  others, 
and  the  following  year  we  find  from  the  Originalia  Rolls  that  they  received 
a  pardon  for  acquiring  the  maoor  in  fee  without  a  licence  from  the  King." 
In  1379  Sir  John  Cobham  an«*x>thers  obtained  a  licence  to  grant  the  manor 


•  O.,  9  Edw.  III. 

'  Close  Rolls  9  Edw.  III.  31. 

>  I.P.M.,  ii  Edw.  III.,  46. 

4  Pat.  Rolls,  13  Edw.  III.  pt.  i,  30. 

5  O.,  23  Edw.  III.  22. 

6  I.P.M.,  40  Edw.  III.  13. 


7  O.,  40  Edw.  III.  29. 

8  O.,  40  Edw.  III.  10. 

9  O.,  40  Edw.  III.  20. 

10  I. P.M.,  42  Edw.  III.  (2nd  nos.)  4. 

11  O.,  42  Edw.  III.  33. 
"  O.,  48  Edw.  III.  31. 


154  THE   MANORS  OF  SUFFOLK. 

to  Katharine  wife  of  Sir  Thomas  de  Clopton,  and  others,  the  Patent  Rolls  in 
which  the  licence  appears  stating  that  it  was  held  of  the  King  by  the  service 
of  rendering  655.  yearly  for  castle  guard  of  Norwich  Castle.1  A  fine 
was  levied  of  the  manor  this  same  year  by  John  Gower  against  John 
Spennythorn  and  Joan  his  wife*  which  is  somewhat  peculiar. 

It  is  stated  by  Davy  and  others  that  William  de  Mylde  had  the  manor, 
and  Sir  Wm.  Parker,  a  most  accurate  historian,  says  it  "  passed  to  the 
family  of  Mylde,"  but  it  is  extremely  doubtful  whether  a  Mylde  ever  was 
actually  lord,  though  it  is  quite  possible  the  manor  was  held  by  Sir  John 
de  Cobham  and  others  in  trust  for  William  de  Mylde,  an  idea  which  is  rather 
confirmed  by  the  fact  of  the  grant  being  made  by  these  parties  to 
Katharine,  wife  of  Sir  Thomas  de  Clopton  as  she  was  the  daughter  of  this 
William  de  Mylde.5 

Sir  Thomas  Clopton  knt.  was  the  younger  brother  of  Sir  William  Clopton 
of  Wickhambrook,  and  the  son  of  Walter  de  Cloptune  who  died  in  1326 
and  of  Alice  his  wife  younger  daur.  and  coheir  of  Warin  surnamed  Fitz 
Hugh.  This  Walter  de  Cloptune  was  the  son  of  William  son  of  Walter 
son  of  William  son  of  Walter  son  of  William  son  of  William  Peche  who  li ved 
in  the  time  of  William  the  Conqueror. 

The  will  of  Sir  Thomas  Clopton  who  died  in  1383  is  dated  the  8th  March 
1382,  and  was  proved  the  12  Oct.  1383.  He  was  buried  in  Chipley  Priory. 
At  this  time  and  for  two  centuries  subsequently  the  manorial  residence 
was  not  called  Kentwell  but  "  Lutons."  In  the  wills  and  documents  of 
successive  Cloptons  till  the  year  1563,  constant  mention  is  made  of  the 
Hall,  a  Place  of  Luton's,  as  the  dwelling-house  of  the  family,  but  in  that 
year  reference  is  made  to  the  new  mansion  house  of  Kentwell  Hall. 
Lutons  Manor  house  probably  stood  in  or  about  the  wood  now  called  the 
"  Pond  Plantation  "  of  Kentwell. 

On  Katherine  Clopton's  death  the  manor  passed  to  her  son  William 
Clopton4  who  died  in  1446.  From  this  William  to  William  Clopton  who 
died  in  1562,  the  devolution  is  identical  with  that  of  Luton  Manor  and  from 
this  last  William  Clopton  to  the  present  time  identical  with  that  of  Monks 
Melford  Manor,  which  has  been  already  given. 

John  Clopton  was  in  1537  called  upon  to  show  by  what  title  he  held 
Kentwell  Manor.5  And  amongst  the  Chancery  Proceedings  of  the  time  of 
Q.  Elizabeth  is  a  Bill  to  establish  a  lease  and  set  aside  a  will  by  Anne 
Clopton,  widow  of  William  Clopton  deceased,  late  of  Kentwell,  against 
Thomas  Clopton  and  others  as  to  the  mansion  house  called  "  Kentwell  or 
Lewton,"  and  other  land  in  Suffolk  said  to  be  the  estates  of  plaintiff's  said 
late  husband.6  Amongst  the  Tanner  MSS.  in  the  Bodleian  is  a  letter  of 
Sir  John  Tracy  to  Isaac  Appleton  in  165!  as  to  his  being  willing  to  sell  his 
wife's  interest  in  the  Living  of  Kentwell  (?)  ;7  while  amongst  the  Harleian 
MSS.  in  the  Brit.  Mus.  of  about  the  same  date  will  be  found  covenants 
between  Sir  John  Tracy  and  Dame  Elizabeth  his  wife  with  Sir  Symonds 
D'Ewes  as  to  yielding  up  the  Manor  of  Kentwell,  this  being  jointure  of  the 

'  Pat.  Rolls,  3  Rich.  II.  pt.  ii.  18.  5  Memoranda  Rolls,   29  Hen.  VIII.,  Pas. 

•  Feet  of  Fines,  3  Rich.  II.  6.  Rec.  Rot.  35. 

>  I.P.M.,  47  Edw.  III.  59.  '  C.P.  i.  182. 

4  See   Manor    of    Hawstead   in  Thingoe         '  Tanner  Ixix.  124. 
Hundred. 


MELFORD   (LONG).  155 

said  Lady  Tracy  in  consideration  of  an  annuity  of  £460  per  annum  payable 
by  Sir  Symonds  D'Ewes  [Harl.  98]. 

Extracts  from  Clopton  deeds  will  be  found  in  the  Bodleian.1  The 
Manor  of  Cressy  was  held  of  Kentwell  Manor.2  It  appears  from  the  Patent 
Rolls  of  1258  that  Hugh  de  Cressy  held  a  knight's  fee  in  (Telnetham)  parcel 
of  Kentwell  Manor.3  Memoranda  concerning  lands  in  Thelnetham 
held  of  Kentwell  Manor  will  be  found  amongst  the  Harleian  Charters  in 
the  Brit.  Mus.4  and  as  to  the  homage  due  to  Kentwell  Manor  for  land  in 
Thelnetham  amongst  the  same  Charters5  and  particulars  as  to  the  Manor 
of  Thelnetham  held  by  Buckenham  as  of  Kentwell  Manor  amongst  the 
MSS.  of  the  same  collection.6  A  petition  in  Chancery  of  John  Clopton 
respecting  Cressy  Manor  held  by  Richard  Florens,  clerk,  as  of  Kentwell 
will  be  found  amongst  the  Harleian  MSS.7  And  in  the  same  collection 
note  is  made  of  a  grant  of  £3.  55.  payable  to  the  King  out  of  Kentwell  Manor 
for  Castleward.8  An  extent  of  the  manor  in  the  time  of  Hen.  III.  will  also 
be  found  amongst  the  Harleian  MSS.9,  and  also  in  the  7  Hen.  III.  and  other 
matters  relating  to  the  manor,  5  Edw.  III.,  may  be  seen  in  the  same 
collection.10  An  extent  of  lands  owing  suit  to  the  manor  in  1325,  or  rather 
a  copy  of  the  extent,  is  amongst  the  Harleian  Charters  in  the  Brit.  Mus.11 
The  Court  Rolls  of  the  manor  for  1313  are  amongst  the  Rolls  in  the  same 
collection,"  and  extracts  from  Court  Rolls  of  the  manor  7  Edw.  II.  to  4 
Hen.  VII.  [1313  to  1489],  amongst  the  Harleian  Rolls'3  and  Harleian 
Charters14,  and  in  1539  amongst  the  former.15 

Fines  for  homage  in  the  manor  for  the  years  1530  and  1634  are  also 
amongst  the  last  mentioned  Charters,16  and  a  Statement  of  Accompts  con- 
cerning the  manor  in  1649  w^  De  found  amongst  the  Cotton  MSS.  in  the 
Brit.  Mus.17 

Kentwell  Hall  is  about  three  quarters  of  a  mile  from  the  high  road, 
and  is  approached  by  a  fine  avenue  of  limes  for  nearly  the  whole  distance. 
It  is  said  that  the  whole  of  these  beautiful  trees  were  at  one  time  sold  to  an 
eminent  pianoforte  maker,  and  some  of  them,  on  either  side  nearest  to  the 
house  were  actually  cut  down,  but  he  was  ultimately  induced  to  forego 
the  purchase. 

The  present  mansion  was  no  doubt  erected  in  the  time  of  Elizabeth,  and 
is  in  the  form  of  the  letter  E,  a  form  adopted  in  the  case  of  so  many  buildings 
erected  in  that  reign  and  supposed  to  be  a  mark  of  respect  to  the  sovereign. 
Mr.  Tymms,  in  his  article  already  referred  to,  thus  describes  the  place  and 
its  surroundings  : — 

"  A  fine  moat,  over  which  there  are  two  bridges,  surrounds  the  house  ; 
and  what  is  more  remarkable,  a  second  moat  appears  to  have  enclosed  the 
pleasure  grounds.  The  modern  alterations  were  made  under  the  direction 
of  Mr.  Hopper,  the  architect.  A  window  in  the  billiard  room  is  filled 
with  stained  glass,  representing  in  twenty-six  coats  the  arms  and  alliances 
of  the  Cloptons,  which  were  collected  from  different  parts  of  the  mansion 

1  4180.  -°  Harl.  299. 

•  Harl.  97.  "  Harl.  58  H.  19. 

•  Pat.  Rolls,  35  Hen.  III.  6,  3.  "  Harl.  Rolls.  H.  7. 

4  Harl.  58  F.  52.  1J  Harl.  Rolls.  O.,  34. 

'  Harl.  58  H.  17.  "  Harl.  58  H.  17. 

6  Harl.  380.  "  Harl.  Roll  H.  8. 

'  Harl.  589.  "  Harl.  58  H.  3,  45,  G.  7. 

•  Harl.  99.  "  Cott.  xvi.  17. 
»  Harl.  362. 


156  THE    MANORS  OF  SUFFOLK. 

and  placed  in  their  present  position  in  the  beginning  of  the  igth  century. 
Part  of  the  glass  is  as  old  as  the  time  of  Henry  the  Seventh,  and  part  is 
of  modern  manufacture.  The  banners  in  the  hall,  the  work  of  the  lady  of 
Col.  Bence,  are  those  of  Henry  the  Third,  Earl  of  Pembroke,  Earl  of 
Strahbogi,  Edmund  Gower,  Katharine  Mylde,  Clopton,  D'Ewes, 
Robinson,  Moore,  Logan,  and  Starkie. 

"In  the  park  which  is  extensive  and  picturesque,  was  formerly  a  little 
chapel  in  honour  of  St.  Anne.  It  is  described  in  a  MS.  of  Roger  Martin,  of 
the  time  of  Queen  Elizabeth,  to  have  been  near  the  pond  in  the  park  ;  and 
to  have  been  the  spot  where  a  drinking  took  place  when  the  parishioners 
went  the  bounds  on  the  second  day  in  Rogation  Week,  being  their  longest 
perambulation." 

An  account  of  Kentwell  Hall  is  to  be  found  in  the  Gentleman's 
Magazine  for  1830,  pt.  ii.  204,  205,  and  in  the  Proceedings  of  the  Suffolk 
Institute,  vol.  n,  59  ;  also  in  the  loth  Rep.  of  the  Hist.  Com.  pt.  iv.  141, 
142,  146 ;  and  an  account  of  a  visit  of  the  Archaeological  Institute  to  the 
Hall  will  be  found  in  the  Archaeological  Journal,  vol.  Ivi.  403. 

Sir  Wm.  Parker  who  knew  the  place  well  from  residing  so  near  says  of 
it :  "  Since  its  erection  more  than  three  centuries  have  rolled  over  it,  and 
far  from  detracting  from  its  beauty,  time  has  only  served  to  add  thereto, 
by  imparting  to  it  its  present  lovely  mellow  tones  and  shades  of  colour,  and 
rendering  more  venerable  the  old  trees  around  it." 

The  old  Hall  is  now  occupied  by  Turton  Norton,  and  could  not  be  in 
better  hands.  The  view  of  the  Hall  is  from  a  photograph  taken  by  Mrs. 
Norton  and  kindly  given  to  the  writer. 

Arms  of  Clopton  :  Sable  ;  a  bend,  argent,  betw.  two  cottises  dancette, 
or. 

MELFORD  RECTORY  MANOR. 

The  Church  of  Melford  was  endowed  by  Earl  Alfric  in  the  nth 
century  with  a  manor  and  about  261  acres  of  land.  On  a  partition  of  the 
church  property  when  the  Hospital  of  St.  Saviour's  at  Bury  was  founded 
a  portion  of  the  land  of  the  manor  was  appropriated  to  St.  Saviour's  and 
at  the  dissolution  fell  into  secular  hands.  It  appears  however  that  at  or 
shortly  after  the  appropriation  for  the  benefit  of  St.  Saviour's  Abbot  Samp- 
son added  further  land  to  the  Rectory  Manor  so  that  about  172  acres  was 
made  up  thus  :  112  acres  of  the  original  manor,  about  60  of  the  gift  of 
Abbot  Sampson  ;  but  by  the  year  1684  we  find  the  glebe  stated  as  1313. 3r. 
and  under  the  Tithe  Apportionment  Act  as  1293..  2r.  i8p.  as  it  exists  to  this 
day.  A  copy  of  a  survey  made  of  the  manor  of  the  Rectory  in  the  14  Edw. 
I.  [1287]  is  given  by  Sir  Wm.  Parker  in  his  History  of  Long  Melford. 

The  manor  consisted  of  100  acres  of  land,  3^  acres  of  meadow,  8  acres 
of  pasture,  and  half  an  acre  of  wood,  and  the  parson  had  free  right  of  bull 
and  boar,  and  claimed  the  right  of  assize  of  bread  and  ale1  of  his 
homagers  ;  and  these  rights  were  in  the  gift  of  Sampson,  formerly  Abbot 
of  St.  Edmund's. 

The  parson  also  held  in  Melford  52  acres  of  arable  land,  which  his 
villeins  held  of  him,  with  their  houses  ;  and  i  rood  of  mowing  meadow, 
six  acres  of  pasture,  and  half  an  acre  of  wood.  He  had  also  7  cottars  who 
held  an  acre  and  a  half  of  land,  with  their  houses,  paying  2  shillings  a  year. 
The  particulars  of  the  tenants  of  the  manor  and  their  various  holdings  are 
given  by  Sir  William  Parker  in  his  history. 

1  Regulating  the  prices  of  bakers  and  alesellers. 


MELFORD   (LONG).  157 

The  Court  Rolls  of  the  manor  dating  from  1412  to  1642  were  in  exis- 
tence as  late  as  1669,  but  have  been  lost  or  destroyed  ;  the  earliest  still 
existing  commences  in  1630  and  ends  in  1641.  Extracts,  however,  from 
the  Court  Rolls  in  1670  will  be  found  amongst  the  Additional  Charters  in 
the  Brit.  Mus.1  From  a  terrier  delivered  at  Bury  St.  Edmunds  in  1613  the 
parsonage  house  is  thus  described  :  ' '  The  site  of  the  Rectory  containeth  an 
acre  wherein  are  built  one  Manour  house  containing  12  severall  rooms 
smal  and  great  with  an  outhouse  and  the  office  of  the  Dairy  with  5  rooms, 
built  on  the  side  of  ye  yarde  :  one  garden  containeing  one  rood  ;  one 
orchard  planted  containeing  one  rood  ;  al  which  are  inclosed  with  a  moate  ; 
one  close  or  ponde  yarde,  with  a  sluce,  and  a  swann's  tofte,  and  two  fish 
pondes,  and  one  smal  crofte  inclosed  containeing  halfe  an  acre  ;  one  Dove- 
coate  with  a  smal  flighte  of  Doves,  and  one  Pound  belongeing  to  the 
Manour."  The  old  Rectory  manor  house  has  been  pulled  down. 


Add.  Ch.  10552. 


158  THE  MANORS  OF  SUFFOLK. 

MlLDEN. 

MILDEN  MANOR   al.    WELLS   HALL   MANOR. 

HIS  manor  in  the  Confessor's  day  belonged  to  his  thane 
Lewin  of  Bacton,  and  at  the  time  of  the  Norman  Survey 
was  held  in  demesne  by  Walter  the  Deacon,  but  had 
formerly  belonged  to  Walter's  brother  Fedric's  fee.  It 
consisted  of  2  carucates  of  land,  and  there  were  6  villeins, 
6  bordars,  4  slaves,  2  ploughteams  in  demesne  and 
3  belonging  to  the  men,  6  acres  of  meadow,  wood  for  6 
hogs,  i  mill,  2  horses,  6  beasts,  22  hogs,  40  sheep,  12  goats,  valued  at  4 
pounds.  By  the  time  of  the  Survey  the  value  had  risen  to  6  pounds  but 
two  of  the  ploughteams  belonging  to  the  men  had  disappeared.  There  was 
however  a  slight  increase  in  the  stock — one  more  beast,  10  more  sheep  and 
four  more  goats.  The  holding  was  6  quarentenes  long  and  4  broad,  and  paid 
in  a  gelt  yd.  There  was  also  a  church  living  with  15  acres  of  free  land  ;' 
and  over  10  acres  (held  by  a  freeman  but  alienable)  the  Abbot  of  St.  Edmunds 
had  soc  and  sac.  The  value  was  2  shillings  only.2  There  was  also  a  free- 
man holding  here  under  the  Abbot  at  the  time  of  the  Domesday  Survey  15 
acres  of  land  and  3  oxen  valued  at  2  shillings.5 

In  the  time  of  Hen.  I.  Sir  Peter  de  Melding  was  seised  of  this  manor, 
and  he  was  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir  William  de  Melding  and  to  him 
succeeded  his  son  and  heir  Peter  de  Melding,  and  to  him  his  son  and  heir 
Peter  de  Melding  who  died  in  1272.  In  the  Hundred  Rolls  the  last  Peter  is 
stated  to  have  held  a  Knight's  fee  here  in  chief  of  the  King  and  to  have  had 
free  warren,  and  that  his  wife  Alice  then  held  the  same  for  life.4  On  the 
death  of  Alice  de  Melding  in  1361  the  manor  passed  to  Remigius  de  Melding 
brother  and  heir  of  the  last  Peter  de  Melding.  On  the  Close  Rolls  for  1274  is 
an  agreement  between  Alice,  described  as  late  wife  of  Peter  de  Meandlingg, 
and  Remigius  de  Meandlingg,  Peter's  brother  whereby  Remigius  grants 
that  what  Alice  holds  of  the  feoff  ment  of  Laurence  de  Meandlingg  shall  remain 
to  Alice  for  life  provided  the  third  of  the  manor  that  Isabella  the  mother  of 
Remigius  held  in  dower  should  remain  to  Remigius  and  also  a  moiety  of  the 
fees  pertaining  to  the  inheritance  saving  to  Alice  for  life  the  other  moiety 
of  those  fees.  Alice  grants  that  after  her  death  the  manor  should  wholly 
revert  to  Remigius  free  of  her  heirs.5  The  manor  did  accordingly  revert  to 
Remigius  de  Melding,  and  he  in  1290  levied  a  fine  of  the  manor  against 
William  Milksop  and  Alice  his  wife.6 

In  J335  a  fi°e  was  levied  of  three  parts  of  the  manor  and  advowson  by 
Guy  de  St.  Clare  and  Margaret  his  wife  against  William  Muschet  and  Alice 
his  wife7 ;  and  a  fine  of  the  remaining  4th  by  the  said  Guy  de  St.  Clare 
and  Margaret  his  wife  in  1343  against  Henry  Reymond  and  Margaret  his 
wife.8  The  following  year  a  fine  is  levied  of  the  whole  by  the  said  Guy  and 
Margaret  his  wife  against  Ralph  Swift  and  Roger  parson  of  Bradfield  St. 
Clare  Church.' 

In  the  time  of  Richard  the  Second  the  manor  had  passed  to  Sir  John 
Sutton  (son  of  Sir  John  Sutton,  son  of  William),  for  he  presented  to  the 

1  Dom.  ii.  427.  '  Feet  of  Fines,  18  Edw.  1. 17. 

•  Dom.  ii.  360.  '  Feet  of  Fines,  9  Edw.  III.  2. 

»  Dom.  ii.  427.  *  Feet  of  Fines,  17  Edw.  III.  19. 

•  H.R.  ii.  142,  151.  »  Feet  of  Fines,  18  Edw.  III.  15. 
'  Close  Rolls,  2  Edw.  I.  8.    Schedule  8rf. 


MILDEN.  159 

living  in  1370  and  died  seised  of  both  manor  and  advowson  in  1393, '  when 
the  manor  passed  to  Sir  Richard  Sutton  his  brother  and  heir  then  60  years 
of  age.  Sir  John  left  a  daughter  Margery  who  married  John  Walton  whose 
heir  general  Joan  Walton  married  Sir  John  Howard  ancestor  of  the  Dukes 
of  Norfolk.  A  rental  of  the  manor  during  the  holding  of  Sir  Richard 
Sutton  will  be  found  amongst  the  Harleian  Rolls  in  the  Brit.  Mus. 
dated  I398-99."  He  died  about  1409  without  issue,  and  the  manor 
went  to  William  Shelton  who  presented  to  the  living  in  1418  and  died 
in  1-421.  The  next  lord  was  Edward  Wellys  of  London  who  presented  to 
the  living  in  1439.  In  1479  James  Hobart  presented  to  the  living  and  died 
in  1483,  and  Henry  Hobart  seeems  to  have  had  some  interest  in  the  manor, 
but  what  interest  is  not  clear,  for  three  years  previously  Sir  Ralph  Shelton 
appears  to  have  acquired  the  manor.  A  fine  in  1476  was  levied  by  Ralph 
Shelton  against  Erkenwald  Wellys  son  and  heir  of  Alice  Wellys,  not  only 
of  this  manor,  but  also  of  Fenhall  and  Rothyes  Manors  and  appurtenances 
in  Melding,  Illegh  Combusta,  Lavenham,  Preston,  Magna  and  Parva 
Waldingfield,  Edwardeston,  Groton  and  Boxford.3  Sir  Ralph  Shelton  the 
grandson  of  William  Shelton  above  mentioned  died  in  1498  seised,  and  the 
manor  passed  to  his  son  and  heir  Sir  John  Shelton,  and  on  his  death  in  1539 
went  to  his  son  and  heir  Sir  John  Shelton  the  younger.  Sir  John  Shelton 
died  in  I5584  and  the  manor  passed  to  his  son  Ralph  Shelton  who  sold  it  in 
1558  to  Robert  Thorpe5  who  subsequently  disposed  of  it  to  Richd.  Forsett, 
at  whose  death  it  passed  to  his  widow  Margaret  who  re-married  William 
Massey.  Davy  says  in  1571  Roger  Annys  and  Margaret  his  wife  held  their 
first  Court,  but  in  what  capacity  he  does  not  state,  but  immediately  after- 
wards he  makes  Wm.  Massey  and  Margaret  his  wife  sell  to  Henry  Frorsett 
son  and  heir  of  Richard,  and  in  1588  he  and  William  Massey  and  Margaret 
his  wife  sold  it  to  Wm.  Webbe.6  Four  years  later  William  Webbe  sold  the 
manor  toThomas  Shorland7  and  he  sold  in  1599  to  Paul  D'Ewes.  Amongst  the 
Harleian  MSS.  is  a  conveyance  by  Richard  Symond  of  his  manor  of  Welles- 
hall  alias  Mildinge  to  John  Scott  for  40  days  in  1606.'  Paul  D'Ewes  held  his 
first  Court  for  this  manor  on  the  5th  Dec.  8  Charles  I.,  and  the  Court  Roll 
is  amongst  the  D'Ewes  papers  in  the  Harleian  MSS.  in  the  British  Museum. 9 
An  order  of  Chancery  for  amending  the  Answer  of  Samuel  Coleman  and 
Edward  Coleman  defendants  to  the  Bill  of  Paul  D'Ewes  plaintiff  about 
cutting  down  certain  loads  of  wood  in  Milding  will  be  found  amongst  the 
Harleian  MSS.  in  the  Brit.  Mus.10  Also  other  proceedings  in  this  action.  Paul 
D'Ewes  died  in  1630,  and  was  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir  Sir  Symonds 
D'Ewes"  on  whose  death  the  18  April  1650  the  manor  passed  to  Sir  Willoughby 
D'Ewes.  It  was  subsequently  sold  to  the  Colmans  of  Brent  Illeigh  and 
passed  with  that  estate  to  Edward  Goate."  In  1885  the  manor  was  vested  in 
Edward  Penton  Powney  of  Fyfield  House,  Hants,  who  married  Madelina 
Louisa  2nd  dau.  of  the  Rev.  George  Porcher  of  Oakwood,  Sussex,  and  dying 
in  1890  the  manor  passed  to  his  trustees  and  ultimately  to  his  eldest  sur- 
viving son  Major  Cecil  Du  Pre"  Penton  Powney  of  Brambridge  House, 
Bishopstoke,  co.  Hants,  in  whom  the  manor  is  now  vested.  He  married 
in  1895  Ethel  Mary,  eldest  dau.  of  Col.  Norton  Knatchbull. 

1  I. P.M.,  17  Rich.  II.  51.  '  Harl.  99. 

*  Harl.  Roll  I.  20.  '  Harl.  MSS.  No.  98, 121,  p.  160. 

3  Feet  of  Fines,  16  Edw.  IV.  8.  '"  Harl.  MSS.  No.  99,  19,  p.  20. 

4  See  Brent  Eleigh  Manor  in  this  Hundred.  "  See  Stowlangtoft  Manor  in  Blackbourn 

5  Fine,  Mich.  5  Mary  i.  Hundred. 

•  Fine,  Easter,  30  Eliz.  and  William  Webbe  "  See  Abbot's  Manor  Brent  Eleigh,  in  this 

v.  W.  Forsett.      Fine,  Hil.  31  Eliz.  Hundred. 

7  Fine,  Easter,  34 


160  THE  MANORS  OF  SUFFOLK. 

Court  Rolls  and  extracts  from  same  will  be  found  for  1464, 1598  and  8 
Car.  I.  amongst  the  Rolls,  Charters,  and  MSS.  of  the  Harleian  Collection  in 
the  British  Mus.1  And  a  compotus  of  the  manor  1482  to  1493  will  be 
found  amongst  the  Rolls  of  the  same  collection.'  A  sale  of  a  rent  charge  on 
the  manor  in  1558  is  in  the  same  collection,1  and  a  precipe  on  a  covenant 
concerning  the  manor  will  be  found  amongst  the  Additional  Charters  of 
the  Brit.  Mus.4 

BURES  OR  BOWERS  MANOR. 

In  the  beginning  of  the  i4th  century  this  manor  belonged  to  the  De 
Bures  family  and  Robert  de  Bures  had  free  warren  here  in  1314.'  Five 
years  later  we  find  letters  patent  by  Peter  de  Denardistone  directing  Simon 
de  le  Hey  of  Melding  and  Isabella  de  Calewedon  his  tenants  to  perform 
their  services  for  their  tenements  in  Milden  to  Sir  Robert  de  Bures  and 
Hilary  his  wife  to  whom  he  had  sold  the  premises.6  Sir  Robert  de  Bures 
died  about  1331,'  and  the  manor  passed  to  his  son  and  heir  Sir  Andrew  de 
Bures,  who  died  the  22  April  1360."  Five  years  later  we  find  the  manor 
vested  in  Sir  Grey  de  Sancto  Claro,  knt.,  for  amongst  the  Ancient  Deeds  in 
the  Record  office  is  one  of  the  39  Edw.  III.9  being  a  sale  by  Sir  Grey  de 
Sancto  Claro  to  John  B.  .  .  of  Kersey  of  all  the  timber  and  underwood  of 
ten  acres  of  wood  in  Milding  belonging  to  his,  Sir  Grey's,  Manor  of  Melding10 
in  a  wood  called  "  le  Park."  The  manor  subsequently  passed  to  Thomas 
Spring  of  Lavenham  the  opulent  clothier  who  died  the  28  Sept.  1486,  when  it 
went  to  his  son  and  heir  Thomas  Spring  who  died  the  29  June  1523,"  when 
it  passed  to  Sir  John  Spring  his  son  and  heir,12  who  dying  the  7  Feb.  1548'' 
it  passed  to  his  son  and  heir  Sir  William  Spring  of  Pakenham.'4  We  meet 
in  1575  with  a  fine  of  Bowers  Manor  levied  by  Robert  Cutler  against  the 
said  William  Spring,15  and  another  two  years  later  of  the  manor  of 
"  Melding  "  against  him  by  John  Mendham.'6  There  is  also  a  fine  levied 
of  Milding  Manor  in  1599  by  Thomas  Feltham  against  John  Clerk  and  others.'7 
The  next  lord  was  apparently  James  Allington  (of  the  Alyngtons  of  Horse- 
heath  in  Cambridgeshire)  who  died  the  7  September  1626,  when  the  manor 
passed  to  his  nephew  and  heir  Sir  Giles  Allington  son  of  his  elder  brother 
Giles  Allington  and  of  Margaret  his  wife  dau.  of  Sir  John  Spencer  of  Althorp 
in  Northamptonshire,  knt. 

In  Milden  Church  on  the  north  side  of  the  Chancel  is  a  magnificent 
monument  of  marble  to  the  memory  of  James  Allington  erected  by 
his  nephew  and  successor  in  the  lordship.  The  figure  is  large  as  life 
lying  in  a  gown,  the  head  supported  by  books,  and  beneath  is  a  skeleton. 
The  inscription  is  : — 

Nosce  Mori. 

Death  hath  added  to  the  ornament  of  this  Place,  the  blessed 
memorials  of  the  right  vertuous  and  learned  Gentleman,  James  Alington 
of  Mildenge  in  the  Count,  of  Suff.  Esqr.  and  Bacheller ;  second  son 

1  Harl.  Roll  i,  22,  23,  28  ;  58  F.  8.  Harl.        "  I.P.M.,  15  Hen.  VIII.  17. 

MSS.  98,  368.  "  There  is  a  fine  in  1546  levied  of  "  Meld- 

Harl.  Roll  I.  21.  ing  and  Whatfield  Manors  "  between 

Harl.  50  D.  29,  56  I.  33.  John   Spryng   and   Henry  Hobert. 

Add.  Ch.  25396.  (Fine,  Mich.  38  Hen.  VIII.) 

Chart.  Rolls,  7  Edw.  II.  16.  "  I.P.M.,  2  Edw.  VI.  65. 
Ancient  Deeds  in  Record  Office,  12  Edw.        "  See  Cockfield  Hall  Manor  and  Netherhall 

II.,  C.  2175.  Manor,  Little  Waldingfield.  in  this 

I.P.M.,  5  Edw.  III.  55.  Hundred. 

I.P.M.,  34  Edw.  III.  60.  "  Fine,  Hil.  17  Eliz. 

C.  3199.  '*  Fine,  Easter,  19  Eliz. 

"  »'.«.  Bures.  ''  Fine,  Mich.  41,  42  Eliz. 


MILDEN.  161 

of  Robert  Alington  Esqr.  and  his  wife  Margaret  Daughter  of  Sir 
William  Conesby,  Knt.,  Lord  Chief  Justice  of  the  Common  Pleas ; 
which  Robert  was  sonne  and  Heire  of  that  heroicall  spiritt  ould 
Sr.  Gyles  Alington  of  Horseheath  in  the  Countie  of  Cambridge,  the 
sixth  Knight  of  that  right  worshipful  Familie,  since  their  residing  in  the 
said  Countie  (who  was  High  Sheriffe  of  the  Countys  of  Cambridge  and 
Huntington  the  22  and  27  of  Henrie  the  8  and  the  6  of  Edward  the 
6th)  and  of  Ursula  Daughter  of  Sr.  Robert  Drurie  of  Hawsted  in  the 
County  ot  Suffolk  Knt.  of  the  Privy  Councill  to  King  Henrie  the  7th. 

Thus  this  worthie  Gentleman  enobled  by  the  Blood  of  his  An- 
cesters  but  more  enobled  by  the  Blood  of  Christ,  at  length  changed 
this  life  for  a  better  with  his  Saviour  the  7th  of  September  Anno 
Domini  1626.  In  honour  of  whose  Pietie  towards  God,  service  to  his 
Country,  and  Charitie  to  the  Poore ;  and  for  rescuing  all  these  from  future 
oblivion ;  Sr.  Giles  Alington  of  Horseheath  aforesaid  Knt.  (his 
nephew  and  Heir  to  the  said  James,  by  his  elder  Brother  Giles 
Alington  Esq.  and  of  his  wife  Margaret,  Daughter  of  Sr.  John  Spencer  of 
Altropin  Northamptonshire  Knt.)  in  sacred  memory  of  his  affectionate 
Love  to  his  dear  Uncle,  erected  this  monument  Anno  Domini  1627. 

In  1764  the  manor  is  said  to  have  been  vested  in  John  Canham.  (?) 


MILD«N  HALL. 


i6a  THE    MANORS   OF  SUFFOLK. 


MONK  ILLEIGH  MANOR. 

RITHNOTH,  Earl  of  Essex,  who  was  killed  by  the  Danes 
at  the  battle  of  Maiden  about  991,  gave  this  manor  with 
the  advowson  to  the  monks  of  St.  Peter  in  Canterbury 
hence  called  Monks  Illeigh.1  The  manor  was  held  with 
5  carucates  of  land  and  soc  and  sac.  In  Saxon  times 
there  were  21  villeins,  13  bordars,  4  slaves,  2  plough- 
teams  in  demesne,  21  belonging  to  the  men,  12  acres 
of  meadow  and  i  mill.  There  was  also  appurtenant  to  the  manor  a  church 
living  with  22^  acres.  The  value  of  the  manor  was  15  pounds,  but  by  the 
time  of  the  Great  Survey  this  was  increased  to  20.  Though  the  men  and 
implements  had  decreased  the  stock  had  risen.  Thus  there  were  but  13 
villeins  in  place  of  21,  12  bordars  in  place  of  18,  3  slaves  in  place  of  4,  while 
the  ploughteams  of  the  men  were  reduced  from  21  to  13.  The  additional 
stock  consisted  of  2  horses,  19  beasts,  20  hogs,  and  160  sheep.  The  manor 
was  a  league  long  and  5  quarantenes  broad  and  paid  in  a  gelt  14^.'  The 
Hundred  Rolls  state  that  the  Prior  of  Holy  Trinity  Canterbury  held  pleas 
here  and  claimed  free  warren  for  his  lands.3 

In  1534  Sir  William  Waldegrave  seems  to  have  held,  but  probably  as 
lessee,  and  he  was  succeeded  in  his  holding,  whatever  it  may  have  been,  by 
his  son  William.  At  the  Dissolution  the  manor  was  given  to  the  Dean  and 
Canons  of  Canterbury  Cathedral  and  the  Dean  and  Chapter  are  the  present 
lords.  Richard  Duke  held  later  as  tenant  of  the  Dean  and  Canons  and 
in  1650  when  the  Rev.  Miles  Burkitt  purchased  the  manor  of  Parliament, 
this  Richard  Duke  as  lessee  by  a  verdict  cast  him  out  of  possession.  In 
McKeon's  Inquiry  into  the  birthplace,  parentage,  life  and  writings  of  the 
Rev.  Wm.  Gurnall,4  he  gives  the  advertisement  to  a  re-issue  of  one  of  Gur- 
nall's  sermons  made  public  by  Wm.  Burkitt  and  secondly  the  Rev.  Robert 
Ainslie,  member  of  the  Independent  Congregation  at  Lavenham,  in  which  is 
the  following  relating  to  the  unfortunate  purchase  of  the  manor  made  in 
1650,  taken  from  Calamy  :  "  The  author  saw  a  petition  of  his  (the  purchaser) 
to  King  Charles  soon  after  the  Restoration,  in  which  he  represented  his 
compassionable  case  in  this  manner;  that  having  in  the  year  1650 
unhappily  purchased  the  Manor  of  Monks  Ely,  in  Suffolk,  belonging  to  the 
Dean  and  Chapter  of  Canterbury,  and  paid  to  Mr.  Richard  Duke  the  imme- 
diate tenant,  £150  for  his  right,  excepting  only  his  lease  and  term  for 
six  years  determining  Sept.  29  1656,  the  said  Mr.  Duke  had  with  the  very 
money  which  he  had  paid  him  purchased  a  new  lease  of  the  Dean  and 
Chapter,  sued  the  petitioner,  and  obtained  a  verdict  to  cast  him  out  of 
possession  without  any  satisfaction, — notwithstanding  that  he  by  purchasing 
and  building,  planting  and  improving  the  premises,  had  expended  about 
£2,500,  and  run  himself  into  debt — whereupon  he  humbly  threw  himself 
and  his  eight  children  at  his  Majesty's  feet,  begging  that  he  might  be 
relieved  either  by  commissioners  appointed  to  inquire  into  particulars,  or 
by  his  Majesty  recommending  his  case  to  the  House  of  Peers.  But  he  could 
get  no  answer  to  his  petition  nor  find  any  way  to  obtain  relief.  He  used 
often  to  say  to  his  friends,  '  Tho'  I  have  lost  a  great  many  scores  of  pounds 
by  my  non-conformity,  yet  blessed  be  God,  I  never  wanted.'  Some  people 

1  Harl.  43  C.  7.  »  H.R.  ii.  143,  153.  195  :  see  I.Q.D.,  15 

•  Dom.  ii.  377.  Edw.  II.  56.     . 

4  Woodbridge,  1830,  8vo. 


MONK    ILLEIGH.  163 

upon  his  being  turned  out  scoffingly  said,  '  Now  we  shall  see  Burkitt  and 
his  family  starve,'  but  he  lived  to  relieve  the  families  of  some  of  those 
very  persons  at  his  own  door."  Particulars  of  the  services  and  customs 
of  the  manor  will  be  found  amongst  the  Additional  MSS.  of  the  British 
Museum.1  In  the  time  of  Hen.  VII.  there  is  an  Inquisition  of  Thomas 
Spring  when  it  was  found  that  a  messuage  called  "  Stakwoodes  "  in  Monk 
Eleigh  was  worth  305.  and  held  of  the  Prior  of  Canterbury  as  of  the  Manor 
of  Monks  Illcgh  by  fealty  and  45.  rent,  and  that  the  same  was  vested 
in  trustees  to  the  use  of  Thomas  Spryng  who  died  the  28  Sept.  2  Hen.  VII. 
[1486],  and  that  Thomas  Spryng  aged  30  was  his  son  and  heir.2>  This  last 
is  no  doubt  the  Thomas  Spring  who  died  the  29  June  1523 .3 

The  manor  seems  to  be  mentioned  in  the  Inquis.  p.m.  of  Sir  John 
Spring  who  died  the  7  Feb.  1547-8  leaving  William  his  son  and  h.  then  aged 
18." 

BOYTON  MANOR  al.  BUYDEN  HALL  MANOR. 

This  manor  seems  to  have  been  held  in  the  beginning  of  the  i4th 
Century  by  the  Boytons,  and  William  de  Boyton  in  1304  had  free  warren 
here.5  Davy  states  that  Sir  William  Baldrey,  knt.  of  London  was  lord  and 
was  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir  George  Baldrey  who  died  in  1540,  when 
the  manor  passed  to  his  daughter  and  heir  Elizabeth  who  was  married  to 
Robert  Lord  Rich  2nd  Baron.  He  was  the  son  of  Richard  Rich,  Baron 
Rich  and  Lord  Chancellor  of  England  who  amassed  a  large  fortune, 
and  as  Dugdale  says,  "  like  a  discreet  pilot  who  seeing  a  storm  at  hand,  gets 
his  ship  into  harbour,"  retired  from  the  high  office  on  the  approach  of 
danger.  He  endeavoured  while  Sir  Thomas  More  ex-Lord  Chancellor 
was  a  prisoner  in  the  Tower  to  persuade  that  upright  and  honourable  judge 
to  acknowledge  the  King's  supremacy  in  spiritual  affairs,  but  without  effect. 
Lord  Rich's  reputation  has  descended  with  an  indelible  stain  by  reason  of 
the  baseness  of  his  conduct  to  Sir  Thomas  More.  Upon  his  trial  Lord 
Rich  was  a  witness  against  him  as  to  a  pretended  conversation  in  the  Tower. 
Its  truth  may  be  estimated  when  we  consider  the  character  of  Sir  Thomas. 
To  the  evidence  he  thus  made  answer  :  "  If  I  were  a  man,  my  lord,  that  had 
no  regard  to  my  oath,  I  had  no  occasion  to  be  here  a  criminal ;  and  if  this 
oath,  Mr.  Rich,  you  have  taken  be  true,  then  I  pray  I  may  never  see 
God's  face  ;  which  were  it  otherwise  is  an  imprecation  I  would  not  be  guilty 
of  to  gain  the  world."  Sir  Thomas  then  proceeded  to  charge  him  with 
being  "  light  of  tongue,  a  great  gamester,  and  a  person  of  no  good  in  the 
parish  where  they  had  lived  together,  or  in  the  Temple,  where  he  was  edu- 
cated." After  which  he  went  on  to  show  how  unlikely  it  was  that  he  should 
"  impart  the  secrets  of  his  conscience  to  a  man  of  whom  he  always  had  so 
mean  an  opinion." 

Lord  Rich  the  2nd  Baron  was  one  of  the  peers  upon  the  trial  of  the  Duke 
of  Norfolk  in  the  reign  of  Q.  Elizabeth,  and  was  afterwards  employed  by  her 
Majesty  upon  a  diplomatic  mission  to  France  as  well  as  upon  some  affairs  in 
Ireland.  He  had  issue  Richard  who  married  Katherine  daughter  and  co- 
heir of  Sir  Henry  Knevitt,  knt.,  but  died  without  issue  in  his  father's  life- 
time, and  Robert  who  succeeded  his  father  as  3rd  Baron  in  1581. 
Elizabeth  his  widow  survived  her  husband,  and  a  fine  of  the  manor 

'  Add.  6159,  6160.  4  I. P.M.,  2  Edw.  VI.  65. 

*  Inquis.,  2  Hen.  VII.  234.  s  Chart.  Rolls,  32  Edw.  I.  24. 

3  See  Netherhall  Manor,  Little  Walding- 
field,  in  this  Hundred. 


164  THE   MANORS   OF   SUFFOLK. 

was  levied  against  her  in  1585  by  Sir  John  Peyton  and  others.1 
In  1 596  we  meet  with  another  fine  of  the  manor  levin  1  by  John  Peyton  and 
others  against  Edwin  Rich.1  In  1598  Robert  Lord  Rich  was  present  at 
the  sacking  of  Cadiz  under  the  Earl  of  Essex,  and  was  created  Earl  of  War- 
wick the  6  Aug.  1618  by  King  James  I.  The  Patent  recites  that  "James, 
&c.,the  King,  calling  to  mind  the  memorable,  &c.,and  renowned  deserts  of 
the  worthy  progenitors  of  his  well-beloved  and  faithful  Robert  Lord  Rich, 
and  observing  that  he  treads  the  paths  of  virtue  and  true  nobility,  as  well  as 
of  piety  and  probity;  being  also  steady,  valiant  and  faithful  to  his  King  and 
country,  creates  the  said  Robert  Lord  Rich  Earl  of  Warwick,  to  have  and  to 
hold  to  him  and  the  heirs  male  of  his  body  ;  and  for  the  l>rtti-r  support  of 
that  honour,  grants  to  him  and  his  heirs  male  £20  yearly,  payable  at  the  Ex- 
chequer." He  married  two  wives,  ist  Penelope  dau.  of  Walter  Dcvereux 
Earl  of  Essex  by  whom  he  had  three  sons — Robert  who  succeeded  him  as 
Earl  of  Warwick,  Henry  created  Earl  of  Holland,  and  Charles  slain  at  the 
Isle  of  Rhee  in  France  in  the  expedition  with  the  Duke  of  Buckingham 
in  1627.  He  also  had  4  daughters.  His  2nd  wife  was  Frances  dau.  of  Sir 
Christopher  Wray,  knt.,  Lord  Chief  Justice  of  the  King's  Bench,  widow 
of  Sir  George  Paul  of  Snartford  co.  Lincoln,  knt.  and  Bart.,  but 
by  her  had  no  issue.  A  precipe  on  a  covenant  concerning  this  manor 
will  be  found  amongst  the  Charters  in  the  Brit.  Mus.3 

A  fine  was  levied  of "  Monks  Eleigh  Manor  "  in  1569  by  William  Humm- 
ynge  against  Robert  Thorpe  and  others.4 


•  Fine,  Easter,  27  Eliz.  '  Add.  Ch.  25498. 

•  Fine,  Trin.  38  Eliz.  4  Fine,  Easter,  II  Eliz. 


NAYLAND.  165 


NAYLAND  MANOR. 

N  the  Confessor's  time  Robert  father  of  Suane  held 
2  carucates  of  land  as  a  manor  with  soc.  There  were  6 
villeins,  20  bordars,  6  slaves,  i  ploughteam  in  demesne, 
4  belonging  to  the  men,  i  mill,  and  10  acres  of  meadow. 
The  value  was  6  pounds  which  by  the  time  of  the  Great 
Survey  had  risen  to  8  pounds.  There  had  been  a  great 
increase  in  prosperity  all  round,  though  the  bordars  were  3  less, 
the  slaves  4  less,  and  there  was  one  ploughteam  less  of  the  men's,  yet  at 
the  Hall  there  were  3  horses,  and  belonging  to  the  manor  31  beasts,  45  hogs,  80 
sheep  and  35  goats.  The  manor  was  half  a  league  in  length,  and  2  quaran- 
tenes  in  breadth  and  paid  in  a  gelt  12^.  Suane  of  Essex  was  the  Domesday 
tenant  in  chief.'  He  was  succeeded  by  his  son  Henry  de  Essex  who  for- 
feited the  manor  in  1163.  Gervase  speaks  of  the  disgrace  of  Henry  de 
Essex  thus  :  "An.  1157  Rex  Henricus  expeditioncm  paravit  in  Gualias  :— 
Signifer  enim  Regis  Henricus  de  Essessia  nomine,  dum  inter  hostiles  cuneos 
impeteretur,  vexillum  regium  in  terram  dimisit.  Quoviso  Gualenscs  auda- 
ciores,  Angli  vero  timidiores  effecti  sunt,  existimantes  regem  in  praclio 
corruisse.  Ex  hoc  infortunio  Henricus,  cum  esset  nobilissimus  inter 
principes  Angliae,  perpetuum  incurrit  obprobrium  et  exhseredationem."2 
The  duel  between  Robert  de  Montfort  and  Henry  de  Essex  took  place  in 
1163  in  which  year  Diceto  says:  "  Robertus  de  Muntford  cum  Henrico  de 
Essex  certamine  singulari  congrediens  victoriam  reportavit.  Henricus 
antem  notam  infamiae  simul  et  ex  hseredationis  jacturam  incurrens, 
indulgentia  principis  habitum  monachalem  suscepit  aput  Radingum."3 
Henry  III.  granted  the  manor  to  Hubert  de  Burgh  when  he  created  him  Earl 
of  Kent.  Page  rather  implies  that  the  manor  had  to  be  parted  with  by  the 
Earl,  for  he  says  of  him  "  after  falling  into  disgrace  with  that  monarch 
[Henry  III.]  he  was  obliged  to  part  with  several  of  his  castles  and  lands  to 
secure  the  quiet  enjoyment  of  the  residue,"  and  the  Suffolk  historian  then 
skips  to  1339  when  the  Scroops  had  the  manor.  However,  the  inference 
would  not  be  correct,  for  Hubert  de  Burgh  held  this  manor  till  his  death. 
This  Hubert  was  one  of  the  most  powerful  and  influential  nobles  of  his 
time.  Dugdale  says  of  him :  "  The  first  mention  of  this  Hubert  I  find  is 
that  he  was  servant  to  King  Richard  I.,  as  also  to  King  John,  being  sent 
by  the  latter  from  Roan,  in  the  first  year  of  his  reign,  to  treat  of  a  marriage 
for  him  with  a  daughter  to  the  King  of  Portugall ;  and  had  such  great 
estimation  from  that  King  that  in  the  third  year  of  his  reign,  being  lord 
chamberlain  of  the  household,  he  was  constituted  warden  of  the  Marches 
of  Wales,  and  had  a  hundred  soldiers  to  attend  him  in  those  parts."  He 
was  one  of  the  nobles  who  stood  to  King  John  and  witnessed  the  signing 
of  the  Magna  Charta,  being  at  that  time  made  Justiciar  of  England.  He 
was  one  of  the  guardians  of  Hen.  III.  and  associated  in  the  government 
of  the  Kingdom  during  his  minority  and  was  Regent  of  England  in  1219. 
He  was  High  Sheriff  of  Norfolk  and  Suffolk  in  1215,  and  1217  to  1225. 

The  incident  to  which  Page  refers  is  narrated  by  Dugdale,  who  states  : 
"  But  before  the  end  of  this  thirteenth  year  [about  Michaelmas]  the  king 
having  a  rendezvous  at  Portesmouth  of  the  greatest  army  that  had  been 
seen  in  this  realm  (it  consisting  of  English,  Irish,  Scotch,  and  Welsh), 

1  Dom.  ii.  4016.  3  Ymag.  Hist.  Col.  535. 

3  Col.  1380. 


166  iTHE   MANORS   OF   SUFFOLK.' 

designing  therewith  the  recovery  of  what  his  father  had  lost  in  foreign  parts, 
and  expecting  all  things  in  readiness,  with  ships  for  their  transportation ; 
but  finding  not  half  so  many  as  would  suffice  for  that  purpose,  he  wholly 
attributed  the  fault  to  this  Hubert  and  publickly  calling  him  '  Old  Traytor,' 
told  him  that  he  had  taken  five  thousand  marks  as  a  bribe  from  the  Queen 
of  France;  and  thereupon  drawing  out  his  sword  would  have  killed  him, 
had  not  the  Earl  of  Chester,  and  some  others,  prevented  it ;  but 
displaced  him  from  his  office  of  Justice;  whereupon  he  withdrew  till 
the  king  grew  better  pacified,  as  it  seems  he  soon  was.  For  the  next  ensuing 
year,  when  divers  valiant  knights,  coming  to  the  king  out  of  Normandy, 
earnestly  besought  him  to  land  forces  in  that  country,  assuring  him  that 
it  might  be  easily  recovered,  this  Hubert  wholly  disswaded  him  from 
attempting  it,  and  prevailed  with  him  to  make  an  expedition  into  Gascoigne 
and  Poictou,  where  he  succeeded  so  well  that  having  little  opposition  he 
freely  received  the  homages  of  the  inhabitants  of  those  countries."  After 
he  regained  the  royal  favour  he  had  a  grant  in  1232  of  the  office  of  Justiciar 
of  Ireland  and  was  made  governor  of  the  Tower  of  London  the  same  year. 
A  little  later  he  fell  again  into  disgrace,  and  was  sent  with  indignity  to  the 
Tower.  It  seems  that  when  by  reason  of  the  intrigues  of  his  enemies,  en- 
couraged by  one  of  the  meanest  of  sovereigns  ever  seated  on  the  throne  of 
this  kingdom,  De  Burgh  had  to  flee  from  London,  he  received  a  royal 
safe  conduct,  relying  on  which  he  started  to  join  his  wife  at  Bury  St. 
Edmunds,  but  he  had  scarcely  begun  his  journey  when  the  king,  notwith- 
standing his  plighted  word  and  royal  safe  conduct,  sent  Sir  Godfrey  de 
Crancomb  with  300  armed  men  to  seize  him. 

They  surprised  him  in  bed  at  Brentwood,  but  he  contrived  to  escape 
almost  naked  into  the  parish  church,  and  took  refuge  at  the  altar  with  a 
crucifix  in  one  hand  and  the  Host  in  the  other,  hoping  that  the  sanctity 
of  the  spot  would  insure  him  respect  and  safety.  But  his  enraged  pur- 
suers led  by  the  knight  in  command,  regardless  of  the  sacrilege,  burst  into 
the  church,  and  having  dragged  the  Earl  forth,  placed  him  on  horseback 
nearly  naked  as  he  was,  tying  his  feet  under  the  girths,  and  so  conveyed 
him  to  the  Tower  of  London. 

So  soon  as  information  of  this  violation  of  sanctuary  came  to  the  ears 
of  the  Bishop  of  London  he  proceeded  to  the  King  and  boldly  rebuked 
him  for  thus  permitting  so  gross  a  violation  of  "  the  peace  of  holy  church," 
saying  that  if  he  did  not  forthwith  free  De  Burgh  of  his  bonds  and  send  him 
back  to  the  church  from  whence  he  had  been  taken  he  would  pronounce  a 
sentence  of  excommunication  against  all  who  had  any  hand  therein. 

"  Whereupon,"  says  Dugdale,  "  the  King,  being  thus  made  sensible 
of  his  fault,  sent  him  back  to  the  same  chappel  upon  the  5th  calend  of  Octo- 
ber, but  withal  directed  his  precept  to  the  sheriff  of  Essex  and  Hertfordshire, 
upon  pain  of  death,  to  come  himself  in  person,  as  also  to  bring  with  him 
the  '  posse  comitatus,'  and  to  encompass  the  chappel,  to  the  end  he 
should  not  escape  thence,  nor  receive  any  manner  of  food;  which  the 
sheriff  accordingly  did,  making  a  great  ditch,  as  well  about  the  bishop's 
house  as  the  chappel,  resolving  to  stay  there  for  forty  days." 

From  his  unfortunate  position  the  Earl  was  relieved  by  the  influence 
of  his  friend  the  Archbishop  of  Dublin  and  was  conveyed  again  to  the 
Tower,  where  he  was  made  to  disgorge  a  large  amount  of  plate,  silver  and 
jewels,  alleged  to  have  been  wrongfully  obtained,  all  of  which,  of  course, 
passed  into  the  royal  coffers.  He  later  received  a  pardon  without, 
however,  obtaining  his  freedom,  but  after  being  removed  to  Devizes  he 


NAYLAND.  167 

contrived  to  escape.  The  Earl  married  1st  Joane  daughter  of  William  de 
Vernon  Earl  of  Devon  widow  of  William  de  Beever  by  whom  he  had  no 
issue;  andly  Beatrix  daughter  of  William  de  Warren  of  Wormegay  co.  Nor- 
folk, and  widow  of  Dodo  Bardolf;  srdly  Margaret  daughter  of  Robert 
Harsick ;  4thly  Hawise Countess  of  Gloucester  and  Essex ;  and  5thly  Margaret 
daughter  of  William  King  of  Scotland.  It  is  said  he  had  issue  by  the  last 
wife,  but  this  has  been  doubted  on  the  ground  that  issue  by  her  would  have 
been  nearer  to  the  crown  of  Scotland  than  any  of  the  competitors  claiming 
in  the  time  of  Edw.  I.  inasmuch  as  the  offspring  of  William  King  of  Scotland 
would  have  had  better  pretention  than  either  Bruce  or  Baliol  who  were  only 
descended  from  the  daughters  of  David  younger  brother  of  the  said 
William.  However  there  is  no  doubt  of  the  Earl  having  issue  by  one  of  his 
wives,  and  the  Manor  of  Nayland  on  the  Earl's  death  in  1243  passed  to  Sir 
John  de  Burgh,  his  eldest  son  who  took  part  with  the  barons  and  fought  at 
the  battles  of  Lewes  and  Evesham  in  the  time  of  Hen.  III.  He  married 
Hawise  daughter  and  heir  of  William  de  Lauvalay,  and  left  issue  a  son 
John  who  died  6  Edw.  I.  [1278.]  He  or  his  father  had  a  grant  of  free  warren 
in  1260.'  John  the  grandson  of  Hubert  de  Burgh  exchanged  the  manor 
with  the  king  about  the  year  1272. 

The  Hundred  Rolls  state  that  the  manor  was  at  the  time  of  the  com- 
pilation of  that  Record  in  the  King's  hands  by  purchase  from  John  de  Burgh,2 
but  the  real  circumstances  seem  to  be  disclosed  in  an  entry  on  the  Patent 
Rolls  in  1273,  where  we  find  a  covenant  between  the  King  and  John  de 
Burgh  "who  had  granted  the  manor  to  the  King"  that  John  should  have 
£600  a  year  until  he  (the  King)  had  seisin  of  this  manor  and  others,  and 
after  seisin  the  King  should  demise  the  manor  to  the  said  John  for  life.3 

Ministers'  accounts  of  the  lands  in  Nayland  "  late  of  John  de  Burgh," 
in  1275  and  1276,  are  still  preserved  in  the  Record  Office.4  The  manor 
was  certainly  in  the  King's  hands  in  1275,'  and  in  1284  was  granted  by  the 
King  to  Gilbert  Peche  for  life.  It  was  in  1298  assigned  to  Margaret  Queen 
of  England  as  part  of  her  dower.  In  1335  a  commission  of  survey  of  the 
manor  was  issued/  and  the  following  year  the  manor  was  granted  by  the 
Crown  to  Geoffrey  de  Scrope  of  Masham  in  exchange.7  The  manor  was  to 
be  held  of  the  lordship  of  Cawston  in  Norfolk  by  the  service  of  one  rose  a 
year.  Geoffrey  de  Scrope  was  in  1323  appointed  Chief  Justice  of  the  Court 
of  King's  Bench  and  again  in  1331,  but  resigned  the  judicial  office  on  going 
abroad  on  the  King's  affairs.  He  was  later  engaged  in  the  wars  of  Flanders 
and  attained  the  rank  of  banneret. 

Sir  Geoffrey  de  Scrope  married  Ivetta  daughter  of  William  Rosse  of 
Igmanthorpe,  and  dying  about  1340  the  manor  passed  to  his  son  Henry  de 
Scrope,  who  in  1334  was  summoned  to  Parliament  as  Baron  Scrope.  He 
distinguished  himself  in  the  wars  with  Scotland,  and  was  present  at  the 
battle  of  Durham  where  the  Scottish  King  sustained  so  signal  a  defeat. 

In  the  next  reign  he  was  one  of  the  ambassadors  sent  to  treat  with 
Charles  King  of  Navarre  touching  a  league  between  that  prince  and  the 
King  of  England.  He  died  in  1391,"  and  the  manor  passed  to  his  son  Sir 
Stephen  le  Scrope  2nd  Baron.  He  had  been  knighted  in  the  lifetime  of  his 
father  for  important  services  rendered  to  his  sovereign  and  country  both 

'  Chart.  Rolls,  44  Hen.  III.  4.  «  Pat.  Rolls,  9  Edw.  III.  pt.  ii.  27^. 

'  H,R.  ii.  140,  150.  7  Chart.  Rolls,  10  Edw.  III.  12,  20 ; 

3  Pat.  Rolls,  2  Edw.  I.  24.  Originalia,  10  Edw.  III.  34. 

4  3  and  4  Edw.  I.,  Bundle  1089,  No.  7.  "  Extent.     I.P.M.,  16  Rich.  II.  28. 

5  I.P.M.,  3  Edw.  I.  41. 


168  THE   MANORS  OF  SUFFOLK. 

by  sea  and  land.  He  married  Margery  widow  of  John  son  of  Sir  William 
de  Huntingfield,  knt.,  and  dying  in  1406  the  manor  passed  to  his  eldest 
son  Sir  Henry  Scrope  3rd  Baron  summoned  to  Parliament  from  1408  to  1414 
as  Lord  Scrope  of  Masham. 

In  an  Inquisition  quod  damnum  in  1415  it  is  found  that  Sir  Henry 
le  Scrope  held  Nayland  Manor  and  a  water  mill  parrel  thereof.'  He  was  in 
high  favour  with  Hen.  IV.,  and  his  abilities  were  of  so  high  an  order  and  his 
counsel  deemed  so  desirable  in  the  affairs  of  the  realm  that  the  King  assigned 
him  the  towns  of  Hamstede  and  Hendon  in  Middlesex  for  lodging  and  enter- 
tainment for  himself  and  his  servants  and  horses  during  his  stay  in  West- 
minster or  London. 

How  grossly  he  abused  the  confidence  of  King  Henry  V.  when  sent  on 
an  embassy  to  the  French  is  quaintly  told  by  Dugdale. 

"  But  this  great  trust,"  says  Dugdale,  "  he  shamefully  abused  ;  for 
being  a  person  in  whom  the  king  had  so  great  a  confidence  that  nothing 
of  private  or  public  concernment  was  done  without  him  ;  his  gravity  of 
countenance,  modesty  in  his  deportment,  and  religious  discourse  being 
always  such  that  whatsoever  he  advised  was  held  as  an  oracle  ;  upon  this 
his  solemn  embassy  into  France  (which  none  was  thought  so  fit  to  manage 
as  himself)  he  treated  privily  with  the  king's  enemies  (being  in  his  heart 
totally  theirs)  and  conspired  the  king's  destruction,  upon  promise  of  reward 
from  the  French  ;  his  confederates  in  this  design  being  Richard,  Earl  of 
Cambridge  (brother  to  the  Duke  of  York)  and  Sir  Thomas  Grey,  a  northern 
knight.  But  before  this  mischievous  plot  could  be  effected  (which  was  to 
have  killed  the  king  and  all  his  brethren  ere  he  went  to  sea,  five  ships 
being  ready  at  Suthampton  to  waft  the  king  over  into  France),  it  was 
discovered.  Whereupon  he  had  a  speedy  trial  for  it  [before  Thomas,  Duke 
of  Clarence,  and  other  peers],  at  Suthampton,  and  being  found  guilty,  there 
lost  his  head,"  in  August,  1415. 

The  attainted  nobleman  had  married  ist  Philippa  daughter  of  Sir 
Guy  de  Brian  and  2ndly  Joan  Duchess  of  York  sister  and  coheir  of  Edmund 
Holland  Earl  of  Kent,  but  had  no  issue.  The  manor  on  the  attainder  passed 
to  the  Crown,  but  in  1421  was  restored  to  the  traitor's  brother  Sir  John 
Scrope  who  in  1426  was  summoned  to  Parliament  as  Lord  Scrope  of  Masham 
and  Upsal,  and  became  Treasurer  of  the  Exchequer.  He  died  in  1455,' 
and  the  manor  passed  to  his  widow  Elizabeth.  On  her  death  in  1466  the 
manor  passed  to  Sir  John's  eldest  son  Thomas  le  Scrope  5th  Baron  who  dying 
in  I475,3  it  passed  to  his  eldest  son  Thomas  6th  Baron.  He  married  Eliza- 
beth daughter  and  coheir  of  John  Nevil,  Marquis  of  Montecute,  by  whom  he 
had  an  only  daughter  Alice.  Thomas  the  6th  Baron  died  in  1494,  and  in 
the  Inquisition  of  that  year  we  find  that  the  Manor  of  Nayland  consisted 
of  500  acres  of  land,  200  of  meadow,  500  of  pasture,  200  of  wood  worth 
3O/.,  and  that  it  was  held  of  Edmund  Earl  of  Suffolk  by  Sir  Thomas 
Scrope  Lord  Masham  who  was  seised  in  fee,  and  that  Alice  Scrope,  aged  12, 
his  daughter  was  heir.4 

Alice  married  Henry  Lord  Scrope  of  Bolton  and  had  a  daughter 
Elizabeth  married  to  Sir  Gilbert  Talbot,  knt.  Alice  Lady  Scrope  died  in 
1501,  and  Elizabeth  in  1516,  when  the  manor  was  retained  by  her  husband 
Sir  Gilbert  during  his  life.  He  died  the  19  September  1517  when  it  passed  to 
his  son  and  heir  Gilbert  Talbot.5  After  this  the  manor  went  as  did  the  Scrope 

•  I.Q.D.,  3  Hen.  V.  2.  '  I.P.M.,  9  Hen.  VII.  948. 

•  Extent.     I.P.M.,  34  Hen.  VI.  14.  '  I.P.M.,  10  Hen.  VIII.  17. 
>  Extent.     I.P.M.   1    Edw.  IV.    1. 


n..\iL-iii.     i.r.m.,  ,54  am.  vi.  14. 
Extent.     I.P.M.,  15  Edw.  IV.  41. 


NAYLAND.  169 

estates  on  the  death  of  Geoff ery  le  Scrope  gth  Baron  without  issue  to  Elizabeth 
Talbot's  great  aunt  Mary  married  to  Sir  Christopher  Danby,  knt.,  and  we 
find  an  action  in  the  Star  Chamber,  in  the  time  of  Philip  and  Mary,  as  to 
seizure  of  wood  &c.  in  the  manor  by  Sir  Christopher  Danby  against  John 
Payne  and  others,"  and  amongst  the  Chancery  Proceedings  in  the  time  of 
Queen  Elizabeth  are  actions  respecting  the  manor  by  John  Freston  against  this 
same  Sir  Christopher  Danby  and  another.2  The  manor  then  passed  to  Sir 
Jerome  Weston,  knt.  of  Roxwell  in  Essex,  who  died  in  1603,  when  it  passed 
to  his  son  Sir  Richard  Weston,  knt.,  who  having  been  employed  in  various 
embassies  and  discharged  several  offices  of  trust  and  importance  in  the 
reigns  of  James  I.  and  Chas.  I.,  in  particular  in  the  reign  of  the  former  as 
ambassador  to  Bohemia  and  later  to  Brussels  to  treat  with  the  representa- 
tives of  the  Emperor  and  King  of  Spain  regarding  the  restitution  of  the 
palatine,  was  advanced  to  the  peerage  in  1628  as  Baron  Weston  of  Nayland. 
The  previous  year  he  had  had  a  grant  of  a  market  for  Nayland.3 

He  died  in  1634,  but  the  manor  does  not  seem  to  have  continued  in  the 
family,  for  the  very  next  year  1635  we  find  that  the  reversion  of  the  manor 
was  granted  to  Sir  George  Hastings  and  others.4  It  is  quite  probable, 
however,  the  grant  may  have  been  but  by  way  of  settlement.  We  do  not 
find  any  further  particulars  of  the  manor  until  1814,  when  we  meet  as  lord 
with  Sir  Wm.  Rowley  2nd  Bart,  son  of  Sir  Joshua  Rowley  (created  a  Baronet 
10  June  1786)  by  Sarah  his  wife  dau.  and  heir  of  Bartholomew  Burton. 
He  married  in  1785  Susannah  Edith  daughter  of  Admiral  Sir  Robert  Harland, 
Bart.,  and  on  his  death  the  2Oth  Oct.,  1832,  the  manor  passed  to  his  eldest 
surviving  son  Sir  Joshua  Ricketts  Rowley  3rd  Baronet  vice-admiral  R.N., 
who  married  in  1824  Charlotte  only  daughter  of  John  Moseley  of  Great 
Glemham  House,  but  had  no  issue,  and  dying  the  18  March  1857  the  manor 
passsed  to  his  brother  Sir  Charles  Robert  Rowley  4th  Baronet  who  married 
in  1830  the  Hon.  Maria  Louisa  Vanneck  only  daughter  of  Joshua  2nd  Lord 
Huntingfield,  and  dying  in  1888  the  manor  passed  to  his  eldest  surviving  son 
Sir  Joshua  Thelluson  Rowley  5th  Bart,  of  Tendring  Hall,  the  present  lord, 
who  in  Oct.  1888  married  the  Hon.  Louisa  Helene  Brownlow  3rd  dau.  of 
Charles  2nd  Baron  Lurgan  formerly  Maid  of  Honour  to  the  Queen. 

Extracts  from  the  Court  Rolls  of  the  manor  as  to  rights  of  the  Prior 
and  Monks  of  Horkesley  from  44  Hen.  III.  to  9  Edw.  II.  will  be  found  in 
the  Bodleian.5 


1  Public  Record  Office.    Bundle  r,  60.  "  Chancery,  D.K.R.  48.     App.  p.  535. 

'  C.P.,  ser.  ii.  B.  Ixii.  3.  5  Bodl.  Essex  Rolls  17. 

3  Originalia,  22  Jac.  I.  3  Pars  Rot.  4. 


THE   MANORS  OF   SUFFOLK. 


NEWTON. 

N  the  time  of  the  Confessor  a  manor  was  held  here  by  the 
Abbot  of  St.  Edmunds  and  in  Norman  days  it  was  held 
by  Aelons  of  the  Abbot.  There  were  2  carucates  of  land, 

2  ploughteams  in  demesne,  ij  belonging  to  the  men,  2  slaves, 

3  beasts,  40  hogs,  97  sheep,  3  villeins,  4  bordars,  14  goats,  16 
hives  of  bees,  wood  for  8  hogs   and   2    acres  of  meadow. 
The  value  was  2  pounds  in  Saxon  days,  but  by  the  time  of 

the  Great  Survey,  it  had  risen  to  2j  pounds.  The  particulars  of  the  manor 
had  somewhat  altered  ;  both  the  slaves  and  the  goats  had  disappeared,  the 
hogs  had  come  down  to  29  and  the  hives  of  bees  to  9  while  there  was  wood 
sufficient  for  6  hogs  only.  The  beasts  however  had  risen  to  7,  the  sheep  to 
102  and  the  bordars  to  10.  The  manor  was  6  quarantenes  in  length  and  3 
in  breadth  and  paid  in  a  gelt  4^.  less  i  farthing.' 

NEWTON  HALL  MANOR. 

This  was  given  by  Theodred  Bishop  of  London  to  St.  Edmunds, 
and  belonged  to  the  Abbot,  as  we  have  seen  at  the  time  of  the  Domesday 
Survey  when  Aelons  held  it  of  him.  In  1285  it  was  held  by  John  de  Moese 
and  passed  to  his  son  and  heir  John.  On  his  death  in  1308  a  third  part 
went  to  his  widow  Ada  in  dower  and  she  remarried  William  de  Pappworth. 
On  Ada's  death  the  whole  passed  to  her  first  husband's  brother  and  heir 
Thomas  de  Moese  at  whose  death  it  went  to  his  daughter  and  heir  Margaret. 
In  1316  the  manor  was  vested  in  Sir  William  de  Botevilleyn  or  Butvillein 
who  was  married  to  Lady  Julian  and  on  his  death  the  manor  passed  to  his 
son  and  heir  Thomas.  A  William  de  Blunvill  had  had  a  grant  of  free  warren 
in  Newton  as  early  as  1267.* 

In  1345  Thomas  sold  the  manor  and  advowson  by  fine  to  William  de 
Bohun  Earl  of  Northampton  and  Elizabeth  his  wife.  This  William  de 
Bohun  was  one  of  the  heroes  of  Cressy  and  was  a  distinguished  person  in 
the  stormy  times  in  which  he  lived.  He  was  created  Earl  of  Northamp- 
ton the  17  March  1337  upon  the  advancement  of  the  Black  Prince  to  the 
Dukedom  of  Cornwall.  The  Earl  was  installed  a  Knight  of  the  Garter 
and  held  several  important  offices  in  the  State.  His  wife  Elizabeth  was  a 
daughter  of  Bartholomew  de  Badlesmere  one  of  the  coheirs  of  her  brother 
Giles  and  widow  of  Edmund  de  Mortimer.  In  1354  a  fine  was  levied  of  the 
manor  and  advowson  by  Peter  Fanelore  against  this  William  de  Bohun  and 
Elizabeth  his  wife,  the  same  being  then  held  apparently  by  William  de 
Clopton  for  life,3  and  in  1359  an(i  X3^2  two  other  fines  were  levied,  the  first 
of  the  manor  and  advowson  and  the  second  of  the  manor  alone  by  Adam 
Fraunceys,  Thomas  de  Langeton  chaplain  and  Gregory  Fanelore  against 
Peter  Fanelore,4  and  by  Gregory  Fanelore  against  John  Osckyn,  John  Barton 
and  Thomas  de  Langham  chaplain,5  and  the  manor  and  advowson  became 
vested  in  Adam  Fraunceys  afterwards  Sir  Adam.  From  Sir  Adam  the 
manor  seems  to  have  passed  to  Peter  Fanelore,  for  he  certainly  held  in 
J373»  as  amongst  the  Ancient  Deeds  in  the  Record  Office  is  a  Bond  of  this 
P,eter  Faneloure  to  Sir  John  Milys  on  account  of  a  loan  with  note  endorsed 
for  voidance  on  Peter  securing  to  Sir  John  lands  in  Newton,  a  rent  in  his 

1  Dora.  ii.  360.  «  Feet  of  Fines,  33  Edw.  III.  8. 

'  Chart.  Rolls,  51  Hen.  III.  4.  '  Feet  of  Fines,  36  Edw.  III.  21. 

J  Feet  of  Fines,  28  Edw.  III.  27. 


NEWTON. 


171 


manor  there  and  the  advowson  of  Newton  Church  bought  by  him  from 
Peter.1  And  in  the  same  depository  is  a  deed  actually  effecting  a  transfer 
by  Peter  Fanelore  to  Sir  John  Milys  therein  described  as  of  Clissley,  parson 
of  Bradewell,  of  lands  and  rents  in  the  Manor  of  Newton  with  the  advowson 
of  Newton  Church.2 

A  Parliamentary  Petition  relating  to  the  manor  by  Peter  Fanelore 
is  referred  to  in  the  34th  Report  of  the  Deputy  Keeper.3  Whether 
Peter  was  son  or  brother  of  Sir  Adam  Fraunceys  does  not  appear  to  be  clear, 
but  on  the  death  of  Peter  the  manor  appears  to  have  passed  to  Sir  Adam's 
daughter  Maud  who  married  ist  John  Aubrey,  2nd  Sir  Alan  Buxhull,  knt. 
K.G.,  and  srdly  Sir  John  Montacute  Earl  of  Salisbury.  By  her  2nd  husband 
Sir  Alan  Buxhull,  knt.  Maud  Fraunceys  would  seem  to  have  had  a  son  also 
called  Sir  Alan  Buxhull  for  we  find  a  settlement  of  this  manor  made  by 
him  as  late  as  1436.  The  father  Sir  Alan  Buxhull  must  have  died  before 

1383- . 

Sir  John  de  Montague  the  3rd  husband  of  Maud  was,  as  Dugdale  says, 
"  a  great  favourite  of  the  King ;  he  was  one  of  those  whom  that  monarch 
[Rich.  II.]  suborned  to  impeach  Thomas  of  Woodstock  Duke  of  Gloucester 
as  also  the  Earls  of  Warwick  and  Arundel  in  the  ensuing  Parliament." 
He  was  appointed  Marshal  of  England  in  the  absence  of  Thomas  Holland 
Duke  of  Surrey  at  the  time  employed  in  Ireland.  "  It  is  reported  of  this 
Earl,"  says  Dugdale,  "  that  though  upon  the  deposal  of  King  Rich.  II. 
(to  whom  he  had  been  most  obsequious)  he  had  such  fair  respect  from  King 
Henry  IV.  that  his  life  was  not  brought  in  question  ;  nevertheless  he  con- 
federated with  the  Earls  of  Huntingdon  and  Kent  in  designing  his  destruction, 
and  accordingly  came  with  them  to  Windsor  Castle,  under  the  disguise 
of  Christian  players  with  purpose  to  murder  him  and  his  sons,  and  to 
restore  King  Richard.  But  finding  that  their  plot  was  discovered  they 
fled  by  night  to  Cirencester  in  the  county  of  Gloucester.  Whereupon  the 
townsmen,  being  much  affrighted  at  their  coming  thither  with  such  numbers 
at  such  unseasonable  time,  stopping  up  all  the  avenues,  to  prevent  their 
passage  out,  there  grew  a  sharp  fight  betwixt  them,  which  held  from  mid- 
night until  three  of  the  clock  next  morning,  so  that  being  tired  out,  they 
yielded  themselves  desiring  that  they  might  not  suffer  death  till  they  could 
speak  with  the  King,  which  was  granted ;  but  that  a  priest  of  their  party 
setting  fire  to  the  town  to  give  them  an  opportunity  for  escape  so  irritated 
the  inhabitants  that  (neglecting  to  quench  the  fire)  they  brought  them  out 
of  the  abbey  in  great  fury  and  beheaded  them  about  break  of  the  day." 
The  Earl  was  one  of  the  most  zealous  of  the  sect  called  "  Lollards,"  and  on 
his  death  the  5  Jan.  1400*  he  was  attainted  and  his  estates  forfeited.3 

It  is  true  that  the  King  restored  some  portion  of  the  forfeited  estates  to 
his  widow  and  children,  and  his  son  Thomas  de  Montague  was  subsequently 
restored  and  regained  the  title.  The  manor  does  not  seem  to  have  been 
forfeited,  possibly  because  the  inheritance  of  the  Earl's  wife,  for  we  find 
that  in  1425  Maud,  the  Earl's  widow,  was  still  in  possession,  and  in  that 
year  died  seised  both  of  the  manor  and  the  advowson.6  On  her  death  the 
manor  passed  to  Sir  Alan  Buxhull  her  son  by  her  second  husband,  and 
therefore  her  heir.  Davy  makes  Thomas  the  next  Earl  of  Salisbury  the 
party  to  whom  the  manor  passed,  but  this  was  evidently  a  guess,  as  he  found 
subsequently  the  manor  in  the  possession  of  Richard  Nevill  Earl  of  Warwick 

1  Ancient  Deeds,  47  Edw.  III.  A.  3829.  4  I. P.M.,  i  Hen.  IV.  ir. 

'  Ancient  Deeds,  47  Edw.  III.  A.  3929.  5  I.Q.D.,  I  Hen.  IV.  33. 

3  No.  3352,  App.  p.  58.  6  I.P.M.,  3  Hen.  VI.  31. 


172  THE   MANORS   OF   SUFFOLK. 

the  husband  of  this  Thomas's  only  daughter  and  heir.  But  a  deed  still 
preserved  amongst  the  Ancient  Deeds  in  the  Public  Record  Office  shows  the 
guess  to  be  a  delusion  and  discloses  how  the  manor  did  actually  devolve. 
It  seems  that  by  a  deed  practically  amounting  to  a  settlement  dated  the  loth 
March  14  Hen.  VI.  John  VVolston  and  Richard  Phylip  who  had  had  a  grant 
from  Sir  Alan  Buxhull  demised  to  this  Sir  Alan  both  the  manors  of  Newton 
Hall  and  of  Wyke  and  the  advowson  of  Newton  Church  to  hold  to  the  said 
Alan  and  his  heirs  with  remainders  to  Richard  Nevill  Earl  of  Salisbury  and 
Alice  his  wife  and  her  issue,  Elizabeth  wife  of  Robert  Lord  of  Wyllughby, 
Anne  wife  of  Lewis  John  and  late  the  wife  of  Sir  Richard  Hankeford,  knt., 
and  the  heirs  of  the  said  Elizabeth  and  Anne.1  It  will  be  seen  that  these 
were  Sir  Alan  Buxhull's  connections  by  the  marriage  of  his  mother,  for 
Alice  was  the  only  daughter  of  Thomas  de  Montague  last  of  the  name, 
Earl  of  Salisbury  the  eldest  son  of  Sir  John  de  Montague  Earl  of  Salisbury 
who  had  married  Sir  Alan  Buxhull's  mother,  and  Elizabeth  and  Anne  were  the 
sisters  of  Thomas.  Sir  Alan  Buxhull  no  doubt  died  without  issue,  and  the  manor 
passed  according  to  the  entail  to  Richard  Nevill  2nd  son  of  Ralph  ist  Earl  of 
Westmoreland,  and  Alice  his  wife.  Alice  was,  as  we  have  said,  the  only 
daughter  of  Thomas  Montague  the  Earl  of  Salisbury  whom  Davy  supposes 
to  have  been  seised  of  the  manor.  We  can  hardly  pass  by  this  celebrated 
man  without  a  word.  Polydore  Vergil  describes  him  as  "  a  man  for  hawtines 
of  courage  and  valiancie  rather  to  be  compared  with  the  auncient  Romanes 
than  with  men  of  that  age,"  and  in  his  account  of  the  reign  of  Hen.  VI. 
says  of  him :  "  He  might  have  ordeyned  and  done  many  thinges  after  his 
oun  fantastic,  for  he  was  a  man  alwaye  of  most  ready  witt  and  mature 
judgement,  valiant  to  enterprise  great  matters  and  in  greatest  daunger 
frollike  ;  neyther  body  nor  minde  would  ever  yield  to  painfulnes  nor 
travaile,  by  reason  whereof  there  was  none  in  whom  the  men  of  warre  had 
more  confidence,  nor  under  whom  they  durst  so  well  attempt  any  daungerous 
exployte."  He  served  in  the  wars  abroad  under  the  Duke  of  Bedford, 
and  was  the  general  sent  by  him  to  recover  Melun  and  was  ultimately 
slain  at  the  siege  of  Orleans  in  1429.  Polydore  Vergil  gives  the  following 
quaint  account  of  the  unfortunate  accident  which  caused  the  death  of  this 
great  captain  :  "  The  siege  of  Orleance  continued  the  more  part  of  winter, 
with  great  perill,  many  woundes,  and  much  slaughter  ;  for  the  Englishmen, 
in  cruell  assaultes,  did  everywhere  eyther  kill  or  wounde  many  of  their 
enemies.  Againe,  the  towne  valiantly  defending,  requited  them  the  like  ; 
when,  as  in  the  meane  space,  the  chaunce  was  that  the  Earle  of  Salisbury, 
loth  to  tarry  longer,  and  desirous  to  winne  the  towne,  one  day  early  before 
sonnrise,  began  to  viewe  the  same  againe  more  earnestly  then  he  was  wont, 
out  at  a  certaine  windowe  of  buildings  which  he  had  in  an  high  place,  to 
theintent  he  might  espye  where  to  give  commodiously  a  newe  assault; 
which  he  thought  mightily  to  assay  as  one  inflamed  with  desire  eyther  to 
winne  the  towne  by  force,  or  to  cause  it  yeelde.  While  that  he  was  busied 
in  this  order,  and  by  the  space  of  60  days  did  vehemently  annoy  the  citizens, 
behold  even  sodenly  eyther  an  yron  or  stone  pellett  shott  out  of  a  brasen 
peece  with  great  force  right  against  the  place  where  he  stoode,  did  strike 
and  breake  thone  side  of  the  windowe,  and  drove  certaine  shilvers  thereof  into 
his  face,  wherewithall  he  was  so  wounded  as  that  he  dyed  thereof  two  dayes 
after.  He  lefte  one  Alis,  his  onely  daughter,  very  like  him  in  conditions, 
vertue,  and  honor,  whom,  as  we  shall  hereafter  shewe,  one  Richard  Nevill 
took  to  wife.  But  howe  great  losse  the  common  wealth  sustained  through 

1  Ancient  Deeds,  14  Hen.  VI.  B.  2786. 


NEWTON.  173 

his  untimely  death  appered  evidently  incontinent.  Truely  from  that  day 
forth  the  English  forrain  affaires  beganne  to  quaile  ;  which  infirmitie 
though  the  English  nation,  as  a  most  sounde  and  strong  body,  did  not 
feele  at  the  first,  yet  afterward  they  suffered  it  as  a  pestilence  and  sicknes 
inwardly,  by  litle  and  litle  decaying  the  strength ;  for  immediatly  after 
his  death  the  fortune  of  warre  altered,  as  hereafter  shalbe  declared  in 
place  convenient  ;  wherefore  the  death  of  the  earle  was  much  lamented  of  all 
the  captaines  in  generall,  who,  neverthelesse,  after  that  they  had  performed 
all  thinges  for  his  buriall,  mainteined  the  siege  and  sought  to  atchieve  that 
which  the  Earle  of  Salesbury  had  in  mind  determined,  which  was,  by  what 
meane  they  might  eyther  take  the  towne  by  force,  or,  at  the  least,  compell 
the  citizens  to  yeelde."  The  Earldom  of  Salisbury  was  revived  in  favour 
of  Richard  Nevill  the  husband  of  the  only  daughter  of  the  last  Earl.  He 
engaged  in  the  Wars  of  the  Roses  serving  the  Duke  of  York,  and  was  present 
at  the  battle  of  St.  Albans.  He  defeated  Lord  Audley  at  Blore  Heath  in 
1456  and  again  fought  at  Northampton  in  1460,  when  he  was  appointed 
Lord  Great  Chamberlain  of  England.  At  the  battle  of  Wakefield,  however, 
he  sustained  defeat,  and  his  2nd  son  Thomas  fell  with  the  Duke  of  York. 
The  Earl  himself  was  made  prisoner  when  his  head  was  immediately  cut 
off  and  placed  on  a  pole  over  one  of  the  gates  of  the  city  of  York,  "  for,"  as 
Polydore  Vergil  says,  "  a  spectacle  to  the  people,  and  a  terror  to  the  rest 
of  the  adversaryes."  This  unfortunate  event  happened  3ist  Dec.  1460 
and  the  manor  passed  to  his  eldest  son  and  heir  Richard  Nevill  surnamed 
the  Stout,  Earl  of  Warwick,  who  thereupon  became  2nd  Earl  of  Salisbury. 
This  nobleman  is  known  to  history  as  the  King  Maker.  He  espoused  the 
cause  of  the  Yorkists  and  commanded  the  van  at  the  Battle  of  Northamp- 
ton and  though  sharing  in  the  reverses  of  his  party  later  he  out-generalled 
the  Lancastrians  and  reaching  London  before  his  adversaries  proclaimed 
the  young  Earl  of  March  as  Edw.  IV.  and  established  him  on  the  throne  by 
his  great  victory  of  Towton  Field.  He  received  for  his  services  the  offices 
of  Lord  Great  Chamberlain  and  Lord  High  Steward,  and  not  unnaturally 
obtained  large  grants  from  the  Crown.  So  enormous  indeed  were  his  ac- 
quisitions that  it  is  said  his  revenue  amounted  independently  of  his  own 
family  property  to  four  score  thousand  crowns  a  year.  It  is  well  known 
how  later  he  re-established  Hen.  VI.  on  the  throne,  and  finally  fell  at  the 
Battle  of  Barnet  in  1471.  His  hospitality  was  so  great  that  it  is  said  that 
in  his  London  house  6  oxen  were  usually  eaten  at  breakfast  and  every  tavern 
full  of  his  meat, "  for  who  that  had  any  acquaintance  in  his  family  should 
have  as  much  sodden  and  roast  as  he  might  carry  upon  a  longer  dagger." 

He  married  Lady  Anne  Beauchamp  daughter  of  Richard  5th  Earl  of 
Warwick  and  left  2  daughters,  but  the  manor  with  the  other  possessions 
of  the  great  Earl  were  forfeited  to  the  Crown. 

The  Crown  in  1484  granted  the  manor  to  Queen's  College  Cambridge 
in  perpetual  frank  almoign,'  but  Hen.  VII.  resumed  the  grant  and  the  manor 
was  again  vested  in  the  Crown.  In  1538  however  we  find  amongst  the 
Bodleian  Charters  a  lease  for  21  years  by  Margaret  Pole  mother  of  Cardinal 
Pole,  and  the  Countess  of  Salisbury  to  William  Alston  of  Newton  of  this 
manor,  there  called  "  Newton  Manor  al.  Newton  Hall."2  Probably  the  lease 
only  related  to  lands  held  of  the  manor  or  the  lease  was  an  attempt  by  the 

1  D.K.R.    9.    App.   ii.   p.    96.     Grant   to         *  30  Hen.  VIII.,  Bodl.  Suff.  Ch.  358. 
Royal  College  of  St.  Margaret  and 
St.  Bernard,  Cambridge.   Pat.  Rolls, 
2  Rich.  III.  pt.  i.  12. 


i?4  THE    MANORS   OF    SUFFOLK. 

countess  to  exercise  a  right  of  ownership.  There  is,  however,  amongst  the 
Chancery  Proceedings  of  Q.  Elizabeth  in  1598  a  claim  made  under  a  lease 
brought  by  Henry  Wynterfludd  against  William  Alston  sen.  and  jun.  to 
messuages  in  Newton  holden  of  Thomas  Barrowe  as  of  his  manor  of  Newton 
Hall  in  Newton  by  William  Houge  who  granted  the  lease  in  question.1 
At  all  events  it  is  certain  that  in  1543  the  manor  was  granted  by  Hen. 
VIII.  to  Thomas  Barrow,  son  of  Thomas  Barrow,  son  of  Richard  Barrow, 
of  Wynthorp  co.  Lincoln,  and  the  particulars  for  the  grant  will  be  found  in 
the  Record  Office,'  and  the  grant  itself  is  entered  on  the  Originalia  Rolls 
of  the  same  year.'  Thomas  Barrow  who  was  of  Shipdenham  co.  Norfolk 
was  the  son  of  Thomas,  son  of  Thomas,  son  of  Thomas,  son  of  Richard 
Barrow  of  Winthorp  co.  Lincoln,  married  Mary  daughter  and  coheir  of 
Henry  Bures  of  Acton,  and  had  by  her  Thomas,  William,  and  Henry  (who 
was  executed  in  London  with  Rookwood),  and  amongst  other  children  a 
daughter  Anne  married  1st  to  Sir  Rafe  Shelton  and  2ndly  to  Sir  Charles 
Cornwallis.  Thomas  Barrow  the  grantee  died  in  1590.  Thomas  his  eldest 
son  having  died  he  was  succeeded  by  his  (Thomas's)  son  William  Barrow 
who  lived  at  Westhorp  and  married  ist  Frances  daughter  of  Sir  Robert 
Wingfield  of  Letheringham  but  had  by  her  no  issue.  He  married  for  his 
second  wife  Elizabeth  daughter  of  Thomas  Daundy  of  Cretingham,  and 
had  by  her  with  three  other  children  a  son  Maurice. 

William  Barrow  died  the  24  Dec.,  1613,  and  was  buried  at  Bury,4 
when  the  manor  passed  to  his  widow  Elizabeth  and  on  her  death  in  1634 
to  their  son  Maurice  Barrow.3  He  died  in  1666  at  the  age  of  69,  and  by 
his  will  dated  i665-86  he  desired  to  be  buried  at  Westhorpe  and  left  £500 
for  the  erection  of  his  tomb.  He  devised  the  manor  to  his  cousin  Maurice 
Shelton  the  elder.  Maurice  Shelton  was  of  an  ancient  family  connected 
with  both  Norfolk  and  Suffolk.  Sir  Ralph  Shelton  who  was  Sheriff  for 
Norfolk  in  1570  married  for  his  second  wife  a  sister  of  William  Barrow  as 
above  mentioned,  and  from  this  marriage  Maurice  Shelton  was  the  second 
in  descent.  On  Maurice  Shelton's  death  the  manor  passed  to  his  son  and  heir 
Maurice  Shelton  of  Barrington  who  married  Martha  dau.  of  Robert  Appleton 
of  Great  Waldingfield  and  died  the  7  Oct.  1680  leaving  a  sole  daur.  and  heir 
Martha  married  to  Lisle  Hacket  of  Monksworth  Hall  co.  Warwick,  but  the 
manor  passed  to  Maurice's  brother  Henry  Shelton  who  married  Hester 
only  daughter  of  Sir  John  Churchman  of  Illington  co.  Norfolk  and  dying  in 
1690'  the  manor  passed  to  his  son  and  heir  Maurice  Shelton.  He  married 
twice,  first  Arabella  daughter  of  Sir  John  Duke  of  Benhall  and  secondly 
Margaret  daughter  of  the  Rev.  John  Randall  of  Bury  St.  Edmunds  and 
died  without  male  issue  in  1749." 

The  manor  now  belongs  to  Earl  Howe. 

Arms  of  Barrow  :  Sable,  2  swords  in  Saltire,  the  points  upwards  argent, 
hilted  and  pomelled  or.  betw.  4  fleur-de-lis  of  the  last — of  Fraunceys  : 
Gul.  a  chevron  erm.  between  three  doves  volant  proper. 

SAYHAM  al.  Si  AM  OR  SAXHAM  HALL  MANOR. 
This  manor  was  held  in  Edward  the  Confessor's  time  by  Hathrad  under 

1  C.P.  iii.  244.  *  For   will    see    Raydon    Hall    Manor   in 

*  35  Hen.  VIII.  D.K.R.,  App.  ii.  p.  164.  Samford  Hundred. 

»  O.,  35  Hen.  VIII.  4  Pars  Rot.  8.  '  His  will  is  dated  the  23  Apl.  1688  trans- 

4  His  will  is  dated  23  Dec.  1613.  ferred  to  the  principal  Registry  16 

*  As  to  Maurice  Barrow  and  the  Shelton  Dec.  1690. 

family  see  Barningham   Manor   in         *  His  will  is  dated  1746  and  was  proved 
Blackbourn  Hundred.  at  Sudbury. 


NEWTON. 

Harold  with  soc  and  sac  and  2  carucates  of  land.  There  were  3  villeir 
7  bordars,  4  slaves,  2  ploughteams  in  demesne  and  2  belonging  to  the  men^N 
wood  for  6  hogs,  4  acres  of  meadow  and  a  church  living  with  30  acres  of 
free  land,  also  i  horse,  3  beasts,  17  hogs,  60  sheep,  17  goats  and  half  right  of 
advowson  to  a  church  living  with  8  acres  of  free  land.  By  the  time  of  the 
Domesday  Survey  the  bordars  had  risen  to  20  and  the  beasts  to  8,  the  hogs 
to  20,  the  sheep  to  103,  the  goats  to  35  and  there  was  an  additional  half 
ploughteam  belonging  to  the  men  ;  but  the  slaves  had  come  down  to  one 
and  there  was  no  horse.  A  freeman  also  half  under  Huthrad  and  half  under 
the  Abbot  of  St.  Edmunds  by  commendation  but  wholly  as  to  soc  of  the 
Abbot  had  20  acres  which  he  could  sell  without  the  necessity  for  any 
licence.  The  whole  was  then  valued  at  60  shillings  but  had  been  in  Saxon 
times  valued  at  40.  It  was  half  a  league  long  and  4  quarantenes  broad  and 
paid  in  a  gelt  6£<f .' 

The  Domesday  tenant  in  chief  was  Ralph  de  Limesi2  a  relation  of  Robert 
de  Limesi  Bishop  of  Lichfield  and  Coventry  and,  according  to  Kelham, 
a  nephew  of  the  Conqueror,  though  Dugdale  makes  no  mention  of  such  a 
relationship.  This  was  one  of  the  forty-one  manors  in  England  bestowed 
upon  him  by  King  William  besides  the  lands  of  his  wife  Christina  one  of 
the  sisters  of  Prince  Edgar  Atheling  grandson  of  Edmund  Ironside  brother  to 
Edward  the  Confessor.  Ralph  de  Limesi  founded  at  Hertford  a  priory  of  Bene- 
dictine monks  subordinate  to  the  Abbey  of  St.  Albans  in  the  time  of  Abbot 
Paul  and  died  in  1093.  He  was  succeeded  by  his  son  Ralph  who  married 
Halewise  and  the  manor  passed  on  his  death  to  his  son  Alan  and  then  to 
Alan's  son  Gerard  de  Limesi  who  married  Amy  daughter  of  Trian  de  Horne- 
lade  of  Bidun- Limesi  and  to  their  son  John  de  Limesi  who  married  Alice 
daughter  of  Robert  de  Harcourt.  John  de  Lemesi  died  in  1198  and  was 
succeeded  by  his  son  Hugh  de  Limesi  who  died  in  1223  without  issue.  In 
1346  we  find  Sir  Robert  de  Royton  lord  and  he  died  in  1361  and  the  manor 
passed  to  his  son  Sir  John  de  Royton  who  was  living  10  Hen.  VI.  He  was 
succeeded  by  his  son  Sir  John  de  Royton  and  he  by  his  son  and  heir  another 
Sir  John  Royton  who  died  in  1416  and  was  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir 
Thomas  de  Royton  who  died  in  1484  and  the  manor  passed  to  his  grandson 
Sir  Robert  de  Royton,  who  died  in  1518.  On  his  death  he  was  succeeded 
by  his  son  Sir  Robert  de  Reyton.  The  next  lord  we  meet  with  is  one 
Alnott  about  1550,  but  soon  after  the  manor  passed  to  Edward  Alston. 

This  family  seems  originally  to  have  come  from  Essex.  As  early  as 
the  time  of  Edw.  I.  we  find  a  William  Alston,  of  Stisted,  in  this  county,  for 
want  of  warranty  of  Brockscroft  in  Stisted  granted  and  conferred  to  John 
de  Carpenter  of  Naylinghurst  in  Braintree,  so  much  of  the  better  land  in 
Stisted  except  his  mansion  house  there.  John  Alston  of  Newton,  descended 
from  the  above-mentioned  William  of  Stisted,  was  father  of  William  Alston 
of  Newton  who  by  Anne  his  wife  daughter  of  Thomas  Symons  had  a  son 
and  heir  Edward  Alston  who  resided  at  Saham  Hall  in  Newton  and  married 
Elizabeth  daughter  of  John  Coleman  by  whom  he  had  two  sons  William 
his  successor  in  this  manor  and  Thomas  of  Edwardston.  William  was  born 
at  Newton  in  1537  and  married  Mary  Holmsted  of  Maplested  co.  Essex 
by  whom  he  had  several  children  whose  descendants  became  settled  at 
Marlesford,  Polstead,  Lavenham  and  various  other  places  in  Suffolk  and  the 
adjoining  counties.  In  the  Calendar  of  Pleadings  relating  to  the  Duchy 
of  Lancaster  in  1600  will  be  found  a  suit  as  to  a  relief  respecting  the  lands  in 

1  Dom.  ii.  4286.  *  See  Overhall  Manor,  Cavendish,  in  this 

Hundred. 


176  THE   MANORS  OF   SUFFOLK 

Newton  by  Alston  against  Turner,1  and  in  the  same  Pleadings  the  same  year 
is  a  suit  as  to  rent,  fealty  and  suit  of  Court,  and  as  to  the  tenure  of  the  Manor 
of  "  Seyham  Hall  "  by  the  Attorney-General  against  William  Barrow  lord 
of  Newton  Hall  Manor.' 

Of  this  family  Sir  Thomas  Alston  of  Odel  in  Bedfordshire  knt.  was 
created  a  Baronet  June  I3th  1642,  and  Joseph  Alston  of  Chelsea  was  created 
a  Baronet  in  1681. 

There  is  amongst  the  Harleian  Charters  in  the  British  Museum  a  grant 
in  dower  of  this  manor  in  the  early  part  of  the  I3th  century.  The  manor 
is  there  called  "  Say  ham  al.  Siam."3  And  in  the  same  collection  is  a 
grant  of  goods  in  the  manor  in  I34&.4 

Edward  Alston  M.D.  who  died  the  21  July  1705  aged  25  years,  the 
Rev.  Edward  Alston  B.D.  of  East  Bergholt  and  rector  of  Newton 
who  died  the  i8th  Feb.  1722  aged  79  years,  and  Samuel  Alston  of 
East  Bergholt  who  died  the  9  Oct.  1752  aged  66,  are  buried  at  Newton. 
A  Thomas  Alston  was  baptised  in  Newton  in  1713  and  was  buried  there  in 
1785,  and  he,  according  to  Page,  appears  to  have  been  the  last  of  the  family 
who  resided  in  Newton.  Edward  his  son  married  Frances  daughter  and 
heir  of  Daniel  Constable  of  Manningtree  co.  Essex  and  settled  there, 
whose  son  Edward  Daniel  Alston  died  at  Palgrave  and  the  Rev. 
Edward  Constable  Alston  of  Cransford  Hall  and  vicar  of  that  parish  in  the 
middle  of  the  last  century  his  only  son  was  the  representative  of  that 
branch  of  the  Alston  family.  Though  the  manor  in  1656  seems  to  have 
passed  to  one  Gunton  and  in  1847  to  have  been  in  the  possession  of  Thomas 
Lazzell  Tiffen,  which  latter  gentleman  resided  at  the  Hall,  the  Alstons  were 
retaining  land  in  the  parish  during  Alston's  period,  according  to  Page. 
Arms  of  Alston  :  Az.  Ten  cstoiles  or,  four,  three,  two,  and  one. 

BOTELERS  al.  BUTLERS  OR  BUXTONS  MANOR. 

This  manor  was  apparently  held  at  the  close  of  the  I3th  century  by 
Robert  Carbonell  who  had  a  grant  of  free  warren  here  in  I277-5  Thomas 
Carbonel  of  Great  Waldingfield  seems  to  have  been  lord  and  to  have  been 
succeeded  (after  the  death  of  his  widow  Elizabeth  in  1325)  by  his  son  John 
Carbonel  who  had  a  grant  of  free  warren  here  in  1301,'  and  died  in  13337 
when  the  manor  passed  to  his  daughter  and  heir  Alice  married  to  Ralph 
Butler.  In  1393  Margaret  daughter  of  Ralph  Butler  and  Alice  his  wife  and 
wife  of  Thomas  Boteler  had  a  confirmation  of  free  warren  here,8  and  in  1410 
Sir  Andrew  Butler  was  lord.  He  by  will  in  1429  left  the  manor  to  his  wife 
Catherine  daughter  of  Sir  William  Philip  for  life.  Sir  Andrew  died  in  1430 
and  on  the  death  of  his  widow  in  1460  it  passed  to  William  Crane  who  had 
married  their  daughter  and  heir  Margery.  William  Crane  was  succeeded 
by  his  son  and  heir  Robert  Crane  who  died  the  23  October  1500,'  and  was 
succeeded  by  his  brother  and  heir  John  Crane  who  died  in  1505,  and  was 
succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir  Robert  Crane  who  died  in  1550,'°  when  the 
manor  passed  to  his  son  and  heir  Robert  Crane  who  died  in  1591,  when  it 

1  Duchy  of  Lancaster,  Cal.  to  Pleadings,  5  Chart.  Rolls,  5  Edw.  I. 

42  Eli/.  3,  34.  '•  Chart.  Rolls,  29  Edw.  I.  8. 

'  Duchy  of  Lancaster,  Cal.  to  Pleadings,  '  I. P.M.,  7  Edw.  III.  4. 

42  Eliz.  36,  43  Eliz.  22.  '  Chart.  Roils,  17  Rich.  II. 

'  Harl.  55  G.  6.  »  I. P.M.,  16  Hen.  VII. 

•  Harl.  54  H.  22.  •  I. P.M.,  4  Edw.  VI.  84. 


NEWTON. 


177 


went  to  his  son  and  heir  Sir  Robert  Crane  so  well  known  as  of  Chilton.1 
This  manor  was  about  1880  vested  in  the  Rev.  T.  L.  N.  Causton,  and  sub- 
sequently in  his  trustees,  but  is  now  vested  in  Mr.  C.  Beaumont. 


For  a  fuller  account  of  the  Crane  family  see  Chilton  Manor  in  Blackbourn 

Hundred.  w 


178  THE  MANORS  OF  SUFFOLK. 


POLSTEAD. 

OBERT  the  father  of  Suane  of  Essex  in  the  time  of 
Edward  the  Confessor  held  a  considerable  manor  here  with 
soc.  It  consisted  of  4  carucates  of  land,  with  26  villeins,  36 
bordars,  i  slave,  2  ploughteams  in  demesne,  15  belonging  to 
the  men,  i  mill,  wood  for  80  hogs  and  31  acres  of  meadow. 
The  value  was  10  pounds.  By  the  time  of  the  Norman 
Survey  the  value  had  risen  to  12  pounds  and  the  details  of 
the  holding  were  considerably  varied.  Thus,  there  were  5  villeins 
and  6  bordars  less,  and  instead  of  the  men  having  15  ploughteams  they 
had  but  9.  There  were,  however,  additionally,  8  horses  at  the  Hall,  28 
beasts,  40  hogs,  and  150  sheep.  The  extent  was  8  quarantenes  long  and 
4  broad,  and  the  holding  paid  in  a  gelt  2od.  whoever  had  the  land.1 

The  following  holdings  of  Ralph  de  Limesi,1  as  entered  in  Domesday 
Book,  seem  to  be  in  Polstead,  one  was  a  manor  of  considerable  size.  They 
were  said  to  be  in  Hoketuna  and  Finstead,  the  latter  stated  to  be  a 
hamlet  of  the  former  and  included  in  the  valuation,  which  was  in  Saxon 
times  4  pounds,  and  in  Norman  days  100  shillings.  The  whole  was  together 
in  length  8  quarantenes  and  in  breadth  4  and  paid  in  a  gelt  ^d.  All  weie 
held  in  the  Confessor's  time  by  Huthrad  under  Harold,  he  holding  as  a 
manor  with  2  carucates  with  soc.  There  was  then  one  villein  and  there  were 
two  bordars,  5  slaves  and  3  ploughteams  in  demesne,  but  a  ploughteam  had 
been  added  by  the  time  of  the  Great  Survey.  There  were  also  10  acres  of 
meadow,  wood  for  20  hogs,  and  i  horse  at  the  Hall,  also  3  beasts  in  Saxon 
times,  but  none  in  Norman  days.  At  Finstead  Huthrad  held  in  King 
Edward's  time  a  carucate  which  Ralph  de  Limesi  held  as  a  hamlet  of  Hoke- 
tona  from  Edgar  his  predecessor  in  title.3 

POLSTEAD  MANOR. 

Suane  the  Domesday  tenant  had  settled  in  England  before  the  Con- 
quest and  readily  joined  with  William  the  ist  on  his  invasion.  His  lands 
were  confirmed  to  him  and  he  seems  to  have  had  additional  grants,  for  in 
Essex  alone  he  held  55  lordships.  Henry  de  Essex,  standard  bearer  to  the 
King,  held  the  manor  in  the  time  of  Hen.  II.  and  forfeited  it  about  n62.4  In 
the  time  of  John  the  lordship  was  held  by  Sir  Hugh  de  Polstead.  He 
married  Hawys  daur.  of  Hugh  de  Candois  lord  of  Burnham  Mercate  and 
coheir  by  Anselina  his  wife,  dau.  and  coheir  of  William  de  Grandcourt. 
Julian  the  other  dau.  and  coheir  married  William  de  Gymingham  and  in 
the  7th  John  they  recovered  one  carucate  of  land  as  heirs  of  William  de 
Grandcourt  against  Walter  de  Grandcourt.  Sir  Hugh  gave  by  deed  sans 
date  to  the  monks  of  Castleacre,  for  the  soul  of  Hawys  his  wife  a  piece  of 
land  in  St.  Margaret's  parish  at  Beresmere  by  Depedale.  In  the  ist  year  of 
King  John  Walter  de  Grandcourt  had  brought  an  action  against  Sir  Hugh 
de  Polstead  for  making  Julian  his  wife's  sister  and  coheir  a  nun 
(she  being  in  his  custody)  that  so  he  might  enjoy  the  inheritance 
of  the  said  Julian ;  but  it  appears  that  Julian  afterwards  married  William 
Jernegan  and  in  the  loth  of  John,  Sir  Hugh  de  Polstede  and  Hawys  his  wife 

1  Dom.  ii.  401.  J  Dom.  ii.  428. 

'  See    Overhall    Manor,    Cavendish,  and  4  Extent.  The  King.     I.P.M.,  c.  Hen.  III. 

Sayham   Hall    Manor,   Newton,  in  244.     See  H.R.  ii.  146. 

this  Hundred. 


POLSTEAD. 


179 


and  Wm.  Jernegan  and  Julian  his  wife  divided  the  estate  which  came  to 
them  as  heirs  of  the  Grandcourts.  and  the  said  Julian  took  as  a  second  hus- 
band Sir  William  de  Gymingham.  From  the  Close  Rolls  we  learn  that  in 
1229  Richard  de  Argent  and  Joan  his  wife  appointed  John  de  Kancia 
their  attorney  in  proceedings  against  this  Hugh  de  Foisted  deforciant 
concerning  the  third  part  of  lands  with  rent  in  Foisted.1 

On  Sir  Hugh  de  Polstead's  death  the  manor  passed  to  his  son  and  heir 
Hugh  de  Polstead.  This  Sir  Hugh  with  Sir  William  de  Gimingham  were 
found  to  hold  two  fees  of  the  Honor  of  Haughley  when  an  aid  was  granted 
on  the  marriage  of  King  Henry  the  Third's  sister  to  the  Emperor  of  Germany  ; 
and  in  the  2oth  of  Hen.  III.  gave  £25  relief  for  5  knights'  fees  which  he  held 
of  the  King  ;  and  in  the  26th  of  that  King  paid  5  marks  fine  for  not  attending 
the  King  into  Gascoyne.  Sir  Hugh  de  Polstead  the  son  died  in  I266.2 
From  the  Testa  de  Nevill  we  learn  that  this  Hugh  de  Polsted  held  in  Pol- 
sted  2  fees  and  3  parts  of  a  fee  of  the  Honor  of  "  Relege,"3  and  from  the 
Hundred  Rolls  we  learn  that  he  held  of  the  King  in  chief  Peniton  belonging 
to  the  Manor  of  Polstead  for  one  Knight's  fee  and  sold  the  same  to  St. 
Peter's,  Ipswich.4  On  Sir  Hugh  de  Polstead's  death  in  1266  the  King  took 
the  manor  in  hand  for  2  years  and  it  was  then  divided  between  Sir  Hugh 
de  Polstead's  3  daughters  and  coheirs,  Hawise,  Petronella,  and  Rohesia. 

Blomefield  states  that  in  1267  Petronella  and  Rohesia,  the  daughters 
of  Hugh  de  Polsted  had  the  right  of  presentation  to  the  Church  of  Polstede.5 
Hawise  the  eldest  daughter  married  Thomas  de  Lambourne  who  resigned  his 
right  in  the  manor  of  Polstede  Hall  in  Burnham  Westgate  in  Norfolk 
for  the  Manor  of  Polstede  in  Suffolk.  Petronella  married  Edmund  de 
Kemesek.  The  Hundred  Rolls  state  that  William  de  Lambourne  and 
Edmund  de  Kemesek  held  in  Polstead  in  chief  of  the  King  2  fees. 6 
William  de  Lamburn  had  warren  here.7  William  de  Lambourne  son  or 
grandson  of  Thomas  died  in  1300,"  without  issue  leaving  a  sister  Joan  his 
heir,  who  married  William  de  Cheyne. 

Petronella  de  Kemesek  by  deed  dated  the  May  23  Edw.  II.  conveyed 
her  portion  or  right  in  this  lordship  to  Sir  James  Lambourne  son  of  the 
above  Thomas  and  Hawise  and  Joan  (not  Mary,  as  Blomefield  and  Page  say) 
his  wife.  Referring  to  this  deed,  Blomefield  says,  "  Her  seal9  is  of  red  wax, 
the  impress  being  a  woman  bearing  in  her  right  hand  an  escotcheon,  argent, 
fretty  sable,  and  in  her  left  a  chief  indented,  the  first  being  the  arms 
of  Polstead,  the  other  probably  those  of  Kemesek." 

The  licence  for  the  last-mentioned  conveyance,  which  is  on  the  Patent 
Rolls,  throws  a  very  different  light  on  the  transaction  to  what  would  naturally 
be  inferred  from  Page's  statement,  which  by-the-way,  is  really  taken  from 
Blomefield.  It  authorises  Petronella  de  Kemesek  to  grant  to  James  de 
Lambourne  and  Joan  his  wife  and  his  heirs  a  moiety  of  the  manor  held  in 
chief  and  for  the  grantees  to  re-convey  to  the  grantor  for  her  life  with 
remainder  to  Thomas  her  son  for  life  and  then  to  James  de  Lambourne  and 
Joan  and  his  heirs.10  The  fine  on  the  alienation  was  duly  paid,  as  may  be 
seen  from  the  Originalia  Rolls." 

1  Close  Rolls,  13  Hen.  III.  m.  i8</.  "  H.R.  ii.  142, 150. 

3  I.P.M.,  50  Hen.  III.  34,  not  15  Hen.  III.,  '  H.R.  ii.  143,  153. 

as  Page  says.  8  Extent.     I. P.M.,  28  Edw.  I.  14. 

3  T.  de  N.  292.  »  i.e.,  the  Seal  of  Petronella  de  Kemesek. 

4  H.R.  ii.  150.  '-  Pat.  Rolls,  i  Edw.  II.  pt.  ii.  12. 

5  Norf.  8vo.  Ed.  vol.  vii.  33.  "  0.,  I  Edw.  II.  Ri.  ii. 


i8o  THE  MANORS  OF  SUFFOLK. 

A  fine  of  this  moiety  of  the  manor  was  levied  the  following  year  (1308)  by 
the  said  Petronella  de  Kemesek  and  Jas.  de  Lambourne  and  Joan  his  wife.1 
Another  fine  of  the  manor  and  advowson  was  levied  in  1338  by  Thomas  de 
Lambourne  and  Elizabeth  his  wife  against  Reginald  de  Shutlyngdon  parson 
of  Lambourne  Church  and  Richard  del  Hoo  chaplain  of  Polestead.1  We 
find  also  another  fine  levied  in  1347  of  both  the  manor  and  advowson  by 
the  same  Thomas  de  Lambourne  and  Elizabeth  his  wife  against  Thomas 
Torny  parson  of  Boxford  Church  and  William  de  Chevyngton  chaplain.1 
Rohesia  de  Polstede  married  Robert  le  Moyne  and  had  an  only  daughter  and 
heir  Emma  who  married  Sir  Ralph  de  Hemenhall  and  in  the  time  of  Rich.  II. 
Richard  de  Hemenhall  died  seised  of  a  moiety  of  the  lordship  of  Foisted 
Hall. 

Thomas  de  Lambourne  son  and  heir  of  James  died  seised  in  1361, 4  and  his 
son  William  de  Lambourne  in  I362,5  when  the  manor  passed  to  his  sister  and 
heir  married  to  William  de  Cheyne  ;  and  on  the  Originalia  Rolls  we  find  an 
order  this  same  year  [1352]  to  accept  security  from  William  de  Cheyne  and 
Joan  his  wife,  sister  and  heir  of  William  de  Lambourne  deceased,  for  a 
reasonable  relief  in  respect  of  Polstead  Manor  held  in  chief  of  the  King  as  of 
the  Honor  of  Reyleagh.6 

William  de  Cheyne  appears  to  have  held  for  a  considerable  time,  for  in 
1386  there  is  a  fine  levied  of  the  manor  and  advowson  by  Ralph  de  Walton, 
John  Benyngfeld  clerk,  John  Brook  clerk,  John  Turk  and  Nicholas  Harpour 
clerk  against  John  Giffard  clerk  and  Sir  John  de  Sutton  "  which  Sir  William 
Cheyne  held  for  life."'  In  1394  there  is  also  a  fine  levied  of  Polstead  and 
Navelond  Manor  by  Thomas  Cogeshall,  Thomas  Bataill,  John  Boys,  Roger 
Wolferston,  Thomas  Monchesy,  Gilbert  Debenham,  Clement  Spice,  John 
Aleyn  and  Ralph  Chamberleyn  against  Ralph  Walton,  John  Benyngfeld 
clerk  and  John  Brook  clerk.8  These  were  evidently  snares  of  the  manor 
for  we  find  Richard  de  Hemenhall  succeeded  by  his  son  William  in  the 
lordship  and  coming  of  age  in  1403.  Three  years  later  the  manor  passed  to 
Sir  Richard  Waldegrave,  who  died  2  May  1434,'  from  which  time  to  the 
time  of  Sir  Wm.  Waldegrave  who  died  in  1613  the  manor  devolved  in  the 
same  course  as  the  Manor  of  Smallbridge  in  Bures  in  this  Hundred. 

In  the  State  Papers  for  1541  is  a  statement  of  livery  being  made  of 
Polstead  and  Levenley  Manors  and  the  advowson  of  the  Church  of  Polstead 
to  Sir  William  Waldegrave  sen.,10  viz.,  son  of  George  Waldegrave,  son  and 
heir  of  the  said  Sir  William  Waldegrave  sen.  Sir  William  Waldegrave  still 
held  in  1582,  for  there  is  a  mortgage  in  the  Record  Office  amongst  the  ancient 
deeds  by  Edmund  Wheler  the  elder  of  Polstead  to  Robert  Leeyes  of  Stoke  by 
Nayland  of  "  Capells  Tenement  "  in  Polstead,  which  he  had  bought  of 
Sir  William  Waldegrave,  knt.  on  the  3rd  Oct.  then  last,  adjoining  "  Sayte- 
feyld  "  al.  "  Sayersfilde,"  and  the  lord's  land  called  "  the  dourie,"  parcel  of 
the  tenement  called  Blacksall,  and  abutting  on  a  grove  called  "  Over- 
fey  Ide  Grove,"  and  on  a  heath  called  "  Polsted  heathe,"  for  payment  by  the 
said  Edmund  to  the  said  Robert  of  £34.  55.  [1582]."  Sir  Wm.  Waldegrave 

1  Feet  of  Fines,  2  Edw.  II.  29.     See  an  «  O.,  36  Edw.  III.  5. 

action  by  this  James  de  Lambourne  '  Feet  of  Fines,  10  Rich.  II.  16. 

against  the  Bishop  of  Colchester.  '  Feet  of  Fines,  18  Rich.  II.  i. 

Pat.  Rolls,  3  Edw.  III.  pt.  i.  3.  •  Extent.     Polstead  Manor  and  advowson. 
'  Feet  of  Fines,  12  Edw.  III.  I. P.M.,  13  Hen.  VI.  27. 

3  Feet  of  Fines,  21  Edw.  III.  14.  '    State  Papers,  1541,  878  (4). 

'  Extent.    I.P.M.,  35  Edw.  III.  no.  "  A.  6589. 
>  I.P.M.,  36  Edw.  III.  106. 


POLSTEAD.  181 

sold  the  manor  in  1598  to  John  Brond,1  John  Gage  and  others.2  A 
fine  was  levied  of  the  manor  in  1601  by  Thomas  Walton  and  others 
against  the  said  John  Brond.  John  Brond  or  Brand  was  a  clothier  of 
Boxford  son  of  Richard  Brand  of  Boxford.  John  died  in  1610  at  the  age  of 
76,  leaving  by  his  second  wife  Ann  Bromwell  of  Boxford  a  son  Benjamin 
Brand  to  whom  the  manor  passed.  Benjamin  Brand  resided  at  Edwardston 
and  had  a  grant  of  arms  the  year  of  his  father's  death.  He  married  Elizabeth 
daughter  of  Robert  Cutler  of  Ipswich  and  died  in  1621  when  the  manor 
apparently  passed  to  his  brother  and  heir  Jacob  Brand  of  Polstead  who 
married  Elizabeth  daughter  of  William  Cutler  of  Ipswich  and  dying  in 
1630  the  manor  passed  to  his  son  and  heir  William  Brand  who  died  in  1705 
leaving  by  Margaret  his  wife  a  son  Jacob  Brand  who  married  Jane  daughter 
and  coheir  of  Bartholomew  Beale  and  on  his  death  passed  to  his  son  and 
heir  William  Beale  Brand  who  married  Ann  Mirabella  Henrietta  daughter 
of  Sir  Robert  Smith  Bart.  At  his  death,  in  1799,  the  manor  went  to  his 
widow  Anne  Mirabella  Henrietta  Brand  who  died  in  1814,  when  it  passed 
to  W.  B.  Brand's  great  nephew  Thomas  William  Cooke  son  of  Thomas  Cooke 
rector  of  Bildeston  who  died  in  1796  and  of  Elizabeth  his  wife,  which  Thomas 
Cooke  was  the  son  of  the  Rev.  Thomas  Cooke  rector  of  Semere  who  died 
in  1793  and  of  Jane  his  wife  daughter  of  the  above-named  Jacob  Brand  of 
Polstead  and  sister  of  the  above-named  William  Beale  Brand.  Thomas 
William  Cooke  married  Mary  Anne  daughter  of  Richard  Matthews  of  War- 
grave,  Berkshire.  Page  says  the  manor  passed  to  this  Mary  Anne,  but  this 
does  not  seem  to  be  the  case.  She  did  take,  but  only  after  her  husband's 
death  without  issue,  in  1825,  and  shortly  afterwards  she  re-married  Charles 
Tyrell  of  Gipping  and  Plashwood,  who  resided  at  Polstead  Hall  and  held  the 
manor  in  right  of  his  wife  until  her  death  in  1849.  The  manor  subsequently 
passed  to  the  Rev.  Thomas  Alexander  Cooke.  He  resided  at  Polstead  Hall 
and  married  Harriet  2nd  daughter  of  Edward  Sarney  of  Sonndess  Oxon  who 
died  in  1894.  Mr.  T.  A.  Cooke  died  the  following  year,  when  the  manor 
passed  to  the  trustees  of  his  will  and  subsequently  to  his  eldest  son  Edward 
Buckley  Cooke  the  present  lord  who  was  born  in  1849,  was  educated  at 
Elstreeand  Dr.  Bridgeman's,  Woolwich,  and  is  a  magistrate  for  the  Western 
Division  of  the  County  of  Suffolk.  Court  Rolls  of  the  manor  1277  to  1506 
and  1523  to  1534  will  be  found  amongst  the  Additional  Rolls  in  the  British 
Museum.3 

Polstead  Hall  is  a  fine  old  handsome  white  brick  mansion  on  a  pleasant 
eminence,  in  a  park  of  100  acres  well  stocked  with  deer  and  containing  some 
grand  old  timber,  amongst  which  is  a  large  oak  tree  near  the  church  known 
as  the  "  Gospel  Oak,"  and  said  to  be  the  oldest  in  England.  As  to  this 
oak  tree,  see  "  East  Anglian  Notes  and  Queries,"  New  Series,  vol.  iii.  88. 
The  place  is  celebrated  for  its  cherries. 

SPROTTS  MANOR. 

Against  this  manor  there  is  a  query  in  the  Davy  MSS.  if  one  Bileston 
was  not  the  lord  in  1359.  In  1573  the  lordship  was  held  by  Sir  Thomas 
Rivett4  who  died  in  1582.  Amongst  the  Marquis  of  Salisbury's  MSS.  at 
Hatfield  is  a  letter  from  Lord  North  to  Lord  Burghley  dated  the  5  October 
1582,  in  which  he  says:  "Sir  Thomas  Rivett  is  thought  to  be  past  recovery, 
and  cannot  live  out  this  winter.  He  hath  conveyed  his  lands  to  his  daughters 

'  Fine,  Mich.  40,  41  Eliz.  *  See    Stoke     Nayland    Manor    in    this 

*  Fine,  Easter,  40  Eliz.  Hundred. 

3  Add.  Rolls,  27681,  27093,  34937. 


i82  THE  MANORS  OF  SUFFOLK. 

and  delivered  the  conveyance  from  himself,  because  he  will  have  no  altera- 
tion ;  his  brother's  son  is  wholly  shut  out  of  all.  To  his  eldest  daughter,  who 
he  hath  matched  with  Mr.  Haydon,  he  hath  given  his  lands  in  Norfolk 
and  Wales ;  these  are  esteemed  near  400  marks  a  year.  To  the  second 
he  hath  given  his  Manor  of  Chippenham  and  his  lands  in  Hertfordshire 
which  is  Baldock.  Chippenham  is  400  marks  a  year.  Baldock  and  those 
lands  are  thought  to  be  £140  by  the  year ;  but  he  hath  given  Chippenham 
to  '  my  lady  '  during  her  life.  To  the  youngest,  which  he  hath  by  this 
venter,  he  hath  given  Stoke  with  all  his  Suffolk  lands,  and  hath  given  her 
besides  the  land  which  he  bought  of  Sir  Nicholas  Pointz,  called  Oselworth. 
Stoke  is  yet  in  lease,  some  part  of  it,  for  a  year  or  years,  10  or  12  ;  that  manor 
only  will  be  worth  £700  a  year.  Howbeit  '  my  lady  '  hath  Stoke  also  for 
jointure.  Yet  if  Sir  Thomas  Cecil  have  any  young  son,  sure  this  young 
daughter,  who  is  more  than  12  years  old,  shall  dispend  near  on  £1,000 
yearly.  This  conveyance  is  kept  very  secret,  and  I  come  to  it  strangely, 
for  I  am  not  in  great  favour  there.  He  would  not  that  his  brother  should 
know  of  this  device."  "  Writer's  purpose  is  to  let  Burghley  know  what  is 
to  his  hand,  and  what  he  bestows  he  might  have  due  thanks  for."  This 
manor  probably  according  to  the  conveyance  passed  to  Mirabill  the  3rd 
daughter  of  Sir  Thomas  Rivett ;  but  we  then  lose  sight  of  it  until  the  end  of 
the  i8th  century  when  we  find  it  vested  in  Sir  Joshua  Rowley,  who  died 
in  1790.  From  this  period  the  devolution  is  the  same  as  Nayland  Manor  in 
this  Hundred. 

CASTELES  MANOR. 

Very  little  is  known  of  this  manor  save  that  it  belonged  at  the  close  of 
the  I5th  century  to  Sir  Robert  Chamberleyne  and  from  him  passed  to  his 
widow  Elizabeth  who  dying  the  23  May  1517'  it  passed  to  their  son  and  heir 
Sir  Ralph  Chamberleyne  who  dying  the  4  March  1523  it  went  to  his  son 
and  heir  Edward  Chamberleyne,2  and  later  belonged  to  Richard  Brand  of 
Boxford,  who  died  in  1610,  when  it  passed  to  his  son  John  Brand  of 
Edwardston  Hall. 

NEWSTEAD  OR  NEWSTEAD  HALL  MANOR. 

Of  this  manor  Thomas  Spring,  the  rich  clothier  of  Lavenham,  was  lord, 
and  died  seised  in  1523,  when  it  passed  to  Sir  John  Spring  of  Hitcham, 
his  son  and  heir.3  The  manor  then  passed  to  Richard  Brand  of  Boxford, 
and  from  him  on  to  his  son  and  heir  John  Brand,4  who  died  in  1610,  and 
was  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir  John  Brand  of  Edwardston  Hall. 
After  this  the  manor  went  to  Thomas  Fones,  apothecary,  who  died  in  1629 
and  was  succeeded  in  the  lordship  by  his  s.  and  h.  Samuel  Fones. 


1  I.P.M.,  9  Hen.  VIII.  117.  4  This  manor  is  included  in  a  fine  levied 

'  I. P.M.,  14  Hen.  VIII.  106.  in   1598  by  John   Bronde  against 

3  See  Netherhall  Manor,  Little  Walding-                    John     Gage     and     others.     (Fine, 

field,  in  this  Hundred.  Easter,  40  Eliz.). 


PRESTON.  183 


PRESTON. 
LWAR  a  freeman  under  Stigand  held  as  a  manor  2  carucates 

°^  ^an(*  nere  w't^1  soc  m  Edward  the  Confessor's  time.  There 
were  4  villeins,  4  bordars,  i  slave,  3  ploughteams  in  demesne 
and  i  belonging  to  the  men,  9  acres  of  meadow,  5  beasts,  24 
hogs  and  40  sheep.  By  the  time  of  the  Norman  Survey 
there  was  not  much  alteration — i  ploughteam  less  in 
demesne,  i  beast  less,  21  hogs  less  and  4  sheep.  In  Newton 
there  were  also  3  freemen  under  commendation  to  Woolard.  Over  two  of 
these  the  Abbot  of  St.  Edmunds  had  soc  and  sac  and  over  the  third 
Wisgar  the  predecessor  of  Richard;  but  earlier  Norman  son  of  Tancred. 
In  Domesday's  time  Roger  de  Poictou  had  the  soc  and  sac,  and  three 
had  23  acres  among  them  and  half  a  ploughteam.  In  the  Confessor's  day 
the  value  was  placed  at  4  pounds,  but  by  the  time  of  the  Survey  it  was 
fixed  at  3.  Roger  de  Poictou  was  the  Domesday  tenant  in  chief.1 

Another  manor  belonged  in  Saxon  times  to  the  Abbot  of  St.  Edmunds 
and  was  held  at  the  time  of  the  Domesday  Survey  of  the  Abbey  by  Arnulf 
a  free  man  who  could  give  or  sell  his  lands.  He  had  3  carucates  in  demesne 
which  he  used  to  plough  with  three  teams,  but  later  with  only  2.  There 
were  2  villeins,  4  bordars  and  they  used  to  plough  half  a  carucate.  There 
were  also  appurtenant  to  this  manor  I  slave,  3  acres  of  meadow,  and  3 
freemen  who  had  26  acres  of  land  and  a  half  and  half  an  acre  of  meadow. 
These  also  could  give  or  sell  their  land.  The  value  had  been  4  pounds,  but 
it  had  come  down  to  3.  The  manor  was  12  quarantenes  long  and  6  broad 
and  paid  in  a  gelt  2d.  There  was  likewise  here  a  Church  living  with 
7  acres.  The  Great  Record  says :  "  Hanc  hominem  et  terram  suam  dedit 
Willelmus  Rex  Sancto  Edmundo  et  Balduino  Abbati  et  socam  et  omnem 
commetudinem,"  but  which  man  the  Record  refers  to  as  having  been  so 
generously  given  by  the  King  to  St.  Edmunds  and  Abbot  Baldwin  is  not 
specified.  Three  socmen  were  the  last  mentioned.1 

PRESTON  HALL  OR  CHURCH  HALL  MANOR. 

The  manor  held  by  Ulwar  in  Saxon  times  and  by  Roger  de  Poictou 
as  Domesday  tenant  was  subsequently  known  as  Preston  Hall  or  Church 
Hall  Manor,  and  may  be  regarded  as  the  main  manor  of  the  5  into  which 
the  land  in  Preston  later  became  divided.  In  1155  we  find  that  this  manor 
was  vested  in  Aubrey  de  Vere  Earl  of  Oxford  who  died  in  1194.  From 
this  time  to  the  death  of  John  de  Vere  I4th  Earl  of  Oxford  in  1526 — a 
period  of  over  three  centuries — the  devolution  of  this  manor  is  the  same 
as  that  of  Earl's  Manor  in  Cockfield  which  has  been  already  given. 

The  following  details  however  relate  to  this  manor  in  particular  : 
Inquisition  post  mortem  of  Hugh  de  Vere  4th  Earl  of  Oxford  in  I264.3 
Robert  de  Vere  6th  Earl  of  Oxford  had  a  grant  of  free  warren  here  in  I33O.4 
John  de  Vere  7th  Earl  of  Oxford.  Inquis.  p.m.  in  1360.*  The  like  of 
Thomas  de  Vere  8th  Earl  of  Oxford  in  1371 6  An  account  of  John  Watres 
bailiff  and  John  Bonde  provost  of  the  manor  from  Michaelmas  5  Rich.  II. 
to  Mich.  6  Rich.  II.  is  amongst  the  Bodleian  Rolls.7  Statement  of  forfeiture 

1  Dom.  ii.  350.  4  Chart.  Rolls,  4  Edw.  III.  37. 

'  Dom.  ii.  3596.  5  I.P.M.,  34  Edw.  111.84;  i6Rich.  II.  157. 

5  I.P.M.,    48    Hen.  III.    26.    Extent    of         •  I.P.M.,  45  Edw.  III.  45. 
manor.  7  Bodl.  Suff.  Rolls,  25. 


184 


THE  MANORS  OF  SUFFOLK. 


of  this  manor  by  the  i2th  Earl  of  Oxford  in  1462  and  grant  to  Duke  of 
Gloucester.'  Amongst  the  Harleian  Charters  in  the  British  Museum  is  a 
grant  by  John  Earl  of  Oxford  to  James  Arblaster  and  John  Power.  It 
is  dated  the  I  July  6  Edw.  IV.1  Inquisition  post  mortem  of  John  Earl  of 
Oxford  in  1475'  and  a  grant  by  the  Crown  the  same  year  of  this  manor, 
also  of  the  Manors  of  Cokefield,  Aldham  and  Mendham  to  John  Howard 
and  the  heirs  male  of  his  body  with  Knight's  fees,  &c.,  belonging  to  the 
King,  to  hold  by  accustomed  services  with  all  issues  due  to  the  King.  * 
Particulars  of  the  lands  in  Preston  held  by  the  Earls  of  Oxford  will  be 
found  amongst  the  Rawlinson  MSS.  in  the  Bodleian.5 

On  the  death  of  John  de  Verei4th  Earl  of  Oxford  this  manor  passed, 
according  to  Davy,  to  the  Earl's  sister  Elizabeth  married  to  Sir  Anthony 
Wingfield,  and  on  her  death  in  1558  passed  to  their  son  and  heir  Sir  Robert 
Wingfield.  A  fine  was  levied  of  a  moiety  of  the  manor  by  John  Wyngfeld 
and  others  in  1562  against  the  said  Sir  Robert,6  and  another  fine  of  the 
whole  by  Richard  Wyngefylde  and  others  in  1576  against  the  said  Sir 
Robert.7  On  Sir  Robert's  death  the  manor  descended  to  his  son  and  heir 
Sir  Anthony  Wingfield.*  But,  according  to  Page,  on  the  death  of  the  I4th 
Earl  of  Oxford  the  manor  passed  not  to  Elizabeth  who  married  Sir  Anthony 
Wingfield,  but  to  her  sister  Dorothy  who  married  John  Lord  Latimer  and 
passed  to  his  son  John  who  had  livery  of  the  same  in  1543  and  was  living 
in  1578  but  had  no  issue  male  by  Lucy  his  wife  daughter  of  Henry  Earl  of 
Worcester.  His  estates  became  divisable  between  his  four  daughters  and 
coheirs.  Kirby  concurs  in  Davy's  statement.  There  are  two  Chancery 
actions  amongst  the  Proceedings  in  the  time  of  Elizabeth  showing  that 
Page's  statement  is  correct  and  Davy's  and  Kirby's  inaccurate.  The 
first  is  an  action  by  John  Nevill  Lord  Latimer  and  another  against  Robert 
Springe  touching  "  The  Priory  "  and  disputed  land  in  Preston  Manor  ; 9  and 
the  second  is  an  action  by  the  same  against  Thomas  Poley,  Julien  his  wife 
and  another  as  to  the  same  manor.10 

By  the  opening  of  the  I7th  century  the  manor  had  passed  to  Sir  Thomas 
Skinner,  for  he  sold  it  in  r6o8  to  Isaac  Woden.  In  1617  it  seems  to  have 
been  in  the  possession  of  Richard  Goodday  sen.  for  he  in  that  year  had 
licence  to  alienate  it  to  trustees.  The  Davy  MSS.  then  state  that  Richard 
Earl  of  Oxford  who  died  in  1632  held  2/3  of  a  fee  here  but  whether  the  manor 
or  not  is  not  clear.  Davy  includes  him  among  his  list  of  lords  and  makes 
Robert  Price  succeed  him  as  lord  and  die  in  1638. 

The  probability,  however,  is  that  the  manor  continued  in  the  Goodday 
family  from  1617  to  the  time  that  Sarah  Goodday  married  Henry  Copinger 
of  Buxhall,  for  we  know  that  in  1689  this  Henry  Copinger  was  lord  of  the 
manor.  Henry  Copinger  was  born  in  1654,  on  the  7th  July  1670  was 
admitted  at  Caius  College  Cambridge,  and  on  the  i4th  Dec.  1675,  ten  days 
after  his  father's  death  was  admitted  a  Fellow  Commoner  of  St.  John's 
College.  In  1686  he  married  Sarah  Goodday  the  only  daughter  and  heir 
of  George  Goodday  and  by  deeds  of  lease  and  release  dated  the  2gth  and 
30th  April  1689,  the  latter  made  between  Henry  Copinger  of  Buxhall  and 

1  R.P.  vi.  228. 
•  Hart.  57  C.  14. 
'  I.P.M.,  15  Edw 


'  I.P.M.,  15  Edw.  IV.  28. 

4  Pat.  Rolls,  15  Edw.  IV.  pt.  ii.  15. 

>  Rawl.  B.  319. 

*  Fine,  Easter,  4  Eliz. 


'  Fine,  Mich.  18-19  Eliz. 

8  See    Walsham    Manor    in    Blackbourn 

Hundred. 

»  C.P.,  ser.  ii.  B.  cxxxii.  86. 
10  C.P.,  ser.  ii.  B.  cxxxii.  87. 


PRESTON.  185 

Sarah  his  wife  of  the  one  part  and  Robert  Beachcroft  citizen  and  cloth- 
worker  of  London  of  the  other  part  they  conveyed  to  the  said  Robert 
Beachcroft  and  his  heirs  "  the  Manner  of  Preston  Hall  al.  Preston  Church 
Hall  "  and  divers  messuages  and  lands  in  Preston  and  Kettlebaston  in 
the  county  of  Suffolk  whereof  divers  rents  belonging  to  the  said 
manor  were  part,  and  were  therein  mentioned  to  amount  in  the  whole  to 
eight  pounds  five  pence  and  one  halfpenny,  namely  thirty-three  shillings 
and  eight  pence  thereof  being  freehold  rent  and  six  pounds  six  shillings 
nine  pence  halfpenny  residue  thereof  being  copyhold  rents  or  arising  out 
of  copyhold  lands  parcel  of  the  said  manor.  The  writer  has  in  his  possession 
a  bond  given  by  the  said  Henry  Copinger  and  Sarah  his  wife  to  the  said 
Robert  Beachcroft  dated  the  soth  April  1689  in  consequence  of  doubts 
having  been  entertained  as  to  the  exact  amount  of  the  rents  arising  from 
the  manor.  It  was  to  operate  in  this  way  :  if  the  freehold  rents  fell  short 
the  Vendors  had  to  pay  to  the  purchaser  a  sum  equal  to  twenty  years 
purchase  of  the  amount,  and  if  the  copyhold  rents  fell  short,  forty  years 
purchase ;  if,  however,  they  were  more  the  purchaser  covenanted  to  pay 
sums  calculated  in  the  like  way  on  the  increase  to  the  Vendors. 

The  manor  descended  from  Robert  Beachcroft  to  Samuel  Beachcroft 
and  in  1734  passed  to  his  eldest  son  Matthew  Beachcroft.  By  Indenture 
of  lease  and  release  dated  the  16  and  17  Oct.  1734  and  made  between 
Matthew  Beachcroft  and  Elizabeth  his  wife  of  the  1st  part,  Dame  Elizabeth 
Porter  widow  of  the  2nd  part,  Robert  Moxon  of  the  3rd  part,  James  Porter 
and  Edmund  Brent  of  the  4th  part,  and  by  virtue  of  a  recovery  the  Manor 
of  Preston  was  conveyed  to  the  use  of  Matthew  Beachcroft  for  life  with 
remainder  to  the  use  of  Elizabeth  his  wife  for  life  with  remainder  to  use  of  the 
children  in  tail  as  Matthew  Beachcroft  and  Elizabeth  his  wife  might  jointly 
appoint  or  as  the  survivor  might  appoint  and  in  default  of  appointment 
in  tail.  Matthew  made  his  will  the  17  July  1747  which  was  proved  at 
Canterbury  and  Elizabeth  made  her  will  the  18  Dec.  1759.  Samuel  Beach- 
croft was  the  heir  at  law,  but  Elizabeth  by  her  will  seems  to  have  appointed 
this  manor  to  Elizabeth  her  daughter  in  tail.  She,  however,  died  un- 
married in  her  mother's  lifetime,  and  Elizabeth  her  mother  by  a  codicil 
dated  the  18  Nov.  1764  appointed  the  manor  to  her  two  sons  Robert  Porter 
Beachcroft  (the  elder)  and  Joseph  Matthew  Beachcroft  in  tail  in  equal 
shares  as  tenants  in  common.  Robert  Porter  Beachcroft  by  will  dated 
the  9  Jan.  1781  devised  all  his  estates  to  his  wife  Sarah  Beachcroft  for  life 
and  if  no  child  to  his  nephew  Matthew  Beachcroft,  son  of  his  brother 
Samuel.  Joseph  Matthew  Beachcroft  died  a  bachelor,  and  by  will  dated  the 
29  Aug.  1781  devised  all  his  estates  to  his  eldest  brother  James  Beachcroft. 
As  neither  Robert  Porter  Beachcroft  nor  Joseph  Matthew  Beachcroft 
suffered  a  recovery  or  barred  the  entail  the  moiety  of  the  first  named  on 
his  decease  descended  to  his  olny  child  the  Rev.  Robert  Porter  Beachcroft 
as  tenant  in  tail;  and  the  moiety  of  J.  M.  Beachcroft  on  his  decease  passed  as 
follows  :  Half  to  the  said  Saml.  Beachcroft  his  eldest  brother  and  from  him 
to  the  said  Matthew  Beachcroft  his  eldest  son  as  tenant  in  tail,  and  the 
other  half  to  the  Rev.  Robert  Porter  Beachcroft  as  tenant  in  tail  being  the 
only  child  of  the  said  Robert  Porter  Beachcroft,  the  said  Samuel  and 
Robert  Porter  Beachcroft  being  the  only  surviving  children  of  the  said 
Matthew  Beachcroft  the  grandfather,  all  others  having  died  without  issue. 

Matthew  either  settled  his  share  on  Elizabeth  his  wife  with  remainder 
to  his  sons  in  tail  or  it  passed  under  his  will  dated  the  10  Aug.  1821  to  his 
trustees  Messrs.  Steward  Beachcroft  and  Maberley  upon  trust  for  sale. 


186  THE  MANORS  OF  SUFFOLK. 

The  share  was  sold  to  Wm.  Turner  in  1829.  He  did  not  retain  long,  for 
in  the  Morning  Herald  for  the  22  Aug.  1832  we  find  that  the  manor  with  209 
acres  was  sold  for  £6,600,  the  timber  and  fixtures  being  taken  at  a  valuation. 
The  farm  was  then  let  for  8  years  at  £260  per  an.  and  the  remainder  of 
the  property  was  estimated  to  produce  about  £40.  The  following  year 
on  the  17  July  the  manor  was  again  offered  for  sale,  being  then  stated  to 
contain  in  all  200  acres  let  for  7  years  at  £260,  also  10  acres  of  woodland, 
the  outgoings  being  £26.  I2s.  $d.  a  year.  It  sold  for  £6,510.'  In  1839  the 
manor  was  purchased  by  Sir  Benjamin  Collins  Brodie  Bart,  the  celebrated 
physician,1  who  frequently  came  down  to  this  part  of  the  country.  He 
died  the  21  Oct.  1862  and  by  will  dated  the  17  Oct.  1861  proved  the  n 
March  1863  devised  the  manor  to  his  trustees  the  Hon.  George  Waldegrave 
Leslie  and  Henry  Halford  Vaughan.  The  latter  by  deed  poll  dated  the 
17  Oct.  1863  renounced,  and  George  Waldegrave  Leslie  and  a  trustee  George 
Lushington,  who  had  been  appointed  in  Vaughan's  place  with  Sir  Benjamin 
Collins  Brodie,  the  physician's  son,  sold  the  manor. 

In  1885  it  belonged  to  W.  S.  Calvert  and  is  now  vested  in  Mrs.  Calvert. 

Preston  Hall  in  the  reign  of  James  I.  and  Charles  I.  was  the  seat  of 
the  great  antiquary  Robert  Reyce,  the  preserver  of  so  much  of  historical 
interest  which  but  for  his  industrious  efforts  would  have  been  irretrievably 
lost.  He  did  not  hold  the  manor  though  his  father  Robert  was  seated  in 
Preston  in  the  time  of  Edw.  VI.  Robert  the  antiquary  married  Mary, 
eldest  daughter  of  Thomas  Appleton  of  Little  Waldingfield  who  died  29 
Feb.  1629  and  was  buried  in  Preston  Church  where  to  her  memory  is  a 
flat  stone  with  an  inscription.  Mr.  Reyce  survived  her  about  nine  years 
and  was  buried  the  15  Sept.  1638  within  the  communion  rails  in  the  parish 
church  of  Preston  near  the  remains  of  his  wife.  He  held  the  patronage  of 
the  living,  and  as  Page  says,  "  was  a  benefactor  to  this  his  native  village 
and  an  honour  to  the  place  that  gave  him  birth." 

Reyce's  Breviary  of  Suffolk  was  published  in  1902  with  notes  by  Lord 
Francis  Hervey,  and  it  is  of  the  greatest  interest  and  value.  The  notes 
are  just  of  that  character  one  rejoices  to  see  appended  to  a  work  like  Reyce's, 
and  useful  as  old  Reyce's  production  is,  the  notes  are  by  no  means  the 
least  useful  or  valuable  portion  of  the  work  as  issued. 

Amongst  the  MSS.  of  the  House  of  Lords  is  an  Indenture  dated  the 
nth  Oct.  1621  by  this  Robert  Reyce  to  Smyth  and  others.  Reyce  out 
of  his  desire  for  the  service  of  God  and  his  regard  for  Preston  where  his 
ancestors  had  lived  for  120  years,  and  been  buried,  and  where  he  had  lived 
and  hoped  to  be  buried,  and  also  his  regard  for  Emmanuel  College,  Cam- 
bridge, grants  the  rectory  and  vicarage  of  Preston  to  Smyth  and  others, 
upon  trust  within  three  years  after  his  death  to  procure  the  union  of  the 
said  rectory  and  vicarage,  with  all  tithes,  &c.,  in  the  person  of  the  then 
present  incumbent  Thomas  Willys  or  in  case  of  his  death  in  such  person 
as  the  Master,  Fellows  and  Scholars  of  Emmanuel  College  should  from  time 
to  time  present  to  the  said  living  ;  the  trust  further  provides  for  the 
preaching  of  sermons  during  Lent  on  certain  subjects,  &c.3 

SWIFT'S  MANOR. 

This  manor  seems  to  have  been  carved  out  of  the  holding  of  the  Earls 
of  Oxford,  of  course  not  later  than  the  time  of  Edw.  I.  It  was  held  of 

1  Newspaper,  19  July  1833.  '  Hist.  MS.  Com:  3  Rep:  App.  p.  241 

1  P.R.S.,      Serjeant-Surgeon     to     Queen 
Victoria: 


PRESTON.  187 

Mortimer's  Manor  by  fealty  and  suit  of  Court  at  the  yearly  rent  of  three  shillings 
and  eight  pence.  In  1360  we  find  Ralph  Swift  holding  2  parts  of  a  fee  of 
the  Earl  of  Oxford.  This  is  not  unlikely  that  Ralph  Swyft  of  Preston  who 
in  1326  had  acknowledged  that  he  owed  to  the  Abbot  of  St.  Osyth  £80 
to  be  levied  in  default  on  his  lands  in  Suffolk.1  In  the  time  of  Hen.  VI. 
this  estate  was  vested  in  John  Jervys.  The  manor  was  later  held  by 
Cecily,  Duchess  of  York  (mother  of  Edw.  IV.),  who  gave  it  in  1480  to 
John  Smith  of  Bury  founder  of  the  Chantry  there,2  and  the  following  year 
it  was  vested  in  the  Guild  of  Jesus  College  in  Bury  by  the  gift  of  this  John 
Smith.  The  particulars  are  not  given,  as  they  can  be  seen  in  the  will 
of  John  Smyth  of  Bury  printed  in  Tymm's  Wills  and  Inventories  from  the 
Registers  of  the  Commissary  of  Bury  St.  Edmunds  and  the  Archdeaconry 
of  Sudbury  issued  by  the  Camden  Society  in  1850.  On  the  dissolution 
the  manor  passed  to  the  Crown  and  in  1548  was  granted  to  Richard  Corbet, 
who  apparently  passed  it  on  to  Wm.  Poley  for  he  seems  to  have  had  it 
this  same  year  and  died  seised  the  31  Aug.  I556,3  when  it  passed  to  his  son 
and  heir  Thomas  Poley.  He  sold  the  manor  in  1588  to  Edmund  Jermyn 
who  alienated  it  to  William  Waldegrave,  but  in  what  capacity  the  alienee 
held  whether  beneficially  or  otherwise  does  not  appear,  though  probably 
as  trustee,  for  we  find  that  John  Jermyn  had  in  1596  licence  to  alienate 
to  Thomas  Jermyn  and  Henry  Firmage  as  trustees.  In  1609  Thomas 
Burler  was  lord,  and  the  next  lord  Thomas  Burler  died  without  issue.  In 
1767  the  manor  belonged  to  John  Newman,  for  there  is  a  memorandum  in 
the  Court  Books  of  Mortimer's  Manor  that  this  year  he  sold  Swift's  Manor 
to  the  Rev.  Henry  Grossman.  Grossman  died  about  1798  leaving  an  only 
child  Elizabeth  married  to  Edward  Green,  and  they  acknowledged  holding 
lands  by  free  tenure  of  the  Manor  of  Mortimer's  the  25  June,  1798,  and  the 
same  date  acknowledged  fealty  for  Swift's  Manor.  In  1833  on  the  17 
July  this  manor  was  offered  for  sale  by  public  auction  and  realised  £3,800. 
It  comprised  150  acres,  the  farm  let  for  4  years  at  £130,  timber  to  be 
taken  at  a  valuation.  The  land  tax  was  stated  to  be  £n.  i8s.4  In  1849 
Sir  Benjamin  C.  Brodie  was  lord,  from  which  time  the  devolution  is  identical 
with  that  of  the  main  manor. 

MAISTER'S   MANOR. 

This  manor  was  held  as  half  a  knight's  fee  by  William  de  Kentwell  of 
the  King,  and,  according  to  Testa  de  Nevill,  Robert  de  Whelnetham  held 
the  manor  of  William  de  Kentwell  at  the  time  of  the  compiling  of  that 
record.  Gilbert  de  Kentwell  who  held  this  same  estate,  which  was  one 
carucate  of  land,  gave  the  same  to  the  Masters  of  the  Commandry  of  Knights 
Hospitallers  or  Knights  of  St.  John  of  Jerusalem  at  Battisford  in  1316, 
in  frankalmoign5  and  on  the  suppression  of  the  religious  houses  it  passed 
to  the  Crown.  In  1543  it  was  granted  to  Andrew  Judd6  who  the  same 
year  had  licence  to  alienate  and  did  sell  to  Robert  Spring  of  Lavenham. 
He  died  the  20  April  r5497  when  this  manor  passed  to  his  son  and  heir 
Thomas  Spring  who  died  the  15  January  1556"  when  it  passed  to  his  son 
and  heir  Robert  who  had  licence  to  alienate  to  Robert  Rookwood  and 
Dorothy  his  wife  in  1572.  The  sale  was  carried  into  effect  by  a  fine  levied 

1  Close  RoDs,  19  Edw.  II.  jd.  5  H.R.  ii.  142,  150,  154,  194. 

•  See  Brett's  Manor,  Hepworth,  in  Black-  "  Originalia,  35  Hen.  VIII.  i  Pars  Rot.  128: 

bourn  Hundred.  '  I.P.M.,  3  Edw.  VI.  141. 

'  I.P.M.,  4  and  5  P.  and  M.  48.  "  I.P.M.,  3  and  4  Ph.  and  M.  93. 
Morning  Herald,,  22  Aug.  1832. 


4 


i88  THE  MANORS  OF  SUFFOLK. 

in  Easter  Term  14  Eliz.  Robert  and  Dorothy  had  licence  to  alienate  in 
1591  to  Richard  Martin  and  Anth.  Rous.  The  assurance  intended  to  be 
made  pursuant  to  this  last  licence  was  probably  by  way  of  settlement  for 
Robert  Rookwood  and  Dorothy  and  also  Ambrose  Rookwood  had  licence 
to  alienate  in  1599  *°  Sir  Thomas  Carey  as  trustee.  Davy  says  that  Ambrose 
Rookwood  was  lord  4  Eliz.  and  Edmund  Cooke  in  1609  and  the  same  year 
Elizabeth  Rookwood  widow.  The  subsequent  devolution  is  not  clear. 
It  seems,  however,  pretty  certain  that  Edmund  Cooke  was  lord  in  1615, 
for  in  that  year  he  obtained  a  licence  to  alienate  "  the  Manor  of  Maysters  " 
with  lands  in  Preston,  Kettlebarston,  Thorpe  Morieux,  Brettenham, 
Brent  Eleigh  and  Lavenham  to  James  Alington.1  James  Alyngton  was 
lord  in  1615  and  on  his  death  in  1626  the  manor  passed  to  his  nephew  and 
heir  Sir  Giles  Alyngton.  In  1691  John  Dalton  was  lord,  but  before  1715  the 
manor  was  acquired  by  J  ohn  Wright  for  he  held  his  first  Court  4  Nov .  that  year. 
He  was  succeeded  by  Joseph  Wright  who  held  his  first  Court  9  Nov.  1741. 
He  was  succeeded  by  John  Wright  who  held  his  first  Court  7  Oct.  1784. 
The  manor  then  passed  to  John  Ely  Wright  who  held  his  first  Court  7 
March  1809.  The  manor  then  seems  to  have  passed  to  Thomas  Wright 
who  died  intestate  and  without  issue  on  the  I2th  Sept.  1847,  when  the  manor 
passed  to  his  father  John  Ely  Wright  as  heir  at  law.  By  a  Settlement 
dated  2  May  1848  and  made  between  the  said  John  Ely  Wright  of  the  ist 
part,  Joseph  Wright  of  the  2nd  part,  Henry  Wright  of  the  3rd  part,  and 
George  Richard  Pye  and  Charles  Hammond  Branwhite  the  younger  of 
the  4th  part,  the  manor  was  conveyed  by  John  Ely  Wright  to  his  sons 
Joseph  and  Henry  to  the  use  that  the  said  John  Ely  Wright  should  receive 
during  life  an  annuity  of  £130  and  subject  thereto  as  to  one  moiety  of  the 
manor  to  Joseph  Wright  and  as  to  the  other  moiety  to  Henry  Wright  in 
fee.  John  Ely  Wright  died  before  the  10  May  1851  and  Joseph  Wright 
died  without  issue  having  by  his  will  left  all  to  his  brother  Henry  who 
held  his  first  Court  the  7  June  1854.  Henry  Wright  died  seised  of  the  whole 
of  the  manor  the  7  Oct.  1856  when  it  passed  to  his  son  John  Ely  Wright 
of  Preston  Manor  who  is  the  present  lord. 

MORTIMER'S  MANOR. 

This  manor  was  vested  in  Sir  William  de  Mortimer  of  Attleburgh  who 
died  in  1297  and  passed  to  his  son  and  heir  Sir  John  de  Mortimer,  knt., 
who  with  Alianora  his  wife  settled  it  in  1333  by  assurance  to  Thomas  de 
Ipswich,  Vicar  of  Preston,  and  Nicholas  de  Hoo  chaplain.'  The  assurance 
was  no  doubt  by  way  of  settlement  as  the  manor  continued  in  the  Mortimer 
family.  A  daughter  of  the  last  named  Mortimer  seems  to  have  married 
a  Ferrars,  and  a  daughter,  issue  of  such  marriage,  married  Robert  Cressener 
who  died  in  1415  seised  of  this  manor  and  the  Manor  of  Otley  .3  The  manor 
then  passed  to  Robert  Cressener' s  son  and  heir  William  Cressener  who 
died  in  1454,*  when  it  passed  to  his  son  and  heir  Alexander  Cressener  who 
died  in  1498  when  it  passed  to  his  grandson  and  heir  John  Cressener  son 
and  heir  of  Sir  John  Cressener.  A  fine  was  levied  in  1541  of  the  manor  by 
Henry  Payne  against  the  said  John  Cressener.5  Amongst  the  State  Papers 
in  the  time  of  Henry  VIII.  is  a  grant  of  livery  of  this  manor  with  other 
manors  in  Suffolk  to  this  John  Cressener.6  He  seems  to  have  been  the 
last  Cressener  holder  of  the  manor  for  he  died  in  1556  and  before  this  date 

'  Add.  MSS.  Brit.  Mus.  5834.  «  I. P.M..  32  Hen.  VI.  16. 

•  Feet  of  Fines,  7  Edw.  III.  8.  '  Fine,  Easter,  33  Hen.  VIII. 

«  I.P.M.,  12  Hen.  IV.  33.  •  1542.    S.P.  137  (52). 


PRESTON.  189 

we  find  William  Poley  who  died  31  August  this  same  year1  seised  at 
his  death  when  the  manor  passed  to  his  son  and  heir  Thomas  Poley  who 
died  about  1558,  when  it  vested  in  another  Thomas  Poley  who  in  1565  sold 
the  same  to  Robert  Rookwood2  who  died  in  1601  when  the  manor  passed 
to  his  son  and  heir  Henry  Rookwood. 

Davy  says  that  in  1614  Sir  Thomas  Tyrwhitt  had  a  grant  of  the  manor, 
but  gives  no  subsequent  information  as  to  its  devolution.  Elizabeth  Gage 
was,  we  find,  lady  of  this  manor  in  1752  and  Sir  John  Gage,  Bart.,  lord  in  1774, 
for  the  26  July  this  year  he  held  a  Court  for  the  manor.  In  1805  Robert  Gage 
Rookwood  was  lord,  for  on  the  22  March  this  year  he  held  a  Court  for  the 
manor.  The  manor  later  passed  to  the  Makins  and  Thomas  Makin  was 
lord  in  1811.  He  by  his  will  dated  the  2gth  Oct.  1834  devised  this  manor 
to  his  son  William  and  dying  the  22  March  1835  was  succeeded  by  him  as 
lord.  William  Makin  died  about  1870  and  his  mortgagees  sold  the  manor 
to  John  Ely  Wright  the  lord  of  Maister's  Manor,  by  whom  it  is  now  held. 

PRIORY  MANOR. 

This  manor  was  passed-  by  fine  from  Michael  Mendham  to  William 
de  Walsham  in  1219,  and  Thomas  de  Mendham  granted  it  to  the  Prior  of 
Holy  Trinity,  Ipswich,  who  in  1333  had  a  grant  of  free  warren  here.3  On 
the  Patent  Rolls  for  1335  is  a  licence  for  alienation  in  mortmain  to  the 
Priory  of  Holy  Trinity  by  William  de  Kenteford  vicar  of  the  Church  of 
Reshemere  (Rushmere)  of  a  messuage,  9  acres  of  land  and  2  J  acres  of  pasture 
in  Preston.4  On  the  suppression  of  the  religious  houses  this  manor 
passed  to  the  Crown  and  it  was  granted  in  1543  to  Andrew  Judde,5  and 
the  same  year  he  granted  it  to  Robert  Spring  second  son  of  Thomas  Spring 
of  Lavenham  and  of  Anne  Apulton  his  wife.  Robert  Spring  married 
Anne  dau.  of  Thomas  Eden  of  London  by  whom  he  had  six  sons,  Thomas 
his  son  and  heir,  Nicholas,  Jeremye,  Robert,  John  and  Stephen,  and  five 
daughters — Elizabeth  married  to  John  Jenney  of  Norf.,  Dorothy  married 
to  William  Humberston,  Mary  married  to  Charles  Cleare  of  Stokesby  co. 
Norf.,  Bridget  married  to  -  -  Thwaytes  of  Hardingham  co.  Norf.  and 
Frances  married  to  Robert  Ashfelde  of  Stowlangtoft.  Robert  Spring  died 
on  the  20  April  1549*  when  the  manor  passed  to  his  son  and  heir  Thomas, 
who  on  his  death  the  15  Jan.  I5567  was  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir 
Robert,  who  had  licence  to  alienate  it  to  William  Prichthorne  in  1568,  who 
had  licence  to  alienate  to  Robert  Spring  son  and  heir  of  Thomas. 

Amongst  the  Chancery  Proceedings  of  the  time  of  Elizabeth  is  an 
action  by  John  Nevill,  Lord  Latimer,  and  another  against  this  Robert 
Spring  touching  "  The  Priory  "  and  disputed  lands  in  Preston.8  Robert 
Spring  in  1580  sold  to  Robert  Reyce.  In  1609  the  manor  was  vested  in 
Sir  Robert  Jermyn  and  in  1613  in  William  Playne,  and  that  year  he  and 
his  wife  were  called  upon  to  shew  title  to  the  site  of  the  Priory.9  A  William 
Hobart  presented  to  the  living  in  1638  and  Jacob  Allen  somewhat  later. 

'  I.P.M.,  4  and  5  Ph.  and  M.  48.  «  Pat.  Rolls,  9  Edw.  III.  pt.  i.  10. 

•  Fine,  Hil.  7  Eliz.  >  35  Hen.  VIII.,  D.K.R.  10.     App.  ii.  p. 

'  Chart.  Rolls,  7  Edw.  III.  38;  see  I.P.M.  224. 

William    de    Kenteford    for    Holy  •  I.P.M.,  3  Edw.  VI.  141. 

Trinity  Priory  of  Ipswich,  9  Edw.  '  I.P.M.,  3  and  4  P.  and  M.  93. 

III.  (2nd  nos.)   54  ;    I.P.M.,    Wm;  •  C.P.  ser.  ii.  B.  cxxxii.  86. 

Vicar    of    Rushmere,  and    Hamo  '  Memoranda,  ii  Jac.  I.,  Trin.  Rec.  Rot; 

Dyke    de    Wydekesho    for    Holy  236. 

Trinity  Priory,  15  Edw.  III.  54. 


igo 


THE  MANORS  OF  SUFFOLK. 


In  1836  the  manor  was  vested  in  John  Green,  at  whose  death  it  passed  to 
his  son  Edward  Green,  at  whose  death  it  passed  to  a  distant  relative  Maud 
Sach,  whose  mortgagees  sold  to  William  Bantock  of  Preston,  but  the  manor 
is  extinct. 


PRESTON  HALL. 


SHIMPLING.  191 

SHIMPLING. 

N  the  time  of  Edward  the  Confessor  Ailith  a  free  woman  held 

6  carucates  and  a  half  of  land  as  a  manor.     There  were 
then  9  villeins,  12  bordars,  3  slaves,  4  ploughteams  in  demesne, 

7  belonging   to  the  men,  wood  for  100  hogs,    17  acres  of 
meadow,  4  horses,  7  beasts,  60  hogs,  80  sheep,  and  16  goats. 
Also  a  church  living  with  60  acres  of  free  land  and  i  bordar, 
i  ploughteam  and  half  an  acre  of  meadow.    The  whole  was 

then  valued  at  10  pounds,  but  by  the  time  of  the  Great  Survey  the  value 
was  assessed  at  12  pounds,  and  there  had  been  various  changes.  The 
villeins  had  risen  to  12,  the  bordars  to  16,  while  the  slaves  had  dis- 
appeared altogether.  There  was  a  ploughteam  less  in  demesne  and  one 
of  those  belonging  to  the  men  had  gone,  while  the  7  beasts  had  come  down 
to  6  and  the  60  hogs  to  33.  On  the  other  hand  there  was  one  more  horse, 
20  more  sheep,  and  8  more  goats.  The  manor  was  a  league  long  and  half 
a  league  broad  and  paid  in  a  gelt  15^. 

The  Domesday  tenant  in  chief  was  Ralph  Bainard.1 

Another  manor  in  Shimpling  of  considerable  size  was  held  in  the 
Confessor's  day  by  Uluric  one  of  his  thanes.  He  had  5  carucates  with  5 
villeins,  4  bordars,  6  slaves,  3  ploughteams  in  demesne  and  3  belonging  to 
the  men,  wood  for  8  hogs,  10  acres  of  meadow,  i  horse,  14  beasts,  40  hogs 
and  120  sheep.  Also  a  church  living  with  30  acres. 

By  the  time  of  the  Domesday  Survey  the  villeins  were  reduced  to  3 
but  the  bordars  had  increased  to  10.  There  was  a  ploughteam  less  in 
demesne,  8  fewer  beasts,  16  hogs  less  and  20  sheep.  Also  under  this  Uluric 
there  were  5  freemen  by  commendation  and  the  Abbot  then  had  soc  and 
sac.  They  held  a  carucate  of  land,  i  bordar,  i  slave,  2  ploughteams  and  2 
acres  of  land  valued  at  9  pounds.  This  manor  was  a  league  long  and  half 
a  league  broad  and  paid  in  a  gelt  tjd.  The  Domesday  tenant  in  chief  was 
the  Countess  of  Albamarle.2 

Bainard  also  held  a  freeman  who  had  been  in  Saxon  times  under 
Ailith  by  commendation  in  the  Abbot  of  St.  Edmund's  soc  with  30  acres, 
i  bordar,  i  ploughteam  and  i  acre  and  a  half  of  meadow  valued  at  10 
shillings.3 

SHIMPLING  MANOR. 

Ralph  Bainard  the  holder  of  the  main  manor  was  a  powerful  baron 
who  had  come  over  with  the  Conqueror.  He  was  lord  of  Castle  Bainard 
in  London  and  of  the  barony  of  that  castle.  By  virtue  of  this  barony  he 
occupied  the  post  of  hereditary  standard-bearer  of  London.  Bainard 
Castle  seems  to  have  been  situate  in  Thames  Street  in  the  City  of  London, 
though  some  assert  that  the  castle  and  the  Tower  of  London  are  the  same, 
and  the  office  Ralph  held  was  virtually  that  of  Constable  of  the  Tower  of 
London.  From  Ralph  the  lordship  passed  to  his  son  and  heir  Jeffrey  by 
Juga  his  wife,4  and  from  him  to  his  son  and  heir  William  Bainard  who  in  the 
reign  of  Hen.  I.  forfeited  the  lordship  with  his  barony  by  joining  with 
Helias,  Earl  of  Mayne  and  others  in  a  rebellion  against  his  sovereign.  The 
King  granted  the  Honor  of  Bainard' s  Castle  to  Robert  Fitz  Walter  and 

1  Dom.  ii.  4156.  4  He  is  not  unlikely  the  Bainard  Godo- 

'  Dom.  ii.  4306.  fridus    mentioned    as    one    of    the 

'  Dom.  ii.  4156;  Domesday  sub-tenants. 


192  THE  MANORS  OF  SUFFOLK. 

when  his  great  grandson  Sir  Robert  Fitz  Walter  granted  Bainard's  Castle 
to  Robert  Kilwardby  the  Archbishop  of  Canterbury  he  was  careful  to 
preserve  the  immunities  of  this  barony.  Those  appertaining  to  Bainard's 
Castle  are  specified  as  follows  :  "  That  the  said  Robert,  as  constable  of  the 
Castle  of  London,  and  his  heirs  ought  to  be  banner-bearers  of  that  city, 
by  inheritance,  as  belonging  to  that  castle ;  and  in  time  of  war,  to  serve 
the  city  in  the  manner  following,  viz.,  to  ride  upon  a  light  horse,  with  twenty 
men-at-arms  on  horseback,  their  horses  covered  with  cloth  or  harness, 
unto  the  great  door  of  St.  Paul's  Church,  with  the  banner  of  his  arms  carried 
before  him  ;  and  being  come  in  that  manner  thither,  the  mayor  of  London, 
together  with  the  sheriffs  and  aldermen,  to  issue  armed  out  of  the  church, 
unto  the  same  door,  on  foot,  with  his  banner  in  his  hand,  having  the  figure 
of  St.  Paul  depicted  with  gold  thereon,  but  the  feet,  hands  and  head  of  silver, 
holding  a  silver  sword  in  his  hand  ;  and  as  soon  as  he  shall  see  the  mayor, 
sheriffs,  and  aldermen  come  on  foot  out  of  the  church  carrying  such  a 
banner,  he  is  to  alight  from  his  horse,  and  salute  him  as  his  companion, 
saying,  Sir  mayor,  I  am  obliged  to  come  hither  to  do  my  service,  which  I 
owe  to  this  city.  To  whom  the  mayor,  sheriffs,  and  aldermen  are  to  answer  : 
We  give  to  you,  as  our  banner-bearer  by  inheritance  for  this  city,  this 
banner  of  the  city,  to  bear  and  carry  to  the  honour  and  profit  thereof  to 
your  power.  Whereupon  the  said  Robert  and  his  heirs  shall  receive  it 
into  their  hands,  and  the  mayor  and  sheriffs  shall  follow  him  to  the  door, 
and  present  him  with  a  horse  worth  twenty  pounds  ;  which  horse  shall  be 
saddled  with  a  saddle  of  his  arms,  and  covered  with  silk  depicted,  like- 
wise, with  the  same  arms  ;  and  they  shall  take  twenty  pounds  sterling  and 
deliver  it  to  the  chamberlain  of  the  said  Robert  for  his  expenses  that  day. 

This  being  done,  he  shall  mount  upon  that  horse,  with  his  banner  in 
his  hand,  and  being  so  mounted  shall  bid  the  mayor  to  choose  a  marshal 
for  the  city  army ;  who,  being  so  chosen,  shall  command  the  mayor  and 
burgers  of  the  city  to  assemble  the  commons,  who  shall  go  under  this  banner 
of  St.  Paul,  which  he  shall  bear  to  Aldgate  ;  and  being  come  hither  they 
shall  give  it  to  whom  they  shall  think  fit. 

And  if  it  shall  so  happen  that  they  must  march  out  of  the  city,  then 
shall  the  said  Robert  make  choice  of  two  of  the  gravest  men  out  of  every 
ward  to  guard  the  city  in  their  absence,  and  their  consultation  shall  be 
in  the  priory  of  the  Holy  Trinity  near  Aldgate  ;  and  before  what  town  or 
castle  this  city  army  shall  come,  and  shall  continue  the  siege  for  one  whole 
year,  this  Robert  shall  receive  from  the  commonalty  of  the  city  one 
hundred  shillings  for  his  pains  and  no  more.  Those  were  his  rights  and 
privileges  in  the  time  of  war  ;  in  time  of  peace  they  were  these  :  That  the 
said  Robert  should  have  a  soc  in  the  same  city,  extending  from  the  canonry 
of  St.  Paul's,  along  the  street  before  Paul's  brewhouse,  unto  the  Thames, 
and  thence  to  the  side  of  the  mill  which  is  in  the  water  that  comes  down 
from  Fleet  Bridge,  and  thence  up  to  London-wall,  all  about  the  Black- 
friars  unto  Ludgate,  and  so  back  to  the  house  of  the  said  friars,  to  the  corner 
of  the  wall  of  the  same  canonry  of  St.  Paul's  ;  that  is,  all  St.  Andrew's 
parish,  which  was  the  gift  of  his  ancestors  for  that  royalty. 

In  this  soc  the  said  Robert  should  have  the  nomination  of  a  socman 
who  should  possess  certain  privileges  in  the  trial  and  execution  of 
criminals. 

Moreover,  the  said  Robert  was  to  enjoy  as  extensive  privileges  in  the 
city  as  the  mayor  and  citizens ;  and  when  the  mayor  held  a  great  council, 


SHIMPLING.  193 

he  was  to  be  summoned  thereto  ;  and  at  all  times  that  he  came  to  the 
hustings  in  Guildhall,  the  mayor  was  to  rise  and  to  place  him  next  to  him- 
self."1 

Robert  Mantel  of  Essex  next  had  a  grant  of  the  manor  for  life  only, 
but  nevertheless  it  seems  to  have  passed  to  his  daughter  and  heir  Petronilla 
who  married  Sir  Fulk  Bainard  the  son  of  Sir  Robert  Bainard,  son  of  Ralph 
Bainard  who  was  second  son  of  Ralph  Bainard  the  Domesday  tenant. 

In  1303  the  manor  was  held  by  Robert  Fitz  Walter  who  had  a  right  of 
gallows  and  free  warren  here.2 

We  find  this  year,  too,  a  grant  on  the  Patent  Rolls  to  this  Robert 
son  of  Walter  stated  to  be  the  King's  kinsman,  in  consideration  of  the 
expenses  incurred  in  the  King's  service,  that  if  he  leave  an  heir  a  minor 
the  executors  of  this  Robert  may  have  the  custody  of  this  manor  which 
was  held  in  chief.3  There  is  a  like  grant  limited  to  4  years  on  the  Patent 
Rolls  in  I3I3-4  In  1306  this  Robert  was  authorised  to  grant  for  life  to 
Adam  de  Waldingfield  part  of  his  park  of  Shimpling  called  "Genteshyrn" 
and  for  the  grantee  to  enclose.5  An  Inquisition  the  same  year  discloses 
the  fact  that  the  amount  passing  was  40  acres  and  the  park  is  therein  called 
"  Gentesherne."6  The  licence  to  Adam  de  Waldingfield  to  enter  appears 
on  the  Originalia  rolls  this  year.7 

The  arrangement  does  not  seem  to  have  worked  very  amicably,  for 
the  next  year  we  find  a  commission  issued  on  complaint  of  Robert 
that  Adam  de  Waldingfeld  felled  his  trees  and  fished  in  his  ponds  at 
Shimpling.8  A  licence  was  granted  to  Robert  Fitz  Walter  to  alienate 
the  manor  in  1315.'  Robert  died  in  1325'°  when  the  manor  passed  to  his 
son  and  heir  Robert  Fitz-Walter,  and  on  his  death  in  1328"  passed  in  dower 
to  his  widow  Joan  daughter  and  coheir  of  John  de  Moulton  and  Egremond. 
There  is  an  order  on  the  Close  Rolls  in  1328  to  deliver  to  this  Joan  in  dower 
a  moiety  of  a  fee  in  Shimpling  held  by  Stephen  de  Sidolfismere  of  the  yearly 
value  of  los.  and  a  moiety  of  another  fee  in  the  same  place  which  John  de 
Luton  and  John  Tristrem  held  of  the  yearly  rent  of  405.,"  and  also  to  deliver 
to  her  the  manor  assigned  to  her  in  dower  of  the  yearly  value  of  £33.  ys.  ojd.,'3 
and  also  Shimpling  Church  of  the  yearly  value  of  £io.'4 

Joan  survived  till  1362  when  Walter  Fitz  Walter  her  grandson  made 
proof  of  his  age  and  had  livery  of  all  his  lands.  He  was  the  son  of  John 
Fitz  Walter  3rd  baron  and  Eleanor  his  wife  daughter  of  Henry  Lord  Percy. 
In  the  Inquis.  p.m.  of  Joan  Lady  de  Egremond  described  as  "wife of  John 
Fitzwauter,  one  of  the  daughters  and  heirs  of  John  de  Multon"  in  1363,  an 
item  of  355.  for  service  to  guardianship  of  Baynard  Castle  appears.'5 

Walter  Fitz  Walter  was  a  valiant  soldier  and  served  with  distinction 
in  the  expedition  into  Gascony  of  Edw.  III.  in  1370.  During  the  campaign 
he  was  taken  prisoner,  and  was  forced  to  mortgage  his  castle  of  Egremond 
for  a  thousand  pounds  in  order  to  effect  his  ransom.  In  1373  he  was 
again  in  France  under  John  of  Gaunt,  and  in  the  succeeding  reign  served 
with  Thomas  of  Woodstock  against  the  Spaniards,  and  later  took  an  active 

Burke's  Extinct  Peerage  1831,  p.  209.  '  I.Q.D.,  9  Edw.  II.  181. 

H.R.  ii.  143,  153,  142,  150.  I0  Extent.     I. P.M.,  19  Edw.  II.  99. 


~~T*J>     —  JJt     *T**»     *-Jvt 

Pat.  Rolls,  31  Edw.  I.  14  ;  35  Edw.  1. 10. 

Pat.  Rolls,  7  Edw.  II.  pt.  i.  13. 

Pat.  Rolls,  34  Edw.  I.  37. 

I. P.M.,  34  Edw.  I.  8oa. 

O.,  34  Edw.  I.  Ri.  7. 

Pat.  Rolls,  i  Edw.  II.  pt.  i. 


I. P.M.,  2  Edw.  III.  59. 
Close  Rolls,  2  Edw.  III.  7. 
Close  Rolls,  2  Edw.  III.  19. 
Close  Rolls,  2  Edw.  III.  7. 
I.P.M.,  37  Edw.  III.  26. 


194  THE  MANORS  OF  SUFFOLK. 

part  in  suppressing  the  insurrection  of  Jack  Straw.  Perhaps  his  most 
notable  successes  were  in  the  expedition  into  Spain  in  1385  with  John  Duke 
of  Lancaster  when  he  stormed  the  forts  raised  against  the  castle  of  Brest  in 
Brittany  and  relieved  by  his  valour  that  fortress  then  closely  besieged. 
He  married  ist  Eleanor,  by  whom  he  had  no  issue,  and  2ndly  Philippa 
daughter  and  coheir  of  John  de  Mohun  Lord  of  Demster  and  widow  of 
Edward  Duke  of  York  and  dying  in  1386'  the  manor  passed  to  or  rather  was 
granted  to  his  widow  Philippa  in  dower.*  She  survived  her  son  Walter 
Fitz  Walter  5th  baron,  who  died  in  1407,  but  who  was  nevertheless  called 
on  in  1405  to  show  by  what  services  he  held  the  manor.3  Philippa  also 
survived  her  grandson  Humphrey  who  died  in  1422,  but  herself  dying  in  1432, 4 
the  manor  passed  to  her  grandson  Walter  Fitz  Walter  7th  baron,  the  son  of 
her  son  Walter  by  Joane  daughter  of  Sir  John  Devereux  and  sister  and  heir 
of  John  2nd  Baron  Devereux.  The  7th  baron  distinguished  himself  in  the 
French  wars  under  Hen.  V.  and  died  also  in  1432,*  when  the  manor  passed 
to  his  widow  Elizabeth.6 

She  died  in  1463'  leaving  two  daughters,  Anne  wife  of  Thomas  Ratcliff e 
who  died  without  issue  and  Elizabeth  who  was  married  to  Sir  John 
Ratcliffe,  K.G.,  brother  of  the  said  Thomas,  carrying  the  barony  of  Fitz 
Walter  into  that  family.  Sir  John  was  a  distinguished  soldier.  He  was 
Governor  of  Trounsak  in  Aguitaine  and  had  a  thousand  marks  per  annum 
allowed  to  him  for  his  guard  thereof.  In  the  reign  of  Hen.  VI.  he  was  retained 
by  that  monarch  as  seneschal  of  that  duchy,  having  an  assignation  of  four 
shillings  per  day  for  his  own  salary  and  twenty  marks  a  piece  per  annum 
for  two  hundred  archers.  He  was  killed  at  Ferrybridge  in  1461  and  the 
manor  passed  to  his  son  and  heir  Sir  John  Ratcliffe  who  in  right  of  his 
mother  was  summoned  to  Parliament  in  1485  as  Baron  Fitz  Walter.  At  the 
coronation  of  the  King's  Consort  Queen  Elizabeth  he  was  associated  with 
Joseph  Tudor  Duke  of  Bedford  in  performing  the  duties  of  High  Steward 
of  England,  but  being  implicated  in  the  conspiracy  in  favour  of  Perkin 
Warbeck  he  was  attainted  of  high  treason,  and  being  carried  prisoner  to 
Calais,  notwithstanding  an  attempted  escape  by  the  corruption  of  his 
guardians,  he  was  beheaded  in  1495. 

His  son  and  heir  Robert  Ratcliffe  was  restored  in  blood,  honour  and  estates 
by  Act  of  Parliament  i  Hen.  VIII.  and  attended  that  monarch  in  his  great 
expedition  to  Therouene  and  Tournay  and  commanded  the  van  of  the  army 
sent  10  years  later  into  France  under  the  Earl  of  Surrey  when  for  his  services 
he  was  created  Viscount  Fitz  Walter.  He  was  one  of  the  peers  signing  the 
articles  against  Wolsey,  and  subsequently  became  a  K.G.  and  on  the  28  Dec. 
1529  Earl  of  Sussex.  This  nobleman  attained  a  special  patent  to  himself 
and  his  heirs  male  of  the  office  of  Server  at  the  time  of  dinner  upon  the 
coronation  day  of  all  future  Kings  and  Queens  of  England  with  a  fee  of 
twenty  pounds  per  annum  out  of  the  Exchequer,  and  was  on  the  attainder 
of  Thomas  Cromwell  constituted  Lord  High  Chamberlain  of  England  for 
life.  He  married  ist  Elizabeth  daughter  of  Henry  Duke  of  Buckingham  and 
a  fine  was  levied  of  the  manor  in  1512,  no  doubt  byway  of  settlement,  by 
Robert  Duke  of  Buckingham  and  others  against  the  said  Sir  Robert  Ratcliffe 
and  Elizabeth  his  wife,  as  also  of  a  moiety  of  the  manor  of  Thurstanton. 8 

'  I.P.M.,  10  Rich.  II.  15.  *  I.P.M.,  16  Hen.  VI.  46. 

•  Pat.  Rolls,  10  Rich.  II.  pt.  ii.  18.  *  Livery  of  Manor,  D.K.R.  48.  App.  p.  287. 
»  Memoranda  Rolls,  6  Hen.  IV.  Mich.  Rec.         '  I.P.M.,  4  Edw.  IV.  37. 

Rot.  i.  '  Fine,  Trin.  4  Hen.  VIII. 

•  I.P.M.,  16  Hen.  VI.  45. 


SHIMPLING. 


195 


Sir  Robert  Ratcliffe  married  2ndly  Lady  Margaret  Stanley  daughter  of 
Thomas  Earl  of  Derby,  and  3rdly  Mary  daughter  of  Sir  John  Arundel 
of  Lanherne,  Cornwall,  and  died  in  1542,  when  he  was  succeeded  by 
his  son  and  heir  Sir  Henry  Ratcliffe  3rd  Lord  Fitz  Walter  and  2nd  Earl  of 
Sussex. 

He  was  engaged  in  the  expedition  into  Scotland  in  1547,  and  was  one 
of  the  first  to  declare  for  Queen  Mary  on  the  decease  of  Edw.  VI.  He 
was  rewarded  accordingly,  being  made  warden  and  Chief  Justice  itinerant 
of  all  the  forests  south  of  the  Trent  and  created  a  K.G.  He  married  Lady 
Elizabeth  Howard  daughter  of  Thomas  Duke  of  Norfolk,  and  dying  the  17 
Feb.  1556  was  succeeded  by  her  eldest  son  Sir  Thomas  Ratcliffe  4th  Lord 
Fitz  Walter  and  3rd  Earl  of  Sussex.  In  the  lifetime  of  his  father  he  had 
been  employed  in  some  important  and  delicate  diplomatic  missions.  He  was 
the  ambassador  chosen  by  Queen  Mary  to  send  to  the  Emperor  Charles  V. 
to  treat  of  a  marriage  between  herself  and  Prince  Philip  the  Emperor's 
eldest  son,  and  afterwards  to  proceed  to  the  Court  of  Spain  to  the  prince 
himself  to  obtain  a  ratification  of  the  treaty.  His  lordship  was  one  of  those 
fortunate  courtiers  who  retained  the  confidence  of  the  succeeding  sovereign, 
and  he  was  confirmed  in  the  office  of  Deputy  of  Ireland,  and  in  1561  con- 
stituted Lord  Lieutenant  of  that  kingdom.  To  him  was  intrusted  the 
negotiations  for  the  matrimonial  alliance  between  Queen  Elizabeth  and  the 
Archduke  Charles  of  Austria  and  later  to  treat  as  to  a  marriage  between 
his  sovereign  and  the  Duke  of  Anjou.  He  married  ist  Lady  Elizabeth 
Wriothesley  daughter  of  Thomas  Earl  of  Southampton  by  whom  he  had  two 
sons  Henry  and  Robert  who  died  young,  and  2ndly  Frances  daughter  of  Sir 
William  Sidney  knt.  sister  of  Sir  Henry  Sidney  knt.  but  had  no  issue,  and 
dying  in  1583  was  succeeded  by  his  brother  Henry  Ratcliffe  5th  Lord  Fitz 
Walter  and  4th  Earl  of  Sussex. 

The  manor  was  sold  by  Robert  Earl  of  Sussex  in  1601  to  John  Snelling 
of  Boxford  co-founder  of  the  Royal  School  there.1  There  is  amongst  the 
State  Papers  a  grant  in  1616  of  Shimpling  Park  for  21  years  to  John  Taylor.2 
John  Snelling  died  in  1619,  when  the  manor  seems  to  have  passed  to  his 
daughter  and  heir  Anne  married  to  John  Duke.  They  sold  to  Frances 
Bacon  and  others,  and  in  1622  Simon  Wells,  D.D.,  rector  of  Brockley  was 
lord.  In  1636  the  manor  had  passed  to  William  Wells  clerk.  In  1640  we 
find  amongst  the  State  Papers  a  lease  of  tenements  and  manorial  rights  of 
Shimpling  Park  made  by  the  Queen  to  William  Crofts,3  and  a  further  lease 
to  the  same  in  1643 .4  A  Parliamentary  Survey  of  Shimpling  Park  made  in 
1650  is  in  the  Public  Record  Office.5  The  manor  passed  in  1655  to 
James  Cobbes  of  St.  Edmunds  Bury  for  he  held  his  first  Court  Baron  for  the 
manor  Oct.  22,  1655.  He  married  ist  Dorothea  dau.  of  Thomas  Oliver,  and 
2ndly  Martha  one  of  the  daughters  of  William  Barnes  of  East  Winch  in 
Norfolk  and  widow  of  Edmund  Isty  of  Bury  St.  Edmund.  He  died  in 
1685  and  was  interred  in  Great  Saxham  Church  on  the  7th  June.  The 
Harveys  of  Cockfield  subsequently  held  the  manor,  and  from  them  it  passed  to 
the  Aspin  and  Acton  families,  of  whom  it  was  purchased  by  Robert  Plampin 
who  held  in  1764.  On  his  death  the  manor  passed  to  John  Plampin,  who 
dying  in  1805  it  passed  to  his  son  and  heir  the  Rev.  John  Plampin,  who  dying 
in  1823  it  was  sold  by  his  trustees  to  Thomas  Halifax  who  was  High 

1  Fine,  Mich.  43,  44  Eliz.  4  State  Papers,  1643,  p.  378. 

•  State  Papers,  1616,  414.  5  D.K.R.  8.     App.  ii.  p.  67. 

3  State  Papers,  1640-41,  p.  48. 


196  THE  MANORS  OF  SUFFOLK. 

Sheriff  of  the  County  in  1838.'  On  his  death  in  1850  the  manor  passed  to 
the  Misses  Halifax.  The  manor  was  acquired  by  Jerom  Murch  of  Cranwells 
in  the  parish  of  Weston  in  the  County  of  Somerset,  and  passed  under  his 
will  to  his  only  son  Denis  Jerom  Murch  who  by  a  conveyance  dated  the  7th 
October,  1898  conveyed  the  same  to  Henry  Edwards  Paine  and  Richard 
Brettell  both  of  Chertsey  in  the  County  of  Surrey,  and  on  the  death  of  the 
said  Richard  Brettell  the  manor  devolved  wholly  upon  and  is  now  vested  in 
the  said  Henry  Edwards  Paine. 

There  is  an  Inquisition  post  mortem  take.i  at  Henhow  respecting  this 
manor  amongst  the  Lansdowne  MSS.  in  the  Brit.  Mus.1  An  appointment 
of  a  bailiff  of  the  manor  in  1438  will  be  found  among  the  Harleian  Charters3 
in  the  Brit.  Mus.  An  assignment  of  the  life  interest  of  Queen  Catherine 
of  Breganza  in  1680  in  Shimpling  Park  is  amongst  the  same  Charters,4  and 
an  abstract  of  a  deed  relating  to  the  Park  is  amongst  the  Additional  MSS. 
in  the  National  Collection.5 

CHADACRE  OR  CHARDACRE  HALL  MANOR,  GIFFORD'S  AND  BOXSTEAD'S. 

This  manor  was  held  in  King  Edward  the  Confessor's  time  by  the 
before-mentioned  Uluric  the  thane  with  i  carucate  of  land.  There  was  i 
villein  and  there  were  3  bordars  and  2  slaves,  2  ploughteams  in  demesne 
and  i  belonging  to  the  men,  3  acres  of  meadow  valued  at  60  shillings.  It 
wa=;  4  quarantenes  long  and  2  broad  and  paid  in  a  gelt  2%d.  The  Domesday 
tenant  in  chief  was  the  Countess  of  Albemarle.6  There  has  been  con- 
siderable discussion  as  to  who  this  countess  was,  and  the  whole  matter  is 
treated  by  Mr.  Planch£  in  his  work  "  The  Conqueror  and  his  Companions." 
She  was  Adelaide  daur.  of  Adelaide  sister  of  theConqueror  and  wife  of  Enguer- 
rand  or  Ingleram,  Sire  d'Aumale  in  right  of  his  mother.  After  the  death  of 
Ingleram  his  widow  married  2ndly  Lambert  Count  of  Leus  in  Artois  brother  of 
Eustace  II.  Count  of  Boulogne  and  had  by  him  a  daughter  named  Judith 
whose  hand  was  given  by  her  uncle  William  the  Conqueror  to  Waltheof 
Earl  of  Northumberland.  Count  Lambert  was  killed  at  Lille  in  a  battle 
between  Baldwin  Count  of  Flanders  and  the  Emperor  Henry  III.,  and  his 
widow  married  3rdly  Odo  of  Champagne  by  whom  she  was  the  mother  of 
Stephen  who  on  the  death  of  his  elder  half-sister  Adelaide  became  the  first 
Comte  d'Aumale  or  Earl  of  Albemarle,  the  Seigneurie  having  been  made  a 
comte  by  King  William.  The  late  Mr.  Freeman  fell  into  the  singular  error 
of  making  Odo  the  husband  of  the  younger  Adelaide.  The  Conqueror's  sister, 
the  first  Countess  of  Albemarle,  probably  died  before  1085.  Her  daughter 
Adelaide  succeeded  to  this  manor  and  on  her  death  without  issue  in  1096 
the  manor  passed  to  the  above  named  Stephen  Earl  of  Albemarle  who  died 
in  1126.  In  1301  William  de  la  Lee  and  Beatrice  his  wife  levied  a  fine  of 
the  manor  against  John  son  of  Walter  de  Barnham  and  Maria  his  wife. 8 
and  the  following  year  the  said  William  de  la  Lee  had  a  grant  of  free  warren 
in  Chadacre.'  In  1328  William  de  la  Lee  having  died  and  Beatrice  his 
widow  holding  the  manor  for  life  a  fine  was  levied  by  John  de  la  Lee  and 

1  The  property  was  offered  for  sale  at  the  '  Lansd.  229,  112. 

Six  Bells  Inn,  Bury  St.  Edmunds,  '  Harl.  48  F.  24. 

Sept.  17  1823.  in  six  lots,  and  con-  4  Harl.  in  H.  n. 

sisted  of  the  mansion  called  Chad-  '  Add.  34741. 

acre  Hall,  with  the  manors,  coverts,  *  Dom.  ii.  4306. 

farm  -  houses,      cottages,      woods,  '  London,  1874,  2  vols.  8vo,  vol.  i  p.  118 
meadows,    pasture    grounds,     and  to  126. 

arable  lands,  consisting  of  568  acres  "  Feet  of  Fines,  29  Edw.  I.  36. 

I  rood  and  18  perches.  »  Chart.  Rolls,  31  Edw.  I.  8,  18. 


SHIMPLING.  197 

Petronella  his  wife  against  John  Tristrem  of  Shimpling  and  Ralph  de 
Rerisby  of  the  same.'  In  1408  a  fine  was  levied  of  "  Giffardes  and  Wode- 
house  "  Manors  by  John  Durward  of  Bokkyng,  Richard  Baynard,  John 
Rookwode,Geoff  rey  Michel,  Ralph  Chaumberlayn,  and  Richard  Walton  against 
Henry  Hunt  and  Alice  his  wife  with  appurtenances  situate  in  Shimpling, 
Stansted,  Boxsted,  Melford  and  Glemsford,2  and  John  son  of  William  Dore- 
ward,  Robert  de  Taye  and  others  feoffees  granted  this  manor  called  Giffords 
in  1418  to  Robert  Hunter  and  Katherine  his  wife.  A  little  later  John  de 
Harleston  was  lord.  He  was  of  the  ancient  family  of  Harleston  and  descended 
from  the  noted  Sir  John  Herolveston  so  often  mentioned  in  our  early  English 
chronicles  for  his  martial  exploits  in  the  time  of  Rich.  II.  He  wa  followed 
by  his  son  and  heir  John  de  Harleston  who  held  part  of  Giffords  and  died  in 
I457»3  when  he  was  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir  John  Harleston  who  dying 
without  issue  in  1459  was  succeeded  by  his  uncle  Robert  Harleston  who 
forfeited  the  manor  in  1475,*  which  includes  tenements  called  "  Chadaker- 
hall,  Revelis  and  Gyffardes."  The  manor  was  the  same  year  granted  to  Sir 
William  Stanley.  The  grant  is  on  the  Patent  Rolls,  and  is  to  William 
Stanley  and  the  heirs  male  of  his  body  of  a  messuage  called  "  Chadakerhall," 
and  a  tenement  annexed  to  it  called  "Reules"  in  Shimpling,  a  tenement 
called  "  Gyffardes  "  in  Shimpling,  Standen  and  Boxstedes,  two  tenements 
called  ' '  Cokes  "  and  ' '  Valauntes  "  in  Hertest  and  a  tenement  called  "  Box- 
stedes "  in  Boxsted,  &c.5  Robert  Harleston  was  restored  in  blood  and 
estate  by  Act  of  Parliament  in  I485.6  On  the  opening  of  the  i6th  cent., 
however  the  manor  is  not  found  to  be  any  longer  in  the  Harleston  family, 
but  a  moiety  vested  in  Sir  Roger  Darcy  the  son  of  Thomas  Darcy  and 
Margaret  his  wife  sister  and  coheir  of  John  Harleston  who  died  as  mentioned 
above  without  issue  in  1459.  Sir  Roger  Darcy  who  was  Esquire  of  the 
body  to  Henry  VII.  married  Elizabeth  daughter  of  Sir  Henry  Wentworth 
knt.  and  dying  the  3  Sept.  I5O77  the  manor  passed  to  his  son  and  heir  Sir 
Thomas  Darcy  who  was  one  of  the  masters  of  the  King's  Artillery  in  the 
Tower  of  London,  and  a  gentleman  of  the  privy  chamber.  In  1542  he 
evidently  obtained  the  other  moiety  of  the  manor  by  virtue  of  a  fine  levied 
against  Sir  John  Mordaunt  and  Ela  his  wife.8  Of  this  moiety  Richard 
Fitz  Lewis  had  died  seised  the  12  July  1529,  having  held  in  right  of  his 
wife  Alice  Harleston  dau.  of  John  and  sister  and  coheir  of  John  Harleston— 
Richard  Fitz  Lewis  had  left  a  son  John  whose  daughter  Ela  had  married 
Sir  John  Mordaunt.9  This  manor  had  been  included  in  a  fine  levied  in  1525 
by  Sir  John  Bourchier  and  others  against  Clement  A.  Harleston.10  In  1551 
being  then  Vice  Chamberlain  of  the  King's  household,  captain  of  the  guard 
and  one  of  the  principal  knights  of  the  privy  chamber  Sir  Thomas  Darcy 
was  advanced  to  the  peerage  as  Baron  Darcy  of  Chiche  in  the  County  of 
Essex  and  made  a  K.G.  A  fine  was  levied  of  the  manor  in  1553  by  John 
Cutler  against  the  said  Thomas  Lord  Darcy."  He  married  Elizabeth  de 
Vere  daughter  of  John  Earl  of  Oxford  and  dying  in  1558  was  succeeded  in 
the  lordship  of  this  manor  by  his  eldest  son  John  2nd  Lord  Darcy.  He 
accompanied  William  Earl  of  Essex  into  Ireland  in  1574,  and  married 
Frances  daughter  of  Richard  Lord  Rich,  Lord  Chancellor  of  England. 

1  Feet  of  Fines,  2  Edw.  III.  30.  '  I.P.M.,  24  Hen.  VII.  80. 

•  Feet  of  Fines,  9  Hen.  IV.  40.  '  Fine,  Hil.  34  Hen.  VIII. 

3  I.P.M.,  36  Hen.  VI.  13.  »  I.P.M.,  21  Hen.  VIII.  122. 

4  R.P.  vi.  1446 ;  I.P.M.,  15  Edw.  IV.  49.  '°  Fine,  Trin.  17  Hen.  VIII. 

5  Pat.  Rolls,  15  Ed.v.  IV.  pt.  iii.  16.  "  Fine,  Mich,  i  Mary. 

6  R.P.  vi.  2816. 


198  THE  MANORS  OF  SUFFOLK. 

How  long  the  manor  continued  in  this  family  is  not  certain.  In  1764 
the  manor  was  vested  in  Robert  Plampin,  and  the  subsequent  devolution 
is  the  same  as  the  main  manor. 

ROWHEADS  al.   ROUSHEDGES  MANOR. 

It  is  not  clear  whether  this  was  a  manor  or  a  free  tenement  only.  An 
Inquisition  in  the  3rd  year  of  Hen.  VII.  [1487]  states  it  to  be  a  tenement 
called  "  Rowheddes  al.  Trystrams  "  in  Shimpling  and  Alpheton  held  of  Lord 
John  Fitz  Walter  as  of  the  Manor  of  Shimpling  by  fealty  and  35.  rent.  It 
is  found  that  trustees  were  seised  of  this  tenement  to  the  use  of  Thomas 
Spryng  who  died  the  28  Sept.  1486,  and  that  Thomas  Spryng  aged  30  years 
was  his  son  and  heir.'  In  subsequent  times  however  it  is  frequently  referred 
to  as  a  manor.  Thomas  Spring  called  the  "  Rich  Clothier  of  Lavenham  " 
was  the  Spring  who  built  two  chapels  in  Lavenham  Church  and  a  good  part 
of  the  steeple.  He  died  in  1523,  when  the  manor  passed  to  his  son  and  heir 
Sir  John  Spring.'  Three  years  before  his  death  he  disposed  of  the  manor  to 
his  brother  Robert  Spring3  who  married  Ann  daughter  of  Thomas  Eden  of 
London  and  died  seised  the  2Oth  April  1549'  when  it  passed  to  his  son  and 
heir  Thomas  Spring  then  30  years  of  age.  Thomas  Spring  married  ist 
Julian  d.  and  h.  of  John  Fayrye  who  died  Sheriff  of  London,  and  2ndly  a 
daughter  of  Appleton  of  Waldlngfield,  and  according  to  the  Davy  MSS. 
held  this  manor  being  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir  Robert  Spring.  It 
seems  pretty  clear  however  that  the  manor  did  not  pass  to  this  last  Robert 
Spring,  for  before  the  year  1575  it  had  vested  in  Stephen  Spring  6th  son 
of  Robert  Spring  and  came  to  him  either  on  the  death  of  his  father 
Robert  in  1549  or  °f  ms  brother  Thomas,  for  in  this  year  1575  Stephen 
disposed  of  the  manor  to  Sir  William  Cordell.5  No  doubt  the  sale  was  made 
as  Stephen  Spring  had  an  only  daughter  as  heir,  Elizabeth  married  to  George 
Kempe  of  Swasye  in  Cambridgeshire. 

Arms  of  Harleston  :   Argent,  a  fesse  erm.  double  cotised  sab. 

A  "  Shimpling  Manor  "  is  included  in  a  fine  levied  in  1569  by  William 
Waldegrave,  John  Heigham  and  others  against  Elizabeth  Drurie  widow  and 
others." 


1  Inquis.  3  Hen.  VII.  234.  '  Fine,  Trin.  35  Hen.  VIII. 

'  See  Netherhall  Manor,  Little  Walding-  '  I.P.M.,  3  Edw.  VI.  141. 

field,  in  this  Hundred,  and  Manor  of  *  Fines,  Easter  and  Trin.,  17  Eliz. 

Pakenham  in  Thedwestry  Hundred.  *  Fine,  Easter,  II  Eliz. 


SOMERTON.  199 


SOMERTON. 

HE  manor  was  held  in  Edward  the  Confessor's  day  by  Stakker 
and  consisted  of  i  carucate  of  land  in  the  Abbot  of  St. 
Edmund's  soc.  There  were  2  bordars,  4  slaves,  2  plough- 
teams  in  demesne,  3  acres  and  a  half  of  meadow,  15  hogs  and 
60  sheep  valued  at  30  shillings.  By  the  time  of  the  Great 
Survey  the  value  had  risen  to  40  shillings.  The  only  addition 
in  the  details  consisted  of  10  beasts  and  5  goats,  while  the 
ploughteams  were  reduced  by  half,  the  slaves  by  3,  the  hogs  by  7  and  the 
sheep  by  10.  Robert  son  of  Corbuzzo  was  the  Domesday  tenant  in  chief.1 
The  only  other  important  holding  in  this  place,  though  not  either  in  Saxon 
times  or  at  the  period  of  the  Domesday  Survey  held  as  a  manor,  was  that  of 
the  Abbot  of  Bury  and  which  Frodo  held  of  him,  namely  one  carucate  of 
land,  i  villein,  5  bordars  accustomed  to  plough  with  3  teams  and  valued  at 
43  shillings  less  4^.  This  land  King  William  gave  to  the  Abbey  with  soc 
and  commendation  and  all  custom.  The  length  was  6  quarantenes  and  the 
breadth  4  and  it  paid  in  a  gelt  $d.  Also  the  Abbot  had  a  freeman  with 
30^  acres  which  in  the  time  of  the  Great  Survey  Frodo  too  held  of  the 
Abbot  and  the  value  was  2  shillings.2 

SOMERTON  MANOR. 

The  main  manor  was  held,  as  we  see,  by  Robert  Fitz  Corbutio  or  Cor- 
buzzo. He  was  one  of  the  three  sons  of  Corbuzzo,  Chamberlain  to  William 
the  Conqueror  in  Normandy,  one  of  whose  duties  was  to  find  rushes  for  the 
Duke's  bedchamber  and  a  bed  of  down.  The  manor  was  granted  in  the 
time  of  Richard  the  First  to  Richard  Nevill.3  In  1205  Thomas  de  Burgo 
was  lord,  and  in  1240  another  Thomas  de  Burgo  who  is  stated  to  have  held 
the  fourth  of  a  fee.  In  1274  we  find  yet  another  Thomas  de  Burgo  lord 
and  he  in  this  year  gave  the  ninth  sheaf  of  all  his  demesne  lands  in  this 
manor  and  Burgh  in  Cambridge,  and  had  in  exchange  the  advowson 
of  the  parish  Church  of  Somerton,  which  the  Prior  of  the  Augustine  Canons 
in  Thetford  conveyed  to  him.  In  1334  a  John  Multon  de  Egremont  was  lord 4 
and  in  1360  John  de  Burgh  held  half  a  fee  of  the  Earl  of  Oxford,  and  he 
was  succeeded  by  his  son  Sir  Thomas  de  Burgh  who  died  leaving  his  sister 
and  coheir  Elizabeth  married  to  Sir  John  de  Ingaldesthorp  or  IngoJdes- 
thorp  son  and  heir  of  Sir  William  de  Ingoldesthorp.  Sir  John  died  seised 
of  the  manor  in  I42O,5  leaving  Elizabeth  his  widow  who  died  the  following 
year.  Sir  John  de  Ingoldesthorp's  will  is  dated  Thursday  next  after  All 
Saints  in  1419,  and  in  it  he  names  Elizabeth  his  wife,  Sir  John  Colvile,  Sir 
William  Assonhull,  knts.,  and  William  AUington  his  executors.  The  will  was 
proved  June  8th  1420.  He  gave  legacies  to  the  churches  of  Reinham,Tilney, 
Emseth,  Ingaldesthorp,  and  Ingtesham  in  Norfolk,  to  Swaffham  Bulbeck, 
Burgh,  &c.,in  Cambridgeshire,  and  2O/.  to  the  chantry  of  Burgh;  of  all  which 
manors  he  was  possessed,  with  that  of  Frenge  in  Norfolk,  and  Somerton  in 
Suffolk,  and  was  buried  according  to  his  desire,  in  the  chancel  of  Burgh  in  Cam- 
bridgeshire, where  on  the  north  side  he  has  a  stately  monument  with  the  statue 
of  himself  (and  lady)  in  complete  armour.  Blomefield  mentions  that  he 
has  seen  a  note  of  Le  Neve's  Norroy  at  Arms,  where  he  says,  "About  his  neck 

'  Dom.  ii.  4256.  4  I.P.M.,  8  Edw.  III.  13. 

•  Dom.  ii.  3596,  360.  5  I.P.M.,  8  Hen.  V.  49. 

3  Bodl.  4167. 


200  THE  MANORS  OF  SUFFOLK. 

is  a  collar  though  more  like  a  garter,  with  the  buckle  put  pendant  in  the 
top  of  his  forehead  above  the  garter,"  adding,  "  This  is  an  odd  description 
of  Le  Neve's,  and  seems  rather  to  be  a  chaplet,  as  was  usual  in  that  age." 
The  will  of  Elizabeth  Sir  John's  widow  is  dated  Thursday  next  before  the 
feast  of  St.  Edmund  King  and  Martyr,  1421,  proved  Feb.  12  following. 
By  it  she  appoints  Sir  Walter  de  la  Pole,  Sir  John  Col  vile,  Sir  William 
Assonhull  knts.,  Thomas  Ingoldesthorp,  Henry  Noffingham,  and  John 
Crane  her  executors,  bequeathing  to  Thomas  her  son  a  bed  in  white  and  red, 
to  Alianore  her  daughter  a  black  mantle,  to  Margaret  Ingoldesthorpe  a 
testour,  to  the  Lady  Margaret  Zouche  her  sister  a  gold  chain ;  Dame 
Joan  Assonhull  wife  of  Sir  William  was  also  her  sister.  She  was  buried 
by  her  husband  at  Burgh. 

Thomas  Ingoldesthorp  was  but  19  years  of  age  at  his  father's  death  and 
the  custody  and  wardship  was  granted  to  his  mother.  He  married  Margaret 
daughter  and  heir  of  Sir  Walter  de  la  Pole  lord  of  Sanston  in  Cambridge  and 
nephew  of  Michael  de  la  Pole  Earl  of  Suffolk.  Thomas  died  under  age  in 
1422.'  His  will  bears  date  January  14  in  the  same  year,  and  by  it  he 
orders  all  his  goods  to  be  disposed  of  by  Sir  Robert  Clifton  and  Thomas 
Sorrel  his  executors.  The  will  was  proved  May  22,  1422,  and  the  testator 
was  buried  in  the  church  of  Burgh.  Margaret  his  widow  had  in  the  same 
year  licence  to  remarry  from  the  King,  and  also  an  assignment  of  dower 
and  died  soon  after  in  1426,  leaving  Edmund  de  Ingoldesthorp  her  son 
and  heir  aged  5  years.  He  married  Joan  2nd  daur.  of  John  Tiptoft  Lord 
Powis  and  sister  to  John  Earl  of  Worcester. 

The  will  of  Sir  Edmund  de  Ingoldesthorp  is  dated  August  4,  1456  and 
in  it  he  appoints  Joan  his  wife,  Sir  John  Prisot  knt.,  Chief  Justice  of  the 
Common  Pleas,  Laurence  Cheyney  and  Thomas  Lockton  his  executors, 
and  gives  to  his  wife  the  manors  of  Kenwick  in  Tilney  and  of  Frenge  in 
Norfolk,  Burgh,  Meldreth,  and  Alvitheley  for  life,  after  to  Isabel  his  daughter, 
and  for  default  of  her  issue  to  John  Earl  of  Worcester,  Lord  Tiptoft  and 
Powis  to  be  sold  to  pray  for  the  souls  of  Sir  John  Ingaldesthorp,  Thomas 
Ingaldesthorp,  his  own,  and  that  of  Sir  Walter  de  la  Pole.  He  died  seised 
of  this  manor  the  2nd  September  1456." 

He  was  buried  in  the  midst  of  the  chancel  of  Burgh  Church  where  a 
sumptuous  monument  was  erected  to  his  memory,  with  his  portraiture  in 
brass,  and  in  armour,  his  head  (without  a  helmet)  resting  on  a  bull's 
head,  couped,  in  a  coronet.  The  inscription,  or  rather  a  fragment  of  it  is 
given  by  Blomefield,  who  says  it  is  "  for  the  most  part  broke  off,  and  seems 
to  have  been  in  rude  rhyming  verse,  according  to  the  taste  of  the  age." 

Uxorem  comitis  de  Wyrceter  ipse  sororem, 

Anno  milleno  quater  x.  c.  x.  quoq. ;  seno  : 
Eccle  dies  bina  Septembris  quando  aniina 
Militis  hujus  erat . 

In  1460  Sir  John  Prisot  one  of  his  executors  had  licence  dated  December 
5,  39  Hen.  VI.  to  found  a  chantry  in  the  church  of  Burgh  for  the  said  Sir 
Edmund,  Sir  Thomas  his  father,  and  Sir  John  his  grandfather,  Sir  John  de 
Burgh  and  Catherine  his  wife.  The  Lady  Joan  widow  of  Sir  Edmund 
married  Thomas  Grey  younger  son  of  John  Lord  Grey  de  Ruthyn  and 
brother  to  Edward  Grey  the  first  Earl  of  Kent.  This  Thomas  was  created 
Lord  Grey  of  Rugemont  in  Bedfordshire  on  the  death  of  Edward  Tiptoft 
Earl  of  Worcester  who  died  a  minor  in  the  3rd  year  of  Richard  III.  She 

1  I.P.M.,  i  Hen.  VI.  46.  "  I.P.M.,  35  Hen.  VI»  20.- 


SOMERTON.  201 

with  her  two  sisters  Philippa,  who  married  Thomas  Lord  Roos  of  Hamlake, 
and  Joyce  who  married  Edmund  eldest  son  of  John  Lord  Dudley,  were 
found  to  be  his  aunts  and  coheirs.  She  died  on  the  2ist  June  1494.' 

It  seems  that  Edmund  de  Ingoldesthorp  left  two  daurs.  only,  Isabel 
and  Joan.  Joan  must  have  died  without  issue  for  the  manor  went  to  the 
issue  of  Isabel.  She  married  Sir  John  Nevill  3rd  son  of  Richard  Nevill, 
Earl  of  Salisbury  by  the  Lady  Alice  Montacute  dau.  and  heir  of  Thomas 
Montacute  Earl  of  Salisbury.  He  was  created  Baron  Nevill  of  Montague 
by  K.  Hen.  VI.  in  1460,  and  after  espousing,  with  his  father  and  elder 
brother  Richard  the  celebrated  Earl  of  Warwick,  the  cause  of  the  House  of 
York,  he  was  advanced  by  Edward  IV.  on  his  accession  to  the  throne 
to  the  dignity  of  Earl  of  Northumberland.  He  received  considerable 
grants  in  Norfolk  and  Suffolk  out  of  forfeited  lands  in  consideration  for  his 
services  under  the  Duke  of  Somerset  when  he  defeated  the  Lancasterians  at 
Hexham ;  but  on  the  subsequent  restoration  of  Percy  he  relinquished  the 
title  of  Northumberland  receiving  in  lieu  that  of  Marquess  of  Montagu.2 
Leland  says  that  the  King  suspecting  the  fidelity  of  Sir  John  Nevill  privately 
incited  the  people  of  the  north  to  desire  the  restoration  of  young  Henry 
Percy  knowing  his  interest  there,  whereby  he  might  be  an  important 
opposing  factor  to  Nevill,  and  that  to  save  his  outward  enmity  when  he 
resigned  the  Earldom  of  Northumberland  he  was  created  Marquis  of 
Montagu.  The  bait  however  did  not  prove  effectual,  for  on  the  revolt  of 
Richard  Earl  of  Warwick,  his  brother  (who  had  an  irreconciliable  hatred  to 
King  Edward,)  the  Lord  Montagu  having  collected  together  6,000  men  in 
King  Edward's  name  joined  the  Earl,  telling  them  that  the  King  having 
restored  Percy  to  the  Earldom  of  Northumberland,  and  giving  him  the 
title  of  Marquis  Montagu,  was  only  giving  him  a  Pie's  nest,  and  therefore 
he  would  take  part  with  his  brother.  He  fell  with  his  celebrated  brother  at 
the  Battle  of  Barnet  14  April  1471,  and  both  were  attainted.  He  left 
issue  by  Isabel:  i  George  who  was  created  Duke  of  Bedford  in  1469  by 
Edward  IV.  when  he  contemplated  marrying  him  to  his  eldest  daughter 
the  Lady  Elizabeth  Plantagenet ;  but  after  the  attainder  of  his  father 
he  was  degraded  of  all  his  dignities  and  honours  by  Parliament  in  1477, 
and  died  without  issue  at  Sheriff's  Honton  in  Yorkshire  in  1485 ;  2  John, 
who  died  without  issue  in  1480  and  was  buried  at  Sanston  in  Cambridge- 
shire ;  3  Anne  wife  of  Sir  Wm.  Stoner  knt.  of  Oxfordshire;  4  Elizabeth 
wife  ist  of  Thomas  Lord  Scrope  of  Upsall  and  2ndly  of  Sir  Henry 
Wentworth  of  Nettlestead;  5  Margaret,  wife  ist  of  Sir  John  Mortimer 
of  Essex  and  2ndly  of  Charles  Brandon  Duke  of  Suffolk  from  whom 
she  was  divorced,  and  3rdly  of  Robert  Downes;  6  Lucy  wife  ist  of 
Sir  Thomas  Fitz  Williams  of  Aldwarke  in  Yorkshire  knt.,  and  2ndly 
of  Sir  Anthony  Browne  knt.  Standard-bearer  of  England ;  and  7  Isabel, 
wife  of  Sir  William  Huddleston  knt.  of  Salston. 

In  the  Inquis.  p.m.  9  Hen.  VII.  it  is  stated  that  the  manor  was  worth 
4/.  and  held  of  the  Earl  of  Oxford ;  also  that  Thomas  Byllyng  and  others 
were  seised  of  the  manor  to  the  use  of  "  Joan  Ingoldesthorp  and  of  Edmund 
Ingoldesthorp  her  husband  and  his  heirs." 

The  heirs  of  Edmund  Ingoldesthorp  are  found  in  this  Inquisition  to  be  : 
John  Stonor  aged  10 ;  Elizabeth  wife  of  Sir  Henry  Wentworth,  late  wife  of 
Thomas  Lord  le  Scroppe;  Margaret  wife  of  Sir  JohnMortymer;  Lucy  wife 
of  Sir  Thomas  Fitz  William ;  and  Isabel  wife  of  William  "  Hodelston,"  all  over 

'  I.P.M.,  9  Hen.  VII.  1088.  *  Let.  Pat.  25  March,  10  Edw.  IV. 


202  THE  MANORS  OF  SUFFOLK. 

23,  viz.,  John  Stonor  as  son  of  Anne  one  of  the  daughters  and  heirs  of  Isabel, 
Marchioness  Mountagewe,  daughter  and  heir  of  the  said  Joan  ;  and  the  said 
Elizabeth,  Margaret,  Lucy,  and  Isabel  as  the  other  daughters  and  heirs  of 
the  said  Marchioness.1  There  is  an  inquiry  in  the  State  Papers  of 
1524  touching  the  feoffment  of  this  manor  to  Dame  Margaret  Mortimer." 

The  manor  seems  to  have  vested  probably  on  partition  in  Dame 
Margaret  Mortimer  remarried  to  Robert  Downes,  and  in  1522  a  fine  was 
levied  of  the  manor  by  Thomas  Rasshe  against  this  Robert  Downes.3 
Further  the  State  Papers  disclose  an  attempt  by  Sir  James  Framingham 
and  his  wife  to  obtain  the  manor  after  this  lady's  death,  and  Wolsey 
granted  an  injunction  restraining  Sir  Anthony  Win gfield  and  William  Waller 
from  proceedings  against  Dame  Margaret  Mortimer  and  her  third  husband 
in  an  action  of  debt  for  3,000  marks  before  the  justices  of  the  King's  Bench. 

It  seems  that  Sir  James  Framingham  and  Dame  Anne  his  wife  had  en- 
deavoured to  persuade  Margaret  Mortimer  to  bind  herself  to  leave  her 
inheritance  to  them,  and  this  she  refused  to  do  on  account  of  their  "  manifold 
unkindness,  saying,  she  would  never  be  bound  to  her  cradle,  but  be  lady 
of  her  own  during  her  life."  It  was  alleged  that  they  several  times  turned 
her  out  of  their  house  at  Crowyshall,  after  having  spent  and  borrowed  all 
her  money  ;  and  had  failed  to  get  bonds  from  her  for  her  inheritance.  The 
last  time  they  put  her  out  they  took  away  from  her  £8  and  withheld  all  her 
plate  and  apparel.  This  took  place  on  Christmas  eve,  and  she  "  was  driven 
to  seek  her  lodging  that  holy  time  of  Christmas,  and  also  fain  to  go  all  the 
said  Christmas,  as  she  went  upon  Christmas  even,  to  her  great  discomfort." 

It  was  shown  that  Margaret  sealed  and  delivered  an  obligation  of  3,000 
marks  the  6  August  n  Hen.  VIII.  [1519]  in  the  chapel  at  Croweshall,  Deben- 
ham,  to  Sir  Anthony  Wingfield  and  William  Waller  when  none  were  present 
but  the  said  Margaret  and  Waller  and  the  chapel  door  was  shut.  When  it 
was  done  Waller  called  in  the  servants  of  the  house  as  witnesses.  The 
effect  of  the  obligation  was  that  she  should  "  make  estate  of  "  a  pension  of 
100  marks  she  had  from  the  Exchequer,  and  the  Manors  of  Somerton  and 
Droitwitch  Suff.  and  Wore,  to  certain  persons  named  by  Wingfield  and 
Waller  for  her  use  during  her  life,  and  at  her  death  for  six  years  the  manors 
were  to  be  held  to  the  use  of  her  will  and  afterwards  to  go  to  Framingham 
and  his  wife.  The  annuity  was  to  remain  to  Dame  Anne  immediately  on 
Margaret's  death  and  there  was  a  provision  that  she  should  not  alienate 
any  of  her  inheritance.  No  feoffees  were  ever  named  by  Wingfield  and 
Waller  to  Dame  Margaret  and  no  request  was  ever  made  to  her  to  make 
any  such  estate,  either  before  her  marriage  to  Downes  or  after.  She  was  a 
widow  for  two  and  a  half  years  after  making  the  obligation.  The  day  of 
making  the  obligation,  Waller  promised  that  none  of  her  lands  should  be 
put  to  any  "  after  deal,  hurt  or  damage,"  but  the  bond  should  only 
stand  to  show  to  Sir  James  who  was  then  on  his  death  bed  and  died  nine 
days  after.  He  also  promised  to  redeliver  the  obligation  at  Sir  James's 
death.  She  sent  Sir  Henry  Wodward  the  chaplain  three  times  to  ask  for  it ; 
but  he  answered  that  he  could  not  well  tell  where  it  was.  He  said  however 
lie  would  look  for  it  amongst  his  books  at  Yepsyche  (Ipswich)  and  Rameshall 
and  send  it  her. 

Dame  Margaret  alleged  that  she  never  had  a  pennyworth  for  the  making 
of  the  obligation  and  never  had  any  lands  or  moveables  from  Robert  Fornesse 

1  Inquis.  9  Hen.  VII.  1088.  3  Fine,  Easter,  14  Hen.  VIII. 

•  I.P.M.,  Hen.  VII.  737. 


SOMERTON.  203 

Dame  Anne's  father.  Broune  and  Dame  Anne  came  to  Downes's  house 
after  he  had  married  Dame  Margaret  and  in  her  sight  stabbed  at  him  with 
a  dagger  "  and  like  to  have  stricked  him  ;  and  for  fear  the  said  Dame 
Margaret  swooned  three  times  that  night  so  that  they  might  anethes  get  the 
life  in  her/'  which  was  the  cause  of  their  selling  Somerton,  for  fear  of  her 
death,  to  pay  her  debts. 

A  few  years  later  we  find  the  manor  vested  in  Arthur  Rushe  who 
died  in  1548,  when  it  passed  to  his  son  and  heir  Anthony  Rushe,  who  sold  the 
same  in  1557  to  Henry  Payne1  and  Richard  Poley  and  the  latter  presented 
to  the  living  this  same  year.  William  Baker  presented  in  1571  and  1583 
and  probably  then  had  the  manor.  A  fine  of  it  was  levied  in  1588  by  Ed- 
mund Saunders  against  Philip  Coningsby2  In  the  time  of  James  I.  it  seems  to 
have  passed  to  Edward  Copley  who  died  in  1609  when  the  manor  passed  to 
his  son  Edward  Copley,  who  sold  to  Sir  Francis  Blundell.  He  died  in  1702 
and  the  manor  passed  to  his  son  and  heir  George  Blundell  and  from  him  to 
his  son  and  heir  Francis  Blundell,  who  was  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir 
Montague  Viscount  Blundell,  and  in  1827  it  was  vested  in  Arthur  Blundell 
Sandys-Trumball  Hill  third  Marquis  of  Downshire.  In  1847  the  manor 
was  vested  in  George  Walter  Poley,  and  is  now  vested  in  John  George 
Weller  Poley  of  Boxstead  Hall. 

The  descent  of  this  manor  of  Somerton  Hall  is  given  in  the  Rawlinson 
MSS.  in  the  Bodl.3  Amongst  the  Chancery  Proceedings  of  the  time  of 
Elizabeth  is  a  claim  by  Anne  wife  of  Philip  Coningslye  and  Elizabeth  Pollie 
as  co-parceners  against  William  Baker  as  to  Somerton  Hall  al.  Somerton 
Manor,  late  the  estate  of  Francis  Pollie  dec.4 

HORES  MANOR. 

To  this  manor  Davy  assigned  as  first  lord,  Edward  Vauney, 
but  without  giving  any  date.  No  doubt  he  merely  entered  the 
name  from  the  fact  that  in  1428  Nicholas  Drury  is  stated  to  have 
held  here  the  fourth  of  a  fee  formerly  belonging  to  Edward  Vauney. 
Nicholas  Drury  held  the  lordship  and  married  Joan  daughter  of 
Thomas  Heath  of  Mildenhall.  He  died  in  1456  when  the  manor  passed 
to  his  2nd  son  Roger  Drury  who  by  his  second  wife  Felice  daughter  of 
William  Denson  of  Besthorp  Norfolk  had  a  son  Sir  Robert  Drury,  who 
on  the  death  of  his  father  Roger  Drury  in  1500  succeeded  to  the  lordship. 

Roger  Drury  the  son  by  his  will  dated  the  2Oth  Jan.  1493  be- 
queathed to  the  "  heyanter  of  the  churches  of  Hartest,  Somerton,  and 
Whepsted  to  iche  of  them  vjs.  viij^."  Amongst  many  peculiar  bequests 
he  gives  "  a  standyng  pece  white  and  gilt  the  which  weyeth  xxvij.  unc. 
myn  old  silver  bason  with  the  Drury's  armes  departed  which  weyeth  xxxvij. 
unc.,  also  my  gilt  ewer  the  which  weyeth  xviij.  unc."  to  his  wife.  He  also 
adds,  "  I  will  that  she  (his  wife)  have  my  chased  pece  with  myn  armys  in 
the  botom,  the  which  weyeth  xij.  unc.,  because  she  hath  ij.  peces  of  the 
same  sute.  Also  I  will  that  she  have  my  playne  flat  pece,  with  a  gilt  knoppe, 
which  weyeth  xvj.  unc.,  also  I  will  that  she  have  my  powder  box  which 
weyeth  vij.  unc.  Also  I  will  that  she  have  my  primer  clothed  with  purpill 
damaske,  and  my  boke  clothed  with  red  leather,  in  which  boke  is  the  masse 
of  John.  Also  I  will  that  she  have  my  white  counterpeynt  which  hath 

1  Fine,  Hil.  4  Mary  i.  3  Rawl.  B.  319. 

'  Fine,  Easter,  30  Eliz.  *  C.P.  i.  190. 


204  THE  MANORS  OF  SUFFOLK. 

myn  armys,  my  greene  coverlyght  wrought  with  white  coton,  my  payer  of 
fritzans,  my  hoole  chamber  that  I  ly  in,  my  ij .  bedds  in  my  maiden's  chamber 
hoole,  with  the  change  of  shets  and  napery  such  part  as  she  thynkyth 
necessary  for  her  withought  contradicon." 

The  escutcheons  as  given  by  Cullum  on  the  tomb  of  Sir  Roger  Drury 
in  Hawstead  Church  are  :  A  tan  between  2  mullets  in  chief. — Drury.  2 
Drury  empaling  a  coat  charged  with  a  chevron. — Harmingficld.  3  Drury 
empaling,  first,  a  coat  charged  with  a  chevron,  on  which  is  a  cross-crosslet ; 
second,  2  lions  passant  guardant. — Denston.  4  Drury  empaling  quarterly, 
ist  3  mullets  on  a  band,  2nd  obscure  except  a  chief,  3  as  2,  4  as  i.  From  the 
time  of  Sir  Robert  Drury  who  died  in  1535-6  to  the  time  of  Sir  Robert 
Drury  who  died  in  1615  the  manor  passed  in  the  same  course  as  the  Manor 
of  Hawstead  in  Thingoe  Hundred. 

Sir  Robert  Drury  did  not  die  seised  of  the  manor,  for  in  1594  he  had 
sold  it  to  Lionel  Sharpe.1 


1  Fine,  Trin.  36  Eliz. 


STANSTEAD.  205 

STANSTEAD. 

'N  the  Confessor's  days  Goodmund  the  Thane  held  in  demesne 

5  carucates  as  a  manor  with  soc.    There  were  4  villeins,  10 
bordars,  10  slaves,  4  ploughteams  in  demesne,  and  2  belonging 
to  the  men,  16  acres  of  meadow,  i  mill,  wood  for  10  hogs,  3 
horses,  16  beasts,  60  hogs,  and  100  sheep.    The  value  then  was 

6  pounds,  but  by  the  time  of  the  Great  Survey  it  rendered 
12  pounds,  tho'  the  villeins  were  but  three,  the  slaves  fewer 

by  4,  and  the  ploughteams  in  demesne  reduced  by  one.  The  only  increase 
was  one  horse.  The  manor  was  one  league  long  and  4  quarantenes  broad, 
and  it  paid  in  a  gelt  j^d.  whoever  might  be  the  holder.  There  was  also 
a  church  living  with  25  acres  of  free  land.1  The  Domesday  tenant  in  chief 
was  Hugh  de  Montfort.  He  was  present  at  the  battle  of  Hastings,  20  years 
before  the  Survey,  and  must  have  been  then  a  good  age,  as  at  the  eventful 
battle  he  had  the  command  of  the  horse.  Indeed  it  is  known  that  in  1054 
he  had  greatly  distinguished  himself  by  his  conduct  in  Normandy  when  the 
great  army  with  which  King  Henry  I.  of  France  invaded  Normandy  was 
defeated  at  Mortemer.  He  had  supplied  the  Conqueror  with  50  ships  and 
sixty  knights  and  in  the  Battle  of  Hastings  he  and  the  Seigneur  de  Vieuxpont 
gallantly  rescued  William  Malet  who  had  his  horse  killed  under  him  and  would 
have  been  slain  himself  but  for  their  timely  aid.  They  lost  many  of  their 
people,but  succeededin  protecting  Malet, and  mounting  him  on  a  fresh  horse." 
His  high  character  and  the  confidence  placed  in  his  abilities  is  shown 
by  the  fact  that  he  was  one  of  the  three  barons  to  whom  the  Conqueror 
when  he  visited  Normandy  in  1067  entrusted  the  administration  of 
justice  in  England.  The  family  were  a  family  of  warriors,  and  the  father 
of  this  Domesday  tenant  lost  his  life  in  a  duel  with  Walkelin  de  Ferrieres. 
In  fact  both  the  combatants  lost  their  lives  in  the  same  affray  and  on  the 
same  day.  Hugh  de  Montfort  the  tenant  in  chief  received  in  reward  for  his 
services  in  the  conquest  sixteen  manors  in  Essex,  nineteen  in  Norfolk,  twenty- 
eight  in  Kent,  and  the  large  number  of  fifty-one  in  Suffolk,  besides  a  con- 
siderable proportion  of  Romney  Marsh.  He  married  a  daughter  of  Richard 
de  Bellofago  by  a  daur.  of  the  Count  of  Ivri,  and  was  therefore  niece  of  John 
Archbishop  of  Rouen,  of  Hugh,  Bishop  of  Bayeux  and  of  the  wife  of  Osbern 
de  Crepon.  By  her  he  had  two  sons  Hugh  and  Robert  and  by  a  second  wife 
he  had  a  daur.  Alice  who  on  the  death  of  her  half-brothers  without  issue 
inherited  the  family  estates.  Hugh  de  Montfort  became  a  monk  in  the 
Abbey  of  Bee  and  probably  died  shortly  after  the  Domesday  Survey.  His 
2nd  son  Robert  was  commander  in  chief  of  the  Norman  army  in  Maine  in 
1099,  and  joined  the  Crusade  under  Bohemund  in  1107.  Alice  the 
daughter  of  Hugh  de  Montfort  married  Gilbert  de  Gant  son  of  Baldwin 
VI.  count  of  Flanders  and  consequently  nephew  of  Queen  Matilda.  Their 
son,  Hugh  de  Gant  assumed  the  name  of  Montfort  and  was  called  Hugh 
the  Fourth.  He  married  Adeline  daughter  of  Robert  Count  of  Mellent  and 
had  a  son  Robert  de  Montfort  who  died  without  issue.  The  Montfort 
arms  were  :  Bendy  of  ten,  Or.  and  Azure. 

STANSTEAD  OR  OVERHALL  MANOR. 

In  1219  the  Domesday  manor  had  become  divided  into  two,  later  known 
as  Overhall  and  Netherhall.      Overhall  which  was  the  main  lordship  was 

1  Dom.  ii.  408.  *  Planch6,  "  The  Conqueror  and  his  Com- 

panions," vol.  i,  p.  167. 


zo6  THE  MANORS  OF  SUFFOLK. 

vested  in  Osbert  de  Wachesham  and  Isabel  his  wife  who  had  also  part  of  the 
advowson.  Osbert  predeceased  his  wife,  and  she  appears  as  the  holder  of 
3  4th  of  a  fee  in  the  Red  Book  of  the  Exchequer.1 

On  her  death  the  manor  passed  to  her  son  Sir  Giles  de  Wachesham' 
who  was  living  in  1234  an^  had  a  wife  named  Elizabeth.  He  died  in  1267, 
leaving  his  son  and  heir  Giles  de  Wachesham  who  had  the  manor.  He  was  a 
witness  to  a  grant  of  Theobald  son  of  Will,  de  Leyston  by  which  he  gave  the 
manor  of  Sawode  to  Bury  Abbey  and  had  a  charter  of  free  warren  in  his 
manors  of  Marlynford,  Wortham,  Stansted,  Wachesham,  &c.  In  1267 
Giles  the  son  and  heir  was  40  years  old  and  John  his  brother  was  of  age  and 
had  half  a  fee  given  him  by  Elizabeth  his  mother.3  In  1272  Giles  the  son 
died*  and  the  manor  probably  passed  to  his  widow  Joan  and  subject  to 
her  interest  to  their  son  Sir  Gerard  or  Giles  de  Wachesham  then  an  infant. 
The  entry  in  the  Hundred  Rolls  as  to  the  manor  is  that  Giles  de  Wachesham 
held  in  chief  of  the  king  one  knight's  fee  in  Stanstead  of  which  half  was  in 
the  hands  of  the  King  as  guardian  by  reason  of  the  death  of  the  said  Giles 
and  that  John  de  Verdun  held  the  other  half5  of  the  said  Giles.6  In  1290 
Sir  Gerard  or  Giles  de  Wachesham  was  Sheriff  of  Norfolk  and  Suffolk,  and 
died  in  1294,  leaving  Giles  de  Wachesham  his  son  and  heir  who  paid  £6. 55. 
for  relief  of  his  father's  lands  namely  a  fee  and  a  fourth  part  in  Stansted, 
2os.  for  Wachesham,  which  he  held  by  the  sergeanty  of  jumping,  belching, 
and  otherwise  making  a  beast  of  himself  once  in  the  year  before  the  King,  as 
appears  from  the  Memoranda  of  the  Exchequer  Ao.  2ist  Edw.  I.  This 
Giles  or  Gerard  as  he  is  sometimes  called,  in  1300  settled  Wortham  on  him- 
self for  life  and  then  on  Giles  de  Wachesham  his  son  and  Amy  or  Amicia 
his  wife  and  their  heirs,  and  in  1310  he  settled  the  advowson  and  part  of  the 
manors  on  John  (?  Robert)  his  son  and  Joan  his  wife.  On  the  Patent 
Rolls  will  be  seen  a  pardon  in  1304  to  Master  Henry  de  Bradenham  for  enter- 
ing on  the  manor  of  Stanstead  demised  to  him  for  life  by  this  Gerard  de 
Wachesham.7  The  fine  was  duly  paid  for  the  transgression  the  same  year,8 
and  the  manor  is  included  in  an  Inquisition  of  Sir  Henry  de  Bradenham's 
lands  with  an  extent.9  The  manor  is  also  included  in  the  Inquisition  post 
mortem  of  Gerard  de  Wachesham  in  1307.'°  This  same  year  we  find  on  the 
Patent  Rolls  a  licence  for  Gerard  de  Wachesham  to  grant  in  fee  simple  to 
Giles  his  son  the  advowson  of  the  Church  of  Stanstead  and  the  reversion  of 
the  manor  of  Stanstead  which  Master  Henry  de  Bradenham  held  for  life." 

In  1329  a  fine  was  levied  of  the  manor  by  Robert  de  Wechesham  and 
Joan  his  wife  dau.  of  Simon  de  Hetherset  against  Giles  de  Wechesham12  and 
in  1359  another  fine  was  levied  by  John  de  Wachesham  and  Margaret  his 
wife  against  Robert  de  Wachesham  then  Sir  Robert  and  Joan  his  wife, 
Ralph  de  Denton  and  others  by  which  the  manor  and  the  advowson  of  the 
church  were  settled  on  themselves  and  their  issue.'3  The  above  Sir  Robert 
de  Wachesham  left  an  only  daughter  Elizabeth  who  married  Sir  Thomas 
Gerbridge'4  who  inherited  the  estate  in  her  right.  He  left  an  only  daughter 
Alice  who  married  Sir  Edmund  Barry  or  Berry,  knt.  The  manor  does  not 
however,  seem  to  have  left  the  Wachesham  family,  for  it  appears  to  have 

'  cxxx.  rider  c.  '  Pat.  Rolls,  34  Edw.  1. 17. 

1  See  Manor  of  Wortham  Hall  in  Hartis-  .     "  Originalia,  32  Edw.  I.  Ri.  5; 

mere  Hundred.  '  I.P.M.,  32  Edw.  I.  189. 

»  I.P.M.,  52  Hen.  III.  14.  •  I.P.M.,  35  Edw.  I.  80. 

•  I.P.M.,  i  Edw.  I.  9.  See  I.P.M.,  3  Edw.  I:          '  Pat.  Rolls,  35  Edw.  I.  31 

28.  "  Feet  of  Fines,  3  Edw.  III.  17. 

This  is  Netherhall  Hall  Manor:  '  Feet  of  Fines,  33  Edw.  III.  29. 

•  H.R.  ii.  142,  146,  150.  '  Davy  says  Sir  Edmund  Barry  or  Berry. 


STANSTEAD.  207 

been  vested  in  a  Sir  Robert  de  Wachesham  in  1433.  This  year  he  made 
his  will  in  which  he  ordered  his  body  to  be  buried  in  the  Carmelites  or  White 
Friars  at  Norwich.  He  left  two  daughters  and  coheirs — Agnes,  married  to 
Sir  William  Paston  afterwards  Judge  Paston  ;  and  Alice  married  to  Sir 
Thomas  Bardolph,  knt.,  who  in  1454  released  their  right  to  Agnes  and  Sir 
William  Paston  in  the  manor  and  advowson  of  Stanstead.  This  Sir  William 
Paston  was  the  son  and  heir  of  Clement  Paston  of  Oxnead  in  Norfolk.  He 
was  bred  to  the  bar  and  in  1413  made  steward  of  all  the  courts  and  letes 
belonging  to  Richard  Courtney,  Bishop  of  Norwich,  who  settled  upon  him 
£5  per  annum  out  of  his  lordship  of  Blofield  and  "  a  livery  yearly  on  the 
nativity  of  our  Saviour  out  of  his  wardrobe  of  woollen  cloth  and  fur  such  as 
the  other  peers  or  nobles  of  his  retinue  received  yearly."  In  1426  he  received 
the  coif  and  in  1429  Hen.  VI.  granted  him  no  marks  per  annum  with  two 
robes  more  than  the  ordinary  fees  of  the  judges  as  a  special  mark  of  his 
favour,  being  a  judge  of  the  Common  Pleas  and  of  the  King's  Council  for  his 
Duchy  of  Lancaster.  The  Prior  of  Bromholm  in  1438  gave  him  for  his 
services  16  acres  of  land  at  Baketon  and  the  Abbot  of  Bury  granted  him 
a  letter  of  confraternity  or  brotherhood  whereby  he  partook  of  all  the 
prayers  of  that  Abbey  both  alive  and  dead.  He  was  surnamed  "  the  Good 
Judge,"  and  died  in  London  the  i4th  Aug.  1443  at  the  age  of  66,  being  buried 
in  the  chapel  at  the  east  end  of  Norwich  Cathedral.  Agnes  his  wife  died  in 
1479  and  was  buried  by  his  side.  His  will  is  dated  June  20  1443,  and  by 
an  Inquisition  taken  Nov.  2  in  the  same  year,  John  Paston  was  found  to  be 
his  son  and  heir  and  of  the  age  of  23  years  ;  Edmund  his  son  was  found  to  be 
1 8,  and  Clement  his  other  son  i  year  old.  Sir  William  Paston  in  right  of  his 
wife  quartered  the  arms  of  the  ancient  families  of  Hetherset,  Wachesham, 
Craven,  Gerbridge,  Hengrave  and  Kerdeston. 

John  Paston  succeeded  to  the  lordship  and  married  Margaret  daughter 
and  heir  of  Sir  John  de  Manteby  by  Margaret  his  wife  daughter 
of  John  Berney  of  Redham.  He  was  a  man  highly  respected  and  worthy 
of  his  father.  Sir  John  Fastolf  Knight  of  the  Garter  appointed  him  one  of 
his  executors,  giving  him  all  his  manors,  lands  and  hereditaments  in  trust 
to  found  a  college  of  seven  priests  at  Castor  near  Yarmouth  and  to  pay 
4,000  marks  in  charitable  uses  in  Norf.  Surf,  and  Norwich  "  for  the  singular 
love  and  trusts  "  (says  Sir  John)  "  that  I  have  to  my  cozen  John  Paston 
before  all  others,  being  in  very  beleve  that  he  will  execute  my  will  herein." 
King  Edward  IV.  seized  several  of  the  estates  of  this  John  Paston  and  he 
was  committed  a  prisoner  to  the  Fleet.  Just  before  his  death,  which  occurred 
in  London  May  26  1466,  he  assigned  over  his  jewels,  chattels  and 
effects  to  Sir  John  Paston  sen.  his  eldest  son  and  heir,  John  Paston  jun., 
William  and  Clement  his  other  sons,  and  was  buried  at  Bromholm  Abbey 
in  a  very  solemn  and  sumptuous  manner.  Blomefield  gives  the  expenses 
paid  at  his  funeral  from  a  roll  in  his  own  possession  and  the  particulars  are 
very  curious. 

Sir  John  Paston  the  son  of  the  Judge  so  thoroughly  trusted  by  Sir  John 
Fastolf  does  not  seem  to  have  borne  the  irreproachable  character  of  his 
father  if  the  tale  told  of  him  be  authentic  It  is  said  that  the  Judge  his 
father  having  left  large  sums  of  money  and  securities  of  great  value  to  be 
distributed  amongst  his  children  and  placed  them  in  a  coffer  which  he 
deposited  in  the  Priory  of  Norwich  having  taken  an  oath  from  his  eldest 
son  Sir  John  Paston  that  the  treasure  should  not  be  resorted  to  without 
the  executors  of  his  will  and  Agnes  his  mother,  Sir  John  in  violation  of 
his  oath  by  a  subterfuge  obtained  possession  of  the  treasure. 


208  THE  MANORS  OF  SUFFOLK. 

It  seems  he  requested  leave  to  place  a  coffer  near  his  father's,  and 
when  resorting  to  his  own  broke  open  that  of  his  father  and  kept  the  con- 
tents for  2  years  when,  as  the  narrator  observes,  "  the  prior  and  the  executors 
durst  have  sworn  that  they  (meaning  the  treasure)  were  safe  therein." 

Edw.  IV.  in  1466  granted  to  Sir  John  Paston,  called  senior  because  of  his 
having  a  brother  called  John,  a  warrant  enabling  him  to  take  possession  of 
all  the  lands  and  inheritance  of  his  late  father  and  of  Agnes  his  grand- 
mother, and  of  Margaret  his  mother  which  had  been  seized  by  the  King  in 
evil  surmises  made  to  him  against  his  deceased  father  and  himself  of  all 
which  they  were  "  sufficiently  openly  and  worshipp fully  cleared  "  before 
the  King.  Sir  John  Paston  senior  acquired  considerable  renown  in  France 
and  was  chosen  to  be  on  King  Edward's  side  at  the  great  tournament  at 
Eltham  in  Kent  against  the  then  Lord  Chamberlain  and  others,  and  was 
also  sent  to  conduct  the  King's  sister  into  France  on  her  marriage  to  Charles 
Duke  of  Burgundy.  He  died  the  15  Nov.  1479  unmarried,  and  was  succeeded 
by  his  brother  John  Paston  jun.,  who  was  made  knight  banneret  by  King 
Henry  VII.  at  the  Battle  of  Stoke  in  Nottinghamshire,  High  Sheriff  of 
Norfolk,  and  was  one  of  those  who  were  appointed  to  receive  the  Princess 
Catherine  of  Spain  wife  of  Prince  Arthur  on  her  landing  in  this  country. 

He  married  Margery  daughter  of  Sir  Thomas  Brews  of  Stinton  Hall 
in  Lalle,  and  dying  in  1503  was  buried  in  the  White  Friars'  Church  at  Nor- 
wich. His  successor  in  the  lordship  was  Sir  William  Paston  his  eldest 
son  and  heir,  an  eminent  lawyer  who  received  from  the  Corporation  of 
Yarmouth  for  his  services  an  annuity  of  £40  a  year.  He  lived  to  the  age 
of  90  and  died  in  1554  and  his  will  was  proved  Dec.  4th  in  the  same  year. 
His  wife  was  Bridget  daughter  of  Sir  Henry  Heydon  knt.  of  Baconsthorp 
in  Norfolk  by  whom  he  had  5  sons  and  7  daughters.  Erasmus  Paston  the 
eldest  son  married  Mary  daughter  of  Sir  Thomas  Wyndham  of  Felbrigge, 
died  before  his  father  in  November  1538  and  was  buried  in  the  Church  of 
Paston  leaving  by  Mary  his  wife  (who  lived  his  widow  52  years  and  was  also 
buried  at  Paston)  a  son  and  heir  William  Paston  who  succeeded  his 
grandfather  in  his  inheritance,  and  had  livery  of  it  in  1554.  He  married 
Frances  daughter  of  Sir  Thomas  Clare  of  Stokesby  and  received  the  honour 
of  knighthood.  In  1572  or  before  that  year  he  sold  the  manor  to  Robert 
Jerny  of  Norwich.  The  manor  then  passed  to  Richard  Martyn,  a  member  of 
the  Martyn  family  of  Long  Melford  settled  there  before  the  time  of  Rich.  II. 

The  arms  of  the  Martyns  were  :  Argent,  a  chevron  between  three 
mascles,  sable,  all  within  a  bordar,  engrailled  gules  :  and  Crest  a  cocka- , 
trice's  head  between  two  wings.  Richard  Martyn  married  ist  Anne 
daughter  of  -  -  Eden  of  London  ;  2ndly  Elizabeth  daughter  of  John  Crane  of 
Chilton,  and  by  his  first  wife  had  Roger  Martyn  the  recusant  who  was  born 
in  1526.  In  the  second  year  of  Q.  Eliz.  Richard  Martyn  was  ordered  to 
send  a  horse  and  man  completely  armed  to  Newcastle  to  rendezvous  and 
march  against  the  French  and  Scots.  He  died  in  1572  and  the  manor  passed 
to  Roger  Martyn.  Roger  was  a  staunch  Roman  Catholic  and  eminent  as 
well  for  his  piety  as  his  liberality.  It  is  recorded  that  at  one  period  of 
bitter  persecution  he  was  obliged  to  hide  himself  during  the  daytime  under 
a  hay  rick,  but  so  popular  and  beloved  was  he  by  his  neighbours  and 
acquaintances  that  they  did  everything  in  their  power  for  his  security  and 
protection. 

He  was  a  person  of  great  learning  and  strict  integrity,  and  Queen  Mary, 
it  is  said,  offered  to  make  him  a  Secretary  of  State  but  he  declined  the 
honour.  His  answer  to  the  Queen  was :  "  that  for  himself  he  was  highly 


STANSTEAD.  209 

satisfied  with  the  sufficiency  God  had  bestowed  upon  him,  and  with  a  private 
life  ;  and  as  for  my  son,  he  will  inherit  a  competency  sufficient,  if  he  proves 
an  honest  man,  and  if  he  becomes  otherwise  it  will  be  far  too  much." 

If  one  may  venture  to  criticise  the  saying  of  so  pious  and  immaculate 
a  man  as  some  have  made  him  out  to  be,  the  reply  appears  somewhat 
selfish,  and  presumes  that  one  would  merely  take  upon  oneself  an  impor- 
tant office  for  the  public  good  from  mercenary  motives.  Sir  William 
Betham  declares  that  the  offer  was  made  to  Roger's  grandfather  and 
namesake,  whom  he  says  lived  to  near  one  hundred  years  of  age  and  died 
the  latter  part  of  Queen  Mary's  reign.  In  this  matter  we  have  followed 
Sir  William  Parker's  statement  in  his  History  of  Long  Melford  that  the 
honour  was  offered  to  Roger  Martyn  who  died  in  1615,  though  of  course  the 
answer  is  not  particularly  appropriate  to  a  young  man  of  eight  and  twenty 
who  most  likely  had  no  son  born  to  him  at  the  time  !  The  son  who  did 
succeed  him  was  born  five  years  after  Queen  Mary's  death.  Although  a 
proclaimed  recusant  the  respect  in  which  Roger  Martyn  was  held 
by  those  immediately  surrounding  was  such  that  he  did  not  experience 
those  hardships  which  in  those  days  so  many  of  his  co-religionists  had  to 
undergo. 

When  with  declining  years  he  was  unable  to  go  far  from  home  he  had 
a  whistle  to  his  cane  by  which  he  called  the  poor  to  him  to  receive  his  charity. 
He  died  Aug.  3  1615  aged  89,  and  the  manor  passed  to  his  son  and  heir 
Richard  Martyn. 

He  married  ist  Eleanor  daughter  of  Francis  Mannock  of  Gifford's 
Hall  in  Stoke  by  Nayland  by  whom  he  had  two  sons,  Roger  who  died 
young  and  Roger  his  heir  born  1584 ;  2ndly  Barbara  daughter  of  Thomas 
Daniel  of  Acton  by  whom  he  had  three  sons  and  one  daughter ;  and  srdly 
Alice  daughter  of  Edmund  Smith  of  Suffolk  by  whom  he  had  only  daughters 
who  all  died  without  issue.  He  died  the  8  March  1624  aged  65  and  was  buried 
at  Melford  with  his  wives  and  children  under  a  large  tomb,  and  the  manor 
passed  to  his  son  and  heir  Sir  Roger  Martyn.  He  was  knighted  in  1625  and 
was  a  recusant  as  were  his  fathers.  It  is  said  that  by  letters  patent  of  Charles 
I.  3  Jan.  1627,  the  statute  35  Eliz.  relating  to  recusants  was  in  his  case  in  a 
measure  relaxed.  He  was  a  Cavalier  and  so  suffered  in  the  rebellion  that 
he  afterwards  petitioned  both  Houses  of  Parliament  for  redress,  setting 
forth  in  his  petition  that  he  and  his  ancestors  had  lived  quietly  among 
.their  neighbours  in  Melford  for  about  300  years.  He  married  Anne  daughter 
of  Laurence  Samuel  Love  of  Sevenoaks  knt.,  and  had  7  sons  and  3 
daughters. 

In  the  Calendar  of  Pleadings  relating  to  the  Duchy  of  Lancaster  in 
1594  is  an  action  by  the  Attorney-General  v.  John  Beneshe  as  purchaser 
of  Stanstead  Hall  Manor  and  Brettenham  relating  to  royalties,  franchises, 
and  other  profits,  &c.'  This  action  however  probably  related  to  another 
Stanstead  Hall  near  Brettenham. 

Sir  Roger  Martyn  died  in  1656  aged  71,  and  the  manor  passed  to  his 
son  and  heir  Richard  Martyn  who  married  ist  Jane  daughter  of  Sir  H. 
Bedingfield  of  Oxburgh,  knt.,  by  whom  he  had  9  sons  and  i  dau. ;  2ndly 
Mary  daughter  of  John  TyndaU  of  Melford  by  whom  he  had  r  son  and 
3  daurs.  He  died  in  1673  and  was  succeeded  in  the  lordship  by  his  son  and 
heir  Sir  Roger  Martyn,  who  was  created  a  Baronet  on  the  28  March  1667. 

1  D.  of  Lane.,  Cal.  to  Plead.,  36  Eliz.  32. 

AI 


2io  THE  MANORS  OF  SUFFOLK. 

He  married  in  1663  Tamworth  dau.  of  Ed.  Homer  of  Mells  in  Somersetshire1 
by  whom  he  had  8  sons  and  10  daughters. 

He  died  the  8  July  1712  aged  73.  Sir  Roger  Martyn  purchased  an 
annuity  of  260  French  livres  for  ever  issuing  out  of  the  Bank  of  Paris,  and 
by  deed  the  2ist  March,  1709  directed  the  same  to  be  paid  to  some  priest 
of  the  Roman  Catholic  Church  for  him  to  distribute  one-third  part  thereof 
among  such  poor  Roman  Catholics  as  might  live  in  or  near  Melford  and  the 
remainder  to  the  said  priest  on  condition  that  he  resided  in  or  near  Melford 
and  never  failed  to  remember  in  the  oblations  of  holy  mass  the  dead  and 
the  living  of  the  donor's  family,  saying  before  or  after  mass  the  De  profundis 
with  the  proper  absolve  for  their  souls,  mentioning  the  last  of  the  deceased, 
and  should  make  a  more  especial  memory  upon  the  obiit  days  respectively 
of  himself,  his  ancestors,  his  lady,  children  and  descendants  who  should  be 
heirs  of  his  estate  and  Roman  Catholics  according  to  a  schedule  annexed, 
but  the  whole  number  of  souls  whose  obiits  were  to  be  commemorated  were 
never  at  any  time  to  exceed  twenty-four,  but  the  first  eleven  in  the  list 
and  the  eight  then  living  to  be  continuedin  perpetuity.  The  priest  was 
to  be  appointed  by  the  Provincial  of  the  English  Dominicans  for  the  time 
being.* 

It  might  strike  one  that  the  pious  founder  required  a  large  amount  of 
consideration  for  his  charitable  gift,  but  pious  persons  are  not  always 
the  most  liberal.  It  seems  as  if  two  such  excellent  qualities  are  too  good 
to  be  found  in  the  same  receptacle  ! 

Sir  Roger  Martin  2nd  Bart,  eldest  surviving  son  of  the  ist  Bart.,  married 
Anna  Maria  Harvey  by  whom  he  had  two  sons,  Roger  his  successor  and 
Richard.  Lady  Martin  died  at  Cambridge  May  15, 1739,  and  Sir  Roger  in 
May,  1742,  when  the  manor  passed  to  Sir  Roger  Martin,  3rd  Bart.,  who 
married  Sophia  daughter  of  Brigadier-General  Lewis  Mordaunt,  brother  to 
the  Earl  of  Peterborough,  by  whom  he  had  a  son  Mordaunt.  Sir  Roger 
Martin  died  in  1762  when  the  manor  passed  to  his  son  Sir  Mordaunt  Martin, 
4th  Bart,  who  married  Everilda  Dorothea  3rd  daughter  of  the  Rev.  William 
Smith,  Rector  of  Burnham,  Norf.  Sir  Mordaunt  Martin  died  in  1815,  but 
he  seems  to  have  sold  the  manor,  which  in  1829  ls  said  by  Kirby  to  have  been 
vested  in  Hart  Logan,  and  in  1844  by  Page  to  be  then  in  Edward  Starkie 
Bence.  E.  R.  S.  Bence  was  the  lord  in  1885  and  the  manor  is  now  vested  in 
Edward  Starkie  Bence  of  Kent  well  Hall. 

NETHERHALL  MANOR. 

This  manor  in  1219  was  held  by  William  de  Verdon  and  Maud  his  wife 
of  the  main  manor  and  these  individuals  had  also  a  part  of  the  advowson. 
In  1275  John  de  Verdon  had  the  manor,  and  married  Isabel  daughter  of 
Giles  de  Wachesham.  He  was  followed  in  the  lordship  by  his  son  and  heir 
John  de  Verdon  who  died  about  1301,  and  was  succeeded  by  his  son  and 
heir  Thomas  de  Verdon  who  died  in  1315,'  when  the  manor  passed  to  his 
son  and  heir  Sir  John  de  Verdon.  A  fine  was  levied  in  1325  of  the  manor  by 
this  John  de  Verdon  and  Agnes  his  wife  v.  Robert  Clypston  parson  of  the 
Church  of  Brynton/  and  Sir  John  de  Verdon  seems  to  have  married  again, 

1  By  Elizabeth  dau.  of  Sir  George  Hereby  •  Parker's  Hist,  of  Melford  p.  348. 

of  Thriburgh  in  Yorks,  Bart.,  and  '  Extent.     I. P.M.,  9  Edw.  II.  54. 

rehct  of  Sir  Francis  Fulgiums  who  '  Feet  of  Fines,  19  Edw.  II.  18. 
afterwards  by  a  3rd  marriage  was 
Viscountess  Monson,  and   her  4th 
husband  Sir  Adam  Felton. 


STANSTEAD. 


211 


for  in  1339  another  fine  of  this  manor  is  levied  by  this  same  Sir  John  de 
Verdon  and  Matilda  his  wife  v.  Master  Alan  de  Hotham.1  Sir  John  died  in 
1346  and  the  manor  passed  to  his  son  and  heir  Sir  John  de  Verdon.  He 
died  about  1392  leaving  a  daughter  married  ist  to  Sir  Hugh  Bradshaw  and 
2ndly  to  Sir  John  Pilkington  to  whom  the  manor  passed  in  right  of  his 
wife.  The  following  fines  were  levied  respecting  this  manor  between 
1396  and  1430  :  Ralph  Rokyngham  v.  Sir  Edmund  Neon  and  Isabella  his 
wife2 ;  Ralph  Rokynham  v.  Sir  John  Pilkyngton  and  Margaret  his  wife3 ; 
Sir  John  Pylkyngton  and  Margaret  his  wife  v.  Ralph  Rokyngham4; 
William  de  Lobenham,  Thomas  of  Hilton,  clerk,  and  Richard  Fethhyng- 
ham  chaplain  v.  Sir  John  de  Pilkyngton  and  Margaret  his  wife 
which  Edmund  Noon  (sic)  held  for  life5 ;  Sir  John  de  Pylkyngton  and 
Margaret  his  wife  v.  William  de  Lobenham,  Thomas  .  .  .  clerk,  and 
Rich.  Ferthynge  chaplain  which  Sir  Edmund  Noon  held  for  life6;  Ralph 
Birche,  William  Gannok  chaplain  and  Wm.  Tayllour  v.  Margaret  who  was 
wife  of  John  Pilkyngton,  Edmund  Pilkyngton  and  Robt.  Pilkyngton.7 
In  1419  Sir  John  Pilkington  granted  a  lease  to  Wm.  Clopton.  Margaret 
Pilkington  died  in  I437-8  In  1499  the  manor  was  vested  in  Sir  John 
Raynsford  and  on  his  death  passed  to  his  son  and  namesake  who  died 
without  issue.  The  manor  then  passed  to  Roger  Martin  probably  by  virtue 
of  a  fine  levied  by  him  in  1533  of  "  Stansted  Manor  "  against  Isabella 
Tressham  and  others.9  Roger  Martin  died  the  21  Nov.  1541'°  when  the 
manor  passed  to  his  son  and  heir  Richard  Martin.  Richard  Martin  was 
in  1569  called  upon  to  shew  title  to  "Stanstead  al.  Staynton  al.  Netherhall."11 
The  title  to  the  manor  subsequently  is  identical  with  that  of  Overhall  the 
main  manor. 

Abstract  of  bye-laws  of  Overhall  and  Netherhall  Manors  in  150-3 
1578  will  be  found  amongst  the  Additional  Charters  in  the  Brit.  Mus."  In 
the  Chancery  Proceedings  in  the  time  of  Q.  Elizabeth  will  be  found  an  action 
touching  the  fraudulent  possession  of  land  called  Syterches  parcel  of  Stan- 
stead  Manor  of  which  Henry  Bowley  was  seised  &c.13  And  also  somewhat 
later  a  claim  by  John  Wynche  son  of  John  Wynche  deceased  against 
Ambrose  Gallant  to  land  held  of  the  manor  of  Netherhall  in  Stanstead  by 
John  Wynche  dec.  who  devised  same  but  did  not  surrender  to  the  use  of  his 
will.'4 

Notes  respecting  Stanstead  Manor  about  1484  will  be  found  amongst 
the  MSS.  of  the  Brit.  Mus.15  and  a  lease  of  the  manor  in  1419  is  amongst 
the  Harleian  Charters  in  the  Brit.  Mus.16 

WOODHOUSE  MANOR. 

The  only  particulars  respecting  this  manor  are  gathered  from  the  Davy 
MSS.  in  the  Brit.  Mus.  It  is  in  these  stated  that  Henry  Rushbrook  and 
Alice  his  wife  and  Robt.  Hunter  enfeoffed  John  son  of  Wm.  Doreward, 
Robt.  de  Teye,  Rich.  Baynard,  Ralph  Chamberlayn  and  Nicholas  Peche, 
who  granted  in  1418  to  Robert  Hunter  and  Katherine  his  wife. 


'  Feet  of  Fines,  13  Edw.  III.  7. 

'  Feet  of  Fines,  20  Rich.  II.  2. 

3  Ib.  3. 

«  Ib.  6  Hen.  IV.  T4. 

s  Ib.  8  Hen.  IV.  32. 

6  Ib.  10  Hen.  IV.  i. 

'  Ib.  8  Hen.  VI.  12. 

8  I.P.M.,  15  Hen.  VI.  61. 


9  Fine,  Easter,  25  Hen.  VIII. 
°  I.P.M.,  35  Hen.  VIII.  129. 
1  Memoranda,  n  Eliz.  Pas.  Rec.  Rot.  63. 
*  Add.  Ch.  26072. 
'  C.P.  i.  73. 
M  C.P.  (29  Eliz.)  iii.  289. 

5  Add.  MSS.  27446. 

6  Harl.  54  H.  31. 


212  THE  MANORS  OF  SUFFOLK. 

We  meet  with  a  "  Woodhouse  Manor  "  in  the  Inquisition  post  mortem 
of  John  Wiseman  who  died  the  27  May  1555  leaving  a  son  and  heir  Edward 
Wiseman,  but  are  not  able  to  say  with  certainty  that  this  is  the  manor 
there  referred  to.1 


I.P.M.,  2  and  3  P.  and  M.  59. 


STOKE    BY    NAYLAND.  213 


STOKE  BY  NAYLAND. 

N  the  Confessor's  time  Robert  or  Rodbert  held  the  main 
manor  with  4  carucates  of  land  with  soc.  There  were  25 
villeins,  32  bordars,  8  slaves,  2  ploughteams  in  demesne, 
12  belonging  to  the  men,  25  acres  of  meadow  and  wood, 
and  60  hogs,  valued  at  10  pounds.  Also  a  church  living 
with  60  acres  of  free  land.  By  the  time  of  the  Norman 
Survey  the  value  of  the  manor  had  risen  to  twelve  pounds, 
and  there  had  been  added  to  it  a  ploughteam  in  demesne,  2  mills,  3  horses, 
8  beasts,  20  hogs,  70  sheep  and  4  goats,  but  the  villeins  had  come  down  to 
15,  the  bordars  to  23,  the  slaves  to  6,  and  the  ploughteams  of  the  men  to  7. 
The  same  Robert  had  also  in  this  place  n  freemen  by  commendation  and 
soc,  having  i  carucate  of  land  among  them  which  they  could  sell,  and  I 
freeman  with  12  acres  by  commendation  only  (for  the  soc  and  sac  belonged 
to  the  Abbot  of  St.  Edmund)  having  formerly  a  ploughteam  and  a  half, 
but  then  one  team  only.  The  value  was  30  shillings  and  it  paid  in  a  gelt 
20^.  The  extent  was  8  quarentenes  long  and  4  broad,  and  the  manor  was  one 
of  those  belonging  to  Suane  of  Essex.1 

At  a  later  period  this  manor  became  divided  into  seven — Tendring  Hall 
al.  Stoke  by  Nayland,  Giffard's  Hall,  Scotland  Hall,  Levenhey,  Causer's, 
Peacham's  and  Shardelowes,  and  Stoke  Rectory  Manors.  There  was  indeed 
an  eighth  manor  separately  entered  in  the  Domesday  Survey,  namely 
Withermarsh  Manor. 

TENDRING  HALL  al.  STOKE  BY  NAYLAND  MANOR. 

This  the  main  manor  passed  on  the  death  of  the  Domesday  tenant  to 
his  son  Robert  de  Essex,  and  at  his  death  to  his  son  Henry  who  forfeited  the 
same  in  1163  as  mentioned  under  Nayland.  In  1282  William  de  Tendring 
and  Beatrice  his  wife  levied  a  fine  against  Ralph  de  Berners  respecting  the 
manor,2  and  in  1285  the  said  William  de  Tendring  had  a  grant  of  free 
warren  here.3  This  William  and  his  wife  Beatrice  had  also  a  grant  of 
market  and  fair  here  in  1303 .4 

William  de  Tendring  died  in  1305,5  and  the  manor  passed  to  his  son 
Sir  John  Tendring,  and  on  his  death  before  1347,  to  Sir  William  Tendring, 
for  that  year  Sir  William  levied  a  fine  of  the  manor,  Ralph  de  Tendring  and 
Roger  parson  of  Parva  Brythe  Church  being  deforciants.6  Sir  William 
died  in  1375,  leaving  a  son  Sir  William  Tendring  who  succeeded  to  the 
lordship.  He  married  Catharine  Clopton  and  died  about  1421.  He  was 
buried  in  Stoke  by  Nayland  Church  and  upon  the  pavement  before  the 
high  altar  is  an  ancient  gravestone,  having  thereon  the  figure  of  a  knight 
in  complete  armour,  resting  his  head  upon  his  gauntlet,  with  this  inscription 
according  to  Weever :  "  Hie  iacent  tumulati,  dominus  Willelmus 
Tendring  miles  and  Katherina  Clapton  vxor  eiusdem  qui  obierunt  anno 
domini  1408. 

Sir  William  Tendring  left  an  only  daughter  and  heir  Alice  who  married 
Sir  John  Howard,  knt.  On  this  marriage  Sir  John  settled  on  his  wife  the 
manor  and  advowson  of  Fersfield  in  Norfolk,  with  Brokes  in  Suffolk,  the 

1  Dom.  ii.  401.  *  I.P.M.,  33  Edw.  I.  60. 

*  .Feet  of  Fines,  10  Edw.  1. 17.  6  George  de  Geddyngge,  App.  cl. ;  Feet  of 
3  Chart.  Rolls,  13  Edw.  I.  67.  Fines,  21  Edw.  III.  19. 

*  Chart.  Rolls,  31  Edw.  1. 17. 


214  THE  MANORS  OF  SUFFOLK. 

same  being  vested  in  Sir  Simon  de  Felbrigge,  John  de  Rochford,  and 
Michael  Beverleye,  Dean  of  Middelham  College  to  the  use  of  himself  and 
Alice  for  life  and  his  heirs  and  if  he  had  none  to  the  use  of  the  trustees' 
heirs.  The  deed  is  dated  at  Fersfield  1398.  Alice  Howard's  will  is  dated 
October  13  1426,  and  in  it  she  orders  her  body  to  be  buried  in  the  south  aisle 
of  the  Ch.  of  Stoke  Nayland  near  her  father  ;  to  which  church  she  bequeaths 
40$.  and  her  white  gown,  striped  with  gold.  She  also  bequeathed  the  like 
sum  to  the  friars'  convent  of  Calre,  to  the  monks  of  the  convent  of 
Bedingfield,  the  friars'  convent  of  Sudbury,  the  friars'  convent  of  Colchester, 
the  friars  predicants  of  Ipswich,  the  friars  minors  there  and  the  friars 
Carmelites  there  ;  and  the  friars  Augustine  of  Thetford.  She  constitutes 
three  chaplains  her  executors,  who  were  to  dispose  of  her  goods  for  the 
health  of  her  soul  as  they  saw  expedient.  She  devised  the  manors  of  Stoke 
Nayland  to  Sir  John  Howard  her  husband  for  life  with  remainder  to  Robert 
Howard  her  son  and  to  the  heirs  of  his  body ;  remainder  to  Henry  Howard, 
brother  of  the  said  Robert ;  remainder  to  Lady  Margaret,  wife  of  the  said 
Robert.  She  died  soon  after,  for  probate  of  her  will  was  granted  the  2Oth 
of  October  next  ensuing  the  date  of  her  will.  She  was  according  to  her  direc- 
tion buried  in  the  south  aisle  of  Stoke  Nayland  Church,  under  the  same 
stone  with  Sir  John  Howard  her  husband,  and  by  her  father  Sir  William 
Tendring.  In  the  east  window  of  the  south  part  of  the  church  are,  according 
to  Weever,  the  portraitures  of  Sir  John  Howard  and  his  wife  Alice,  with  the 
following  inscription :  Orate  pro  animabus  domini  Johannis  Howard 
et  dominoe  Aliciae  vxoris  eius.  Upon  a  fair  marble  though  much  defaced 
in  the  choir  :  Orate  pro  animabus  Johannis  Howard,  militis,  qui  obijt  Anno 
Dni.  14  .  .  .  et  Aliciae  vxoris  eius  qui  obijt  in  festo  Sancte  Luce  Evangeliste 
Anno  Dni.  1426  quorum  animabus  propitietur  Deus.  Amen.  On  Alice 
Howard's  death  in  1426  the  manor  passed  to  her  husband  for  life.  Sir 
Robert  Howard,  knt.  their  eldest  son  subsequently  inherited.  He  married 
Margaret  eldest  daughter  and  coheir  of  Thomas  Mowbray  Duke  of  Norfolk 
by  Elizabeth  his  wife  daur.  and  coheir  of  Richard  Fitzallen  Earl  of  Arundel 
and  cousin  and  coheir  of  John  Mowbray  Duke  of  Norfolk,  and  died  in  his 
father's  lifetime,  leaving  a  son  Sir  John  Howard,  who  was  the  first  Duke  of 
that  family.  Sir  John,  who  was  Sheriff  of  the  Counties  of  Essex  and  Hert- 
ford in  the  reigns  of  Hen.  IV.  and  Hen.  V.  did  not  die  as  Weever  states  in 
1400,  for  he  made  his  will  the  i  April  1435,  and  died  in  1437,  in  which  year 
his  will  was  proved.'  He  was  steward  of  the  Liberty  of  St.  Edmund's  Bury 
in  1399.*  On  Sir  John  Howard's  death  the  manor  passed  to  his  grandson 
Sir  John  Howard.  He  distinguished  himself  in  early  life  in  the  French 
wars  of  Hen.  VI.  In  the  latter  part  of  that  reign  he  accompanied  John 
Viscount  Lisle  to  Blay  with  22,000  men  and  was  present  when  the  valiant 
Earl  of  Shrewsbury  was  slain.  In  1442  he  was  sent  by  the  King  to  appease 
the  great  riot  in  Norwich,  and  being  a  great  support  to  the  Yorkists,  was 
in  1461  appointed  Sheriff  of  Norfolk  and  Suffolk,  Constable  of  Norwich 
and  Colchester  Castles  and  Carver  to  the  King.  In  1466  he  was  constituted 
Vice-Admiral  of  the  Counties  of  Norfolk  and  Suffolk,  and  the  following  year 
Treasurer  of  the  Household.  He  occupied  many  important  positions,  being 
joint  commissioner  to  treat  with  Burgundy  in  1472  and  1473,  and  with  France 
in  1475,  1477  and  1478.  In  1477  he  had  a  grant  of  the  office  of  Constable 
of  the  Tower  and  the  next  year  was  made  Captain-General  of  the  King's 
Fleet  against  the  Scots  and  was  also  installed  Knight  of  the  Garter. 

•  I.P.M.,  16  Hen.  VI.  56.  •  Placita  Coram  Rege,  i  Hen.  IV. 


STOKE  BY    NAYLAND.  215 

In  1478  and  1482  he  obtained  grants  of  market  and  fair  in  Stoke 
Nayland.1  In  consideration  of  his  great  services  he  had  granted  to  him 
from  the  Crown  in  special  tail  the  manors  of  Layham  and  Whersted, 
with  other  manors  in  the  counties  of  Essex,  Dorset,  and  Norfolk  which 
were  then  in  the  Crown  by  reason  of  the  attainder  of  John  Earl  of  Wiltshire. 
At  a  later  period  in  the  15  Edw.  IV.  Sir  John  Howard  was  further  rewarded 
with  a  grant  in  special  tail  of  the  manors  of  Preston,  Cokefield,  Aldham  and 
Mendham  then  in  the  Crown  by  the  attainder  of  John  de  Vere  Earl  of 
Oxford.  On  the  25  July  i  Rich.  III.  he  had  a  further  grant  of  lands  which 
included  the  manor  of  Lavenham.2 

On  the  28th  of  June  1483  he  was  created  Duke  of  Norfolk  and  Earl 
Marshal  of  England,  by  which  latter  office  he  was  empowered  to  grant  to 
any  person  or  persons  the  office  of  Marshal  of  the  King's  Bench,  or  Marshal 
of  the  Exchequer,  and  office  of  Marshal's  crier  before  the  Steward  and 
Marshal  of  the  King's  Household,  and  was  further  empowered  in  the  King's 
presence  or  absence  to  bear  a  golden  staff  tipped  at  each  end  with  black, 
the  upper  part  thereof  to  be  adorned  with  the  royal  arms,  and  the  lower 
with  those  of  his  own  family,  and  for  the  better  support  of  the  dignity  of 
the  office  he  received  a  grant  to  himself  and  his  heirs  for  ever  of  £20  annually 
out  of  the  fee  farm  rent  of  Ipswich.  He  was  present  with  Rich.  III.  at 
Bosworth  and  fell  leading  the  van  of  the  royal  army  22  August  1485.  He 
was  of  course  attainted  in  the  Parliament  held  7  Nov.  i  Hen.  VII. 

On  the  Patent  Rolls  in  1486  is  a  special  pardon  to  Thomas  Earl  of 
Surrey  al.  Thomas  Howard  late  of  Stoke  with  right  reserved  to  the  Crown 
to  imprison  him  during  pleasure  in  any  prison  which  it  may  select.3 

Sir  John  the  first  Duke  of  Norfolk  married  first  Catherine  daughter  of 
Richard  Lord  Molines.  She  died  in  1452  and  was  buried  in  Stoke  by 
Nayland  Church  between  the  high  altar  and  the  choir  where  a  monument 
was  erected  for  her  exhibiting  the  figure  of  a  lady  habited  in  a  hood  and 
gown  on  one  side  whereof  are  the  arms  of  Brotherton,  three  lions  passant 
gardant  or ;  the  arms  of  Howard,  gules,  a  bend  between  6  cross  crosslets 
argent,  and  a  lion  rampant  ducally  crowned.  Also  on  the  four  corners 
are  escutcheons  of  arms  :  On  the  right  next  her  head  four  coats  within  a 
garter  circumscribed  Honi  soit  Qui  mal  y  Pense,  i  the  arms  of  Brotherton, 
2  Howard,  3  Warren,  Chequy,  or  and  azure,  4  Mowbray,  a  lion  rampant 
argent.  On  the  sinister  side,  six  coats  impaling  wavy  of  six  (the  arms  of 
Molines)  i  Brotherton,  2  Howard,  3  Warren,  4  Brews  of  Gower,  azure,  a 
lion  rampant  and  semi  of  cross  crosslets,  or,  5  a  lion  rampant,  ducally  crowned, 
6  Mowbray.  At  her  feet  an  escutcheon  of  the  arms  of  Molines  on  the 
right ;  and  on  the  sinister  six  coats  Brotherton,  &c.,  as  before.  Beneath 
her  feet  is  the  following  inscription  :  Under  this  stone  is  buried  the  body  of 
the  right  honorable  woman  and  ladie  sometime  wife  unto  the  right  high  and 
mighty  prince  lord  John  Howard  Duke  of  Norfolke,  and  mother  unto  the 
right  noble  and  puissant  prince,  lord  Thomas  Howard  duke  also  of  Norfolke, 
which  lady  departed  this  present  life  Ann.  dom.  1452. 

The  Duke  married  2ndly  Margaret  daughter  of  Sir  John  Chetworth,  knt., 
who  survived  him  and  by  her  will  dated  May  13  1490  ordered  her  body  to 
be  buried  in  the  choir  of  the  Church  of  our  Lady  in  Stoke  Nayland  before 
her  image  on  the  side  of  the  high  altar.  She  appointed  that  immediately  after 
her  decease  her  executors  should  find  three  hundred  priests  to  say  ccc  masses 

1  Chart.  Rolls,  15,  22  Edw.  IV.  9.  *  pat.  Rolls,  I  Hen.  VII.   pt.  iii.   16  (12) ; 

'  Pat.  Rolls,  i  Rich.  III.  pt.  i.  8  ;  2  Rich.  Privy  Seal,  i  Hen.  VII.  No.  826. 

III.  pt.  ii. 


216  THE  MANORS  OF  SUFFOLK. 

and  diriges  for  her  soul,  within  eight  or  ten  days  after  her  decease.  Likewise 
that  they  should  find,  as  hastily  as  might  be,  two  virtuous  priests  to  sing  in 
the  Church  of  Stoke  for  the  space  of  three  years  for  her  soul,  the  souls  of  her 
husband,  John  Norreys  Esq.,  Nicholas  Wyfold,  and  all  others  to  whom  she 
was  beholden.  She  bequeathed  to  the  repair  of  the  church  v.  marks  and 
to  the  gild  of  St.  John  in  Stoke  xxs.  to  keep  her  obit  and  pray  for  her  ; 
xxvis.  &d.  to  the  house  of  St.  John  of  Colchester,  the  like  sum  to  the  nuns  of 
Brusyard  and  the  friars  of  Clare  ;  xxs.  to  the  house  of  St.  Buttolph's,  and  the 
like  sum  to  the  grey  friars  and  friars  of  Sudbury,  who  were  every  of  them 
to  keep  her  obit  and  pray  for  her.  She  bequeathed  to  her  daughter  the  Lady 
Berners,  and  to  her  son  her  husband  (sic)  all  her  household  goods  except  plate, 
as  also  what  belonged  to  her  chapel  with  the  chalice  ;  but  that  they  should 
have  of  her  plate  two  great  pots  of  silver,  two  flaggons,  and  vi.  great  bowls 
with  covers  ;  to  her  daughter  Marney  a  chain  of  water-flowers.  She  con- 
stituted Edmund  Daniel  and  Thomas  Swayne  vicar  of  the  church  of  Stoke 
Nayland  her  executors  and  her  lord  and  son  (in  law)  the  Earl  of  Surrey 
supervisor.  The  probate  bears  date  Dec.  3  1494. 

Though  the  first  Duke's  eldest  son  Thomas  Earl  of  Surrey  was  attainted, 
as  was  his  father,  we  find  on  the  Patent  Rolls  in  1486  a  special  pardon  to 
him  as  "  Thomas  Earl  of  Surrey  al.  Thomas  Howard  late  of  Stoke,"  but 
right  is  reserved  to  the  Crown  to  imprison  him  during  pleasure  in  any 
prison  which  it  may  select.1  The  Crown  exercised  its  pleasure  under  the 
reservation  by  keeping  the  Earl  in  prison  for  three  and  a  half  years  in  the 
Tower.  His  lordship  was  restored  in  1489  and  in  1503  was  constituted 
Lord  High  Treasurer  of  England,  and  Lord  High  Steward  for  the  trial  of 
Sir  Edward  Sutton,  Lord  Dudley  for  felony  committed  in  the  County  of 
Stafford.  In  1507  he  obtained  a  special  livery  of  all  the  manors  and  lands 
whereof  the  Duke  his  father  had  died  seised,2  and  in  1513  was  appointed 
Lieut. -General  of  the  North  and  Captain-General  of  the  Army.  His 
great  military  achievement  was  the  victory  at  Flodden  Field  Sept.  9  1514, 
where  the  Scots  were  defeated  and  their  sovereign  King  James  IV.  slain. 
In  this  battle  the  Scots  lost  the  Archbishop  of  St.  Andrews,  2  Bishops,  4 
Abbots,  12  Earls,  14  lords,  besides  knights  and  10,000  men.  This  great 
success  secured  for  the  Earl  the  Dukedom  his  father  had  enjoyed  and 
the  same  year  he  was  created  Duke  of  Norfolk  and  Earl  Marshal.  For 
his  services  against  the  Scots  he  had  a  special  grant  by  the  King's  order 
that  he  and  the  heirs  male  of  his  body  should  for  ever  bear  as  an  honourable 
augmentation  to  his  arms,  on  the  bend  of  the  Howards'  arms,  the  upper 
half  of  a  red  lion  (depicted  as  the  arms  of  Scotland  are)  pierced  through  the 
mouth  with  an  arrow.  In  1521  he  performed  the  office  of  Lord  High 
Steward  at  the  trial  of  Edward  Duke  of  Buckingham  and  gave  sentence  of 
death  upon  him,  but  not  without  tears  ;  and  in  1522  consoled  himself  by 
obtaining  a  grant  to  his  son  Thomas  Earl  of  Surrey  of  the  manors  of  Welles, 
Shyringham,  Stafford,  Bannyngham,  Warham  and  Weveton  in  the  County 
of  Suffolk  (sic)  with  the  advowson  of  the  churches,  part  of  the  said  Duke's 
lands.  He  resigned  the  office  of  Lord  Treasurer  of  England,  and  retired 
with  the  King's  permission  to  his  castle  at  Framlingham,  where  he  con- 
tinued to  reside  until  his  death.  He  married  ist  Elizabeth  daughter  and 
heir  of  Sir  Frederick  Tilney  knt.  and  widow  of  Humphrey  Bourchier  Lord 
Berners,  and  2ndly  Agnes  daughter  of  Hugh  Tilney  sister  and  heir 

1  Pat.  Rolls,   i  Hen.  VII.  pt.  iii.  16  (12) ;         •  Pat.  Rolls,  22  Hen.  VII.  pt.  iii. 
Privy  Seal,  I  Hen.  VII.,No.  826. 


STOKE    BY    NAYLAND.  217 

of  Sir  Philip  Tilney  of  Boston  in  Lincolnshire  knt.  By  his  will 
dated  the  last  day  of  May  1520  he  bequeathed  his  body  to  be  buried  in  the 
church  of  the  Priory  of  Thetford  before  the  high  altar  there,  appointing  that 
his  executors  should  cause  a  tomb  to  be  made  and  set  up  directly  with  the 
images  of  himself  and  Agnes  his  wife  thereon,  allowing  for  the  charge 
thereof  cxxxiii/.  vis.  viii^.  He  also  bequeathed  to  his  son  and  heir 
apparent  who  should  be  living  at  his  decease  his  great  hanged  bed,  paled 
with  cloth  of  gold,  white  damask,  and  black  velvet,  broidered  with  these 
two  letters  J  and  A,  as  also  one  suit  of  hangings  of  the  story  of  Hercules, 
made  for  the  great  chamber  at  Framlingham  in  Norfolk.  He  died  May 
the  21,  1524  at  his  castle  at  Framlingham  and  was  buried  in  the  Priory  of 
Thetford  according  to  his  desire,  with  great  solemnity.  The  manor  passed 
to  his  widow  Agnes  for  life.  It  seems  that  she  was  attainted  and  her  interest 
was  forfeited  to  the  Crown  ;  but  amongst  the  State  Papers  of  Hen.  VIII., 
in  1542,  is  the  notice  of  a  grant  for  life  to  her,  as  "  Agnes  duchess  of  Norfolk, 
widow,  of  Stoke  Hall  Manor,  of  lands  in  Stoke  Nayland,  Polstede,  Box- 
worth  and  Higham,  which  premises  the  said  Duchess  held  for  life  with  the 
remainder  to  Thomas  Duke  of  Norfolk  and  his  heirs,  forfeited  by 
attainder."1 

On  Agnes's  death  the  manor  passed  to  Thomas  Howard  3rd  Duke 
of  Norfolk,  who  was  Lord  Deputy  of  Ireland  in  1520,  High  Treasurer 
of  England  in  1522,  and  held  many  other  important  offices  of  State. 
He  attended  the  King  into  France  and  was  sent  chief  ambassador 
to  the  French  King  to  attend  him  to  Nice  and  commune  with 
the  Pope  as  to  his  delaying  King  Henry's  divorce.  In  1536  he  marched 
to  the  assistance  of  the  Earl  of  Shrewsbury,  when  he  suppressed  the  insur- 
rection in  Yorkshire  called  the  Pilgrimage  of  Grace,  raised  on  account  of  the 
dissolution  of  the  lesser  monasteries,  and  was  soon  after  made  Lieutenant- 
General  of  all  the  King's  forces  beyond  the  Trent.  He  was  High  Steward 
of  the  Liberty  of  Bury  St.  Edmunds,  and  joint  High  Steward  of  the 
University  of  Cambridge  in  1540.  But  after  all  his  great  services  to  the 
King  and  his  country,  the  King  was  so  far  misled  and  incensed  against 
him  by  the  insinuating  persuasions  of  some  of  the  nobility  who  bore  him  no 
good  will,  in  consequence  of  his  casual  expressions  as  to  newly  raised  up 
men,  that  he  not  only  sent  him  prisoner  to  the  Tower,  but  gave  order  for 
seizing  his  goods,  stating  to  his  ambassadors  abroad  that  the  Duke  and  his 
son  had  conspired  to  take  upon  themselves  the  government  during  his  (the 
King's)  life,  and  after  his  death  to  get  the  prince  into  their  hands.  The  Duke 
and  his  son  were  both  attainted  in  parliament ;  the  Earl  lost  his  head  and  the 
Duke  would  have  fared  no  better  had  not  death  cut  off  his  inexorable 
sovereign.  Sir  Walter  Raleigh  in  his  preface  to  his  History  of  the  World 
describes  the  Duke  as  exceeding  "  Valiant  and  advised,  whose  deservings 
King  Hen.  VIII.  knew  not  how  to  value  ;  having  never  omitted  anything 
that  concerned  his  own  honour  and  the  King's  service."  And  of  the  son  the 
Earl  of  Surrey  he  says,  "  he  was  no  less  valiant  than  learned,  and  of  excellent 
hopes."  The  bills  of  attainder  were  passed  but  8  days  before  the  King's 
death.  The  Lord  Paget  affirmed  in  the  House  of  Commons  in  the  ist  year 
of  Q.  Mary  that  upon  his  honour  the  King's  assent  was  never  given  to  the  bills, 
but  his  stamp  only  put  thereto,  which  was  done  by  William  Clark.  Not- 
withstanding the  death  of  the  King,  so  powerful  were  the  Duke's  enemies 
that  when  in  the  beginning  of  Edward  the  Sixth's  reign  pardon  was  given  by 

1  State  Papers  1542,  362  (58). 

Bl 


2i8  THE  MANORS  OF  SUFFOLK. 

proclamation  to  all  persons  for  all  crimes  whatsoever,  six  only  excepted,  he 
was  the  chief  of  the  excepted  persons.  As  to  the  particulars  laid  to  his 
charge  the  act  of  repeal  in  the  ist  of  Q.  Mary  recites  that  there  was  no  special 
matter  in  the  act  of  attainder,  but  only  general  words  of  treason  and  con- 
spiracy and  that  out  of  their  care  for  the  preservation  of  the  King  and  the 
prince  it  was  passed;  and  this  act  of  repeal  further  sets  out  that  "  the  only 
thing  with  which  the  Duke  stood  charged  was  bearing  of  arms  which  he 
and  his  ancestors  had  borne  both  within  and  without  the  kingdom  in  the 
King's  presence  and  in  sight  of  his  progenitors  which  they  might  lawfully 
bear  and  give,  as  by  good  and  substantial  matter  of  record  it  did  appear." 
It  also  adds,  that  the  King  died  after  the  date  of  the  commission,  but  did 
not  give  it  himself ;  moreover  that  the  King  did  not  sign  the  commission 
with  his  own  hand ;  his  stamp  being  only  set  to  it,  and  that  not  at  the 
upper  part,  but  to  the  nether  part  of  it,  contrary  to  the  King's  custom. 
On  the  attainder  all  the  manors  and  estates  of  the  duke  were  seised,  but 
the  effect  of  the  act  of  repeal,  was  to  restore  to  him  his  estates  without  any 
particular  pardon. 

On  the  insurrection  of  Sir  Thomas  Wyatt,his  Grace  raised  200  horse 
and  600  foot,  with  which  he  marched  from  London,  and  on  his  way 
to  Rochester  defeated  Knevit  who  was  marching  to  join  Wyatt.  His  forces 
however  deserted  him  later.  On  the  suppression  of  the  rebellion  the  Duke 
being  over  80  years  of  age  retired  to  his  seat  at  Kenninghall  in  Norfolk, 
where  he  died  the  25  Aug.  1554.  He  married  ist  the  Princess  Anne,  3rd 
daughter  of  Edw.  IV.,  and  2ndly  Lady  Elizabeth  Stafford  (eldest  daughter 
of  Edward  3rd  Duke  of  Buckingham),  by  whom  he  had  a  son  Henry,  the 
distinguished  poet  and  statesman  of  whom  Sir  Egerton  Brydges  says: 
"  Excellent  in  arts  and  in  arms,  a  man  of  learning,  a  genius,  and  a  hero  ; 
of  a  generous  temper  and  a  refined  heart ;  he  united  all  the  gallantry  and 
unbroken  spirit  of  a  rude  age  with  all  the  elegance  and  grace  of  a  polished 
era.  With  a  splendour  of  descent,  in  possession  of  the  highest  honours 
and  abundant  wealth,  he  relaxed  not  his  efforts  to  deserve  distinction  by 
his  personal  worth.  Conspicuous  in  the  rough  exercises  of  tilts  and 
tournaments,  and  commanding  armies  with  skill  and  bravery  in  expeditions 
against  the  Scots  under  his  father,  he  found  time,  at  a  period  when  our 
literature  was  rude  and  barbarous  to  cultivate  his  mind  with  all  the 
exquisite  spirit  of  the  models  of  Greece  and  Rome,  to  catch  the  excellencies 
of  the  revived  muses  of  Italy,  and  to  produce  in  his  own  language  com- 
positions which  in  simplicity,  perspicuity,  graceful  ornament,  and  just 
and  natural  thought,  exhibited  a  shining  contrast  with  the  works  of  his 
predecessors,  and  an  example  which  his  successors  long  attempted  in  vain 
to  follow." 

Henry  Earl  of  Surrey  married  Frances  daughter  of  John  Vere  15th 
Earl  of  Oxford,  by  whom  he  had  a  son  Thomas  who  succeeded  his 
grandfather  in  1554  as  4th  Duke.  The  unjust  condemnation  of  the  Earl 
of  Surrey  and  his  execution  is  well  known.  He  suffered  in  1547.  Thomas 
the  4th  Duke  suffered  a  like  unfortunate  end  with  his  distinguished  father, 
for  being  attainted  of  high  treason  in  consequence  of  communications 
made  with  Mary  Queen  of  Scots,  he  was  beheaded  the  2  June  1572,  but 
the  manor  was  acquired  the  previous  year  by  Sir  Thomas  Rivett,  Davy 
says  in  1563.  Sir  Thomas  Rivett  was  an  Alderman  of  London 
and  the  son  of  Thomas  Rivett  of  Stowmarket.  Sir  Thomas  levied  a 
fine  of  the  manor  in  1571  against  Thomas  Duke  of  Norfolk.'  Sir  Thomas 

•  Fine,  Mil;  13  Eliz. 


STOKE   BY   NAYLAND. 


219 


married  first  Alice  eldest  dau.  of  Sir  John  Cotton  of  Landwade  and  by 
her  had  3  daurs. — Mirabel  married  to  Charles  Heydon  of  Baconsthorpe 
Norf.  :  Alice  to  Thomas  son  and  heir  to  Sir  Gilbert  Jarrat  Master  of  the 
Rolls;  Isabel  who  died  an  infant.  Sir  Thomas  married  andly  Grissell 
daughter  of  William  Lord  Paget'of  Beaudesert  co.  Stafford  and  died  in 
1582  aged  63,  being  buried  in  the  chancel  of  the  Church  of  Chippenham, 
when  the  manor  passed  to  his  widow  who  remarried  Sir  William 
Waldegrave  knt.  of  Smallbridge.  She  died  the  2ist  July,  1600, 
when  the  manor  passed  to  Ann  (the  only  daughter  of  Sir  Thos. 
Rivett  by  his  2nd  wife),  married  to  Henry  Lord  Windsor  of  Bradenham 
co.  Buckingham  son  of  Edward  Lord  Windsor  and  Catherine  dau.  of 
John  E.  of  Oxford.  Henry  Lord  Windsor  died  in  1605,  aged  about  43,  and 
his  widow  the  27  November  1615  ;  and  there  is  in  the  Church  of  Nayland  a 
grand  monument  of  marble  to  her  memory.  She  is  represented  as  a 
Baroness  in  her  robes,  two  females  kneeling  at  her  head,  one  son  at  her  feet, 
with  the  following  inscriptions  :— 

Fuit  hrec  Anna  Tierona  omnibus  animae  virtutibus  corporisque 
dotibus  ornatissima,  erga  Deum  religiosa,  devota  erga  virum ;  in 
amando  constans,  in  Sanguine  conjunctos,  in  pios  praecipue  in  pauperes 
liberalitate  et  charitate  praecellens  insigni,  adeo  ut  mulierculis  pauper- 
tate  fractis  et  senio  confectis  in  refrigerium  hoc  hospitium  in  hoc 
oppidulo  struxit  Pensionem  annuatim  et  perpetuo  illis  providendam 
per  testamentum  pie  et  provide  curavit.  Denique  cum  ad  fatalem  suae 
senectutis  horam  quinquegenaria  aut  eo  circiter  pervenisset,  animam 
aeterno  nomini  firma  in  Christo  fide  placide  et  sauviter  redd  : 
Die  Novembris  27  Ann.  Salv.  1615. 

Dominus  Thomas  Windsor  Mrestissimus  filius  chariss  :  matri  hoc 
qualecunque  monumentum  cum  multis  lachrymis  officiosae  pietatis 
monumentum  devotissimfc  posuit  et  consecravit. 
Deo  opt.  max.  et  memoriae  Sacrum. 

Gloriosam  in  Christo  resurrect! onem  hie  expectat  Honoratissima 
D'na  Anna  Baronessa  Windesor  filia  et  una  haeredum  clarriss  :  viri 
Thomas  Rivett  Equitis  aurati  de  Cheepnum  in  com.  Cantabrig.  et 
hujus  maneni  de  Stoke  Nailand  D'ni  ex  secundis  nuptiis  Grisildse  filiae 
Honoratiss  :  D'ni  Gulielmi  Pagett  Baronis  de  Beudesert  praenobilis 
ordinis  Garteran  sodalis,  quatiior  Principibus  Henrico  Octavo, 
Edwardo  sexto.Mariae  et  Elizabeths,  in  sanctiusconsiliumMariasautem 
et  in  privati  sigilli  munus  asciti,  uxor  nobilis.  Baroriis  Henrici  Dn'i 
Windsor,  cujus  et  vidua  ad  extremum  usque  spiritum  intemerata 
remansit,  et  ex  cujus  connubio  mater  plurium  liberorum,  sed  reliquit 
tres  tantum  superstites,  Thomam,  scilicet  jam  Baronem,  utriusquc 
Parentis  fortunarum  et  honorum  filium  et  haeredem  digniss  :  et  duas 
Filias  unius  nominis,  Elizabethan!  seniorem  et  Elizabetham  juniorem. 
Hie  tumulata  jacet  pia,  provida,  pulchra,  pudica 

Religiosa  Deo  femina,  fida  viro, 
Indulgens  proli  miserisque  tenerrima  mater, 

Ut  quibus  et  moriens  hospita  tecta  dedit. 
Chara  suis,  dilecta  bonis  et  arnica  propinquis, 

Moribus,  ingenio,  dote,  decore  potens. 
NobUitate  nitens  triplici  natique  virique 

Et  quia  Pagetti  filia,  mater  erat. 

Cuique  eques  auratus  pater  ;   heu.  non  prorogat  sevuin, 
Huic  genus  aut  virtus  ;  hie  tumulata  jacet. 

The  following  arms  appear  on  the  tomb  :   i   Arms  of  Windsor.    Gules 
a  saltire  Argent  between  twelve    cross-crosslets    or,  impaling  Samborne, 

1  Though  held  in  high  honour  by  Hen.  VIII.  he  lost  his  credit  with  Edw.  VI.  who 
degraded  him  from  his  knighthood  of  the  Garter  upon  pretence  that  he  Was  defective 
in  blood  and  arms  for  3  descents.  Q.  Mary  however  restored  him  and  he  died  a 
zealous  R.  Catholic  in  1563  and  was  buried  at  Drayton  ab.  16  miles  from  London. 
A  monument  since  destroyed  was  erected  to  his  memory  in  Lichfield  Cathedral. 


220  THE  MANORS  OF  SUFFOLK. 

Argent  a  chevron  sable  between  three  mullets  gules.  2  Windsor  impaling 
Blount,  Sable  two  bars  nebulyor.  3  Windsor  impaling  Rivett ,  Argent  three 
bars  sable  in  chief  as  many  trivets  of  the  last.  4  Windsor  impaling  Vere, 
Earl  of  Oxford,  Quarterly,  gules  and  or,  in  the  first  quarter  a  mullet  of  the 
second.  5  Rivett  impaling  Raven,  Or  on  an  orb  gules  a  raven  proper.  6 
Rivett  impaling  Pagett,  Sable  on  a  cross  engrailed  between  four  eagles  dis- 
played argent,  five  lions  passant  guardant  of  the  field.  7  Pagett  impaling 
Preston,  Argent  two  .bars  gules,  on  a  canton  of  the  last  a  cinquefoil  of  the 
first.1 

Thomas,  Lord  Windsor  son  and  heir  was  lord  in  1655.  He  sold  to 
Thomas  (?)  Williams,  whose  son  andheir  Sir  John  Williams  was  Lord  Mayor  of 
London  in  1736,  and  built  the  present  mansion,  which  by  purchase  passed  with 
the  manor  to  Sir  Wm.  Rowley  K.B.  a  distinguished  naval  commander,  a 
lord  of  the  Admiralty  in  1751  and  Admiral  of  the  Fleet  in  1762.  He  married 
Arabella  daughter  and  heir  of  George  Dawson,  captain  in  the  army,  and 
dying  in  1763  was  succeeded  by  his  son  Joshua  Rowley,  Rear-admiral  of  the 
Red  Squadron  of  his  Majesty's  Fleet,  who  giving  many  proofs  of  courage 
and  conduct  during  his  long  services,  was  created  a  Baronet  the 
10  June  1786.  He  married  Sarah  daughter  and  heir  of  Bartholomew 
Burton,  and  dying  the  26  Feb.  1590  the  manor  passed  to  his  eldest  son 
Sir  William  Rowley  2nd  Bart,  after  which  the  devolution  is  identical  with 
Nayland  Manor. 

There  is  in  the  Record  Office,  a  Parliamentary  petition  of  one  James 
Phenw  relating  to  the  manor.7  And  on  the  Patent  Rolls  is  a  grant  in  1300  for 
life  to  William  Crisp  of  the  custody  of  the  park  of  the  manor  with  2d.  a  day 
out  of  the  issues.3  Also  on  the  Patent  Rolls  of  1303  is  a  grant  to  Margaret 
Queen  of  England  of  I28/.  6s.  lod.  for  arrears  of  farm  of  manor.4  Also  on 
the  Close  Rolls  in  1328  is  a  Survey  of  the  King's  mills  of  the  manor.5 

A  manor  called  Stoke  Nayland  Manor  without  any  distinguishing 
name  is  mentioned  from  the  time  of  Edw.  III.  to  the  reign  of  Hen.  VIII. 
This  belonged  to  Geffrey  le  Scrope,6  who  was  in  17  Edw.  III.  constituted 
Chief  Justice  of  the  Court  of  King's  Bench,  but  resigned  his  judicial  office 
on  going  abroad  on  the  King's  affairs.  He  attained  the  rank  of  banneret 
and  married  Ivetta  daughter  of  William  Rosse  of  Igmanthorpe.7  He  died 
about  1340,  and  this  manor  passed  to  his  son  Henry  le  Scrope,  who  in  the 
early  part  of  the  reign  of  Edw.  III.  was  engaged  in  the  Scottish  wars  and 
was  summoned  to  Parliament  as  a  Baron. 

On  the  Patent  Rolls  of  Hen.  VI.  it  is  stated  that  this  Henry  le 
Scrope  had  the  manor  by  gift  of  John  de  Gunwardeby  in  1351  by  name  of 
"  all  his  manor  of  Neyland  with  its  members  in  Stoke  .  .  .  Wyslon 
and  Levenesheth  whereof  120  messuages  10  tofts,  200  acres  of  land  10  of 
meadow,  100  of  pasture  and  20/."  As  Geffrey  le  Scrope  had  the  manor 
prior  to  1335  this  deed  of  gift  in  25  Edw.  III.  seems  strange,  but  possibly 
one  of  the  parties  had  a  limited  interest  only.  In  the  Inquis.  p.m.  of 
Lord  le  Scrope  in  1392  part  only  of  the  manor  seems  to  be  included  and 
an  extent  given.  Lord  le  Scrope  served  as  an  ambassador  and  was 
one  of  those  selected  to  negotiate  with  Charles  King  of  Navarre, 
touching  a  league  between  that  prince  and  Richard  II.  He  died  1391  and 
was  succeeded  by  his  son  Sir  Stephen  le  Scrope  2nd  Baron.  He  was 

1  Suffolk  Institute,  vol.  iv.  pp.  194,  195.         *  Close  Rolls,  18  Edw.  II.  12. 
'  No.  6703  D.K.R.  34.    App.  p.  115.  *  See  Nayland  Manor  in  this  Hundred. 

•  Pat.  Rolls,  28  Edw.  I.  12.  '  I.P.M.,  9  Edw.  III.  (and  nos.)  32. 

4  Pat.  Rolls,  31  Edw.  I.  34. 


o 

d 

X 

I 

_ 

3 


STOKE   BY   NAYLAND.  221 

knighted  for  his  services  during  his  father's  lifetime,  and  married  Margery 
widow  of  John  son  of  Sir  William  de  Huntingford  knt.,  and  dying  in  1406 
the  manor  passed  to  his  eldest  son  Henry  3rd  Baron,  who  was  found 
guilty  of  high  treason  as  mentioned  in  the  account  of  Nayland  Manor,  and 
lost  his  head  in  the  month  of  August  1415.  He  married  ist  Philippa 
daughter  of  Sir  Guy  de  Brian,  and  2ndly  Joane  Duchess  of  York,  sister  and 
coheir  of  Edmund  Holland  Earl  of  Kent,  but  had  no  issue.  He  was 
succeeded  by  his  brother  Sir  John  Scrope  who  obtained  from  the  King  a 
grant  of  the  lands  which  had  gone  to  the  Crown  on  the  attainder  of  his 
brother  Henry  Lord  Scrope  to  hold  for  4  years,  and  later  obtained  a 
restoration  of  the  inheritance.  In  1425  a  commission  was  constituted  to 
determine  whether  this  manor  had  been  entailed  on  Henry  Lord  le  Scrope 
his  grandfather  and  the  heirs  of  his  body  and  whether  he  (Sir  John)  was 
entitled  notwithstanding  the  forfeiture  for  high  treason  3  Hen.  against 
Henry  Lord  le  Scrope.1  The  manor  is  mentioned  in  the  Inq.  p.m.  of  Sir 
John  Wingfield  in  1480,*  and  was  in  1545  granted  to  John  Foster  and 
Richard  Marden.3  It  is  apparently  the  manor  in  respect  of  which  a  fine  was 
levied  in  1576  by  John  Ive  and  others  against  William  Dawtrey  junior, 4  and 
in  1582  by  Edward  Rookewood  against  Sir  Thomas  Danby  (?  Dantrey).5 

Arms  of  Rowley  :    Argent  on  a  bend  engrailed  between  two  crows, 
sable,  three  escallops  of  the  field. 

GIFFORD'S  HALL. 

In  1281  the  Patent  Rolls  show  that  there  was  an  action  pending 
between  Roger  le  Chaumberleyn  and  Thomas  Gifford  touching  a  way 
stopped  in  Stoke,'  and  in  1287  Wm.  Gifford  had  a  grant  of  free  warren  here. 
On  his  death  in  1310  the  manor  passed  to  Thomas  Gifford,  on  whose  decease 
in  1318  it  passed  to  his  son  and  heir  William  who  had  a  grant  of  free  warren 
and  presented  to  Nayland  in  1312,  1328,  and  1340.  Robert  Gifford  was  the 
next  lord  and  he  presented  to  the  living  in  1353.  In  1377  Simon  Burley 
held  the  manor,  and  had  a  grant  of  free  warren.7  '  The  following  year,  being 
a  knight,  he  levied  a  fine  of  the  manor  against  Robert  Crull  clerk,  William 
Reade  clerk  and  John  Chaumberleyn  chaplain.9  The  manor  next  passed  to 
John  Withermarsh  who  died  in  1395,  and  it  went  to  his  son  and  heir  Richard 
Withermarsh  who  in  1427  levied  a  fine  of  the  manor  and  the  manors  of 
Holton  Hall  and  Ingrames  and  the  advowson  of  Holton  Church 
against  William  Stonham  of  Hadleigh  and  Margaret  his  wife,  Nicholas 
Colloppe  of  Aldham  and  Cristine  his  wife,  and  William  Mathe  ....  of 
Langham.10  In  1428  Philip  Mannock  purchased  the  manor  from  the 
Crown  and  that  family  held  the  same  subsequently  for  many  generations. 
The  Mannocks  had  resided  in  the  neighbourhood  since  the  time  of  Edw. 
III.  and  are  stated  to  have  come  originally  from  Denmark  and  to  have 
flourished  in  this  country  under  the  Danish  kings.  On  Philip  Mannock's 
death  the  manor  passed  to  his  son  and  heir  John  Mannock  who  married  the 
daughter  of  Sir  Thos.  Waldegrave  knt.  and  had  a  son  George  who  succeeded 
his  father  at  his  death  in  1476."  George  Mannock  married  Katherine 
daughter  of  Sir  Wm.  Waldegrave  knt.  and  dying  in  1541  the  manor  passed  to 
his  eldest  son  William  Mannock.  In  1549  William  levied  a  fine  of  the  manor 

'  Pat.  Rolls,  3  Hen.  VI.  pt.  i.  8d.  '  Chart.  Rolls,  i  Rich.  II.  5. 

'  I.P.M.,  2i  Edw.  IV.  59.  "  Gyffords  and  Hallymote  Manor,  Wattis- 

3  Originalia,  37  Hen.  VIII.  5  Pars  Rot.  117.  field,  in  Blackbourn  Hundred. 

4  Fine,  Hil.  18  Eliz. ;  Mich.  18, 19  Eliz.  9  Feet  of  Fines,  3  Rich.  II.  13. 

5  Fine,  Easter,  24  Eliz.  10  Fine,  5  Hen.  VI.  21. 

'  Pat.  Rolls,  9  Edw.  I.  gd.  "  I.P.M.,  16  Edw.  IV.  76. 


222  THE  MANORS  OF  SUFFOLK. 

against  Francis  Mannock,' and  married  Audrey  daughter  of  John  Alington, 
and  sister  of  the  last  Sir  Giles  Alington  of  Horseheath  co.  Cambridge.  He  died 
the  8  July  1558,*  when  the  manor  passed  to  his  son  and  heir  Francis  Mannock. 
In  the  Inquisition  post  mortem  of  the  last-mentioned  Wm.  Mannock  it  is 
set  forth  that  he  died  seised  of  the  manor  of  Holton  Hall,  Raymes,  Giffords, 
and  Chamberlains  in  Stoke  Neyland,  and  that  Francis  Mannock  his  son  and 
heir  was  five  years  old.  The  following  year  a  fine  was  levied  in  respect 
of  all  these  manors  by  John  Wynterflod  against  the  said  Francis  Mannock.5 
Francis  Mannock  levied  a  fine  of  the  manor  in  1569  against  Robert  Bell 
and  others/  and  in  1570  was  called  upon  to  shew  by  what  title  he  held  this 
manorand  also  the  Rectory.'  Francis  married  Mary  daughter  of  William  Fitch 
of  Canfield  co.  Essex  and  dying  on  the  3  November  1590  in  his  68th  year 
was  buried  in  the  Church  of  Nayland.  Upon  a  plate  of  brass  on  the  north 
aisle  of  the  chancel  is  the  following  : — 

Quid  dant  Divitia;  Crassi,  Craesive  Talenta  ? 
Quid  juvat  immensus  tantus  et  orbis  honor  ? 
Oiniu'a  vilescunt,  quze  more  rapit  ore  voraci  : 
Virtutis  solids;  Vita  perennis  erit. 


GIFFOID'S  MAI  L 

The  manor  passed  to  Francis's  eldest  son  William.  He  was  a  recusant, 
and  in  1596  Queen  Elizabeth  let  to  R.  Croft  two-thirds  of  the  estate  "  in  the 
possession  of  William  Mannock  guilty  of  recusancy."  In  1602  King  James 
the  First  granted  a  general  pardon  for  all  crimes  and  forfeits  to  the  said  Wm. 
Mannock,but  in  1612  two-thirds  of  the  estate  were  again  forfeited  for  recusancy. 
William  married  Audrey  eldest  daughter  of  Ferdinand  Parys  ofLinton  co. 
Cambridge,  and  died  the  24  March  1616  aged  60  ;  and  in  the  Church  of  Stoke 
by  Nayland  is  a  stone  to  his  memory  without  any  brass  thus  inscribed  : — 

Hie  jacet  antiqua  ducens  ab  origine  gen  tern 

Mannockus  priscis  adnumerandus  avis  ; 
Qui  Gulielmus  erat  Francisci  maximus  revo 

Filius,  ac  hseres  jure  tenebat  opes. 
Unica  multiplici  faciebat  prole  beatuin 

Uxor,  et  ilia  uno  consociata  virp. 
De  liberis  propero  cessit  pars  maxima  letho, 

Filia  j  am  superest  fratribus  una  tribus. 
En  !  ut  quisque  pias  tollens  ad  sidera  palmas 

Unanimo  tantos  lundat  ab  ore  sonos, 
"  Sit  requies  animx  "  veniens  hoc  turba  precetur 

Quid  vetat  extinctis  mitia  vota  dare  ? 
Obiit  24  die  Martii,  Anno  1616,  aetatis  suse  60. 

Fine,  Mil.  3  Edw.  VI.  4  Fine,  Hil.  n  Eli*. 

I.P.M.,  5  and  6  P.  and  M.  65.  5  Memoranda,  12  Eliz.  Hil.  Rec.  Rot.  46. 

J  Fine,  Hil.  i  Eli*. 


STOKE   BY   NAYLAND.  223 

He  was  followed  by  his  son  and  heir  Sir  Francis  Mannock  created  a  Bart, 
by  Chas  I.  in  1627.  The  very  same  year  however  an  Inquisition  was  ordered 
to  be  taken  of  his  estate  for  recusancy.  He  married  Dorothy  daughter  of 
William  Sanders  of  Wilford  co.  Northampton  and  died  the  20th  November 
1634  aged  49.  There  is  a  monument  of  various  marbles  to  his  memory  in 
Nayland  Church  against  the  north  wall  with  the  inscription  : — 

In  pious  and  deserved  memory 
of  Sr  Francis  Mannock  Baronet 

Whose  Ancestors  long  since  derived  from  Denmark  and  in 

England  called  Lords  of  Mannock's  Manor  (now  called  great 

Gravensden  in  the  Countie  of  Huntington)  the  still  continued 

Inheritance  of  theyr  Families  :  have  also  for  many  ages  been  Lords 

and  Inhabitants  of  this  Manor  of  Gifford's  Hall  in  this  Parish. 
Whose  religious  Conversation  made  him  reverenced  of  all :  whose  Candor 

of  mind,  Sweetness  of  Manner,  generous  Hospitalitie,  made 
his  Life  loved  and  honoured  by  the  Rich  ;  whose  bountifull  Charitie  made 
his  Death  lamented  by  the  Poor. 

Eccl"5.  viii ; 

Sunt  optanda  magis  purae  bona  nomina  vitse 
Nobilis  unguenti  quam  pretiosus  odor. 

On  a  marble  slab  with  a  figure  in  brass  of  a  female  is  this  inscription 
to  his  wife  : — 

D.  O.  M. 

Atrato  hoc  marmore  velatur  et  ssepe  ad  invidiam  dolentium 
defletur  humanitus  perillustris  fseminse  et  elegantis  Dorothae  Sanders  : 
conjux  fuit  nobilissimi  viri  Francisci  Mannock  Baronetti  quern  prole 
beavit  mascula,  et  ne  sexus  videretur  oblita  sui,  filiam  reliquit  in  cunis 
Annam. 

Lugent  nee  immerito  talem  maritus  conjugem,  filii  talem  matrem, 
Lugebit  et  olim  filia  orbitatis  conscia,  nee  est  qui  non  lugebit,  novit  qui 
datum  tamque  cito  repetitum  hoc  donum  Dei. 

Debitum  na'ae  (naturae)  Solvens  exivit 
Septimo  eid.  Julij  anno  Incarnati  verbi. 

MDCXXXII. 
Suae  aetatis  42.    Conjugii  24. 

Sir  Francis  left  three  sons,  Sir  Francis  Mannock  to  whom  the  manor  passed, 
John  and  William,  and  one  dau.  Anne.  The  second  Sir  Francis  married  Mary 
eldest  dau.  of  Sir  George  Heneage  of  Hainton  in  the  county  of  Lincoln  knt. 

Sir  Francis  and  his  lady  are  both  stated  to  be  recusants  in  the  State  Papers 
in  1639,'  and  in  1649  Sir  Francis's  estate  being  under  sequestration  Sir  George 
Heneage  his  son-in-law  entered  upon  part  in  order  to  raise  money  for  the 
younger  children's  portions.  In  1650  a  decree  was  made  of  the  Committee 
of  the  House  of  Commons  for  levying  the  sequestration  and  ordering  the 
judgments  of  the  visitation  of  Sir  George  Heneage  for  provision  for  the 
children  with  orders  to  bring  them  up  in  the  Protestant  religion.  Amongst 
the  State  Papers  is  an  order  this  year  summoning  Sir  Francis  to  shew  cause 
why  his  estate  settled  on  Sir  George  Heneage  (his  wife's  father)  should  not  be 
sequestered.1  In  1658  Richard  Cromwell  granted  a  release  of  the  estate 
sequestered  for  recusancy  to  Richard  Waterman  on  the  payment  to  the 
Exchequer  of  one  hundred  and  fifty  pounds  yearly. 

On  the  death  of  Sir  Francis  Mannock  in  1687  the  manor  passed  to  his 
son  and  heir  Sir  William  3rd  Bart,  who  dying  in  171^  the  manor  passed  to 
Sir  Francis  Mannock  4th  Bart,  who  dying  in  1758  it  passed  to  Sir 
William  Mannock  5th  Bart.  On  the  death  of  Sir  William  in  1764  the  manor 
passed  to  his  son  and  heir  Sir  Wm.  Anthony  Mannock  6th  Bart,  and  on  his 
death  in  ±776  to  his  uncle  Sir  Francis  Mannock  7th  Bart,  who  died  in  1778 
without  issue  leaving  Thomas  his  brother  and  heir  who  succeeded  to  the 

'  State  Papers,  1639,  427.  a  State  Papers,  Cal.  of  Compounders,  1650,2230. 


224  THE  MANORS  OF  SUFFOLK. 

title  as  8th  Bart,  and  died  in  1781  without  issue  when  the  manor  passed 
to  Sir  George  the  gth  Bart,  who  was  killed  by  the  overturning  of  the  Dover 
mail  June  3, 1787,  and  dying  without  issue  the  baronetcy  expired. 

The  manor  in  1787  came  into  the  possession  of  William  Comyns  who 
assumed  the  name  of  Mannock.  He  died  in  1819  leaving  no  issue  and  the 
manor  devolved  upon  Patrick  Power,  who  likewise  assumed  the  name  of 
Mannock  by  royal  licence  in  1830.  The  connection  of  the  Powers  with 
the  Mannocks  arose  through  marriage  with  the  Strickland  family.  Patrick 
Mannock  married  Catherine  daughter  of  Nicholas  Power. 

Gifford's  Hall  is  a  fine  remnant  of  a  baronial  residence,  part  dating 
from  the  time  of  Hen.  VI.  The  gateway  which  is  castellated  is  stated  to 
have  been  erected  by  Peter  Gifford,  a  distant  relative  of  AnneBullen.  The 
house  surrounds  a  quadrangular  court.  The  mouldings  and  spandrels  of 
the  doorways  are  fashioned  in  brick.  Opposite  to  the  entrance  are  some 
remains  of  an  old  chapel.  The  dining  hall  has  a  fine  open  timber  roof 
and  minstrels'  gallery.  The  Hall  is  owned  and  now  occupied  by  James 
Winter  Brittain. 

In  a  paper  in  the  Proceedings  of  the  Suffolk  Institute  (vol.  iv.  p.  198) 
it  is  said  that  Peter  Giffard  in  the  reign  of  Hen.  III.  probably  built  the 
older  part  of  the  present  mansion,  the  hall  with  its  fine  oak  roof  and  the 
butteries.  "  These,"  says  the  writer,  "  are  of  earlier  date  than  the  entrance 
tower  ;  this  which  is  of  brick  with  the  moulding  of  the  windows,  the  doors 
and  the  arch  over  the  door  is  of  the  Tudor  age  and  must  have  been  built 
by  the  Mannocks.  Opposite  the  entrance  are  the  remains  of  an  old  chapel 
dedicated  to  St.  Nicolas.  Richard  Constable  in  the  year  1216  built  this 
chapel  close  by  his  house.  It  was  amply  endowed  by  his  son  William 
Constable." 

Arms  of  Mannock  :   Sable,  a  cross  formec  flory  arg. 

LEVENHEY  al.  NETHERHALL  MANOR. 

From  the  Domesday  tenant  this  manor  passed  to  his  son  R.  de  Essex, 
and  his  son  Henry  forfeited  in  1165.  It  next  appears  to  have  belonged 
to  William  de  Crikett  and  to  have  passed  from  him  to  his  son  William  who 
died  in  1298.  He  was  succeeded  by  his  son  William  de  Crickett  and  he  and 
his  wife  Joan  had  free  warren  here  in  1309,  in  which  year  he  died  and  was 
succeeded  by  his  son  William  de  Crickett  who  died  in  1343,  when  the  manor 
passed  to  his  son  Sir  William  de  Crickett  who  died  in  1354,  when  it  went  to 
his  son  and  heir  William  de  Crickett  who  died  without  issue. 

In  the  time  of  Hen.  VI.  the  manor  was  vested  in  Sir  Richard  Walde- 
grave,  at  whose  death  it  went  to  his  brother  Sir  Thomas,  and  at  his  death 
to  his  son  and  heir  Sir  William.  Sir  William  Waldegrave  died  the  30  Jan. 
1527,'  and  the  manor  passed  to  his  son  and  heir  George  Waldegrave  who 
died  the  8  July  1528,"  when  it  went  to  his  son  and  heir  Sir  William.3  Sir 
William  Waldegrave  died  the  7  Nov.  1554,'  when  the  manor  vested  in  his 
son  and  heir  Sir  William  Waldegrave.  A  fine  however  was  levied  of  the 
manor  in  1548  by  Ralph  Gyfford  against  John  Beaumonte  and  others,5 
and  in  1551  by  the  said  Ralph  Gyfford  against  George  Foster  of  a  moiety.6 
In  1574  we  find  amongst  the  Chancery  Pleadings  relating  to  the  Duchy  of 
Lancaster  an  action  by  Edward  Baeshe  against  Thomas  Revett  "  as  grantee 

•  I.P.M.,  19  Hen.  VIII.  44.  «  I.P.M.,  i  and  2  P.  and  M.  92: 

'  I.P.M.,  20  Hen.  VIII.  18.  »  Fine,  Trin.  2  Edw.  VI. 

]  I.P.M.,  20  Hen.  VIII.  18,  •  Fine,  Easter,  5  Edw.  VI. 


STOKE   BY  NAYLAND. 


225 


of  the  Crown  on  attainder  of  the  Duke  of  Norfolk  as  to  lands  in  Netherhall 
in  Stoke  Manor."1  Amongst  the  Additional  Charters  in  the  Brit.  Mus. 
is  a  precipe  on  a  covenant  in  1593  concerning  "  Lavenhey  al.  Netherhall 
Manor  in  Stoke  by  Nayland,"2  which  fine  was  duly  levied  the  same  year 
by  Thomas  Hopper  against  Sir  W.  Waldegrave  and  others.3  In  1620  the 
manor  appears  to  have  become  vested  in  Geoffrey  Little  sen.  and  Geoffrey 
Little  jun.,  and  later  to  have  passed  to  Sir  Joshua  Rowley  who  died  in 
1798,  after  which  the  descent  of  the  manor  is  identical  with  that  of  the  main 
manor. 

Amongst  the  Harleian  Charters  in  the  Brit.  Mus.  is  a  lease  of  land  in 
;<  Levenhey  in  Stoke  Nayland  "  by  St.  Osyth  Priory  early  I3th  cent.  ;4  and 
in  the  Record  Office  a  fine  between  John  Beaumont  and  others  quser. 
and  John  Peryent  and  other  def.  of  one-third  of  this  manor,5  and  another 
between  Rad.  Gyfford  quaer.  and  John  Beaumont  and  others  def.  of  half 
of  the  manor  in  I548.6 

SCOTLAND  HALL  MANOR. 

John  de  Scotland,  who  held  this  lordship,  died  in  1334,  and  it  then 
passed  to  his  son  and  heir  William  de  Scotland  by  deed  9  Edw.  III.  [1335] 
who  gave  it  to  his  mother  Margaret  who  remarried  Robert  de  Roke- 
wode,  and  they  held  it  in  1357.  It  passed  to  Thomas  de  Rokewode  son 
and  heir  of  Robert  in  1359  and  he  died  without  issue,  when  it  went  to  his 
brother  and  heir  John.  John  de  Rookwode  represented  the  county  in 
Parliament  in  the  34  and  42  years  of  Edw.  III.  [1360  and  1369].  He 
married  Joan  dau.  of  Sir  Robert  Swynborne.  On  John  de  Rookwode's 
death  the  manor  passed  to  his  son  and  heir  John  de  Rookwode  who  married 
Eleanor  daughter  of  Sir  William  Burgate  and  Eleanor  Vis-de-Lau.  This  last 
John  died  without  issue.  The  last  John  Rokewode's  brother  William 
Rokewode  of  Stanningfield  succeeded  in  1436,  and  married  Elizabeth  dau. 
of  Sir  Henry  Coggeshall,  and  on  his  death  the  manor  passed  to  his  son  and 
heir  William  who  married  Elizabeth  dau.  of  Thomas  Tyrrell  and  at  his  death 
went  to  his  son  and  heir  Thomas  Rokewode.  Thomas  Rokewod  married 
Anne  daughter  of  John  Clopton  of  Kentwell,  and  dying  8  April  1520, 7 
the  manor  passed  to  his  son  John  Rokewod  who  resided  at  Coldham  Hall 
in  Stanningfield,  and  married  Elizabeth  daughter  of  Clement  Higham  of 
Wickhambrook.  He  died  the  n  April  1521,"  when  the  manor  passed  to  his 
widow  Elizabeth  for  life  and  afterwards  to  their  son  Robert  Rokewode  who 
married  first  Anne  daughter  of  Nicholas  Ashton  of  Lane.,  and  2ndly  Agnes, 
daughter  of  Thos.  Sporne  of  Lavenham,  by  whom  he  had  a  son  Robert 
Rokewode.  Robert  married  first  Bridget  daughter  of  Edmund  Kempe  of 
London,  and  2ndly  Dorothy,  daughter  of  Sir  William  Drury  of  Hawsted 
knt.  Robert  the  father  died  in  1566,  but  previously  in  1563  on  the 
marriage  of  his  son  Robert  with  the  daughter  of  Sir  Wm.  Drury  he  had 
joined  with  his  son  in  granting  the  manor  to  the  wife  of  the  latter.9  Robert 
Rokewode  the  son  died  in  1600.  This  year  Henry  Rokewode,  son  and 

'  Duchy  of  Lane.,   Cal.  to   Pleadings,  16         '  A  fine  was  levied  of  the  manor  in  1563 

Eliz.  21.  by    Christopher    Haydon    against 

'  Add.  Ch.  25482.  the  said  Robert  Rokewood  (Fine, 

1  Fine,  Mich.  35,  36  Eliz.  Easter,  5  Eliz.) ;  in  1593  by  Richard 

4  Harl.  44  C.  16.  Martyn    against Rookwood 

5  28  Hen.  VIII.  1536.  (Fine,  Hil.  33  Eliz.) ;  and  in  1599  by 

6  2  Edw.  VI.  Sir    John    Heigham    and    others 
1  I.P.M.,  12  Hen.  VIII.  29.  against    Robert    Rookewoode    and 
•  I.P.M.,  13  Hen.  VIII.  125.  others  (Fine,  Easter,  41  Eliz.). 

ci 


226  THE  MANORS  OF  SUFFOLK. 

heir  of  Robert  Rokewode  the  son,  had  the  lordship  and  died  without  issue, 
and  Ambrose  his  brother  and  heir  being  implicated  in  the  Gunpowder  Plot 
was  convicted  of  treason  and  executed  at  Tyburn  in  1605,  leaving  by 
Elizabeth  his  wife  dau.  of  Robert  Tyrwytt  of  Ketleby  co.  Lincoln  a  son 
Robert.  Ambrose's  offence  was  having  concealed  the  knowledge  of  some 
part  of  the  plot  communicated  to  him  and  Sir  Everard  Digby  by  his  friend 
Catesby.  Sir  Robert  Rokewode  the  son  of  Ambrose  was  a  faithful  adherent 
of  Charles  I.  He  married  Mary  dau.  of  Sir  Robert  Townsend  of  Ludlow,  co. 
Salop,  and  died  in  June  1679.  Two  of  his  sons  he  lost  in  the  Royal  cause,  one 
of  them,  Capt.  Robert  Rokewode,  being  killed  at  Oxford,  and  the  other, 
Capt.  William  Rokewode,  at  Alresford.  They  were  altogether  an  unfor- 
tunate family,  and  a  grandson  of  this  Sir  Robert  Rokewode,  also  bearing 
the  unfortunate  name  of  Ambrose,  after  having  held  a  command  in  the 
Guards — Brigadier-General — in  the  time  of  James  II.,  was  executed  like 
his  great-grandfather  and  namesake  at  Tyburn  in  1696,  for  having  been 
implicated  in  the  treason  known  as  the  Barclay  conspiracy.  The  late  Mr. 
Tymms  in  a  paper  on  Coldham  Hall  mentions  that  at  the  place  of  execution 
he  delivered  to  the  Sheriff  a  paper  in  which  he  says  :— 

"  I  do  with  all  truth  and  sincerity  declare  and  avow  I  never  knew, 
saw,  or  heard  of  any  order  or  commission  from  King  James  for  the 
assassination  of  the  Prince  of  Orange  and  attacking  his  guards,  but  I  am 
certainly  informed  he  had  rejected  proposals  of  that  nature  when  made 
unto  him.  Nor  do  I  think  he  knew  the  least  of  the  particular  design  for 
attacking  the  guards  at  his  landing,  in  which  I  was  engaged  as  a  soldier, 
by  my  immediate  commander  (much  against  my  judgment).  But  his 
soldier  I  was,  and  as  such  I  was  to  obey  and  act.  Near  twelve  years  I 
have  served  my  true  king  and  master,  K.  James,  and  freely  now  lay 
down  my  life  in  his  cause.  I  ever  abhorr'd  a  treacherous  aclion  to  an 
enemy.  If  it  be  a  guilt  to  have  complied  with  what  I  thought,  and  still 
think,  to  have  been  my  duty,  I  am  guilty.  No  other  guilt  do  I  own.  As 
I  beg  of  all  to  forgive  me,  so  I  forgive  all  from  my  heart,  even  the  Prince 
of  Orange,  who,  as  a  soldier,  ought  to  have  considered  my  case  before  he 
signed  the  warrant  for  my  death.  I  pray  God  to  open  his  eyes  and  render 
him  sensible  of  the  much  blood,  from  all  parts,  crying  out  against  him,  so 
to  prevent  a  heavier  execution  hanging  over  his  head  than  what  he  inflicts 


on  me." 


The  arms  of  Rokewode  :  Argent,  six  chess  rooks,  three,  two,  one,  sable. 

In  1536  John  Beaumount  levied  a  fine  of  a  3rd  of  the  part  of  the 
manor  against  John  Paryent  and  others.1  In  1814  we  find  the  manor 
vested  in  Wm.  Valentine  Comyns  Mannock. 

WlTHERMARSH   MANOR. 

This  manor  was  one  of  those  held  by  Robert  Suane's  father  before 
the  Conquest  and  continued  to  be  held  by  the  son  notwithstanding  the 
change  of  dynasty  in  consequence  of  the  aid  rendered  by  the  family  to 
William  the  Conqueror.  The  manor  consisted  of  4  carucates  with  soc. 
In  Saxon  times  there  were  27  villeins,  32  bordars,  2  slaves,  3  ploughteams 
in  demesne,  13  belonging  to  the  men,  i  mill,  and  30  acres  of  meadow, 
valued  at  10  pounds.  By  the  time  of  the  Domesday  Survey  the  value 
had  risen  to  12  pounds,  and  there  were  2  horses,  20  beasts,  24  hogs,  15 
fore  t  mares,  and  80  sheep,  but  there  were  3  villeins  and  5  bordars 

•  Fine,  Mich.  28  Hen.  VIII. 


STOKE   BY   NAYLAND.  227 

fewer,  and  i  slave  only,  while  the  ploughteams  in  demesne  had  come  down 
by  one,  and  those  belonging  to  the  men  had  fallen  from  13  to  8.  The 
length  of  the  manor  was  8  quarantenes  and  the  breadth  4,  and  it  paid  in 
a  gelt  20^.' 

Davy  seems  to  think  that  the  manor  was  called  Netherhall  Wither- 
marsh  Manor,  but  this  does  not  appear  to  have  been  the  case.  Netherhall 
Manor  was  the  same  as  Levenhey.  This  manor  passed  from  the  Domesday 
tenant,  as  did  the  last  manor  treated  of,  to  his  son  Robert  and 
grandson  Henry,  when  it  was  forfeited.  In  the  time  of  Henry  the  second 
Umfreda  de  Winewershe  widow  seems  to  have  held  this  manor.  In  1320 
Roger  de  Withermarsh  held  it,  and  in  1371  Rich.  Withermersh. 

In  I553  George  Bacon  and  Margaret  his  wife,  daughter  and  heir  of 
John  Abell,  had  a  grant  of  the  manor,2  and  in  1563  Sir  Thos.  Revett  held  it 
by  grant.  The  manor  then  probably  descended  through  the  Waldegraves 
and  Windsors  to  the  Rowleys,  as  in  the  case  of  Tendring  Hall  Manor,  the 
title  to  which  has  been  already  deduced. 

CAPEL  MANOR. 

This  manor  is  unnoticed  by  Davy,  but  clearly  had  a  separate  existence, 
and  was  at  an  early  period  in  the  possession  of  a  family  of  the  name  of 
Capel.  Hen.  I.  gave  Jakeham  to  Hugh  Capel  by  the  service  of  two  knights' 
fees,  and  Sir  Richard  de  Capel  was  Lord  Justice  of  Ireland  in  1261.  John 
Capel  of  Stoke  Nayland  died  seised  of  this  manor  in  1449  and  his  will 
dated  the  4th  April  1449'  was  proved  the  14  June  the  same  year.  By  his 
wife  Joan  he  left  three  sons  and  a  daughter  all  under  age.  John  the 
eldest  inherited  this  manor.  William  the  second  son  was  a  member  of 
the  Drapers'  Company,  an  eminent  merchant,  and  acquired  an  immense 
fortune.  At  the  coronation  of  Henry  VII.  he  was  knighted,  served  the 
office  of  Sheriff  of  London  in  1489,  of  Lord  Mayor  in  1503,  and  was  repre- 
sentative in  Parliament  of  that  city  from  1491  to  1514.  It  is  recorded  of 
Sir  William  that  Empson  and  Dudley,  emissaries  of  Hen.  VII.  under  some 
pretence  or  other  extorted  from  him  the  sum  of  £1,600  to  enrich  the  Treasury 
of  the  Exchequer,  and  demanded  a  like  sum  a  few  years  afterwards  under 
the  pretence  that  during  his  mayoralty  he  did  not  duly  punish  a  party 
who  had  been  accused  before  him  of  coining  false  money,  "  though,"  as  one 
chronicler  says,  "  he  was  indeed  guilty  of  no  other  fault  but  that  God  had 
filled  his  coffers."  Knowing  his  innocence  of  the  charge  he  refused  to  pay, 
for  which  he  was  committed  to  the  Tower  where  he  remained  until  the 
death  of  the  King,  which  fortunately  for  the  prisoner  occurred  the  same 
year.  On  the  accession  of  Hen.  VIII.  he  was  released  from  confinement 
without  payment  of  the  illegal  fine,  and  Dudley  being  committed  for  his 
great  oppressions,  both  he  and  Empson  soon  lost  their  heads  under  a  des- 
potism which  brooked  no  rival.  Sir  William  Capel,  who  was  ancestor  of 
the  Earls  of  Essex,  married  Margaret  daughter  of  Sir  Thomas  Arundel  knt. 
of  Lanhern  in  Cornwall,  ancestor  of  the  Lords  Arundel  of  WT ardour  and 
Trericeand  died  on  the  6th  of  September  1515.  He  was  buried  in  a  chapel 
of  his  own  founding  in  St.  Bartholomew's  Church  near  the  Royal  Exchange, 
London. 

A  "  Capell  Manor  "  is  mentioned  in  the  Inquisition  p.m.  of  James 
Hubert  who  died  the  24  Feb.  1517,  being  then  found  seised  of  the  same, 
when  it  passed  to  Walter  Hubert  his  son  and  heir.4 

'  Dom.  ii.  401.  3  28  Hen.  VI. 

•  Originalia,  I  Mary,  4  Pars  Rot.  45.  4  I.P.M.,  9  Hen.  VIII:  251 


228  THE  MANORS  OF  SUFFOLK. 

CHAMBERLAIN'S  MANOR. 

This  manor  was  vested  in  Ralph  le  Chamberlaine  in  the  time  of  Hen. 
III.  The  Chamberlain  family,  from  whom  no  doubt  the  name  was  derived, 
were  settled  in  the  parish  at  even  an  earlier  date.'  Davy  says  he  was 
succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir  Sir  Thos.  le  Chamberlaine  ;  but  we  find  in 
1275  Roger  le  Chamberlein  holding  land  here,  and  bringing  an  action  against 
John  de  Tendring  touching  common  of  pasture  in  Stoke,1  and  in  1281  against 
Thomas  Giffard  touching  a  way  stopped  up  there.5  This  Roger  le  Cham- 
berlaine was,  according  to  Davy,  the  son  and  heir  of  Sir  Thos.  and  died  in 
1319  seised  of  the  manor,4  which  passed  to  his  son  and  heir  Richard  le  Cham- 
berlaine,5 and  it  fs  in  1341  mentioned  in  the  Inquis.  p.m.  of  Alice,  the 
wife  of  the  said  Richard  le  Chamberlaine.6  This  Richard  le  Chamberlaine 
seems  to  have  parted  with  a  portion  of  his  estate  in  1325,  and  to  have 
settled  the  remainder  in  1334,  for  on  the  Originalia  Rolls  in  1325  is  a 
licence  to  him  to  enfeoff  John  de  Kersey  chaplain,  of  one  messuage,  60  acres 
of  land,  10  of  meadow,  20  of  pasture,  3  of  wood,  and  405.  rent  in  Stoke 
Neyland,  Hegham,  and  Shelley  ;7  and  on  the  Patent  Rolls  in  1334  is  a  licence 
for  him  to  enfeoff  Nicholas  atte  Pond  chaplain  of  5  messuages,  100  acres 
of  land,  10  of  meadow,  25  of  pasture,  3  of  wood,  and  405.  rent  in  these  same 
places,  said  to  be  held  in  chief  as  of  the  Honor  of  Raleigh,  then  in  the  King's 
hands,  and  for  him  to  regrant  to  him,  Alice  his  wife  and  his  heirs.8  Alice, 
Richard's  widow,  died  in  1341,  and  the  manor  passed  to  her  son  Roger 
Chamberlaine,  who  was  succeeded  by  his  son  and  heir  Ralph  Chamberlaine. 
A  fine  was  levied  in  1365  of  the  manor  of  Stoke  Nayland,  probably  meaning 
this  manor,  by  Robert  Crull  parson  of  Swanescombe  Church,  Roger  Savale 
parson  of  Stratford  Church,  and  John  Chamberlain  chaplain,  against 
Bernard  Donat  and  Cecilia  his  wife.9  The  manor  may  then  have 
descended  for  a  time  like  the  manors  of  Throgton  in  Thorpe  Morieux  in 
Cosford  Hundred  and  like  Gedding  Manor  in  Thedwestry  Hundred  through 
the  Chamberlain  family. 

In  1558  the  manor  was  held  by  William  Mannock,  who  died  this  year,10 
and  it  passed  to  Francis  Mannock,  who  died  seised  of  it  in  1590.  At  the 
end  of  Queen  Elizabeth's  reign,  her  majesty  leased  to  Richard  Croft  2 
parts  of  "  Gifford's  and  Chamberleins."  In  1805  the  manor  was  vested  in 
William  Mannock,  and  descended  in  the  same  mode  as  the  Manor  of  Giffords. 

The  manor  is  included  in  a  fine  levied  of  the  manor  in  1559  by  John 
Wynterflod  against  Francis  Mannock." 

CAUSER'S,  PEACHAM'S,  OR  SHARDELOWE'S  MANOR. 

Edmund  de  Shardelowe  in  1288  had  lands  held  of  him  here ;  and  in  1563 
Sir  Thos.  Revett  had  a  grant  of  the  manor,  according  to  the  Davy  MSS . 
Mr.  Davy  considers  that  after  this  the  manor  probably  descended  as  did  the 
manor  of  Tendring  Hall.  The  manor  of  Shardelowes  is  mentioned  in  the 
Inquisition  p.m.  of  Roger  Darcy  who  died  the  3  Sept.  1507  leaving  Thomas  his 
son  and  heir,"  and  also  in  a  suit  as  to  tithes  between  Peter  Baker  and  Wm. 

'  Rad.  le  Chamberlane,  I.P.M.,  /.  Hen.  III.  '  O.,  6  Edw.  III. 

18.  •  Pat.  Rolls,  8  Edw.  III.  pt.  ii.  32. 

Pat.  Rolls,  3  Edw.  I.  4^.  »  Feet  of  Fines,  39  Edw.  III.  2. 

Pat.  Rol